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Snowflake

Fun

5 Simple math/science activities

©Brooke Perry 2011


1. Snowflake Measurement & Estimation- How many
snowflakes tall are you?

Copy the snowflakes on the next page. You may have to copy 10-12
pages of them or use some pre-made snowflakes from the teacher
supply store. You can mount the snowflakes on a wall or tall cabinet or lay
them out on the floor in a large meeting area. If you want to record the
results and keep it posted for several days, you’ll probably want to mount it
in a more permanent place instead of on the floor. You can also create
labels or name badges to record each students results. Another idea is to
use pictures to record the results. It just depends on how much variance
you have in your student’s height. Students need to make their prediction,
and then record their results. I added tally mark practice and number
words to allow students to practice writing different forms of numbers.
Don’t forget to include yourself or a “mystery guest.” Your students will
love seeing your measurement too!
©Brooke Perry 2011
©Brooke Perry 2011
123
456
7 89
©Brooke Perry 2011
10 11 12
13 14 15
16 17 18
©Brooke Perry 2011
19 2 21
22 23
24 25
©Brooke Perry 2011
How many snowflakes tall am I?
My Prediction:
 I think I will be ______ snowflakes tall.
My Results:
 I was actually ______ snowflakes tall.

1. I can use tally marks to show how many


snowflakes tall I am.
______________________

2. I can write the number word.


______________________
3. I can write the tens and ones in my number.

____ tens ____ ones

4. My number is odd even


©Brooke Perry 2011
2. Symetry-Coffee Filter/Doilie Snowflakes

Give each student a coffee filter or doilie. Show them how to fold
in into eighths. You can also show them how to use fourths for very
young students-this may give them more room for cutting and help
them to avoid cutting too much.

After folding, students will cut their own snowflake, and open it up.
Students can discuss the line of symmetry and the parts of the
snowflake that are the same.

This is a really simple, short math activity. The snowflakes turn out
beautifully and can be used to decorate bulletin boards, hang in the
window, or hang them from the ceiling. You can leave them as they
are or mount them onto construction paper for a splash of color.

©Brooke Perry 2011


3. Snowflake Science-ice cream in a bag, (Solids, liquids, gases)
Here is the recipe for ice cream in a bag. You can also complete a similar activity in a coffee
can. This is a great activity for reviewing the states of matter, and for allowing students to
observe how “heat” or the “absence of heat” causes change.

What you'll need:


1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 cup milk or half & half
1/4 teaspoon vanilla
6 tablespoons rock salt
1 pint-size plastic food storage bag (e.g., Ziploc)
1 gallon-size plastic food storage bag
Ice cubes

How to make it:


Fill the large bag half full of ice, and add the rock salt. Seal the bag. Put
milk, vanilla, and sugar into the small bag, and seal it. Place the small bag
inside the large one, and seal it again carefully. Shake until the mixture is
ice cream, which takes about 5 minutes. Wipe off the top of the small
bag, then open it carefully. Enjoy!
Tips: A 1/2 cup milk will make about 1 scoop of ice cream, so double the recipe if you
want more. But don't increase the proportions more that that -- a large amount
might be too big for kids to pick-up because the ice itself is heavy.
This recipe is from:
http://crafts.kaboose.com/ice-cream-in-a-bag.html
©Brooke Perry 2011
This is just a fun activity that helps students to understand that when the
temperature reaches freezing point, water freezes and turns into icicles
or snowflakes. You can incorporate science tools by using
thermometers, magnifying glasses, and timers (to see how long it takes
for the temperature to drop or for the liquid to begin freezing).

©Brooke Perry 2011


4. Snowflake Problem Solving-you can use problems to accompany an art project.

_____ snowflakes are in the air.


_____ snowflakes are on the ground.

How many snowflakes are there in all?


______ + _______ = _______

_____ snowflakes are in the air.


_____ snowflakes are on the ground.

How many snowflakes are there in all?


______ + _______ = _______

_____ snowflakes are in the air.


_____ snowflakes are on the ground.

How many snowflakes are there in all?


______ + _______ = _______
©Brooke Perry 2011
_____ snowflakes are in the air.
_____ snowflakes are on the ground.
How many more snowflakes are there
in the air? ____ - ____ = _______

_____ snowflakes are in the air.


_____ snowflakes are on the ground.
How many more snowflakes are there
in the air? ____ - ____ = _______

_____ snowflakes are in the air.


_____ snowflakes are on the ground.
How many more snowflakes are there
in the air? ____ - ____ = _______

©Brooke Perry 2011


5. Snowflake Experiment &Art-Using the scientific method.

Question: Which mixture makes the best snowflakes?

Discuss/Make Predictions
Record Hypothesis
Test/Experiment
Record Findings
Discussion/Conclusion-were your predictions accurate?

Materials:
4 bowls
q-tips
Water
Black or blue construction paper (dark colors will allow the crystals to
show up best)
Epson salt, table salt, regular sugar, and powdered sugar

Procedure:
-use an equal amount of the salt/sugar along with an equal amount of
water in each bowl. Allow students to test by drawing snowflakes on
their construction paper. Allow them to dry, and review the results.
©Brooke Perry 2011
The best way to keep the results accurate and organized is to divide the
students into four groups. Have the students rotate through four
different station areas/tables (label them carefully with large numbers).
If students fold their paper into fourths and write down number 1-4 or
ABCD, they can see which mixture works best. You can also use the
labels that I created to attach to the pages. Remind the students that
they need to draw in the section that matches the number or letter at
their station area/table.

Another way to complete the experiment without each student having


their own page is to give each student a “job”: mixers, observers,
painters. . .You can use a giant piece of black butcher paper and divide it
into four sections. This way everyone gets to participate, but you can
make sure that the results are valid and clear. You can use your
professional judgment about which way will be best. It just depends on the
age/maturity level of your students.

©Brooke Perry 2011


You can probably tell that I love math and science just as much as I love
literacy. I am thinking about presenting at CAMT this year. I have
selected a title, and I have lots of ideas. I just need to take the time to
submit the proposal and get it in the mail! I hope these activities are helpful!

-Brooke

©Brooke Perry 2011

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