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Collaboration
and
Co­teaching
Webinar
Activity
#1:

Pan
Balance
Model

A
Model
for
Solving
Algebraic
Equations


Solve
the
equation
by
using
a
Pan
Balance:


3v

+
10
=
6v
+

1


The
following
example
is
provided
to
show
how
the
Pan
Balance
model
works.



Step
1.

Draw
Pan
Balance
to
represent
the
equation.
Variables
are
represented
with
bags

labeled
v;
constants
with
small
boxes.
 


 v
 v





 


 v v v v v v v

 
 
 
 
 
 

______________________________________________________________________________________________





 

Step
2.

Systematically
remove
bags
and
blocks
from
each
side
to
keep
pan
balanced.



 v v

 
 


 v v v v
v v v

 
 
 
 
 


 

____________________________________________________________________________________________


 


Step
3.

Simplify
and
solve.



 v v v


______________________________________________________________________________________________________________




Since
3
bags
balances
with
9
blocks,
there
must
be
3
blocks
in
each
bag.

v
=
3























































































































































































©2010,
EDC



 Getting
to
Know
the
Mathematics
Improvement
Toolkit:
A
Webinar
Series


 



Webinar
Activity
#2

Video
Clip
The
Warm­Up



What
roles
did
the
co‐teachers
take?

What
actions
did
they
take
to
support
student

learning?


Special
Education
Teacher

 Regular
Education
Teacher
 

(white
shirt)
 (striped
shirt)


 
 

ROLES:
 ROLES:


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

STRATEGIES:
 STRATEGIES:


 


































































































































































































©2010,
EDC



 Getting
to
Know
the
Mathematics
Improvement
Toolkit:
A
Webinar
Series


 


Webinar
Activity
#3:
Sample
Workshop
Activity


Possible
Roles
for
Co‐Teachers

1.
Read
the
first
column
and
pick
2
actions
to
focus
on.

2.
Brainstorm
possible
roles
for
the
other
teacher
and
add
them
to
the
second
column.

3.
Reflect
on
your
own
practices.



Check
()
roles
that
you
use
frequently.
Star
(*)
roles
that
you
would
like
to
try
or
use
more
often.

()
 One
teacher’s
actions:
 What
might
the
other
 How
will
these
actions

(*)
 teacher
do?
 of
help
the
students?


 a.
Provide
directions
to
whole
 
 

class


 b.
Teach
math
concept
to
whole
 
 

class


 c.
Teach
a
strategy,
such
as
self‐ 
 

questioning


 d.
Demonstrate
how
to
use
 
 

manipulatives,
calculators,
or

other
tools


 
e.
Lead
a
whole
class
discussion
 
 



 f.
Facilitate
student
 
 

presentations
to
whole
class



 g.
Write
on
board
or
overhead
 
 



 h.
Read
aloud
to
whole
class
 
 



 i.
Review
homework
or
 
 

assessment


 j.
Work
with
individual
 
 

students



 k.
Work
with
pairs
or
groups
of
 
 

students



 m.
Informally
assess
individual
 
 

students



 n.
Provide
remediation

 
 



 o.
Provide
enrichment

 
 




















































































































































































©2010,
EDC



 Getting
to
Know
the
Mathematics
Improvement
Toolkit:
A
Webinar
Series


 


Webinar
Activity
#4:

Sample
Handout


Six
Models
of
Co‐Teaching


1.
One
Teach,
One
Support

One
teacher
leads
the
lesson
while
the
other
teacher
moves
through
the
room

helping
individuals
as
needed.


2.
One
Teach,
One
Observe

One
teacher
leads
the
lesson
while
the
other
teacher
observes
students.

In
advance

of
the
lesson,
the
teachers
agree
on
what
observational
information
they
are
seeking.


After
the
lesson,
they
analyze
the
information
together.


3.
Alternative
Teaching

The
class
is
divided
into
a
large
group
and
a
small
group.
The
small
group
receives

different
instruction
and
the
goals
for
each
group
may
differ.
Students
may
be

assigned
to
groups
or
given
a
choice.
Students
should
not
always
be
in
the
same

group.
This
method
works
well
for
providing
additional
instruction
or
extension.



4.
Parallel
Teaching

Students
are
split
in
two
heterogeneous
groups
with
each
teacher
teaching
one
group

• Lesson
goals
are
the
same
for
both
groups

• They
may
teach
the
same
lesson
or
vary
the
instructional
methods,
styles

and/or
contexts.



5.
Stations

Students
rotate
through
stations
working
with
a
co‐teacher
to
complete
the
task
in
a

designated
amount
of
time.

Teachers
can
vary
delivery
to
address
individual
student

needs.
Students
may
work
independently
at
some
of
the
stations.


6.
Team
Teaching

Two
teachers
deliver
instruction
at
the
same
time
and
share
leadership
in
the

classroom.
It
might
not
be
clear
to
an
observer
who
is
the
“math”
teacher
and
who
is

the
“special
education”
teacher.

This
is
considered
by
many
to
be
the
most

sophisticated
form
of
co‐teaching.





Based
on
the
work
of
Marilyn
Friend,
www.marilynfriend.com




















































































































































































©2010,
EDC



 Getting
to
Know
the
Mathematics
Improvement
Toolkit:
A
Webinar
Series


 


Webinar
Activity
#5
 






Handout:
Matching
Models
to
Needs



 What
do
you
see
as
 What
do
you
think
is
required
to
 When
would
you
use

Model
 benefits
to
students
and
 use
this
model?
 this
model
in
your
co­
teachers?
 (content
proficiency,
co­planning,
 teaching?

experience
of
co­teachers,
etc.)

Parallel
Teaching
 
 
 

Students
are
split
in
two
 

heterogeneous
groups
with
each
 

teacher
teaching
one
group
 

• Lesson
goals
are
the
same
for

both
groups

• They
may
teach
the
same

lesson
or
vary
the

instructional
methods,
styles

and/or
contexts.


Stations
 
 
 

Students
rotate
through
stations
 

working
with
a
co‐teacher
to
 

complete
a
task.
Students
may

work
independently
at
some

stations.

Alternative
Teaching
 
 
 

Class
is
divided
into
a
large
group
 

and
a
small
group.
The
small
group

receives
slightly
different

instruction.
Students
are
assigned

to
groups
or
given
a
choice.

Students
should
not
always
be
in

the
same
group.




















































































































































































©2010,
EDC



 Getting
to
Know
the
Mathematics
Improvement
Toolkit:
A
Webinar
Series


 


Webinar
Activity
#6

Handout:

Co‐Teaching
Lesson
Planner
for
____________________


Date
______________

Math
Goals
and
Priorities:
List
the
math
and
other
learning
goals.

 How
will
we
assess
student
learning
of
the
math?


 
 
 

Put
a
star
next
to
the
most
important
goals.




Part
of
 Demands/Barriers
 Strategies
 
 

Lesson:
 What
does
this
lesson
ask
students
to
 What
can
you
do
to
help

 Role
of
Co­Teacher
1
 Role
of
Co­Teacher
2

do?
What
will
be
difficult?
Why?
 students
meet
the
demands?


 
 
 
 


Beginning



 
 
 
 


Middle



 
 
 
 


End


Preparation:

What
materials/preparation
is
needed?

Who
will
do
what?
 
 
 


For More Information:


Mathematics
Improvement
Toolkit:
http://www.middlegrademath.org/
 























Emily
Fagan


efagan@edc.org
 
Anna
McTigue

amctigue@edc.org





Addressing
Accessibility
in
Mathematics:
edc.org/accessmath




















































































































































































©2010,
EDC



 Getting
to
Know
the
Mathematics
Improvement
Toolkit:
A
Webinar
Series