Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 3

BRAIN-BASED LEARNING IN THE MIDDLE LEVEL CLASSROOM

3 CREDITS HOUR
EDML 200
SUMMER 2011
Meeting times: June 27 – July 1, 2011
Location: The University of Vermont
Instructor: Ken Reissig

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Brain-based education emphasizes how the brain learns naturally and is based on what
we currently know about the structure and function of the human brain. This course
will introduce the latest brain-based education research. Participants will learn how to
integrate strategies and develop a brain compatible framework for creating effective
middle level instruction.

COURSE TOPICS/GOALS:
 Overview of Basic Brain Development
 Hemispheric Functional Specialization
 Information Processing in the Brain
 Memory and Learning
 Thinking Skills and Transfer
 Techniques and Classroom Applications

Brain-based learning is a comprehensive approach to instruction using current research


from neuroscience. THIS COURSE WILL ADDRESS THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS:

1. How has a technology-changing world altered the way young adolescent brains
learn, think, read, socialize, and interpret information?

2. How do improve learning, memory, and thinking in a distracted world?

3. What occurs inside the brain during the process of learning?

4. What is the effect of pacing, schedule and schooling on student learning and
achievement?

5. How will I use brain-compatible learning to change my practice? What does this
look like?

6. How will I use brain-compatible learning to change my classroom? What does


this look like?

TEXT BOOKS:
Sousa, David A. (2010) Mind, Brain, and Education: Neuroscience Implications for the
Classroom. Solution Tree; 1st edition
NATIONAL MIDDLE SCHOOL ASSOCIATION STANDARDS ADDRESSED IN THIS COURSE
 Make decisions about curriculum and resources that reflect an understanding of
young adolescent development using current research.
 Develop middle level curriculum that is relevant, challenging, integrative,
exploratory, and reflects the interdisciplinary nature of knowledge.
 Incorporate all young adolescents’ ideas, interests, and experiences into
curriculum in ways that encourage all young adolescents to observe, question,
and interpret knowledge and ideas from diverse perspectives.
 Use a wide variety of teaching, learning, and assessment strategies that are
developmentally responsive, motivating culturally sensitive, and technologically
sound, and know when to implement them.
 Create learning experiences that encourage exploration and problem solving so
all young adolescents can be actively engaged in learning.
 Provide all young adolescents with opportunities to engage in independent and
collaborative inquiry.

ACADEMIC HONESTY & PROFESSIONALISM:


All students are required to be familiar with and adhere to the “Academic Honesty
Policy Procedures” delineated in the following website:
http://www.uvm.edu/~uvmppg/ppg/student/acadintegrity.pdf

ACCOMMODATIONS:
Accommodations will be provided to eligible students with disabilities. Please obtain an
accommodation letter from the ACCESS office and see one of the instructors early in
the course to discuss what accommodations will be necessary. If you are unfamiliar
with ACCESS, visit their website at http://www.uvm.edu/access to learn more about
the services they provide. ACESS: A-170 Living Learning Center, University of
Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405. PH: 802-656-7753, TTY: call 711 (relay), Fax: 802-
656-0739, Email: access@uvm.edu, Instant Messenger: UVMaccess. General office
hours: 8:30am – 4:30pm Monday through Friday. Call to make an appointment.

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS:
Using the latest brain based research; participants will develop their own use of brain-
based learning to enhance the teaching and learning process in their classrooms:

1. Metacognitive Unit: Participants will develop and teach a “How does my brain
work” unit that teaches students about how their brain learns and strategies to
increase memory and retention.
2. Blog Journal: Participants will reflect on the impact of brain-based strategies in
their daily practice.
3. Action Research Project: Through student interviews, case studies, and critical
review of student work, participants will analyze the outcomes of brain-based
teaching strategies in their classroom.
COURSE SCHEDULE
Day Topics Readings
Mon. Basic Brain Development Sousa Chapter 1-2
Hemispheric Functional Specialization Additional Readings TBA
Tues. Information Processing in the Brain Sousa Chapter 3-4
Additional Readings TBA
Wed. Memory and Learning Sousa Chapter 5
Additional Readings TBA
Thur. Thinking Skills and Transfer Sousa Chapter 6-7
Additional Readings TBA
Fri. Techniques and Classroom Applications Sousa Chapter 8
Additional Readings TBA

EVALUATION RUBRIC

Using Brain-Based Research to Enhance Instruction and Learning:


Assignments 1 & 2
1= Inadequate 5 = Consistent/Comprehensive
Standards Assessed Comments 1-5 pts.
Design developmentally appropriate learning opportunities that
applies brain-based instructional strategies to support the
diverse needs of learners.
Make decisions about curriculum and resources that reflect an
understanding of brain-based research and young adolescent
development.
Use a wide variety of teaching, learning, and assessment
strategies that are brain-based and know when to implement
them.
Create learning experiences that encourage exploration and
problem solving so all young adolescents can be actively
engaged in learning.
Provide all young adolescents with opportunities to engage in
independent and collaborative inquiry.
Evaluate the relative effectiveness of developmentally responsive
programs, best practices, and organizational components that
reflect brain-based research the philosophical foundations of
middle level education and implement those that are most
effective.