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Military Honours and Marks of Respect BRd 2

CHAPTER 92

MILITARY HONOURS AND MARKS OF RESPECT

(MOD Sponsor: FOTR)

CONTENTS

Para
9201. Table of Marks of Respect
9202. The ‘Alert’
9203. Piping the Side
9204. The National Anthem
9205. Musical Salutes and Airs
9206. The Queen and Members of the British Royal Family
9207. Spare
9208. Foreign Sovereigns, Presidents of Republics, and Members of Foreign
Reigning Royal Families
9209. Commonwealth Governors-General, etc, Heads of Commonwealth
Republican Countries, HM The Yang Di-Pertuan Agong of Malaysia
9210. Commonwealth Prime Ministers and Foreign Heads of Government
9211. Foreign Governors-General, Governors, Officers and Officials
9212. Officers of Non-Military Services
9213. Commonwealth Naval Boards
9214. Honorary Admirals of the Fleet and Admirals
9215. Officers of Flag Rank and Commodores
9216. Captains
9217. Honours at Departure as well as at Reception
9218. Proceeding on Board Otherwise than by Boat
9219. Navy, Army and Air Force - Reciprocal Honours
9220. Officers on the Retired List
9221. Boat Passing with Royal Personage, or Flag Flying
9222. Boat Passing with Flag Discs Displayed
9223. Boat Passing with Governor-General, Governor, Lieutenant-Governor
9224. Two Ships Passing
9225. Relaxation of 9215 to 9220 and 9224
9226. HM Army and Air Force Vessels
9227. Salutes and Marks of Respect in Boats
J.9228. Guards of Honour
J.9229. Honours and Salutes to Members of the Royal Family and other Personages
J.9230. Compliments by Guards and Sentries
9231. Salutes
J.9232. Spare
J.9233. Compliments in Special Cases
J.9234. Salutes in the Air
9235. Ceremonial Fly-Pasts
9236. Freedoms of Cities, Towns, Boroughs, etc.
9237. National Day of Remembrance

ANNEXES

Annex 92A: Marks of Respect and Salutes

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CHAPTER 92

MILITARY HONOURS AND MARKS OF RESPECT

Notes:

1. This chapter should be read in conjunction with BR 1834, Royal Navy Ceremonial
and Drill.

2. All references to Officers and Ratings apply equally to both male and female
unless specifically stated otherwise.

3. Where no bugler is borne, or available, the boatswain’s call shall be deemed the
appropriate alternative and the relevant paragraphs interpreted as such.

4. For the purposes of defining the appropriate level of ceremonial, visits and
occasions are categorised as Formal, Informal, Routine or In-Transit. A Formal visit is
defined as a visit by a Royal or VIP Personage, Flag Officer, Commodore or Captain,
entitled to fly a Standard, Flag, Pennant or similar, with the intention of carrying out a formal
inspection of the ship, establishment, divisions or other similar formal ceremonial
occasion.

Definitions:

Foreign Sovereign See 9407..sub para 2


Flag Officer ) See Explanation of Terms
Officer of Flag Rank Commonwealth ) on Page xxiii
)

9201. Table of Marks of Respect

1. The marks of respect to be paid to Royal personages, officers and officials on their
arrival at and departure from Her Majesty’s ships and naval establishments are
summarised in Annex 92A; this includes the occasions on which the Alert and Piping the
Side are to be used and when Guards and Bands are to be paraded. Annex 92A also
contains the authorised scale of gun salutes. For salutes from shore batteries see
Para 9402.. For salute by bugle when no band is available see 9205. sub para 2. The
relevant articles should be consulted for detailed instructions.

2. Timing. These marks of respect are normally paid only between Colours and sunset,
but the senior officer present may waive this rule in special circumstances.

3. Where ‘No’ appears in Annex 92A, column 3 (Alert), attention is called to 9212. .sub
para 2 and sub para 3.

4. Where ‘No’ appears in Annex 92A, column 4 (Pipe), the visitor should be piped if he
is in naval uniform and entitled to be piped under Para 9203. and Para 9220..

5. Guards. For the composition of naval guards of honour see BR 1834, Royal Navy
Ceremonial and Drill. For the composition of Royal Marines guards of honour see
BR 2118, Royal Marines Drill (for personages entitled to a Royal Guard see Para 9206. to
9209.). See also Para J.9230. and Table 92-1.

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6. Governors and Lieutenant-Governors. Particular attention is called to Para 9306.,


which gives lists of officials who are entitled to be received with the honours prescribed for
Governors and Lieutenant-Governors.

7. Minor Dignitaries. Salutes for minor dignitaries do not appear in Annex 91A and are
contained in local orders.

8. National Anthems, Salutes and Official Marches. National anthems, salutes and
official marches are contained in BR 12, National Anthems, Salutes and Official Marches.

9202. The ‘Alert’

1. In addition to the other occasions specifically prescribed in these Regulations (see


Para 9201., Para 9206. to 9215., Para 9217. to 9226. and Para 9306.) the ‘Alert’ is to be
sounded on the bugle, between the hours of Colours and sunset, whenever an officer of
Flag rank or Commodore in uniform, comes on board or leaves any of Her Majesty’s ships,
or pays a formal visit to a Naval establishment. The ‘Alert’ in a Naval establishment is not
required where that senior officer is on an informal or routine visit or in-transit to board or
disembark from a boat or aircraft. (see Para 9215.).

2. The ‘Alert’ is to be sounded at the hoisting and hauling down of Colours, see -
Para 9136.

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Table 92-1. Composition of Guards of Honour and Nomenclature

GUARD PARADED GUARD MUSICAL


TITLE OF GUARD
(MOUNTED) FOR STRENGTH SALUTE
HM The Queen & Other Royal Guard of 1 LT/CDR National
Members of the Royal Family Honour Anthem
1 LT
4 POs
96 JRs
(Colour Party)
1 LT/SLT
1 WO
2 LHs
Bugler
Foreign Heads of State & Royal Guard of 1 LT/CDR Appropriate
Foreign Sovereigns Honour National
4 POs Anthem
96 JRs
(Colour Party)
1 LT/SLT
1 WO
2 LHs
Bugler
Admiral of the Fleet, former First Admiral of the Fleet’s 1 LT Rule
Sea Lords and Admirals who Guard Britannia
have served as Chief of 1 S/LT
Defence Staff
2 POs
48 JRs
Bugler
Admiral Admiral’s Guard 1 LT Rule
Britannia
2 POs
24 JRs
Bugler
Vice Admiral Vice Admiral’s Guard 1 LT Iolanthe
2 POs
24 JRs
Bugler
Rear Admiral Rear Admiral’s Guard 1 LT/SLT Iolanthe
1 PO

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18 JRs
Bugler
Commodore Commodore’s Guard 1 S/LT Iolanthe
1 PO
12 JRs
Bugler
Captain RN (In command) Captain’s Guard 1 PO Nil
12 JRs
As Required Ship’s Guard (Sea 1 LT/SLT According
Going) 1 PO to Rank
12 JRs
(Standard size
Ship’s Guard)
Entering/Leaving Harbour Ship’s Guard (Sea See FLAGO
Procedure ‘A’ Colour Guard Going) (0208)
firing or receiving a gun salute

9203. Piping the Side

1. Between the hours of Colours and sunset, the side is to be piped for the following,
coming on board or leaving one of Her Majesty’s ships:

a. Her Majesty The Queen.

b. His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, when in naval uniform.

c. Other members of the Royal Family of the rank of Captain, RN or Reserve, and
above, when in naval uniform.

d. The Admiralty Board and Commonwealth Naval Boards, when acting as Boards.

e. Officers of Flag rank in uniform and Commodores in uniform.

f. An officer in uniform if holding an appointment in command of a Commonwealth


seagoing ship of war or tender in commission, but such officer coming on board
by a brow is not to be piped unless arriving at a pre-arranged time.

g. The President or a member of a court-martial proceeding to or returning from the


court.

h. The Officer of the Guard when flying a pennant.

i. A body when being brought on board or sent out of a ship.

j. Professional heads of Commonwealth navies.

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2. The side is to be piped at all hours for officers of foreign navies in uniform, i.e. officers
of navies other than those of Commonwealth countries. Local orders for NATO Standing
Naval Forces may modify these instructions.

3. The side should normally be piped for an officer entitled to it even if accompanying a
senior officer who is not so entitled.

4. The side is not to be piped at any shore establishment.

5. For officers on the Retired List, see Para 9220.

9204. The National Anthem

1. At the reception of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh the whole of the National
Anthem is to be played (see Para 9206.)

2. The first six bars only are to be played at the reception of other members of the Royal
Family, and similarly, within their respective jurisdictions or while proceeding on the public
service, at the reception of the Governors-General of Commonwealth countries. See
Para 9206., Para 9207. and Para 9209.

3. The National Anthem is not to be played at the reception on board Her Majesty’s ships
of any other British official or authority.

4. The first six bars of the National Anthem are to be played by naval and Royal Marines
bands, when present, at the reception on shore, at a naval establishment or elsewhere,
within their respective jurisdictions or while proceeding on the public service, of
Governors-General, Governors and Lieutenant-Governors (as defined in Para 9306.) of
Commonwealth countries.

5. At the reception of Heads of Republican Commonwealth countries or His Majesty The


Yang di-Pertuan Agong of Malaysia, the national anthem of the Commonwealth country
concerned is to be played.

6. For the reception of foreign Sovereigns and Presidents and members of reigning
foreign Royal Families, see Para 9208.

9205. Musical Salutes and Airs

1. The following airs are to be played on the occasions below:

a. At the reception of the Secretary of State for Defence, the Admiralty Board, acting
as a Board, a Commonwealth Naval Board, Chief of Defence Staff (if a naval
officer), Chief of Naval Staff and First Sea Lord, Admirals of the Fleet, former First
Sea Lords and Admirals who have served as Chiefs of Defence Staff, Admirals
and Commanders-in-Chief: Rule Britannia.

b. General Salute for British officers of Flag rank and Commodores not entitled to
Rule Britannia: Iolanthe.

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c. General Salute for Governors and Lieutenant-Governors (as defined in


Para 9306.) of Commonwealth countries within their respective jurisdictions,
British General officers and Brigadiers, officers of Air rank, foreign officers and
officials of rank equivalent to British officers and officials so entitled: Garb of Auld
Gaul; for Royal Marines General officers: The Preobrajensky March.

d. March past for the Royal Navy: Heart of Oak.

e. March past for the Royal Marines: A Life on the Ocean Wave.

f. Regimental slow march for the Royal Marines: The Preobrajensky March.

g. Advance in Review Order: Nancy Lee.

2. The General Salute or, for a Commodore the Commodore’s Salute, shall be sounded
on the bugle when no band is available to play the National Anthem or musical salute.

3. Commonwealth naval officers should be accorded the same musical salutes as RN


officers of equivalent rank and status.

9206. The Queen and Members of the British Royal Family

1. The Queen, The Duke of Edinburgh and other members of the Royal Family are to be
received on board any of Her Majesty’s ships or on arrival at naval establishments by a
Royal Guard with arms presented, the bugles sounding the ‘Alert’, the officers saluting,
and the band playing the National Anthem, as in Para 9204. A similar procedure is to be
adopted on the departure of the Royal personage unless dispensation has been granted
by the Royal personage to reduce or modify the arrival or departure ceremonial.

2. If other members of the Royal Family are present on the same occasion as The Queen
or The Duke of Edinburgh, the Royal Salute as in sub para 1 is to be given on their arrival
and departure, but the band is not to play the National Anthem for them.

3. Other members of the Royal Family, when The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh are
not present, are each to be received on board with the Royal Salutes as in sub para 1 but
if more than one member is or will be present the band is to play the National Anthem only
for that member of the Royal Family for whom the Guard is paraded.

4. On the occasion of informal visits to HM ships or Naval establishments by The Queen


or The Duke of Edinburgh or any other member of the Royal Family, the personal standard
is not be hoisted, nor are gun salutes to be fired. A Royal Guard and band are, however,
to be paraded unless otherwise ordered.

9207. Spare

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9208. Foreign Sovereigns, Presidents of Republics, and Members of Foreign


Reigning Royal Families

1. The honours and marks of respect laid down in Para 9206. and Para 9207. are to be
paid, as applicable, to foreign Sovereigns (Para 9103. and Para 9408.), Presidents of
Republican States and members of foreign reigning Royal Families, except that the foreign
national anthem is to be played instead of the British. A foreign national anthem is to be
played in full unless a recognized abbreviated version is known to exist. Should the
appropriate foreign national anthem not be available, the musical salute to be played is
Garb of Auld Gaul.

9209. Commonwealth Governors-General, etc, Heads of Commonwealth


Republican Countries, HM The Yang Di-Pertuan Agong of Malaysia

1. These, within their jurisdiction or while proceeding on the public service, are to be
received on board any of Her Majesty’s ships with the military honours and marks of
respect due to the Sovereign, the appropriate musical salute as prescribed in 9204 being
played.

2. Governors and Lieutenant-Governors (as defined in Para 9306.) when in uniform, and
within their jurisdiction, are to be received with the honours and marks of respect
prescribed for Flag Officers who are Commanders-in-Chief, the musical salute prescribed
by Para 9205. being played. The side is not, however, to be piped except in accordance
with 9201..sub para 5.

9210. Commonwealth Prime Ministers and Foreign Heads of Government

1. The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, the Prime Ministers of other
Commonwealth countries, and the heads of government of foreign nations are to be
received with the ‘Alert’ when visiting HM ships in their official capacity.

9211. Foreign Governors-General, Governors, Officers and Officials

1. Subject to any special instructions laid down in station orders, Governors-General and
Governors in foreign countries should normally receive the same marks of respect as are
given to British officials in similar positions.

2. The same honours and marks of respect are to be paid to foreign officers of equivalent
rank as are prescribed by these regulations for British officers, except for musical salutes,
which are to be in accordance with 9205..1 sub para c.

3. Foreigners of high distinction who are normally received with a guard of honour when
visiting ships of their own nation are to be similarly received when visiting Her Majesty’s
ships.

9212. Officers of Non-Military Services

1. All officers of Her Majesty’s Foreign, Commonwealth, and other non-military services,
in uniform and entitled to a salute of eleven guns or more, are to be received on board any
of Her Majesty’s ships with the ‘Alert’.

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2. When other British representatives pay official visits, the senior officer present may
direct, when it is considered appropriate, that ships’ companies be called to attention by
pipe.

3. It is also at the discretion of the senior officer present to order that other distinguished
persons visiting Her Majesty’s ships in their official capacity shall be received with the
‘Alert’, when it is considered that this action would be appropriate.

4. Civic dignitaries paying official visits are to be received with the military honours and
marks of respect as detailed at Annex 92A. Some Mayors and other civic office-holders
still use ex officio the title of ‘Admiral’ (deriving from ancient rights in Admiralty which are
now generally repealed) but the bearers are not recognised as entitled to fly a personal
flag in HM ships, to wear any form of naval uniform or to be greeted with naval or military
honours.

5. Officers of Her Majesty’s Foreign, Commonwealth and other non-military services who
are also officers of Flag rank or General or Air officers are, when wearing the uniform of
their naval, Army or RAF rank, entitled in every respect to the honours due to that rank if
these are higher than those due to their civil office, but when they are received on board
Her Majesty’s ships the band is to play the salute applicable to the civil appointment held.
Should the civil appointment not entitle the holder to a musical salute, he should be
received, if wearing the uniform of his naval, military or air force rank, with the musical
salute due to that rank.

6. Except as directed above and in Para 9201., Para 9209. and Para 9210., officers of
Her Majesty’s Foreign, Commonwealth and other non-military services are not entitled to
the military honours prescribed in this section.

9213. Commonwealth Naval Boards

1. When members of Commonwealth Naval Boards, acting as Boards, pay an official


visit to any of Her Majesty’s ships or naval establishments, they are to be received by a
guard with arms presented, the bugles sounding the ‘Alert’, the officers saluting, and the
band playing the salute.

2. Naval members of Commonwealth Naval Boards, when paying an official visit to any
of Her Majesty’s ships or naval establishments and not acting as a Board, are to be
received by the guard and band appropriate to their ranks.

9214. Honorary Admirals of the Fleet and Admirals

1. An Honorary Admiral of the Fleet or Honorary Admiral, when in naval uniform, is to be


accorded the same honours and marks of respect as an Admiral of the Fleet or Admiral.

9215. Officers of Flag Rank and Commodores

1. During Formal visits, Flag Officers and Commodores entitled to fly a broad pennant
are to be received on board any of Her Majesty’s ships or on arrival at a naval
establishment by a bugle sounding the ‘Alert’ and a guard presenting arms accompanied
with the appropriate musical salute from a band (see Table 92-1 and Annex 92A).

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2. An informal, routine or in-transit visit to a Naval Base, air station or establishment by


a Flag Officer is indicated by:

a. Negative disc if arriving by boat.

b. Star plate uncovered if arriving by car; no flag displayed.

Ceremonial is to be confined to the point of entry/departure: the gate staff are to salute as
the Flag Officer enters and departs the Establishment. Neither OOD nor ceremonial sentry
is required and the ‘Alert’ is not to be sounded. The Flag Officer is to be met at the
destination area by the Commanding Officer or Head of Department concerned. Car door
opener(s) and ceremonial sentries are not to be provided. Thereafter normal marks of
respect apply whether the Flag Officer is on foot or in a car; individuals should salute in
passing but keep walking unless engaged in conversaton by the Flag Officer. The officer
or rating in charge of a squad only should salute on the march or if stationary, call the
squad to attention and salute.

3. Other officers of Flag rank and Commodores who are not entitled to fly flags and broad
pennants are to be received in the same manner, as clause 1, when paying a formal visit
and in the same manner as clause 2 for other visits.

9216. Captains

1. A Captain, conducting a formal visit, is to be received on board any of Her Majesty’s


ships or on arrival at a naval establishment by a guard with arms presented.

9217. Honours at Departure as well as at Reception

1. The military honours and marks of respect authorized in the foregoing articles are not
to be rendered at the departure as well as the reception of the personages and officials
specified, unless specifically ordered for by the visiting personage.

9218. Proceeding on Board Otherwise than by Boat

1. When an officer proceeds on board one of Her Majesty’s ships or arrives at a naval
establishment otherwise than by boat, in circumstances under which he would be flying his
flag or pennant if he had proceeded by boat, he is to receive the same honours and marks
of respect as if he had so proceeded, but see 9203. sub para 4 on piping the side.

9219. Navy, Army and Air Force - Reciprocal Honours

1. Officers of the Royal Marines, the Army and the Royal Air Force, being in their proper
uniforms, are to be received on board any of Her Majesty’s ships, or on arrival at naval
establishments, with the same honours and marks of respect as are directed by these
regulations to be paid to officers of corresponding rank and status in the Royal Navy, when
the occasion of the visit is of a similar nature to those laid down, except as regards piping
the side.

2. Officers of the Royal Navy, being in their proper uniform, are to have the same honours
and marks of respect from Royal Marines, Army and Royal Air Force units as the officers
of corresponding rank and status in those services.

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9220. Officers on the Retired List

1. The ‘Alert’ is to be sounded and the side piped for an officer on the Retired List under
the same rules (Para 9202. and Para 9203.) applicable to an officer of equivalent rank on
the Active List, when he goes on board any of Her Majesty’s ships, or arrives at a naval
establishment, in his proper uniform.

9221. Boat Passing with Royal Personage, or Flag Flying

1. When a Royal personage or Head of State in a boat or tender, or the Admiralty Board,
a Flag Officer or Commodore, with flag or broad pennant flying in a boat or tender, is
passing a ship not under way, the ‘Alert’ is to be sounded, the OOD only to salute and
those officers and ratings on the upper deck to stand to attention and face the passing boat
or tender.

9222. Boat Passing with Flag Discs Displayed

1. When a member of the Admiralty Board not acting as a Board, an officer of Flag rank,
or a Commodore in uniform in a boat displaying a red or blue disc, as appropriate, is
passing a ship not under way, the ‘Alert’ is to be sounded.

2. The white (negative) disc will be displayed on a Flag Officer’s barge either to prevent
the work of the ship being interfered with or to avoid the ship’s company being disturbed
during the meal hours and dog watches. In this case the ‘Alert’ is not to be sounded nor
the hands on deck called to attention, the Officer of the Watch only saluting. When the Flag
Officer, either in uniform or plain clothes, passes close to the ship, and the ‘Alert’ has not
been sounded, officers and ratings who are close to the ships side should stand to
attention as an act of courtesy.

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Table 92-2. Marks of Respect to be Paid by Ships Being Passed by Boats with
Important Personages (see Para 9221. to 9223.)

Guard
Pipe
Indication Alert and
‘Still’
Band
(1) (2) (3) (4)
Standard Yes (i) No
Admiralty Board Flag Yes (i) No
Flag or broad pennant Yes (i) (ii)No
Red or blue disc (Para 9174.) Yes (i) No
White (negative) disc (Para 9174.) No No No
Masthead pennant No Yes No
Governor or other official flying flag who is received with Yes (i) No
guard and band (Para 9223.)
Official who is received with ‘Alert’ only (Para 9223.) Yes (i) No

Notes:

1. The ‘Still’ is to be piped if no Bugler is available. Ships under way are to pipe the
‘Still’ only.

2. The ship of an officer senior to the officer in the boat should sound the ‘Alert’ but
not parade guard and band (Para 9221.)

3. The Officer of the Watch (or if none the Quartermaster) should salute from the
gangway in ships not under way in all the above cases.

4. The same marks of respect are to be paid to equivalent foreign officers and
officials.

9223. Boat Passing with Governor-General, Governor, Lieutenant-Governor

1. When a Governor-General, Governor, or Lieutenant-Governor, as defined in


Para 9306., with his flag flying in a boat or tender, passes one of Her Majesty’s ships which
is not under way, the ‘Alert’ is to be sounded, the OOD only to salute and those officers
and ratings on the upper deck stand to attention and face the passing boat or tender.

2. When a person who is about to be, or has been, received with the ‘Alert’ passes one
of Her Majesty’s ships which is not under way, the ‘Alert’ is to be sounded (see also
Para 9212.).

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9224. Two Ships Passing

1. When in the periods:

a. between sunrise and five minutes to morning Colours,

b. between morning Colours and five minutes before evening Colours,

c. between evening Colours and sunset,

one of Her Majesty’s ships passes another ship which is not under way, and if either be
flying a Standard, Admiralty Board Flag or other distinguishing flag, or is a flagship or
foreign warship, the junior ship is to sound the ‘Alert’ and the other is immediately to do
likewise and after a short interval sound the ‘Carry on’. The junior ship is, after a short
interval, also to sound the ‘Carry on’. In cases of doubt as to seniority, especially where
foreign warships are involved, Her Majesty’s ships are to be prepared to give the salute
first at the most opportune moment, provided that they are satisfied that it is likely to be
returned in a similar manner.

2. If guards and bands are paraded, the junior ship is to give the appropriate salute as
laid down in Para 9206., Para 9208., Para 9213. and Para 9215., the guard in the senior
ship receiving the salute at the ‘Slope’; but if one of the ships be a foreign warship, a similar
salute to that laid down in Para 9215. is to be given by the junior and returned in full by the
senior, the bands playing the foreign national anthem.

3. If neither ship be a flagship, or a warship or a foreign nation, the bugle is not to be used
but similar marks of respect are to be paid and returned by pipe. If guards and bands are
paraded, the guard is to remain at the ‘Slope’.

4. When one of Her Majesty’s ships passes another ship which is also under way, the
foregoing marks of respect are to be paid and returned by pipe only. If guards are paraded
the guard is to come to the ‘Slope’, but if a foreign warship should act, or appear likely to
act, as laid down in sub para 1, reciprocal action is to be taken by one of Her Majesty’s
ships when passing, or being passed by, such foreign warship.

5. When ships are in company at sea, marks of respect are only to be paid as follows:

a. On first passing after sunrise each day.

b. On inverting the line during manoeuvres.

c. On hauling off or disengaging after replenishment or transfers (not on approach).

9225. Relaxation of 9215 to 9220 and 9224

1. Notwithstanding the provisions of these Articles, Commanders-in-Chief and Flag


Officers are authorised to permit limited relaxation’s of military honours and marks of
respect at Annex 92A in individual ships and naval establishments under their command,
in which the rigid application would cause unacceptable interruptions to the routine work
on which their ship’s companies are engaged. Relaxation’s are not permitted in the case
of visits by HM ships to foreign ports or when passing or being passed by foreign warships.

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9226. HM Army and Air Force Vessels

1. Her Majesty’s Army and Air Force vessels (Para 9135.) will conform with the normal
ceremonial respects paid by Her Majesty’s ships at sea as laid down in Para 9224., except
that, as bands are not included in their companies, marks of respect will be paid by pipe.

9227. Salutes and Marks of Respect in Boats

1. The rules are given in BR 67 Admiralty Manual of Seamanship Chapter 5.

2. Ceremonial reception at anchor or a buoy is given in BR 1834 Naval Ceremonial and


Drill Chapter 11.

J.9228. Guards of Honour

1. Not Exceeding 100 Servicemen. A guard of honour not exceeding a total of 100
ratings, soldiers or airmen with four officers, a band and colour as appropriate may be
mounted as follows:

a. For The Queen or a member of the Royal Family who is a Royal Highness;

b. For a foreign Sovereign, Head of State, or a member of a reigning foreign Imperial


or Royal Family;

(1) When attending Service occasions.


(2) On other occasions when ordered to do so by the Defence Council or a
Commander-in-Chief. When a Commander-in-Chief proposes to mount a
guard of honour for one of the personages mentioned in b on his arrival in the
United Kingdom, the Defence Council is to be informed immediately.

c. At State ceremonies when ordered to do so by the Defence Council.

d. For a Governor-General, Governor, High Commissioner or Officer administering


a British Commonwealth country, Associated State or Dependent Territory, or for
an Ambassador when taking the salute on the occasion of The Queen’s Birthday
Parade when British troops are stationed in a Commonwealth country of which
The Queen is not Head of State.

2. Not Exceeding 50 Servicemen. A guard of honour not exceeding a total of 50 ratings,


soldiers or airmen with four officers, a band and colour as appropriate is to be mounted as
follows:

a. To receive a foreign head of government.

b. To receive the Secretary of State for Defence at a Service station.

c. To receive the Chief of Defence Staff, First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff,
former First Sea Lords and Admirals who have served as Chief of Defence Staff,
the Chief of the General Staff or the Chief of the Air Staff on an official visit to any
formation of the three Services.

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d. To receive a Commander-in-Chief or a Flag, General or Air Officer Commanding-


in-Chief on his arrival and departure on a ceremonial occasion within his
command and when he first takes up and finally quits his command if outside the
United Kingdom.

e. To receive a Commonwealth or foreign officer of Flag, General or Air rank who is


a Chief of Defence Staff or a Head of a single Service, or an officer holding a four
star or five-star appointment in a Commonwealth or foreign country, on his arrival
in the United Kingdom or at a Service station within a territory subject to Her
Majesty’s authority to visit the civil Governor or officer in command.

f. To receive a Minister of Defence of a Commonwealth or foreign country on his


arrival in the United Kingdom in an official capacity.

g. To receive the Secretary-General of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or


other international organization of similar status of which the United Kingdom is a
member country, on his arrival in the United Kingdom in an official capacity.

h. On other occasions, subject to the approval of the Defence Council at stations in


the United Kingdom, or of the British representative in the territory or senior
Service officer as may be appropriate at stations abroad.

J.9229. Honours and Salutes to Members of the Royal Family and other Personages

1. The honours and salutes to be given by guards of honour and on parades on the
arrival and departure of The Queen and other members of the Royal Family are as follows:

a. To The Queen, The Duke of Edinburgh and The Prince of Wales:

Royal Salute - Arms presented, Standards, Guidons and Colours lowered. The
band is to play the first verse of the National Anthem for The Queen and The Duke
of Edinburgh but only the first six bars for The Prince of Wales. If the Duke of
Edinburgh or The Prince of Wales arrives or departs during The Queen’s
presence the National Anthem is not to be played.

b. To other members of the Royal Family who are Royal Highnesses:

Royal Salute - Arms presented, Standards, Guidons and Colours lowered and the
first six bars of the National Anthem played, except that,

(1) when any of the personages at ‘a’ are present, six bars of the National
Anthem are to be played only if specially ordered for the member for whom
the parade is held; and
(2) when none of the personages mentioned at ‘a’ are present, but more than one
other member of the Royal Family is present, the first six bars of the National
Anthem are to be played only for the member for whom the parade is held.

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2. Arms are to be presented to the Crown when in ceremonial procession and not in the
presence of the Sovereign, but Standards, Guidons and Colours are not to be lowered and
bands are not to play the National Anthem.

3. The honours and salutes to be given by guards of honour and on parades on the
arrival and departure of other personages are as follows:

a. To foreign Sovereigns and the other personages mentioned in J.9228.1


sub para b;

Royal Salute - Arms presented, Standards, Guidons and Colours lowered and the
band plays the whole of the national anthem of the personage.

b. To a Governor-General and the other personages mentioned in J.9228.1


sub para d;

Royal Salute - Arms presented, Standards, Guidons and Colours lowered and the
band normally plays the first six bars of the British National Anthem. Within
independent States, however, the playing of national anthems will be subject to
local instructions.

c. To a head of government as mentioned in J.9228.2 sub para a:

General Salute - Arms presented and the band plays the National Anthem of the
recipient. Standards, Guidons and Colours are not to be lowered.

d. To the personages mentioned in J.9228.2 sub para b and sub para c and to
Admirals of the Fleet, Field Marshals and Marshals of the Royal Air Force, other
officers of Flag, General or Air rank, and Commonwealth or foreign officers of
corresponding rank, and inspecting officers of lower rank:

General Salute - Arms presented and the band plays the general salute or in the
Royal Navy the appropriate salute. Standards, Guidons and Colours lowered only
for the personages mentioned in J.9228.2 sub para a and sub para b and for
Admirals of the Fleet, Field Marshals and Marshals of the Royal Air Force.

4. Personages mentioned in J.9228.1 sub para d who are also officers of Flag, General
or Air rank are entitled to the honours due to their rank as well as those due to their civil
office.

5. Service officers in any civil office are entitled to the honours appertaining to such
office.

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J.9230. Compliments by Guards and Sentries

1. Compliments are to be paid by guards and sentries as prescribed in J. Table 92–3.

J. Table 92-3. Compliments by Guards and Sentries (see Para J.9232.)

GUARDS SENTRIES
A. Guards mounted on B. Guard to turn out C. Sentry to D. Sentry to
and present arms to present arms salute
to
1 The Queen and The Duke The Queen and The All members All officers in
of Edinburgh Duke of Edinburgh of Royal uniform
Family
2 Other members of the As in Serial 1B and to All members All officers in
Royal Family all other members of of Royal uniform
the Royal Family Family
3 Governors-General, As in Serial 2B, to the As in Serial Personages of
Governors, High personage on whom 3B lower degree
Commissioners or the guard is mounted and all officers
Officers administering and to personages of in uniform
British Commonwealth similar or higher
countries, Associated degree
States or Dependent
Territories
4 Officers of Flag, General As in Serials 1A, 2A As in Serial Officers below
or Air rank and 3A and to officers 4B Flag, General or
of Flag, General or Air Air rank in
rank when in uniform uniform
5 Officers below Flag, As in Serial All other officers
General or Air rank 5B and to field in uniform
officers or the
equivalent
6 Regimental Guards As in Serials 1A, 2A, As in Serial All other officers
3A and 4A and once a 5C in uniform
day to their
Commanding Officer

Guard’s are also to turn out and present arms to armed parties (see definition in BR 1834,
Royal Navy Ceremonial and Drill).

9231. Salutes

1. Naval Personal Salute. The personal salute, in addition to being a mark of respect,
is an act of courtesy and good manners. It is never wrong to salute even if subsequently
the person saluting another discovers that person is not entitled to be saluted. All Service
personnel are to salute on the occasions and in the manner prescribed below:

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2. Method. The method of making the naval personal salute with the hand is laid down
in BR 1834, Royal Navy Ceremonial and Drill. Ratings are to salute all Officers, and
Chaplains; Officers are to salute those superior to them in rank. The naval personal hand
salute is only to be made when the senior person is in uniform and wearing uniform
headgear (see sub para 3 and the exception at 4a sub para (5) below). Without uniform
headgear and when civilian clothes are being worn a verbal salutation is only to be given,
e.g.: ‘Good Morning/Afternoon/Evening Sir/Ma’am’ by the junior person. When the junior
person is in civilian clothes, sports rig or in uniform without uniform headgear the head and
eyes are turned in the direction of the person to whom the compliment is being given. The
mode of salute to be used by Royal Marines is that laid down in Military regulations and is
taught in the Corps (see BR 2118, Royal Marines Drill).

3. Uniform Headgear is any heargear identified in Naval Uniform Regulations (BR 81).

4. Saluting Occasions

a. All officers and ratings in uniform are to salute the following on all occasions:

(1) The Queen and all members of the Royal Family and foreign Royal Families
whether they are in uniform or civilian clothes.
(2) Officers in uniform senior to them of the Royal Navy, Royal Marines, Royal
Naval Reserve and Royal Marines Reserve, and commissioned officers in the
Army and Royal Air Force. Sea Cadet Corps and Combined Cadet Force
(CCF) officers should also be saluted when carrying out their duties as such.
(3) Uniformed officers senior to them of Commonwealth naval, military and air
forces.
(4) Uniformed officers senior to them of foreign naval, military and air forces.
(5) Officers in plain clothes recognised and known to be senior officers when
arriving/departing official functions. (see sub para b, sub para c and
sub para d).
(6) Occupants of cars flying official military distinguishing flags or pennants, or
bearing star plates, of senior officers.
(7) Uncased Colours carried by naval, military or air force units.
(8) The coffin in funeral processions.
(9) The Cenotaph, Whitehall, London.
(10) Junior officers are to salute their superiors on the first meeting each day

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The following exceptions apply:


(11) In the interests of safety, the driver of a vehicle or the rider of a motorcycle or
bicycle is not to salute.
(12) Officers in attendance on Her Majesty or other Royal personages (or the
personal staff of Governors-General or Governors representing the
Sovereign) are not to salute when the National Anthem is played for the Royal
Salute.
(13) During ceremonial parades, officers in attendance on a senior officer are not
to salute when the senior officer receives a personal salute from the guard.

b. On board Her Majesty’s ships.

(1) All Officers and ratings are to salute when coming onboard or leaving one of
Her Majesty’s ships. The Hand Salute is only to be made when in uniform.
When civilian clothes are worn, the person saluting stands to attention at the
inboard head of the brow for the duration of 2 marching paces before carrying
on. For all officers, the gangway staff will return the salute of officers crossing
the ship’s brow.
(2) Officers and ratings need only salute officers senior to them when addressing
or being addressed by those officers on formal occasions - reporting Colours,
Sunset, Rounds, Both Watches and Inspections.

c. In naval establishments. The term Naval establishments encompasses Royal


Naval Air Stations and Naval Bases. The following rules for the exchange of
personal salutes when in uniform are to be observed:

(1) When outdoors, a rating who is standing is to face and salute a superior
officer who passes him; if sitting, or kneeling and at work, when a superior
officer passes, he is, where it is safe and practicable to do so, to rise, stand
to attention and salute.
(2) When outdoors two or more officers or ratings, not in an organised party, pass
or are passed by a senior officer, all are to salute.
(3) When outdoors a junior officer in company with a senior officer is to salute
only those officers who are senior to the latter.
(4) Officers are to return all salutes from junior officers and ratings. When two or
more officers together are saluted, the senior officer only is to return the
salute.
(5) When outdoors organised party at the halt in the charge of an officer or rating
is passed by a senior officer, only the officer or rating in charge is to salute,
first calling the party to attention and to face the appropriate direction.

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(6) Salutes to be given by organised parties on the march as follows:

(a) Whem commanded by an officer: the officer-in-charge is to give the order


‘Eyes Right’ (or ‘Left’) and is to salute when passing:

(i). An officer senior to the officer-in-charge and equivalent ranks in the


other Services.

(ii). The Colours of the Royal Navy, Queen’s Colours or Regimental


Colours, uncased.

(iii). The body when a funeral is passing.

Notes:

1. When passing other officers senior to the officer-in-charge, formed


armed parties or guards of honour without Colours or with Colours cased,
the officer-in-charge of the party is to salute.

2. When saluted by officers junior to the officer-in-charge, or ratings,


the officer-in-charge of the party is to return the salute.

(b) When commanded by a rating: the rating-in-charge is to give the order


‘Eyes Right’ (or ‘Left’) and is to salute when passing:

(i). All officers.

(ii). The Colours of the Royal Navy, Queen’s Colours or Regimental


Colours, uncased.

(iii). The body when a funeral procession is passing.

(iv). A formed armed party

(v). When returning the salute of an unarmed party or sentry.

(c) When indoors, except during a formal inspection, rounds or


presentations, personal salutes are not required, however when a
superior officer of any armed service enters the office of a junior officer
or rating, the junior officer or rating should, if seated, rise and give the
greeting ‘Good Morning/Afternoon/Evening Sir/Ma’am’.

d. In other Military and Ministry of Defence Headquarters and establishments. The


rules and guidance at 4 sub para c above will apply unless varied or relaxed by
that establishment’s Commanding Officer, Principal or Head of Establishment.

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5. Hoisting or Hauling Down Colours. When the Colours are hoisted or hauled down
and when the National Anthem, and/or Commonwealth and foreign national anthems are
played, all officers and ratings not fallen in are to face in the appropriate direction and stand
to attention, saluting if in uniform and wearing uniform headgear, when in sight of the mast
or ensign during the ceremony. If the mast or ensign cannot be seen they are to face the
general direction and stand to attention during the ceremony. Parties fallen in are to be
called to attention by the officer or rating in charge, who alone is to salute. When a national
anthem is played indoors or between decks, individual officers and ratings in uniform are
to salute if wearing uniform headgear; if uncovered, they are to remain uncovered and
stand to attention; those in plain clothes are to stand to attention uncovered.

6. Female Officers and Ratings - Marks of Respect. Female Officers and ratings of
the Royal Navy and QARNNS are required to pay, and be paid, marks of respect in the
same manner and on the same occasions as male Officers and ratings.

7. Females Removing and Replacing Headgear. Female ratings are generally


excused removing headgear when their male counterparts would be expected to do so
(see ‘a’ and ‘b’ below). They are however to remove their headgear as a drill movement at
courts-martial, defaulters, during the reading of punishment warrants and during the
evolution of ‘Man and Cheer Ship’ as defined in BR 1834 Naval Ceremonial and Drill
Chapters 2 and 11.

a. Female Officers and ratings are not required to remove their caps indoors (except
when ordinary courtesy makes it desirable). During the playing of the National
Anthem inside buildings, on occasions when Naval Officers and ratings would
remain uncovered, female members of the Royal Navy are to stand to attention
without saluting.

b. Female ratings are not required to remove headgear during Religious services
and Church parades.

J.9232. Spare

J.9233. Compliments in Special Cases

1. An officer of Her Majesty’s diplomatic or other non-military service is entitled to the


honours and salutes appertaining to his office.

2. An officer holding a civil office who is also an officer of Flag, General or Air rank is
entitled to the honours due to that rank if they are higher than those due to his civil office.

3. The compliments laid down in these regulations are to be paid to officers of


corresponding rank in the Service of any power formally recognised by Her Majesty.

J.9234. Salutes in the Air

1. The approved method of saluting from aircraft consists of a shallow dive and climb,
but it is to be carried out only when there is a saluting base on the ground at a display or
on special occasions when duly authorized by the Commanding Officer of the station
concerned. The flying restrictions prescribed in JSP 318, Military Flying Regulations, are
to observed.

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2. Salutes are not to be exchanged between aircraft.

9235. Ceremonial Fly-Pasts

1. The occasions of national importance to be recognised by ceremonial fly-pasts of RN,


Army and RAF aircraft are as follows:

a. The actual date of the accession, coronation and wedding of the Sovereign.

b. The day announced in the London Gazette as the official anniversary of the
Sovereign’s birth.

c. The weddings of children of the Sovereign.

d. The birth of a Royal Prince or Princess.

2. Ceremonial fly-pasts may be ordered by the Defence Council on other occasions of


national importance.

3. In the United Kingdom, the Defence Council will issue instructions on each occasion.
Abroad, the Commander-in-Chief is to make the necessary arrangements for the fly-past,
which is normally to take place in the vicinity of Government House or, where there is no
direct representative of the Sovereign, in the vicinity of the headquarters of the RN, Army
and RAF formation concerned.

9236. Freedoms of Cities, Towns, Boroughs, etc.

1. Authority to approve applications to accept Freedoms of cities, towns, boroughs, etc.


is delegated to Commanders-in-Chief. Guidance on the expenditure of public moneys for
ceremonies in connection with such events is given in JSP 760, Naval Leave and Travel
Regulations.

9237. National Day of Remembrance

1. The second Sunday in November is known as Remembrance Sunday, and is


observed as a National Day of Remembrance for the First World War (1914 - 1918) and
the Second World War (1939 - 1945).

2. On Remembrance Sunday, a period of two minutes’ silence commencing at 1100 is to


be observed in HM ships and establishments. As far as practicable all work and noise in
HM ships is to cease; and all machinery and work in HM establishments is to be stopped.
Rail and water transport need not, however, be stopped. Powerboats of HM ships and
establishments are to stop where circumstances permit, and pulling boats are to lay on
their oars.

3. Communications watches must continue.

4. The observance of the two minutes’ silence is to be incorporated in the statutory


Sunday Morning Service. On this occasion Commanders-in-Chief or senior officers are
authorised to order officers and ratings to take part, although no officer or rating is to be
obliged to attend the service of any denomination other than his own (see Para J.9316.).
Mourning bands are not worn (Para J.9511.)

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5. The above procedure is to be carried out on the Day of Remembrance when in


company with ships of any other nation. In Commonwealth and foreign ports HM ships
should, in addition to the above procedure, conform to local custom as regards
observance. Details of local procedures in foreign ports are contained in the appropriate
Port Guide and advice should be sought in advance from the Defence, Military or Naval
attache as appropriate. With a view to avoiding any misunderstanding, the senior British
naval officer is always to inform the senior officers of any foreign ships in company in good
time of the procedure which will be carried out by HM ships.

9238-9299. Unallocated.

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