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Naval Netwar FORCEnet Enterprise Plan June 24, 2009

Naval Netwar FORCEnet Enterprise Plan

June 24, 2009

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OPENING LETTER

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FROM THE LEADERSHIP OF

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THE NAVAL NETWAR FORCEnet ENTERPRISE (NNFE)

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In 1984, the term “cyberspace” was introduced in a science fiction novel by William Gibson, where it described “a graphic

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representation of data extracted from the banks of every computer in the human system.” Twenty-three years later, in April

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2007, the first public nation-on-nation “cyber attack” took place on Estonia after that country removed a statue of a Soviet

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soldier from the town square in its capital, Tallinn, to the dismay of Soviet descendants who lived in Estonia and Russia.

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Today, rapid changes continue to take place in technology and networks across the globe, profoundly changing how people

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interact. The security of our nation demands a technology strategy vision that supports our defense and naval strategy,

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coupled with an organizational structure that can unflinchingly execute that strategy in an increasingly interconnected

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environment.

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Like successful commercial business conglomerates, the Navy has adopted enterprise business models to leverage resources,

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achieve goals, and deliver products. The Naval NETWAR FORCEnet Enterprise (NNFE) is a unique warfare-focused

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structure comprising four separate organizations that incorporate the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Chief Operating Officer

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(COO), Chief Financial Officer (CFO), and Chief Information Officer (CIO) leadership hierarchy to achieve its goals and

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objectives.

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The Commander, Naval Network Warfare Command (NETWARCOM) serves as NNFE CEO and delivers

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integrated cyber mission capabilities in Information Operations (IO), Intelligence, Network Operations (NetOps),

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and Space that enable warfighters across the full range of military operations. He provides highly trained forces,

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interoperable and well-maintained equipment, clear processes, and governance for the Fleet.

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The Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV DCNO) for Communication Networks (N6) serves as NNFE CFO

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and oversees the development of netcentric policy, planning, governance, requirements integration, and investment

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direction to provide information warfighting advantages to combat-ready Navy forces.

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The Commander, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) serves as NNFE COO and delivers

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FORCEnet through invention, acquisition, development, delivery, and sustainment of integrated and interoperable

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Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR), business

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Information Technologies (IT), and space capabilities in the interest of national defense.

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The Director, United States Marine Corps (USMC) C4 serves as USMC CIO and NNFE member. He is responsible

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for ensuring the Marine Corps continues to be the world’s most capable expeditionary fighting force through

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dramatic enhancement of Marine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF) expeditionary and joint C4 capabilities via

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application of C4 and IT.

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The NNFE vision for its technical strategy continues to sustain and evolve the naval C4ISR suite as an essential and vital

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element of our national security strategy. On a daily basis, networks, sensors, computers, and mobile devices continue to

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converge, and all trends show that it will not be long before the tools of computing will become ubiquitous, affecting every

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part of our daily lives. Naval C4ISR capabilities are the backbone for both Navy and Marine Corps warfighting capabilities

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overall, while facilitating needed business processes. This ultimately results in versatility for combat effectiveness.

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This book describes NNFE investment areas within the current Program Objective Memorandum (POM) cycle and features

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future capabilities that position the NNFE to address the diverse strategic challenges we will face through 2012 and beyond.

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These future capabilities envisioned for the “Next Navy and Marine Corps” must outpace the threats posed by attacks on our

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naval networks and will encompass power projection in cyberspace. Converging, decoupling, and protecting our shore, sea-

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based, and space-based systems will shape a powerfully networked force—a concept described as “netcentricity.” This

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netcentricity provides geographically dispersed commanders with the power to share and exploit all manner of knowledge

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and collected information, fully operationalizing Command and Control (C2) functions, and enabling them to exercise the

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authority and rapid decision making necessary to dominate the battlespace. Additionally, enhancing current capabilities and

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reorganizing our staffs and operating forces will enable the NNFE to leverage existing material and manpower resources to

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more effectively meet and exceed operational challenges.

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This vision for the NNFE forms the basis of our strategic, operational, and fiscal decisions through the current POM cycle.

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We share it to inform and guide the actions of those whose support is critical to our continued success.

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VADM H. Denby Starling II, USN

Commander, Naval Network Warfare Command

RADM Michael C. Bachmann, USN

Commander, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command

VADM Harry B. Harris Jr., USN

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Communications Networks (N6)

Major General (sel) George J. Allen, USMC

Director, C4/Chief Information Officer of the Marine Corps

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

OPENING LETTER

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ROLES AND CURRENT THREATS

THE ENVIRONMENT

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To Shape a Global Network

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Collaborative Decision Making

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Future Trends

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NNFE Spearheading Network Transformation

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NNFE ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

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Effects-Based Execution

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NNFE Delivers FORCEnet

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NNFE Executes the Maritime Strategy

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NNFE: First in Decision Superiority

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CURRENT CAPABILITY: TODAY'S NAVY AND MARINE CORPS

OVERSEAS OPERATIONS

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Marines Networking on the Move

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New C4I Front-Line Technologies

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MRAP C4I Integration

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ISR: Sensors

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Mobile Operations Control Center (MOCC)

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Information Operations (IO) Provider

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Tactical Communications

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Coalition Partners

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Fleet Operations – Space

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SUPPORTING FLEET OPERATIONS

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Facilities

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Organizations

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Functions and Infrastructure

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Navy “Business” – Corporate Operations

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HIGH-END WARFARE

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Navy Air and Missile Defense Command

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Theater Battle Management Core Systems (TBMCS)

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HEW Engineering

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Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Defense

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C2 Battle Management Communications (C2BMC)

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FUTURE CAPABILITY: NEXT NAVY AND MARINE CORPS

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CONVERGE NETWORKS

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NNFE Network Revolution

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On Course to a Solution

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Networks Are a Combat System

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CANES Program

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MCEITS Initiative

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NNE of 2016

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Network Transformation, Other Domains

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NNFE Advancing Airborne Networks

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Investments Improving Joint Communications

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Vision: Enhanced Warfighter Capability

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Success Story

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DECOUPLE SERVICES

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Afloat Networks: Building on the Backbone

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SOA: An Affordable Future

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SOA as a NNFE Transformation Tool

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Consolidation and Synchronization

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Challenges

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Optimum Business and Warfighter Architecture

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Benefits of SOA

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Other Investment Areas

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HM & E/Combat Systems Network Development

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Success Story

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ENHANCE CURRENT CAPABILITY

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Naval “Firsts” in Modernizing Communications

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Operational Flexibility

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Information Transport C4I Portfolio

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National Security Space Enterprise

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JTRS Program

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Linking Warriors to the GIG

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CENTRIXS-M Program

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Success Story

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FUTURE ALIGNMENT

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NNFE Defending Cyberspace

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Fleet Alignment

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The Cyber Workforce

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OPNAV and Acquisition Community Alignment

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NGEN SPO

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Network Governance

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Intelligence Investments

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Experimentation Investments Lead to Innovation

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OPERATIONALIZE C2

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Investments in Naval Expeditionary C2

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The Sea as Maneuver Space: Seabasing

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Strategic Collaborative Alignment

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Maritime Operations Center (MOC)

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“Plug-and-Fight” C2

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Trident Warrior FY09

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MOC Enhancements

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Deployable Joint C2

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MDA Program

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ISR and C2 Program Portfolio

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Transitioning C2 and ISR to SOA

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Persistent Surveillance

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Success Story

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CYBER WARFARE

Information Operations (IO)

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Defining the Battlespace

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Technological Challenges and Opportunities

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NNFE Role in Cyberspace

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Information Assurance (IA)

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Defense in Depth

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Navy IA Programs

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TOTAL WORKFORCE: OUR PEOPLE

Total Force Strategy

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Preparing Future Warfighters

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Resource Alignment

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Diversity

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Retention

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STRATEGIC TECHNOLOGY: NAVY AND MARINE CORPS AFTER NEXT

Future Science and Technology Investments

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An Illustration of the Vision: Orange vs. Purple

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Aboard the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), Year 2029

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Inside the Command Operations Center (COC)

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Data Strategy

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Semantic Web: Effective Info Sharing

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UCore: Enhancing Naval Productivity

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Bird’s Eye View: USDC “Teleporting”

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Ultimate C2: God’s Eye View

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ORANGE Objective in Sight

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Humanitarian Mission Accomplished

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The NNFE Vision

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APPENDICES

Appendix A: Major Contractors

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Appendix B: Acronyms and Abbreviations

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Appendix C: Glossary

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Appendix D: Image Credits

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Appendix E: Links

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Acknowledgements

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Leadership Quotes Included in the Table of Contents

“Modern warfare has evolved to the point where there’s no question that the warfighter who can make decisions fastest and with the best accuracy is going to win the fight. Our operational commanders need a robust network that will enable the information dominance and decision superiority necessary to win that fight—and the Naval NETWAR FORCEnet Enterprise will deliver.”

–VADM H. Denby Starling II, USN

Commander, Naval Network Warfare Command

ROLES AND CURRENT THREATS “The basic premise of our maritime strategy is that the United States is a force for good in the world– that while we are capable of launching a clenched fist when we must–offering the hand of friendship is also an essential, prominent tool in our kit.” –General James T. Conway, Commandant of the Marine Corps

CURRENT CAPABILITY “Until recently, there has not been an institutional home in the Defense Department for today’s warfighter. Our contemporary wartime needs must receive steady long-term funding. I intend to use the fiscal 2010 budget to directly support, protect, and care for the man or woman at the front.” – Mr. Robert M. Gates, Secretary of Defense

FUTURE CAPABILITY "The Navy is first and foremost a fighting, sea-going service—always has been. The weapons and technology change. The ships, aircraft, and submarines certainly improve over time, but the job remains the same: take the fight to the enemy so that he cannot take it to us." –Admiral Mike Mullen, Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff

CYBER WARFARE “The opening rounds of the next war will likely be in cyberspace. The Navy must organize, train, and resource a credible Navy Cyber Force, and develop “leap-ahead,” interoperable, and resilient capabilities in cyberspace to successfully counter and defeat a determined, asymmetric threat.” –Admiral Gary Roughead, Chief of Naval Operations

OUR PEOPLE: TOTAL WORKFORCE "As I look to the future in my role as CNO, I see three very simple things: to build tomorrow's Navy; to maintain the readiness of today's Navy; and to ensure the policies that we have in place for our people continue to attract, recruit, and retain the young men and women of America who can come to the Navy and fulfill themselves both personally and professionally." –Admiral Gary Roughead, Chief of Naval Operations

STRATEGIC TECHNOLOGY “To meet the future needs of the Navy-Marine Corps Team, the US must continue investments in the power of discovery, invention, and innovation to maintain its rapid pace and stay ahead of the threats that challenge America and its allies worldwide.” –Rear Admiral Jay M. Cohen, Chief of Naval Research, ONR

ROLES AND CURRENT THREATS

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THE ENVIRONMENT

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To Shape a Global Network

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Networking capability is essential to executing an effective US Navy and Marine Corps strategy for the

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st century. Networks expand the effectiveness of US forces through more effective information

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sharing, multiplying the power of limited numbers of units and small forces. As the nation’s top-level

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strategies evolve, the Navy and Marine Corps are networking more with joint, allied, coalition forces,

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nongovernmental organizations, and Other Government Agencies (OGA) to defend the maritime global

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commons and cooperate in multinational sea-air power projection. Shaping a collaborative, shared

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workspace and increasing US capability with these partners is a core 21 st -century strategic challenge.

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Naval networks will operate both within the overall US exclusive military/government domain and into

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the public realm, leveraging commercial networks and information assets. This emerging operating

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concept has placed additional burdens on naval networks regarding procedures, protocols, security,

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language, and equipment. Global maritime security depends on global information sharing. The future

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Navy must do more with a smaller number of ships that must see beyond their own horizons to remain

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effective throughout a vast maritime domain; networking makes that possible.

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Collaborative Decision Making

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Operations in the maritime domain demand Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (C4)

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capabilities both globally and regionally coupled with Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance

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(ISR) assets. For enhanced maritime capability, services must exploit new military technologies and

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capabilities among regional allies. At a minimum, US forces and allies must share common C2, with

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regular participation of coalition officers trained to work on combined staffs. When these prerequisites

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are met, the integration of compatible C4ISR systems for warfighter decision-makers becomes a

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coalition force multiplier, enabling effective integration of US capabilities with allies—a true

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collaborative environment for military operations.

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Future Trends

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The Sea Services are growing more dependent upon “Network-Centric Warfare” (NCW), a doctrine of

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war pioneered by the Department of Defense (DoD) that seeks to translate an information advantage,

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enabled in part by IT, into a competitive warfighting advantage through the robust networking of well-

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informed geographically dispersed forces. NCW is appealing for several reasons: (1) fewer US and

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allied naval forces in theater cause increased reliance on dispersed, interactive operations; (2) advanced

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communication and data transmission systems enhance tactical advantages of those dispersed forces

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(e.g., Cooperative Engagement Capability [CEC]); and (3) wider, accelerated use of offboard/remote

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sensors that use networking for information dissemination and control (e.g., satellites and unmanned

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aerial, surface, and undersea vehicles—including armed unmanned platforms). These NCW trends

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continue to accelerate, with demands on naval networks for more effective use of bandwidth to

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accommodate new requirements. Communication and network capabilities and techniques, including

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time-sharing, burst communications, data routing, and assignment of priorities are vital to warfare

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success in such an environment.

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NNFE Spearheading Network Transformation

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The Naval NETWAR FORCEnet Enterprise (NNFE) bears the responsibility for transitioning the Navy

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and Marine Corps into the evolving world of 21 st -century IT, and is the naval enterprise positioned at the

 

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nexus of two ongoing revolutions in warfare. The first is the increasing centralization of information

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networks for sharing precise, accurate, and timely tactical information among all levels of forces––

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leading to decentralized, or what the Marine Corps calls distributed, operations. The second revolution is

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the exponential increase in commercial availability of information-handling and computing power that

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underlies today’s proliferation of networks and their interconnection.

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Increased use of data transmission and communications by naval forces will also provide potential

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adversaries with greater access to the means and techniques for interfering with advanced networks.

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This became evident when Iraqi forces attempted to obstruct Global Positioning System (GPS) weapon

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guidance during the 2003 conflict and recent foreign cyber attacks on congressional, DoD, and other

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government agency networks. Adversaries possess an agility advantage in developing cyber-attack

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capabilities, because of the nature of a large, complex, hierarchal institution such as the US armed

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forces, readily available cyber-attack techniques (often disseminated on the Internet), and the near-

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ubiquity of commercial hardware and software. These security considerations have profound

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implications for the NNFE.

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As these advanced information networks evolve, the role of common protocols and communication

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technologies in melding forces grows in strategic significance. Surface, submarine, air platforms, shore

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facilities, and land combatants all have their own core competencies and capabilities which, when

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exercised to their full potential, are essential to the success of any naval strategy. Fundamentally,

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however, these platforms are nodes in a network that need to be deployed and interconnected. A

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flexible, open architecture–one that separates data, applications, and hardware–will make possible the

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seamless interoperability of all cooperating forces and facilitate the “plug-and-fight” integration of new

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arrivals, regardless of the internal details of their hardware or software applications. Simultaneously, the

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cyber defense of networks, connectivity, and decision-making systems must become an essential

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element of our IT infrastructure, even as our own ability to attack adversarial networks creates new

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opportunities.

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US national security, homeland security, and military strategies envision a 21 st -century maritime and

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littoral battlespace dominated by strongly networked sea-air-land forces comprising US, allied, coalition,

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and nongovernmental assets. As the key provider of the pervasive C4ISR network needed to make this

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vision real, the NNFE remains the single most important enabler for creating and maintaining these

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critical maritime force networks of the future.

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NNFE ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

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In the fall of 2005, Commander, US Fleet Forces Command (CFFC) directed Commander, Naval

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Network Warfare Command (NETWARCOM) to establish a new warfighting enterprise with the

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mission to collectively enhance and accelerate the delivery and interoperability of netcentric capabilities

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to the Fleet, while improving efficiencies, readiness, and cost-effectiveness for naval forces. Building

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upon concepts underlying FORCEnet, the systematic methodology for the Navy to implement netcentric

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operations, the Naval NETWAR FORCEnet Enterprise (NNFE) is chartered to provide cost-effective

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delivery of forces ready for tasking by Navy Component Commanders (NCCs) worldwide at required

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levels. The NNFE also delivers an agile, cost-focused implementation of FORCEnet.

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The NNFE team consists of warfighters, acquisition professionals, engineers, managers, and logisticians

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to meet the demands of strategic planning, warfighter/requirements, modernization and life cycle

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management, and funding/financial strategies.

 

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The Commander, NETWARCOM, acting as the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), chairs the Enterprise.

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The CEO reports to the Fleet Readiness Enterprise (FRE) lead by CFFC and Commander, US Pacific

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Fleet Command. Within the NNFE, the CEO is directly supported by the Commander, Space and Naval

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Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR), acting as the Chief Operations Officer (COO), and the Chief

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of Naval Operations (OPNAV N6), acting as the Chief Financial Officer (CFO). The Director, C4/Chief

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Information Officer (CIO) of the Marine Corps also participates as a NNFE member, ensuring a total

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naval force perspective.

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Effects-Based Execution

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The NNFE is engaged in operating and defending the Navy and Marine Corps components of the Global

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Information Grid (GIG) as a weapons system. A blended team that delivers Fleet readiness and

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operational capability in cyberspace, the NNFE is extending and optimizing use of Intelligence,

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Information Operations (IO), Cyber Operations, Network Operations (NETOPS), and Space. The

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primary goal of the NNFE construct is to optimize existing resources and management of all elements of

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cost in order to achieve required levels of current readiness, save operating funds to recapitalize the

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future Navy, and optimize the ability of the NNFE to deliver future capability on schedule.

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Developing NNFE product lines is involving designing and implementing a network architecture that

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includes standard joint protocols, common data packaging, seamless interoperability, and strengthened

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security. It requires identifying and prioritizing capability investments within and across joint,

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interagency, and international programs. Most importantly, it will emphasize people as the center of

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development, so that technological advances support increasingly rapid and accurate decision making.

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NNFE execution plan is designed to effectively address escalating operational costs, Fleet

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recapitalization, and expanding mission requirements that necessitate the Navy transform the way

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resources are managed. To accomplish today’s missions and prepare for tomorrow’s challenges, the

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Navy must implement better operating practices.

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NNFE Delivers FORCEnet

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The Navy's Seapower 21 and Marine Corps’ Vision and Strategy 2025, outlined how naval and joint

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forces will transform to "take the fight to the enemy" in Overseas Contingency Operations, improving

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capabilities today for the uncertain decades ahead. These and other strategies lay the foundation of a

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unified battlespace where the sea provides a vast maneuver area from which to project direct, decisive

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power around the globe. FORCEnet, the Navy and Marine Corps' network-centric warfare thrust,

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provides the architecture to align and integrate naval warfare systems, functions, and missions. Called

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the operational construct and architectural framework for naval warfare in the Information Age,

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FORCEnet is the “glue” that integrates warriors, sensors, C2, platforms, and weapons into a networked,

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distributed combat force to improve the kill chain outcome.

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The NNFE leads the execution of FORCEnet as the naval element of the GIG. The goal of FORCEnet is

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to arm our forces with superior knowledge that leads to increased combat power. In pursuit of this goal,

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FORCEnet will provide a comprehensive network of sensors, analysis tools, and decision aids to support

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the full array of naval activities, from combat operations to logistics and personnel development. The

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focused, timely, and accurate data delivered by FORCEnet will help leaders at every level by allowing

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them to draw on vast amounts of information and share the resultant understanding. This will increase

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the joint force's ability to synchronize activities throughout the battlespace to achieve the greatest

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impact.

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NNFE Executes the Maritime Strategy

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Comprising the world’s oceans, seas, bays, estuaries, littorals, and the airspace above them, the maritime

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domain connects nations and supports more than 90% of the world’s trade. Recognizing the vital

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strategic and economic importance of maintaining stability within the vast global maritime commons,

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the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard created a unified maritime strategy, A Cooperative Strategy

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for 21st Century Seapower. The Maritime Strategy integrates joint seapower with other elements of

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national power, as well as those of our friends and allies, to protect the maritime domain anywhere in the

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word today, and well into the future.

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These integrated, joint “netted forces” will increasingly depend on their ability to securely share reliable

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information in a net-centric environment, since the foundation of maritime security rests upon

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Battlespace Awareness (BA): knowing what is moving above, on, and beneath the oceans. Commanders

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must be able to understand the dispositions and intentions of others operating in their area, as well as the

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characteristics and conditions of the operational environment itself. By delivering FORCEnet, the NNFE

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provides the joint capabilities of Net-Centric Operations (NCO), BA, and Command and Control (C2)

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which will provide the networked sensors, systems, and trained operators that acquire and distribute

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information, enabling a commander’s awareness and empowered decision making toward accomplishing

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the following Maritime Strategy six key strategic imperatives and their complementary core capabilities:

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Imperative: Limit regional conflict with forward-deployed, decisive maritime power.

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Where conflict threatens the global system and our national interests, our maritime forces will be

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ready to respond alongside other elements of national and multinational power, to provide political

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leadership with a range of options. Deployed naval forces operating forward enable familiarity with

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the environment and regional actors. Where and when applicable, forward-deployed maritime forces

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will isolate, capture, or destroy terrorists, their infrastructure, resources and sanctuaries, preferably in

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conjunction with coalition partners. Networked naval forces will be able to aggregate for potential

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major conflict or disaggregate for maritime security operations globally. Enhanced interoperability

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with nation partners will enable the Global Maritime Partnership effectively increasing US and

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partner nation presence and influence. Exploiting cyberspace will enable the Navy and Marine Corps

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to optimize their forward presence, maintain maritime domain awareness, and connectivity over a

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broader geographic area, offering economy of force, while supporting critical missions.

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Imperative: Deter major power war.

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Preventing wars is as important as winning them. The expeditionary character of maritime forces–

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our lethality, global reach, speed, endurance, ability to overcome barriers to access, and the ability to

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quickly aggregate and disaggregate networked naval forces–provide the joint commander with a

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range of deterrent options. Our advantage in space-based assets–upon which much of our ability to

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operate in a networked, dispersed fashion depends–must be protected and extended. Cyberspace

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offensive and defensive capabilities also provide joint commanders with new nonkinetic deterrence

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options. The Commander armed with the power of effectively networked information sources

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maintains a distinct tactical edge over his adversary to assess situations, rapidly determine threat, and

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act decisively to carry the day.

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Imperative: Win our nation’s wars.

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The ability to operate freely at sea is one of the most important enablers of joint and interagency

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operations. The net-centric nature of FORCEnet provides maritime domain awareness that gives

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commanders the information dominance and decision superiority needed to exercise sea control

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across the sea and cyberspace global commons, ensuring freedom of action in both domains. Sea

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control must expand to include “sea-based cyber control,” protecting national interests and

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projecting power across the cyber lines of communication, including undersea cables, the maritime

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electromagnetic spectrum, and low-earth orbiting satellites. Sea-based cyber control must also

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support distributed maritime operations, monitored in globally netted, cyber-empowered Maritime

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Operations Centers (MOC), tracking every ship with the same persistence and fidelity as aircraft are

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tracked today.

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Imperative: Contribute to homeland defense in depth.

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The layered, in-depth defense provided by our maritime forces are defending the homeland by

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identifying and eliminating threats as far from American shores as possible. Our efforts to enhance

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Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA) and improve C4I interoperability are contributing to the

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safety, security, and economy of our nation and its partners. Naval forces have a unique role in a

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world of pervasive networks and cyber-battlefields. In open networks, the Navy’s forward presence

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offers capabilities in a world where milliseconds matter. In regional wireless environments, or

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against physically closed, stand-alone networks, the Navy brings a unique capability to gain access

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to otherwise closed and inaccessible networks within the last tactical mile. The Navy must leverage

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its forward presence to project cyber power and put information on target with the same skill and

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precision that it has long projected kinetic power.

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Imperative: Foster and sustain cooperative relationships with more international partners.

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Cooperative relationships contribute to the security and stability of the maritime domain for the

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benefit of all. The pervasive presence of global networks provides an opportunity for maritime

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forces to share information among allied maritime nations across geographic boundaries to mitigate

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threats short of war, including piracy, terrorism, weapons proliferation, drug trafficking, and other

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illicit activities. Maritime security is greatly enhanced when systems and networks are linked to

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promote openness and collaboration among those who are affected by irregular and transnational

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threats. Our maritime forces will help build relationships through increased emphasis on

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humanitarian assistance and by cooperating with international partners who desire to contribute to

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the safety and security of shipping and commerce across the global commons.

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Imperative: Prevent or contain local disruptions before they impact the global system.

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The expeditionary character of maritime forces uniquely positions them to provide assistance. Our

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ability to conduct rapid and sustained noncombatant evacuation and humanitarian assistance

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operations is critical to relieving the plight of our citizens and others when their safety is in jeopardy.

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The power of networks and information sharing will serve to enhance understanding of where needs

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are greatest following a disaster, speed the delivery of services to the affected areas, and provide

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improved methods to monitor recovery actions over time.

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NNFE: First in Decision Superiority

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Tailored to exact decision superiority in a world of increasing complexity, today’s NNFE is strongly

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poised to evolve naval cyber forces into a 21 st -century world that requires new capabilities, capacities,

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and competencies to protect US and allied interests in a cyber-centric world. The Navy and Marine

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Corps–increasingly working closely with the Coast Guard–will be required to accomplish an ever-

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increasing range of missions dependent upon secure, collaborative networking across military, civilian,

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domestic, and international boundaries. The NNFE will play a major role in these missions by providing

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commanders with the C2, NCO, and BA capabilities to make better, timelier decisions to ensure

226

effective execution. Operating at the nexus of seapower and cyberpower, the NNFE is leading naval

ROLES AND CURRENT THREATS

6

227 forces into the 21 st century as informed ambassadors and effective warriors, serving our nation’s

228 interests and facilitating free global interaction from the sea.

 

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229

The current capability of the US naval forces is unmatched in the global naval hierarchy. The Navy and

230

Marine Corps are exercising this capability daily—fulfilling heavy operational demands and completing

231

long deployments. Structured to provide forward-thinking strategy and technical leadership in today’s

232

complex, resource-scarce landscape, the Naval NETWAR FORCEnet Enterprise (NNFE) brings

233

together the Navy and Marine Corps C4I, Information Operations (IO), and Information Technology

234

(IT) communities in support of those operations. This is not just a group of acquisition professionals

235

acquiring things for our deployed forces; the NNFE is engaged in the battle today. The NNFE

236

C4ISR/IO/IT professionals are actively provisioning sensor inputs to commanders in the field; operating

237

unique equipment with deployed forces; and creating, operating, and defending our global electronic

238

presence. In the paragraphs that follow, you will see examples of how the NNFE is not only contributing

239

to but also participating in every aspect of Navy and Marine Corps missions today. NNFE funding not

240

only supports acquiring new capabilities and bringing technology to new programs, but also represents a

241

substantial investment in actually operating the force. Answering Secretary of Defense Robert Gates

242

call, the NNFE is providing for and participating in our current war fighting efforts.

243

244

For ease of reading, the phrase “C4ISR professionals” (Command, Control, Communications,

245

Computers, and Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) will be used throughout this section to

246

refer to the collective body of professionals drawn from NNFE organizational elements, and in both the

247

Navy and Marine Corps. These C4I, IO, and IT professionals are in the field, at the command centers

248

and operational facilities, and throughout the shore infrastructure supporting both deployed and

249

Continental United States (CONUS)-based operations today.

250

OVERSEAS OPERATIONS

251

C4ISR professionals are participating in all aspects of current operations. They are supplying tools to

252

mobile forces, providing connectivity and reach-back, delivering sensors, and inserting special teams to

253

meet specific operational needs.

254

Marines Networking on the Move

255

Forward-deployed mobile warriors are using NNFE C4I tools to conduct effective, targeted major

256

combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. These tools continue to play major roles in achieving

257

success on the battlefield. A case in point is once-violent Ramadi, formerly one of the most dangerous

258

Al Qaeda strongholds in the Iraq provincial capital of Al Anbar Province and southwest point of the

259

“Sunni Triangle.” Battle-tested C4I is evolving as a force multiplier in maintaining stability in Ramadi.

260

Successful counterinsurgency efforts by Marines and Soldiers have involved pacifying areas in enemy

261

territory through small forward-deployed garrisons with interlocking communications fortified by

262

sensor-driven intelligence. Short-range patrols from garrisons gather information and engage the enemy;

263

such patrols mean less time on roads, which avoid road- and vehicle-based Improvised Explosive

264

Devices (IEDS) that inflict casualties and damage, with the potential for greatly restricting movement.

265

Joint and Iraqi forces have built networks of indigenous people familiar with the terrain and regional

266

culture, allowing more direct contact between the military force leader and the local leadership.

267

268

These relationships would not be possible without the extension of C4I network connectivity down to

269

company level and below. Today’s Marine platoons utilize streaming full-motion video of Intelligence,

270

Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) feeds and voice over IP telephony (VoIP) often down to platoon

271

level, a capability available today that was only accessible at the division level in the early days of the

272

Iraq War in 2003. Marine Corps Systems Command (MARCORSYSCOM) is using new applications

273

such as biometrics–automated methods of recognizing a person based on physiological or behavioral

274

characteristics–that have moved directly to the warfighter, resulting in denying insurgents anonymity

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275

and ability to communicate as “signalers,” leaders who command armed fighters with hand and arm

276

gestures.

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278

Improved connectivity has placed greater demand for more bandwidth, particularly for Beyond Line of

279

Sight (BLOS) links. Marine Corps C4 efforts are currently expanding bandwidth capacity for Marines

280

on the edge of the battlefield via increased civilian C4I personnel support, training, and deployment of

281

commercial satellite communications terminals for orbital links. According to USMC Major General (s)

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George J. Allen, Director of Marine Corps C4, “Marine C4I requires a robust, rapidly fielded highly

283

mobile IP networking capability adapted to the swift force movement characteristic of modern combat.”

284

New C4I Front-Line Technologies

285

As the tempo of front-line operations increases, MARCORSYSCOM is rapidly fielding advanced

286

technology into the field to meet warfighter demands, improve capability, and achieve results. The 155-

287

millimeter infrared (IR) illuminating projectile, when launched, casts IR illumination over the battlefield

288

that exposes enemy forces to US forces using night-vision equipment, improving battlespace awareness

289

for more effective engagement. Another valuable tool for Marines is the Improved Thermal Sight

290

System for light armored vehicle (LAVs). “This second-generation thermal site provides clearer images,

291

increased detection range and sensitivity, and boosts target effectiveness,” states Brigadier General

292

Michael Brogan, Commander of MARCORSYSCOM. Further, NNFE technologies are enabling

293

reconnaissance battalions to improve tactical understanding of operational zones through geolocation

294

photography. Photos taken on the battlefield are automatically tagged and loaded with GPS-embedded

295

coordinates and then logged into digital tactical maps. This powerful capability gives commanders the

296

ability to “point and click” operational data such as photos, text, video, and audio reports that link back

297

to a specific area on the map for analysis and planning. Newly added fine-tuning capabilities such as a

298

laser range finder, digital compass, and azimuth feature indicate relative range of objects further away

299

from the camera for improved strike capability. C4I investments are improving operational capabilities

300

for today’s conflicts.

301

MRAP C4I Integration

302

SPAWAR Systems Center Atlantic (SSC LANT) is leading the charge protecting warfighters through

303

state-of-the-art C4ISR technology integration into multiplatform Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected

304

(MRAP) vehicles. Improved battlefield intelligence generated and shared directly by the troops in the

305

field are helping MRAP crews better understand the “who, what, and when” of threats.

306

307

Responding to the Chief of Naval Operations’ (CNO) call to bring “game-changing ideas” to the Fleet,

308

the MRAP C4I Integration Team, in partnership with project lead MARCORSYSCOM, speedily ramped

309

up C4ISR suite integration into more than 60 MRAP vehicles per day. The electronics suites provided

310

enhance intelligence and communications capabilities in a heavy electronics countermeasures

311

environment.

312

313

MRAPs support counterinsurgency operations, multimission operations (convoy lead, troop transport,

314

and ambulance), mine and IED clearance operations, and explosive ordnance disposal. The Marine

315

Corps Warfighting Lab and the Joint IED Defeat Organization continue to develop and field

316

technologies that either prevent IEDs from detonating (jammers) or cause them to detonate well in front

317

of the vehicle (mine roller). In addition to the modified vehicles' V-shaped hulls that deflect blasts and

318

shrapnel to provide more effective protection for service members inside, C4I suites that include radios,

319

electronic warfare devices such as advanced IED jamming capability, sensors, intravehicle C2 systems,

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320

and other classified equipment are saving the lives of Marines and Soldiers everyday in Iraq and

321

Afghanistan.

322

323

The goal is to continue protecting warfighters from deadly IED threats, which are still the number-one

324

hazard and projected danger to ground forces for years to come. This critical, DoD-designated number-

325

one program of record became the largest and fastest military acquisition buildup since WW II. Less

326

than 18 months after the project launched in February 2007, more than 10,000 fully outfitted vehicles

327

have been delivered in theater thanks to a coordinated Continuous Process Improvement (CPI)/Lean Six

328

Sigma (LSS) effort—a disciplined process improvement methodology that utilizes resources efficiently,

329

saves costs, and increases readiness. According to BGen Brogan, "The many successes of the joint

330

MRAP vehicle program are the result of an overwhelming team effort by many players.” Secretary of

331

Defense Robert Gates stated: “This is a significant achievement. The program has gone from zero to

332

10,000 in just about a year and a half. These vehicles have proven themselves on the battlefield and are

333

saving lives.”

334

ISR: Sensors

335

While C2 applications, communications devices, and computers used by front-line warfighters garner

336

much attention, those systems would be useless without sensor input. Everyone from Marines in the

337

field to Combatant Commanders (COCOMs) with global responsibilities count on sensor information

338

delivered when needed. The largest expansion in this field has been in the equipping and utilization of

339

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), important ISR assets for naval and joint forces. Cameras on the

340

aircraft help commanders on the ground see and map out a wide area of operations with their "persistent

341

surveillance" capability. Capable of flying in poor weather coupled with continued insertion of new

342

technologies, and proven in real-world operations, the UAVs are rapidly evolving into powerfully

343

networked game-changing ISR platforms. The C4ISR professionals outfitting and operating these

344

systems are making a difference on today’s battlefields.

345

Scan Eagle

346

ScanEagle is a small tactical UAV sensor equipped with sensors for day and night detection of

347

stationary or moving targets. Widely deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan, the UAV is capable of launching

348

from ships and is equipped with a repeater for the Automatic Identification System (AIS) that transmits

349

information on identity, course, speed, and other data on large ships back to the launching ship.

350

ScanEagle played a key ISR role in the April 12, 2009 rescue of Captain Richard Phillips of the Maersk

351

Alabama who was captured by four Somali pirates and held in a 28-foot lifeboat. ScanEagle, catapulted

352

off the USS Bainbridge (DDG 96), detected the lifeboat in the Indian Ocean and tracked its activities,

353

sending electro-optical (EO) and IR still and video feeds to the Bainbridge. ScanEagle provided the

354

Navy with critical data and improved its situational awareness during the tense standoff, which

355

culminated in Navy Sea Air and Land (SEAL) sharpshooters ending the incident April 12, killing three

356

pirates, taking a fourth into Navy custody, and whisking Captain Phillips safely aboard the Bainbridge.

357

358

Raven B

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The Raven is a 4.2-pound, backpack-able, quiet, hand-launched sensor platform that provides day and

360

night, real-time video imagery for “over the hill” and “around the corner” ISR and target acquisition.

361

Raven Bs are giving Marines a longer, more detailed look “over the hill” for route planning in

362

obstructed terrain like a city block in Iraq or Afghanistan’s hills and mountains. Human Factors

363

engineering made it is so simple to operate that one of the best pilots in the Iraqi theater was a cook.

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Shadow

365

The Shadow is an unarmed tactical reconnaissance UAV currently in active service with the US Army

366

and Marine Corps in Iraq and Afghanistan.

367

GBOSS

368

The Marine Corps Combat Development Command (MCCDC) is fielding the Ground Based

369

Operational Surveillance System (GBOSS) multiple camera continuous surveillance system. The

370

GBOSS allows the user to identify a civilian, terrorist, insurgent, or criminal and the type of weapon

371

carried. Enemy snipers have fewer opportunities to sneak up on Marines or plant roadside bombs.

372

Patrols are more effective in surveillance, gathering intelligence, and can patrol less, thus saving lives.

373

Footage of insurgents’ actions can be used immediately or later, allowing Marines to not only identify

374

threats, but also plan tactics for offensives. ‘‘It is really easy to use,” said Sgt. Joshua Carter, instructor

375

at the Field Artillery Meteorological Crewmembers Course at Fort Sill, OK. Carter learned how to use

376

GBOSS in just a few hours. ‘‘It is definitely a way to identify someone wicked fast and kill the bad guy

377

before he kills us. They will never know when or where we are watching.”

378

Undersea Sensors

379

Mapping the sea floor and its associated environs requires sensors that move in another medium. Many

380

undersea sensor systems exist, and the bulk of the discussion about coverage or capability quickly

381

moves beyond classification levels appropriate for this publication. C4ISR professionals continue to

382

support this work and are conducting sensor operations today. SSC PAC is exploring and supporting a

383

number of undersea applications for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUV) and undersea glider

384

technology. The Ocean Bottom Characterization Initiative (OBCI) is characterizing the seafloor

385

(acoustic bottom loss, scattering strength, and bottom layers) using passive acoustic sensors deployed on

386

Autonomous Underwater Gliding Vehicles (AUGVs). This effort will transfer into the Littoral Battle

387

Space Sensor Fusion and Integration (LBSF&I) Program as part of Program Objective Memorandum

388

(POM) 12.

389

Mobile Operations Control Center (MOCC)

390

NNFE onboard imaging and electronic system technologies aboard Navy P-3 Orion surveillance aircraft

391

play major roles locating and hunting down enemy fighters in remote mountain locations in

392

Afghanistan. Flying missions over more than 650,000 square miles of Afghan terrain, the P-3s are

393

supported by critical sea-to-air-to-ground communications in far-flung operations by a small group of

394

ground-based allies: the MOCCs. These expeditionary communications providers are currently deployed

395

in support of Overseas Contingency Operations in various locations throughout the Middle East,

396

Republic of the Philippines, and the Horn of Africa. Comprising small, specialized self-sufficient

397

detachments (six to twelve Sailors) available on short notice, MOCCs quickly transmit ISR data from

398

the P-3s (e.g., bomb damage assessments and locations of enemy troops–even in moving vehicles) to

399

military commanders for timely action from nearby ground troops. MOCCs deployed in Afghanistan are

400

making vital contributions to tactical mission planning; intelligence collection; and mission brief

401

preparation supporting naval and joint commanders. MOCCs also support humanitarian relief

402

operations, such as Hurricane Katrina.

403

404

MOCCs are one of three programs supported by the Tactical/Mobile (TacMobile) Program of Record

405

(POR). Two other systems are Tactical Support Centers (TSC), which also provide operational ground

406

support for Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft, and the Joint Mobile Ashore Support Terminal

407

(JMAST) that provide C4I support to naval CCs ashore.

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408

Information Operations (IO) Provider

409

Sensors coupled with operators in an operational theater create a network to share and use the

410

information they need to be successful. The increasing use of networked computers and supporting IT

411

infrastructure systems by military and civilian organizations is creating a new vulnerabilities and

412

opportunities for US forces. These vulnerabilities and opportunities create a field of military operations

413

focused on attacking/defending information systems, their outputs, and their users—IO. The NNFE is

414

strengthening capability in IO. According to NNFE CFO Vice Admiral Harry B. Harris, Jr., Deputy

415

Chief of Naval Operations for Communication Networks (DCNO OPNAV N6), “the focus is on three

416

different areas. First, we are working hard to bring high IO capabilities to the warfighter in cyberspace

417

to achieve decision superiority. The IO mission area comprising Computer Network Operations (CNO)

418

and Computer Network Defense (CND) is essential to protecting Navy networks and operating

419

establishments. Secondly, our IO portfolio must provide asymmetric capabilities to meet maritime

420

challenges. We are developing strong ties to Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD), antisubmarine warfare

421

(ASW), and irregular warfare programs. We need to be able to meet adversaries with asymmetric

422

capabilities, including electronic warfare and CNO.”

423

424

IO is not conducted solely from air-conditioned computer operations centers. NETWARCOM maintains

425

a boots-on-ground forward presence by deploying hundreds of Individual Augmentee (IA) personnel to

426

Iraq, Afghanistan, and other locations to perform CNO, signals intelligence (SIGINT), cryptology, and

427

IO today. Information Warfare Officers (IWO), Information System Technicians (IT), and Cryptologic

428

Technicians (CT) are in the field working closely with joint and multinational forces in a wide variety of

429

special missions:

430

Tactical Cryptologic Support (TCS) Teams

431

TCS personnel fully integrate with Naval Special Warfare (NSW) teams, providing SIGINT

432

support for force protection, indications, warning of enemy activity, and direct action/special

433

reconnaissance missions. These Sailors are on the ground with Special Forces, taking the fight to

434

the enemy. The unique skills and capabilities they bring to the fight are critically important to

435

operational success—their impact is significant and often immediate. Feedback following a

436

mission is quickly routed throughout a tight supporting joint network of collectors, analysts, and

437

team members. Analysts and combat forces add newly derived information to target databases

438

for immediate access. When an insurgent is taken off the streets everyone knows it, and further

439

exploitation yields even more data to all involved in the hunt.

440

Joint Expeditionary SIGINT Terminal Response Unit (JESTR)

441

NETWARCOM Sailors embedded with US Army units are working the streets side-by-side with

442

Soldiers identifying, locating, and engaging insurgents. Like their counterparts in the TCS teams,

443

they play an integral role in operations.

444

Combined Explosives Exploitation Cell (CEXC)

445

CEXCs comprise military, scientific, and law enforcement teams that perform IED forensics and

446

gather intelligence, often under severe time-constraints, to stay ahead of technological advances

447

employed by insurgent bomb makers. The Navy is fielding teams focused on improving long-

448

term capabilities to understand, evaluate, and defeat asymmetric kinetic attacks—physical

449

surprise attacks by a weak adversary upon a stronger enemy’s perceived weakness. Investments

450

in effectively employing specialized personnel with the knowledge, skills, experience, and

451

materiel to neutralize and defeat such attacks are necessary to defend US and allied interests.

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452

Highly trained CEXCs such as Canadian Navy diver Lt. Cdr. Roland Leyte, work in the battle-

453

scared terrain of southern Afghanistan gathering bomb-scene data for incorporation into the

454

massive database at Bagram Air Base north of Kabul for further study. According to Leyte, “In

455

Afghanistan, because it's a war zone, we only get 30 to 90 minutes to get all our forensics and get

456

on the helicopter again.” Leyte’s evidence is helping locate and root out Al Qaeda or Taliban

457

insurgent networks, saving lives and preventing future attacks. Perhaps a CEXC collecting

458

fingerprint or DNA information today will prevent a NATO coalition base from infiltration by a

459

terrorist posing as a local worker in the future.

460

461

These joint, allied, coalition forces, and nongovernmental organizations are playing critical roles in

462

today’s operational successes.

463

Tactical Communications

464

To support forces in the field and afloat, the Navy has fielded numerous systems and capabilities to

465

enhance communications, data reach-back, and mobile C2 capabilities. Existing on amphibious ships,

466

aviation platforms and aircraft, and submarines and ashore, the support provided by C4ISR professionals

467

at work today facilitates and enhances the operational capabilities of our entire force.

468

Blue in Support of Green

469

The Navy supports the Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) commander “Blue In Support of

470

Green” (BISOG) by providing two channels of High Frequency Shipboard Automatic Link

471

Establishment (ALE) Radio (HFSAR) capability on amphibious ships that provide continuous Line of

472

Sight (LOS) and BLOS communication links for both voice and data to Marines ashore in Afghanistan

473

and Iraq.

474

Enhanced Manpack UHF Terminal (EMUT)

475

The EMUT antenna, also known as the Conical Logarithmic Spiral Mobile (CLSM), is an

476

omnidirectional antenna designed to provide over-the-horizon tactical satellite voice and data

477

communications in the Ultra High Frequency (UHF) frequency band. It is currently being used in

478

current operations, Humanitarian Civil Assistance (HCA), and the war on piracy. EMUT provides a

479

capability independent of shipboard radio, antenna, and crypto availability, and is used by Marine

480

Reconnaissance and Humanitarian Missions to relay target imagery and other valuable data back to the

481

Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) commander. By permanently installing EMUT antennas vice

482

temporary installations on/off amphibious platforms, the Navy/Marine Corps team will save

483

approximately $1M a year. Permanent installations have begun with the first install on USS Nassau

484

(LHA 4) and 10 more in fiscal year 2009.

485

Commercial Broadband Satellite Program (CBSP)

486

Since last fall, warfighters on board the mine countermeasure ship USS Champion (MCM 4) and patrol

487

craft USS Hurricane (PC 3) have begun to operate with improved communications capability and

488

performance, thanks to new technology executed by Program Executive Office for Command, Control,

489

Communications, Computers, and Intelligence (PEO C4I) under CBSP, the next-generation Navy

490

Commercial Satellite Communications (COMSATCOM) Program. As the Navy adopts more computer-

491

based applications, communications, and networking, CBSP has brought the once bandwidth-deprived

492

Patrol Coastal community into the information age. According to LT Kathryn Devine, CO, USS Chinook

493

(PC 9) CBSP capability allows smooth communications in near real-time between ship and the

494

maintenance team on shore. “Enhanced connectivity on classified network and CENTRIXS has

495

provided some additional key communication paths to our operational commander via chat servers.”

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496

497

CBSP allows Sailors and Marines to take required online courses, check email, connect with their

498

families, surf the web, and access personnel files at about the same speed as a home broadband

499

connection. Operational information on SIPRnet is now available to even our smallest platforms. For

500

LCDR John Callaway, CO of the minesweeper Champion, “It’s the first time I have been able to surf the

501

SIPRnet while at sea.”

502

Communications at Speed and Depth (CSD)

503

The NNFE’s multifaceted contribution to winning our nation’s wars is impressive and wide-ranging,

504

extending into the realm of undersea communications. Current spending on the CSD Program, directed

505

by Program Executive Office for Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence

506

(PEO C4I) Submarine Integration Program Office, is essential to the Navy’s undersea communications

507

network. Operational tests performed with the USS Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (CSG)

508

successfully confirmed two-way connectivity that allows full submarine integration into strike group

509

operations and permits Navy networks to share situational awareness, conduct collaborative planning,

510

and execute joint force missions. The CSD Program provides communications for all nuclear-attack

511

(SSN) and nuclear-powered guided-missile (SSGN) Ohio-class submarines, as well as limited capability

512

to Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines (SSBN).

513

514

USS Georgia (SSGN 429) deployed in spring, 2009 is the fourth and newest boat of the newly

515

configured SSGN class to join the fight. A critical component of Navy core capabilities of power

516

projection and deterrence, the SSGNs can carry up to 154 Tomahawk cruise missiles for precision

517

strikes. Rotating crews provide extended presence in theater. Additionally, as many as 66 Special

518

Operations Forces (SOF) such as Navy SEALS can be delivered, as the boat quietly and covertly

519

operates in undisclosed areas of the world, providing theater commanders with a highly capable strike

520

asset and a stealthy launching platform for irregular warfare operations.

521

Common Submarine Radio Room (CSRR)

522

As one of the first stealth platforms, submarines are very aware of the impact of intercepted electronic

523

emissions. NNFE technology has made it possible for a vessel to transfer to radio silence with the click

524

of a mouse, thanks to the Common Submarine Radio Room (CSRR), a network-based communications

525

architecture that supplies high-bandwidth, interoperable communications common across all submarine

526

classes and between onboard subsystems, external platforms, and land-based communications facilities.

527

The CSRR modification onboard SSGNs consists of a second Extremely High Frequency (EHF)

528

Follow-On Terminal (FOT) and submarine High Data Rate (HDR) antenna that provides additional

529

high-bandwidth communications that support SOF mission planning as well as their associated control

530

systems. Additionally, an incorporated second Digital Modular Radio (DMR) supports strike and SOF

531

missions. The CSRR structure provided by the NNFE allows the most recent capabilities available to

532

easily and efficiently be integrated into operational systems on an ongoing basis.

533

SubNet Relay (SNR) and High-Frequency Internet Protocol (HFIP)

534

Sharing computer-based information has often required special equipment. C4ISR professionals have

535

designed systems where that is no longer the case thereby allowing units without the most recent

536

equipment to join the information age. SNR and HFIP transport IP data traffic using existing

537

communications architecture and legacy shipboard radio and cryptographic equipment. The system has

538

been employed by the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) CSG, embarked weather airborne early

539

warning aircraft squadron (VAW) 124, Harry S. Truman CSG employing ship-to-ship connections, and

540

USS Montpelier (SSN 765) using submarine-to-ship connections.

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541

Coalition Partners

542

Today, our forces do not operate alone. Fostering and sustaining cooperative relationships with

543

international partners is a key component of our Maritime Strategy. Operational interaction in any

544

theater now involves many nations—the ability to interact with coalition forces from both traditional

545

(NATO, Allies) and nontraditional (USSR, Chinese, and Indian forces engaged in antipiracy) national

546

partners is critical to operational success. Additionally, naval forces are engaged in building partnerships

547

around the world.

548

549

Africa Partnership Station (APS) collaboratively provides regional maritime services in order to

550

achieve common international goals, primarily stability and security, to combat terrorism and

551

piracy

552

553

US Naval Forces Southern Command’s (NAVSO) Southern Partnership Station (SPS) provides a

554

variety of training to strengthen leadership, security, search and rescue planning, combat patrol,

555

and urban raid tactics in the Southern Hemisphere

556

557

Pacific Partnership (PP), born out of the US response to the December 2004 tsunami in Southeast

558

Asia, provides a dedicated humanitarian and civic assistance mission each year since 2006

559

comprising medical, dental, and engineering civic action programs

560

561

Continuing Promise (CP), similar to PP, is a dedicated civic and humanitarian relief effort with

562

partner nations and foreign military personnel deployed aboard US Navy hospital ships and other

563

platforms

564

565

C4ISR professionals are providing equipment and capability through Foreign Military Sales (FMS),

566

section 1206 COCOM funding, and other current investment and sharing venues designed to enhance

567

operations with our coalition partners.

568

MDA and Defense in Depth

569

Working with allies, the layered, in-depth defense provided by our maritime forces helps recognize and

570

eliminate threats to the US as far from the American shoreline as possible. Team SPAWAR has been

571

integral to the rapid, successful deployment of the Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA) Program. MDA

572

crosses several user communities and affects the work of not only the Navy, but also the Coast Guard,

573

COCOMs, and interagency task forces in their ongoing effort to keep maritime trade safe and

574

prosperous. Information exchange was demonstrated using some early pilots with service-oriented

575

architecture (SOA) in an initiative called the Maritime Domain Awareness Data Sharing Community of

576

Interest, which contributed significantly to the MDA focus on enhanced vessel tracking, anomaly and

577

threat detection, and getting information to the Sailors, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen who are at the tip

578

of the spear boarding vessels. These successful initial tests established an MDA project office in PEO

579

C4I that works directly with the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) in expanding the effort across the US

580

Central Command (CENTCOM) and US Pacific Command (PACOM) Areas of Responsibility (AOR),

581

as well as several interagency partners. Those capabilities are in place today and growing in the future—

582

there are both operational and acquisition activities that require continued support.

583

CENTRIXS Building Partnerships

584

Recently, 24 nations participated in the Second Annual Maritime Security Conference held in Sorrento,

585

Italy. The conference focused on strengthening global maritime partnerships, improving collective

586

capabilities, and information sharing. It is in this realm, information sharing for enhanced

CURRENT CAPABILITY: TODAY’S NAVY & MARINE CORPS 15

587

interoperability, where NNFE programs like the Combined Enterprise Regional Information Exchange

588

System (CENTRIXS) were designed. CENTRIXS allows combined forces to communicate through

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secure channels and share information in a tactical, real-time setting. US and Malaysian forces

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successfully employed the system during a Cooperative Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT)

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exercise, where the two nations conducted ship-to-ship operational dialog in both text and web-based

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formats. RADM William Burke, executive agent of CARAT remarked, “with CENTRIXS installed in

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the exercise HQ onboard Royal Malaysian Navy ships, and throughout the US CARAT Task Group, we

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have an opportunity to reach new heights in combined C2.” LCDR Chandra Sehgaran, Royal Malaysian

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Navy, opined that “By using CENTRIXS, the communication process with the various forces and

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CARAT HQ runs smoothly and confusion is eliminated.” Global interoperability, reliability, and

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interconnectivity in an easy-to-use format are what make CENTRIXS so valuable in building maritime

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partnerships. CENTRIXS is fielded and currently operating in multiple theaters today.

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Fleet Operations – Space

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