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Peter Morffew

Introduction
I have been asked numerous times over the years about the origin of my
name, the only answer I could give was a quoted from the surname
dictionaries ’Morffew arrived in England with the Norman invasion but was
used as a term of abuse by the Crusader Knights for the Saracens and
Muslims’.
When I was in the army I was asked if Morffew had any connection with
Morphou Gate in Cyprus, something that always seemed too coincidental.

With the advent of the personal computer it has become easier to find out
about the origin of my name and its geneology.

My search for the origin of Morffew and the other variants has included Anglo
Saxon England, the Normans before and after 1066, the Crusades and The
Kingdom of Cyprus.

The information that I have gathered has been compiled into a document for
others to read so that they can understand the possible origin of their name.

I would like to thank Peter Edbury of Cardif University for his help and Zoe
Heukels-Morffew and Nils Visser for the work they have done so far on the
Morffew history in their “Preliminary Findings Morffew Family History”.

All comments are welcome and can be sent to


peter.wendy@talk21.com

Peter Morffew
July 2010

2
Historical influences
The historical events that have affected earlier generations of Morffews was
considerable.
Prior to 1066 the tribes in Britain were under constant pressure from invaders
such as the Saxons, Angles and Vikings ( Danes ) to name a few.

Prior to the invasion of 1066 Normans ranged across Europe, from London to
Southern Italy and across to Constantinople and also in the Iberian Peninsula.
After the invasion of England in 1066 some of the barons rebelled and had
their land forfeited. Henry I promoted those of humbler origin to higher office
and some Norman knights fell out of favour.

In the Middle Ages the Black Death killed some 40% of the European
population and there were those who contracted Leprosy.
Later in 1665 there was the great plague which again killed large numbers,
especially in London.

Wars prevailed across Europe. The 100 years war between France and
England, in England there was the Wars of the Roses.
There were wars in Italy and the Mongols invaded from the East as far as
Vienna and Poland.
Not forgetting the Crusades which was the largest migration in the Middle
Ages from Europe involving about 1,000,000 people.

Large numbers took up the cross and set off for the Holy Land to undertake
their vows or to fight the Moors in Spain.
A Crusade not only involved the knights and the men at arms but the camp
followers, family, fortune seekers and robbers.

There were the Crusades of Northern Europe which Crusaders from across
Europe embarked on, some annually to fight the pagan tribes in Lithuania
and Latvia.

Those that embarked on the Crusades took on a great risk. It is estimated that
just 25% survived the 3rd Crusade.

Various military orders such as the Knights Templars, Knights Hospitalers


were formed where individuals served across Europe and in the Holy Land.

There were famines across Europe in 1272, 1277, 1283, 1292 and 1311 and
crops failed across European and large numbers died as a result.

3
With all of this activity affecting the European population no wonder it is hard
to find where individuals might have originated from especially when
individuals and families died enroute to the Holy Land or from the Black Death
and buried in mass graves without any record.

Large numbers of people migrated in the Middle Ages over land and by sea.
Some Normans that travelled south to fight for the Lombards in Italy migrated
back to Normandy for the invasion of 1066.

There were a wide variety of accents and languages. Two types of French
was spoken in the North and South of France in the Middle Ages, L’oil and
Doc with both having trouble understanding each other.
Second and third generation Normans in Italy would have acquired an Italian
accent making some words sound different when pronounced and possibly
misspelt. Names could be mispronounced and misspelt hence the different
ways to spell Morffew, Morfou, Morfewe, etc. especially if the original name
was spelt as it is in Italy to day, Morfu.

In the 1600s there was the mass migration of the Huguenots and the Muslims
from Spain.
English, Scottish and Irish served in Europe either for England or in foreign
service such as Holland and Austria.

4
About the Morffew name
In the 1960s I came across a dictionary of surnames in a library. Morffew was
described as an old Barbaric name. This description seems to have been
dropped and the present day quote below is the general description for the
Morffew name.

‘Recorded in many forms although all are quite rare, and including Maffie,
Maffey, Maffy, Morfey, Morphey, Morffew, Morphew, Murphew. It is believed
to originate from the pre 7th century word 'malfe' meaning ill-omened, and
used as a term of abuse applied to the devil or an enemy of some sort.
It is said to have been given by the famous Crusader knights of the 12th
century to the Saracens or Muslims in the Holy Land. However the surname
already existed at that time, original name holders having accompanied
William, Duke of Normandy in his Conquest of England in 1066’

Other references in the Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial words dated 1559

”Morphew… A Leprous erution on the face A morpheu or statnying of the


skynne”
Quote 1450 Agnus Castus 125/111
“with pat anoynteth cloth rubbe be Morfu and be place per be zowthis…and
be morfu andbe skurfe schall falle awaey.

Records in England are post the Norman invasion and most are post the First
Crusade such as “Wido Malfeth” in 1130.

The Modern day Morffew seems to have transformed from earlier spellings
prior to the 1500s
Morffew is peculiar to England and of those who migrated from England to the
USA, Canada and Australia.

The 1911 United Kingdom census shows the PH version more prominent out
of the various forms of spelling the name ( 450 ), in the 1911 census there
are less than 500 people with the name Morffew and Morphew, there were no
returns for the name Morfew. This is out of a population of 36 Million.

The census of 1841 shows Morffew, Morphew and Morfews mainly in London
and the surrounding counties, especially to the west.
The 1911 census shows that some Morphews had migrated to the Midlands
and North of England but the Morffews has stayed in the London area

The different forms of spelling might have come about because Britain was
involved in several wares since the 1500s.*1
In the 1700s Latin was still used by the Armies of Europe so that Officers of
different nationalities could communicate. Most rank soldiers were illiterate
and could not spell their own name.

5
Further name changes might have happened during the Napoleonic Wars
when large numbers of British troops served in Spain and France.

Today in Europe the name Morfu is found in Spain, Italy, Portugal and
France.
This would indicate that the ‘F’ rather than the ‘PH’ is the original way to spell
the name.
That is if there is any connection with the French, Portuguese, Spanish, Italian
and English similar sounding names.
Also there is the Greek name Morfi also found in the US as well as Greece.

All of these names sound similar to the town name, Morphou in Cyprus.
There is a discrepancy whether Morphou should be spelt with a PH or a F.

After the 1600s a lot of Europeans migrated to the New World and today
Morffews and those with similar sounding names can be found in America’s
and Australia.

Looking for references to those with the name Morffew and any variants and
individuals turn up such as the Frenchman , Charles Morfu in 1618 travelled
with the Italian satirist and Canon who had written some poems about the
Pope and his family.
Charles Morfu revealed the indentity of the Canon to would be robbers who
kidnapped him and he was taken to the Papal Palace at Avignon.

Today Morffew has been misspelt in numerous ways and there is no reason
why this should not have been different in previous centuries when the
population was not so literate. We must not forget the name might have an
American spelling connotation where it was misspelt when the person
migrated in previous centuries or acquired an American slant.

Some surname dictionaries refer to the Morphue or Morpheas.


This is a rare skin condition commonly known to day as Localised
Scleroderma.
Morphorea or Morphea is a red or purple blemish or patch that affects 1 in
1,000 people.
There are treaties on how to detect the difference between Bubonic Plague,
Leprosy and Morphorea.
For those with Morphorea instead of Leprosy or Bubonic Plague might have
been referred to as Morfues.

Morphue was used as a insulting term for Saracens and Muslims which
indicates a connection with the Crusades.
The abusive term might have been used for Mercenaries serving in foreign
armies and in the Levant such as the English Free Company based in Pisa
In 1318 Philip V of France considered the Flemish who were French enemies
to be as bad as the Saracens so the Christians could be held in contempt
similarly as the Saracens.

6
1
* British and Portuguese troops defended Tangiers from 1500 for the next 30
years.The Wars of Spanish Succession in 1700 The War of Austrian Succession
1740, The 1st and 2nd Silesian War 740-45, The Seven Years War 1756 – 63 the
first world war, The American War of Independence and the French
Revolutionary Wars in 1795

Morffew as a medical term


In the middle ages Morphue was used as a medical term for a skin blemish.
This might have close links to determine if a person has Leprosy or a skin
complaint such as heat rash.
This term could have come about with the Crusading order of St. Lazarus.

This order was a group of Knights who had contracted leprosy and were
banished from their own orders, such as the Knights Templars.
The Order of St. Lazarus was formed to allow knights to carry on their duty as
knights if they wished to.
The Knights of the Order of St. Lazarus had their own community and
accommodation in Jerusalem and Acre and actively took part in the defence
of these cities in the Levant.
The Order of St. Lazarus had Papal ascent and communes were set up
across Europe especially in France. There were even a small community in
The Kingdom of Cyprus. Later to be absorbed by the Order of the Knights
Hospitalers.

The knights who formed part of the Order of St. Lazarus were referred to
Lazarites or Lepers. None seemed to be refered to as Morphues.

The Order was set up in the same way as the other orders such as the
Knights Templars with their men at arms etc.
There were also knights who volunteered to work along side the Lazarites.
These were not Lepers but healthy knights who would care for them if the
need arose.
These healthy knights might have been referred to as Morphues.
With so little documention about the Order of Lazarus there is not be
sufficient evidence

7
Anglo Saxon England
Looking at England prior to the Norman invasion there was the Kingdom of
Hwicce which covered the area of Warwickshire, Worcestershire and
Gloustershire.
The Kingdom of Hwicce came under the rule of Aethelbald, king of the
Mercians and the South Angli.

Aethelbald ruled over a large area that stretched from Staffordshire down to
Oxfordshire and parts of Kent and possibly Essex. Aethelbald is also referred
to as the King of London.

In the Kingdom of Hwicce was the Morfe Forest, also called the Great Morfe
Forest.
There is reference to this forest in a charter from Aethelbald to Cyneberht for
10 hides at Ismere by the river Stour and Land at Brochyl in Morfe Forest for
the construction of a minster.
This minster has been thought of as the beginnings of Kidderminster.

Even though Morfe Forest does not exist today there is Morfe Lane and off
this lane is Morfe House Farm and Little Morfe. Leading from Morfe Lane is
Morfe Hall Lane which leads to Morfe Hall Farm.
These are on ordinance survey maps and can be seen on Google Earth.
Also close by is a Essex Wood

In the area of Morfe Lane and what was Morfe Forest are burial mounds that
show a considerable settlement of people.
These people who lived in Morfe Forest might have been referred to as
Morfes or those who are from Morfe.

Aethelbald actively protected his realm and fought in Wessex as well.


Being a king of such a large area the people of Morfe might have travelled
with him and also fought with him.
Aethelbald travelled around his realm to collect taxes and to over see justice.
This would explain the demographic distribution of Morffews from Shropshire
down to Kent.

The Wolverhampton archives and local studies 1851 census street index
shows that there was a place called Morfe, Morfe Farm, Morfe Hall, Morfe
Heath House and Morfe lane. Even though Morfe Forest had been cleared by
1851 the name Morfe showed how prominent this area must have been.

8
The Google image shows just a few buildings today and this might have been
the result of the industrial revolution when people left the country side to work
in the towns and cities.

Morfa in modern Welsh means marsh. This is spelt Morfeydd and would
suggest the name dates back to the Britons and Celts prior to any Anglo
Saxon invasion.
The Briton Celts in this area were displaced by the Anglo Saxons and fled to
Wales and Cornwall.
Later some of these Briton Celts migrated to North West France ( Breton)
and North West Spain ( Gallaecia ) .

Looking at the census from the late 19th century there is not a nucleus of
Morffew’s, Morphews or morfew’s in the area of Morfe Forest.

Ordinance Survey map of Morfe lane


and farms

9
Drawn map of Morfe Forest
and the surrounding villages
dates circ 1500
Note the French way of writing Morfe Forest

10
Map of the Great Forests and
Chases in Shropshire

11
Europe Pre 1066
Prior to the Norman invasion of 1066 the opportunity for European Christians
to come into contact with Muslims was relatively easy.
Muslim invaders ( Moors ) had crossed over to the Iberian Peninsula ( Spain )
and establish a Mulsim state in 600 AD.
The Moors carried out sorties over the Pyrenees into France. These became
so bold that they managed to push the Franks ( French ) as far back as
Poitiers into a small enclave.
The Franks in a concerted effort pushed the Moors out of France and
establish a Christian strip on the Spanish side of the Pyrenees.

The Christians and Moors fought to maintain their states. Many Christian
soldiers and Knights joined the Reconquista.
Many of these Knights were Norman mercenaries trying to carve out their
own state from the wars.

Below: The map shows the extent of the Moor territory in Spain 1000 AD
Moor region in green.

12
The Normans in Italy created their own states and built their own Castles and
towers in the County of Calabria and County of Aversa.

The extent of the Norman territory was small in 1059 but was later to cover all
of Southern Italy just south of Rome as they forced the Byzantines out of Italy.
the maps below show the progress of the Normans in Southern Italy.

13
Once the Italian Normans created the Duchy of Apulia and Calabria they
turned to Sicily where the Muslim raiders frequently attacked the Italian coast
line.
The Normans initially attacked in 1061 but returned to Italy.
In 1064 The Normans returned and attacked Polermo.
The fighting was had going but the Normans captured Sicily in 1076.

At the same time Western Knights volunteered to serve in the Byzantine


Imperial Army as mercenaries. Some of these Knights were Normans, as well
as Franks and other nationalities including Anglo Saxons who fled the
Norman invasion in 1066.
These western mercenaries fought Muslims, Turks and other invading tribes.

Whilst in the service of the Byzantine Empire some of the western knights
learnt Greek and a few managed to learn Arabic.

Normans who had fought in Italy as mercenaries invaded Sicily, a Muslim


state. These Normans were invited by local monarchs to fight against the
Saracens and Moors that plagued the Italian Coast line.
Also Italian Normans fought in the Reconquista in Spain

Christian Knights in Europe also fought pagans and infidels such as Vikings,
Goths, Saxons, Livs and other European tribes.

The phrase pagans and infidels became a general term used for all enemies
of Christianity at the time and this might have included those who were to be
considered the enemy at that time regardless of their religion.

The opportunity for Morfue to become a derogatory name prior to the 1066
invasion was quite considerable but with so many enemies referred to as
pagans or infidels there should be more people with the name Morffew and its
variants across Europe rather than a few concentrated in England and a few
other countries in Europe.

14
The Norman invasion 1066
It is considered that the Morffew name in England has its origins from the
Norman invasion.
Morffew is a Frank or Latin sounding name and possibly first appears when
a knight Mengle et Maufe is referred to in the Roll at Battel Abbey.
But this name cannot be found on the plaque in the church in Dives-sur-Mer in
Normandy where Williams invading army took mass before sailing for
England.

William the Conqueror’s invasion of England was not just a Norman affair.
William recruited his invading army from Northern Europe and included
Flemish, Breton and Picardy soldiers and knights. Also a few Germans and
Danes and Normans from Southern Italy.
The Normans from Southern Italy had experience of transporting horses by
ship when they invaded Sicliy and William needed their help with the invasion
of England.
.
A third of Williams invading army was from Breton who spoke a different
language to the Normans.
The various nations in Northern Europe and also the Normans across Europe
knew of the invasion and band’s of soldiers and individuals thronged to
Williams cause in a hope of land and fortune.

The Normans in Italy are of particular interest. These were landless Normans
who travelled south in search of their fortune in 1017.

15
They hired themselves out as Mercenaries in Italy, especially to the Lombards
who had occasional conflicts with neighbouring states and also the Muslims in
Sicily.
Norman knights even fought against the Papal State and were also hired by
the Pope.
The first wave of Normans who fought in Southern Italy managed carved out
their own state from captured Byzantine territory which had Papal blessing in
1059. This Norman state was divided into 6 baronet’s one was Melfi the
capital.
The Normans In Southern Italy and the Pope were the only people in Europe
at the time who supported Williams invasion of England.
Could Mengle et Maufe have come from Melfi?

When the Normans turned their attention to Sicily in 1060, a Muslim state they
had to rely on the Neapolitans to build the boats to get across to Sicily.
Normans also fought in Spain against the Moors and abusive term Morfue
could have been in general use by 1066.

The Normans would not have been able to build the alleged 700 ships and a
large number of skiffs and small boats to act as ferries. This made up the fleet
of some 3000 vessel’s for the invasion of England and must have had help
from other skilled boat builders from across Europe.

Having built these boats their skills might have been used to reconstruct the
forts erected by the Anglo Saxons under Alfred the Great. Alfred embarked on
a defence programme that involved all those living in England to be ready to
fight for the King and he also had a series of forts built across Southern
England.
Because of this William had a ready made defence system in case of any
rebellion.

After defeating the Anglo Saxons at Hastings William imposed his rule with a
scorched earth policy from the first day he landed and as he advanced on
London his army burnt crops, destroyed villages and killed the inhabitants.
Those that survived must have fled to the forests.

Looking at Norman, Flemish, Picardy and Breton names none seem to sound
similar to Morffew.
Normans tended to adapt their name to where they controlled, ruled or lived.
The Normans would have changed their names once they arrived in England
making it difficult to trace any relation they might have had in Normandy or
any where else in Europe.

When looking at names sounding similar to their trades or craft the only one
could be similar is the fort builders.
The Norman forts were build on a mound which had to be constructed.
These mounds were called Motte which the word moat is derived from this.
The people who designed Motte might have been named after their trade and
a modern name similar to Motte is Mowat.

16
After the Normans invaded the Domesday Book was compiled, a list of the
land in England and people who owned it.

The Domesday book does not seem to list any name similar to Morffew but
there is a Ansculf de Pencheny ( Ausculph of Picquisgny ), a Picardy
adventurer who was granted lordships in various counties*2. One of note is
Staffordshire where there is a Morfe House Farm, Morfe Hall farm and Little
Morfe all off Morfe lane.
Also close by was the Morfe Forest. This Forest had become mooreland by
1700
Morfe Forest became a Medieval Royal Forest in East Shropshire.
At its core was a wood that stretched from Bridgnorth to Six Ashes ( Near
Enville ) and Claverley.
The forest was preambled in 1300 and the boundary recorded.

Once William had invaded England the Bretons settled in East Anglia, Suffolk,
Northumbria( Richmond) and the west country ( Devon, Cornwall, Wessex ).
Two of these regions ( East Anglia and Suffolk ) had a concentration of
Morffews in the 1841 census.

In 1076 Bretons in East Anglia rebelled against Williams rule and they
forfeited their land and some were executed. Their land was redistributed to
those more faithful
It could be possible these knights were taken off the rolls at Battel Abbey.

In 1085 King Canute IV of Denmark gathered a large fleet to invade England.


William got to hear of this and recruited a large army of Normans and
Mercenaries which was said to be larger than the one of 1066.
This army could not be sustained in one area and was distributed across the
country with different counts.
Canute died that year and the invasion never came but Williams large army
stayed.
This brought about the Domesday book which was drawn up so William could
see how many soldiers could be sustained in each area of England.
One thing all of these invaders from Northern Europe had in common was
being able to speak or understand French.
Taking control of England the Normans dictated that French would be the
lingua franca of the courts and administration.
French stayed in use for a number of centuries in England, even Henry 1st and
Richard 1st spoke French and was related to Norman nobility.

Because French was used by the nobility it can be assumed that French
generic terms were used such as when using abusive language as well as
place names taking on a French sound.

*2 Warwickshire, Berkshire, Middlesex, Oxfordshire, Huntingdonshire,


Cambridgeshire, Surrey, Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Staffordshire
and Worcestershire.

17
Crusades
Pre Crusades
Christians from all over Europe had been going on pilgrimages to Jerusalem
for over a hundred years before the First Crusade.
In 999 Norman’s returning from the Holy Land assisted the Lombards to fight
Saracens and Moors marauding the coast.
These Normans were invited to stay but carried on back to Normandy to tell
others about the request.
As well as Pilgrimages Europeans had traded with the cities and ports where
spices and silks were traded and bought back to the Capitals of Europe.
When the first Crusade arrived in Tyre the Crusaders had found that Genoans
and English had already taken the city.

First Crusade1095

Just 29 years after Williams invasion of England the First Crusade set off for
the Levant
Some of the Crusaders in 1095 were sons of the Normans who came across
in 1066. One such crusader was the son of Geoffrey I Boterel, Conan who
was killed in 1098.

The first Crusade records a Morphoria of Melitene .

Morphoria of Melitene was a Armenian Princess who married Baldwin II and


became Queen of Jerusalem. Baldwin II a Norman took the title off King of
Jerusalem.
The First Crusades comprised of Franks ( French ), Germans, Spanish and
Normans. These Normans came from different regions across Europe.

18
A large army joined in Normandy which included some English Normans.
When the Crusading army arrived in Southern Italy they arrived as the
Normans in Italy were laying siege to Amelfi, the coastal town. A large number
of these Normans joined the Crusade.
With so many Normans forming part of the First crusade it has been
suggested that it could be termed a Norman Crusade.
Especially when the Pope gave his blessing for the Crusade in Melfi.

The Crusaders arrived in Constantinople and their first mission was to relieve
Edessa which they did with ease. Then they took Jerusalem.
Prior to this a group of 9 French Knights met with Baldwin II to offer their
services to escort pilgrims around the Levant ( Holy Land ). Baldwin II gave
his blessing as did the Pope.
Born were the Knights Templars. Knights Templars were recruited from all
over Europe over the next few years.

The 9 Knights took up residency in Jerusalem in the Temple of the Mount.


Close by Morphoria of Melitene took up residency.

After taking Jerusalem Crusaders settled in the Levant ( Holy Land )


establishing Christian rule in Palestine.
Crusaders and Christians lived cheek by jowl with the Muslims and other
indigenous groups in the Levant.
The Crusaders adopted some of the local customs and dress and they could
have been termed as going native.

The Crusaders built towns and castles and established new communities.
The Crusaders even intermarried into local indigenous communities.
The intermarried off spring might have had a more Arab or Mediterranean skin
tone which attracted the abusive phrase “ Morphue “ which became a
Crusader racist phrase.

There is a reference to a “Wido Malpeth in 1130 who it is alleged was married


to “Tower Malpeth “ who had some connection with the Tower of London.
The stone for the Tower of London was transported from France.
Being connected with such a prominent land mark Tower Malfeth might have
been asked to travel on the First Crusade to help build new or improve castles
in the Holy Land.
Wido Malpeth might have been mentioned as a person of some standing, i.e.
owning land because she would possibly have inherited the land left by her
husband if he died on the Crusades.

Second Crusade 1147


On the Second Crusade, One of the largest armies assembled at any time in
Europe was divided into three units. The French and German columns
marched across Europe into Byzantium. The third unit, a naval one set out
from English ports which comprised of Flemish, Bretons and English ships
and troops.
The English force was large and some had experience of fighting in the
Iberian Peninsula.

19
These English Crusaders came from East Anglia, Kent, London and Cornwall.

On route to the Holy Land this naval force stopped to capture Lisbon in
Portugal.
The siege lasted from May to October with the Crusaders prevailing.
Some of the English contingent settled in Lisbon.
After this English were actively encouraged to settle in Portugal by Alfonso 1
and large numbers of English migrated to Portugal to help fight the Moors.

After Lisbon the naval force sailed to Catalonia and capture Tortosa and again
some of the English Crusaders settled here and became wealthy.

There is a interesting correlation between the counties the English soldiers


and Sailors came from and the geographic distribution of Morffews, Morfews
and Morphews in England. The 1841 census shows the same counties where
soldiers and sailors embarked on the 2nd Crusade also have the name
Morffew, Morphew and Morfew.

Third Crusade 1190 - 1191


The Third Crusade saw large numbers of English embark for the Holy Land.
Richard 1st had huge funds and hired large numbers of troops from England
and in the Holy Land.
Richard also had his own fleet which enabled him to invade Cyprus.
There does not seem to be any reason why the English might have acquired
the name Morffew.
As a result of the Third Crusade the Kingdom of Cyprus was established and
some English soldiers might have been recruited to serve here rather than
return to England.

Fourth Crusade 1203

The fourth Crusade did not have any significant numbers of English. This was
mainly a French Crusade which instead of sailing to the Holy Land went
straight to Constantinople and laid siege to it.
Even though the Pope was angered at this the Fourth Crusade set a trend for
future Crusades where large number of Mercenaries were employed.

20
The Kingdom of Cyprus
Whilst Googling the name Morphou I
came across a Jean De Morphou,
1330 – 1385.
He was the richest Baron in the Kingdom of
Cyprus.
His daughter married Hughue, The King of
Jerusalem and Cyprus

Jean de Morphou’s full title was Jean de


Morpho Count of Edessa and Rochas,
Marshall of Cyprus and married to Echiva.
The Marshall of Cyprus was responsible for
the Kingdom of Cyprus mercenaries in battle.

The Morpho Baronage coat of arms was a Black


Lion on a yellow back ground, ( Lion Argent shield Or )
Which dates back to the early 1300s.

Jean De Morphou is also alleged to have had a affair


Morphou coat of Arms
with Eleanor Queen of Avignon making him possibly
very well connected.

Jean De Morphou served with distinction in Alexandria on the 1365 Crusade.

Jean De Morphou was a chief negotiator for the Cypriots when they rebelled
in Cyprus which makes him prominent in the local politics of Cyprus at the
time.

21
According to Lenitos Makkarias he was corrupted by the
Genoese by a offer to help his son in law Hughue of Lusignan
take over the Kingdom of Cyprus.

Jean de Morphou did not have any male heirs and so the direct line died with
him.
Hughe and Marie did not have any children and it seems that the Morphou
line died out.

Even though counties and cities in the Levant were lost to the Saracens titles
referring to these lost Regions were still handed on by the King of Cyprus
In recognition of service.
Knights and lesser men had titles indicative of their ancestry such as Thomas
of Picquigny and James of Fleury were refered to as knights of Acre and
Peter Le Jaune was described as a Knight of Tripoli in late 1323.
There is no reason why this tradition did not carry on with knights and lesser
men adopting titles connected with the Kingdom Cyprus such as Morphou
and the nobility in the Kingdom like Jean de Morphou.
The first record of de Morphou is in early 13th century. A Lawrence de Plessy
was knighted at Morphou and adopted the title de Morphou as well as his
descendants.

Morphou and the Morphou


region in Cyprus

Lawrence de Plessy was from a English crusading family and includes Hugh
and Richard de Plessy.
Richard de Plessy was the royal keeper of parks.
The de Plessy linage came with William Duke of Normandy in 1066.

Jean de Morphou had no heirs and his line died out but the de Morphou title
was adopted by the de Grignier family in the early 15th century.
This seemed to have caused a dispute because the Morphou region was a
royal estate.

* * * * *

22
The Kingdom of Cyprus came about when Richard 1st invaded Cyprus but
did not want to the trouble of ruling a country whilst on campaign
so he sold Cyprus to the Knights Templar’s.
The Templar’s could not control the local population after they revolted
against the Templar’s treatment.

The Templars gave Cyprus back to Richard and he passed Cyprus onto Guy
de Lusignan.
Guy de Lusignan was related to Richard who was a Crusader nobleman from
the 1st Crusade.

Guy invited Franks and Crusaders who left the Levant ( The Holy Land ) after
the Saracens invaded to settle in Cyprus. The Franks were given land and
owed allegiance to the King of Cyprus.
This established the Kingdom of Cyprus as a Crusader nation where
Crusaders could rally and set off on future Crusades.

Because the Franks ( French) were the nobility in the Kingdom of Cyprus
French was the lingua franca of the courts and records.
Later Greek and Italian was used for recording of tax where Greek for the
indigenous Cypriots, Italian for the Neopolitan, Venetian and Genoan
merchants.
It was even suggested that all Crusades should be lead by a French
nobleman.

The population of Cyprus initially was the indigenous Greeks and those who
had to leave the mainland as cities and castles fell to the Turks and Saracens.
These were mainly French ( Franks ), Italians and Spanish.

Over the next century the Cypriot population increased and became very
cosmopolitan.
The population comprised of Franks ( French ) who were the nobility in the
Kingdom of Cyprus. Germans, Italians, Spanish, Portuguese, Syrians,
Maronites, Ethiopians, Indians, Georgians, some English, Venetians,
Genoese, Burgandians and the indigenous Greeks. Also there were the
Knights Templars, Hospitalers and at one time the Order of St. Lazaus.
Some of these would have been in the employed in the service of Jean De
Morphou.

When future Crusades were launched such as the seventh Crusade under
Peter 1 the population increased because of the influx of Mercenaries and
Crusaders from all over Europe where Peter 1 had spent three years
recruiting.
This army comprised of Templars, Hospitalers, English archers, Italian
Crossbowmen and French men at arms. As well as Knights from Europe.
There was also the New Holy Order of the Sword, a mercenary force formed
by Peter1 for the recapture of the Levant and Jerusalem.
When the Turks invaded Armenia, a territory associated with the Kingdom of
Cyprus the rich Armenians fled to Cyprus increasing the population further.

23
When we talk about the Crusaders we must not forget the camp followers and
also the families. People who settled in the Holy Land and Cyprus would
have had children who would not have known any other life.

As well as the Military side of Kingdom of Cyprus life the commerce and trade
was busy.
Cyprus was a major producer and exporter of Sugar and Cotton.
These commodities were in great demand across Europe and also for the
Crusaders who would stop off in Cyprus for supplies.
Sugar helped to make the Kingdom of Cyprus one of the richest countries in
the Middle Ages Europe.
The sugar was formed into a distinctive hat shape which might have been
referred to a Morphou sugar when other regions started to produce more
refined sugar.

After 1365 Europeans raided the coast line around the eastern Mediterranean
and took to piracy and became rich from their proceeds.
This provoked the Marmeloukes to attack Cyprus in the same way capturing
Christians and selling them as slaves in Alexandria.

1425 Marmaloukes attacked Farmagusta which put the Franks into disarray
and they retreated leaving the Marmaloukes to pillage.
The native Cypriots took advantage of the vacuum caused by the Franks
retreating into the Troudos Mountains.

The Frank rule in the Kingdom of Cyprus ended in 1589 when the Venetians
took control in payment for their support of the Kingdom of Cyprus Monarchy.
Franks had their land redistributed .

In 1570 the Ottomans attacked Cyprus and annexed the Kingdom.


The Latin population were either expelled or converted to Islam.
The Greek Orthodox faith was restored.

24
Final thoughts
Google the name Morffew, Morfew or Morphew and the search includes UK,
America, Australia and Canada.
The Name Morfu shows a predominance for Spain and Italy, along with some
in France, Portugal and South American Spanish speaking countries.
Morfi is found in Greece and the US. All of these names are rare.

This begs the question how can so many people from various nations around
the world have a similar sounding name as the town of Morphou in Cyprus
which was the title of one of the most prominent Barons in the Kingdom of
Cyprus on the 1365 Crusade.
Cyprus being a centre for Crusades in the Middle Ages where people from all
Christian nations flocked.

Morffew is a French, Frank sounding name which is why the name in England
is associated with the Norman invasion of 1066. Mengel et Maufe arrived with
William and it is believed he might have been the originator of the name.
This does not explain the other Morfu’s in Italy, Spain and France.
The second army that William brought over in 1085 does not seem to record
any names. These were lesser Normans and mercenaries, some might have
come from Southern Italy and Melfi.

The language written and spoken in The Kingdom of Cyprus was French.
The tradition of adopting the name or title of the baron or town within the
Kingdom of Cyprus after a successful campaign would have been keenly
taken up. Those who had arrived in Cyprus after the fall of the Levant still
referred to themselves as of Jerusalem, Tyre, Acre and other towns.
Those who arrived in Cyprus from Europe after the fall of the Levant might

25
have been given the name of the region or Baron in Cyprus to stop them
adopting that name of a Levant town.

The name Morffew and those names that sound similar originate from the
countries that went on the Crusades and individuals volunteered to fight for
the Kingdom of Cyprus especially on the 1365 Crusade when Alexandria was
attacked.
Peter 1 recruited across Europe. English, Spanish, Italians and French joined
his cause. Others joined his Crusade including the Knights Templars and
those who joined the Order of the Sword.
This successful attack was celebrated throughout Europe for the great victory
against Islam which was praised by the Pope and the courts across Europe.
In England a lament was composed to celebrate the attack on Alexandria.

On returning the soldiers, knights and sergeant at arms who served under
Jean de Morphou would have been hailed as hero’s. Some might have been
invited to talk of their adventure after returning with their silks, satins and gold.
Because of their celebrity status some might have adopted the title Morphou
to show they had been present or were given the title/name by those who
listened to their story especially the nobility.
This would explain the demographic spread of the name Morfu, Morffew,
Morphew, etc across Europe today.
In the 1841 United Kingdom census the name Morffew and Morphew
predominates around the counties of Kent, Sussex, Surrey, Suffolk, London
and Hampshire. The counties that may Crusaders volunteered from.

The alternative reason for the Morphue name is that Morphue being a
derogatory term for the Saracens and Muslims but why would Crusaders
attract the same abuse. There were various terms of abuse used for those
who travelled to the Levant and also for those who lived in the Levant but one
are like Morphou.

If the name Morffew is associated with the term for a blemish which affects
1/1000 there would surely be more Morffews than just the few in the 1841
census..

Looking at the online database for the English who served in the Hundred
Years War there is no record of any Morffews or any name that sounds
similar. This would possibly indicate the name Morffew and any variant might
be post Hundred Years War when English soldiers were hired across Europe
in Italy, Burgundy and in the Kingdom of Cyprus especially for the attack on
Alexandra in Egypt.

There does not seem to be any correlation between the Forest of Morfe and
the name Morffew. In the 1800s most Morffews lived in the South especially in
the London area. Also it would not account for the number of Morfu’s in Spain,
Italy and France

26
This work is not finished and the search goes on for the possible source of the
name Morffew.
It seems that maybe by looking at the Crusades and the Kingdom of Cyprus
we might have metaphorically come face to face with our ancestors.

Morffew demographics in England


Looking at the on line records for those who served England in the 100 Years
War there is no record of any Morffew, Morphew, Morfu, Morphue, Malfe to
date.

There is a interesting correlation with those who went on the 2nd Crusade and
the counties that Morffews, Morfew and Morphews appear in the 1841
census.

The English census prior to 1900 shows that Morffew and Morphew in
England and Wales is not a common name.
The name is not common in the United States either.
The census figures below show the numbers returned from the Federal
Census of 1830 to 1930.

The Morfu name is found in Southern Italy from Rome southwards.


In Spain, Portugal and thinly Spread across France.
The name also occurs in Spanish speaking South American countries,
especially Argentina.

Morphew
1830 = 5, 1850 = 56, 1860 = 91, 1870 = 119, 1880 = 128, 1900 = 331,
1910 = 379, 1920 = 516, 1930 = 598.

Morffew shows three records over this whole period.

The records do not show a mass exodus to America in the 19th century. There
is a steady growth in the Morffew, Morfew and Morphew population.

27
Murphew seems to be a corruption of the Morffew name. It does not appear in
England and Wales census records before 1900

Prior to 1900 there are no records for Morffew or Morphew in Australia,


Canada or New Zealand.

Looking at the Morfu name in Portugal, Spain, France and Italy there are very
few which would indicate again a rare name.
It is equally rare in South America with most in Argentina and Brazil. This
would indicate a possible later migration in the 20th century rather than in
the 19th century.

Prior to these census records records have been published of the names of
those who served in France during the 100 years war. There are no
Morffew, Morfew, Morphew or Morfue listed.

A list of Census records showing


Morffew, Morphew and Morfew

Morffew in the 1911 Census

Institution,
Household
or Vessel
Name
Birth
Year
Age
Sex
Registration District
County

Household
MORFFEW, Clara Ann
1870
41
F
Aston
Warwickshire

Household
MORFFEW, Elizabeth
1874
37
F
Richmond
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, Emma
1855
56
F
Paddington
London

28
Household
MORFFEW, Emma
1879
32
F
Chelsea
London

Household
MORFFEW, Emma
1908
3
F
Chelsea
London

Household
MORFFEW, Emma Alice
1859
52
F
Reading
Berkshire

Household
MORFFEW, Frances
1866
45
F
St George
London

Household
MORFFEW, Frederick
1911
0
M
Chelsea
London

Household
MORFFEW, Frederick George
1880
31
M
Richmond
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, Frederick Robert
1906
5
M
Richmond
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, George
1856
55
M
Paddington
London

Household

29
MORFFEW, George
1906
5
M
Chelsea
London

Household
MORFFEW, George
1887
24
M
Chelsea
London

Household
MORFFEW, George Henry
1890
21
M
Hackney
London

Household
MORFFEW, Harriet
1851
60
F
Chelsea
London

Household
MORFFEW, Helen Moore
1874
37
F
Fulham
London

Household
MORFFEW, Henry
1846
65
M
Chelsea
London

Household
MORFFEW, Henry
1902
9
M
Chelsea
London

Household
MORFFEW, Henry J
1877
34
M
Chelsea
London

Household
MORFFEW, Isabella Ann
1849

30
62
F
Edmonton
Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Ivy Mary
1901
10
F
Fulham
London

Household
MORFFEW, James
1860
51
M
Aston
Warwickshire

Household
MORFFEW, James William
1888
23
M
Aston
Warwickshire

Household
MORFFEW, Jane
1854
57
F
Kingston
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, Kathleen
1886
25
F
Paddington
London

Household
MORFFEW, Kim Alice Louisa
1911
0
F
Chelsea
London

Household
MORFFEW, Lilian
1882
29
F
Paddington
London

Household
MORFFEW, Nellie
1889
22
F

31
Chelsea
London

Household
MORFFEW, Robert
1856
55
M
Kingston
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, Robert Samuel
1881
30
M
Kingston
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, Rose
1893
18
F
Kingston
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, Rose
1889
22
F
Brentford
Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Thomas
1878
33
M
Fulham
London

Household
MORFFEW, Vilalet
1885
26
F
Kingston
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, Walter William
1885
26
M
Paddington
London

Household
MORFFEW, William Keats
1899
12
M
Edmonton
Middlesex

32
Household
MORFFEW, Willie
1895
16
M
Kingston
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, Winnifeed Phoebe
1902
9
F
Fulham
London

Morffew in 1871 census

Institution,
Household
or Vessel
Name
Birth
Year
Age
Sex
Registration District
County

Household
MORFFEW, Alice
1857
14
F
Chelsea
London, Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Ann
1825
46
F
Chelsea
London, Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Annie
1853
18
F
Chelsea
London, Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Eliza

33
1868
3
F
Chelsea
London, Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Elizabeth
1850
21
F
Reading
Berkshire

Household
MORFFEW, Emily
1860
11
F
Chelsea
London, Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Emma A
1859
12
F
Reading
Berkshire

Household
MORFFEW, Fanny E
1866
5
F
Reading
Berkshire

Household
MORFFEW, George
1856
15
M
Reading
Berkshire

Household
MORFFEW, Henry
1821
50
M
Chelsea
London, Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Henry
1846
25
M
Chelsea
London, Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Henry W
1854
17

34
M
Reading
Berkshire

Household
MORFFEW, Louisa M
1862
9
F
Reading
Berkshire

Household
MORFFEW, Mary A
1822
49
F
Reading
Berkshire

Household
MORFFEW, Mary Ann
1859
12
F
Chelsea
London, Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Sarah
1862
9
F
Chelsea
London, Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, William J
1820
51
M
Reading
Berkshire

Institution,
Household
or Vessel
Name
Birth
Year
Age
Sex
Registration District
County

Household
MORFFEW, Anna M
1850
1
F
Westminster

35
Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Elizabeth
1798
53
F
Westminster
Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Elizabeth
1850
1
F
Saint George in the East
Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Emma
1846
5
F
Westminster
Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Henry
1794
57
M
Kingston
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, Jane
1843
8
F
Westminster
Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Maria
1835
16
F
Westminster
Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Mary Ann
1824
27
F
Saint George in the East
Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Robert
1833
18
M
Kingston
Surrey

36
Household
MORFFEW, Sarah
1797
54
F
Kingston
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, Thomas
1794
57
M
Westminster
Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, William
1820
31
M
Saint
Middlesex

Morffew in 1841 census

Institution,
Household
or Vessel
Name
Birth
Year
Age
Sex
Registration District
County

Household
MORFFEW, Elizabeth
1796
45
F
Holborn
Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, George
1826
15
M
Holborn
Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Hannah
1826
15
F
Holborn
Middlesex

37
Household
MORFFEW, Harriett
1826
15
F
Kingston
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, Henry
1796
45
M
Kingston
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, Henry
1821
20
M
Kingston
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, James
1828
13
M
Holborn
Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, Robert
1834
7
M
Kingston
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, Sarah
1796
45
F
Kingston
Surrey

Household
MORFFEW, William
1791
50
M
Holborn
Middlesex

Household
MORFFEW, William
1821
20
M
Holborn
Middlesex

38
1911 Census shows a record of 450 Morphews spread across the UK.
Morphews in 1911 are predominant in and around London but some are in the
Midland’s and North of England.

Morphew in 1841 Census


Institution,
Household
or Vessel
Name
Birth
Year
Age
Sex
Registration District
County

Household
MORPHEW, Adelaide
1833
8
F
Ipswich
Suffolk

Household

39
MORPHEW, Ann
1776
65
F
Reigate
Surrey

Household
MORPHEW, Ann
1829
12
F
Gravesend & Milton
Kent

Household
MORPHEW, Ann
1801
40
F
Malling
Kent

Household
MORPHEW, Ann
1834
7
F
Malling
Kent

Household
MORPHEW, Ann
1824
17
F
Maidstone
Kent

Household
MORPHEW, Ann
1796
45
F
Dover
Kent

Household
MORPHEW, Annette
1838
3
F
Wisbech
Norfolk

Household
MORPHEW, Augusta
1837
4
F
Malling
Kent

Household
MORPHEW, Augustus
1834

40
7
M
Maidstone
Kent

Household
MORPHEW, Caroline
1821
20
F
Falmouth Union
Cornwall

Household
MORPHEW, Catherine
1791
50
F
Falmouth Union
Cornwall

Household
MORPHEW, Catherine
1840
1
F
Droxford
Hampshire

Household
MORPHEW, Charles
1828
13
M
Ipswich
Suffolk

Household
MORPHEW, Charles
1840
1
M
Sevenoaks
Kent

Household
MORPHEW, Charlotte
1806
35
F
Stepney
Middlesex

Household
MORPHEW, David
1806
35
M
Droxford
Hampshire

Household
MORPHEW, Edward
1772
69
M

41
Epsom
Surrey

Household
MORPHEW, Edward
1806
35
M
Whitechapel
Middlesex

Household
MORPHEW, Edward
1826
15
M
Malling
Kent

Household
MORPHEW, Edward
1801
40
M
Malling
Kent

Household
MORPHEW, Edwin
1834
7
M
Maidstone
Kent

Household
MORPHEW, Eleanor
1832
9
F
Malling
Kent

Household
MORPHEW, Eliza
1826
15
F
Ipswich
Suffolk

Household
MORPHEW, Eliza
1814
27
F
Epsom
Surrey

Household
MORPHEW, Eliza
1835
6
F
Lewes Chailey West Firle & Newhaven
Sussex

42
Household
MORPHEW, Elizabeth
1801
40
F
Bosmere & Claydon
Suffolk

Household
MORPHEW, Elizabeth
1811
30
F
Ipswich
Suffolk

Household
MORPHEW, Elizabeth
1836
5
F
Ipswich
Suffolk

Household
MORPHEW, Elizabeth
1828
13
F
Stepney
Middlesex

Household
MORPHEW, Elizabeth
1801
40
F
Ashford, East
Kent

Household
MORPHEW, Elizabeth
1826
15
F
Sevenoaks
Kent

Household
MORPHEW, Elizabeth
1811
30
F
Grinstead, East
Sussex

Household
MORPHEW, Elizabeth
1832
9
F
Grinstead, East
Sussex

Household

43
MORPHEW, Elizabeth
1838
3
F
Brighton
Sussex

Household
MORPHEW, Emma
1816
25
F
Bosmere & Claydon
Suffolk

Household
MORPHEW, Fanny
1811
30
F
Epping
Essex

Household
MORPHEW, Frances
1830
11
F
Stepney
Middlesex

Household
MORPHEW, Francis*
1816
25
M
Derby, West
Lancashire

Household
MORPHEW, Frederic
1830
11
M
Lewes Chailey West Firle & Newhaven
Sussex

Household
MORPHEW, Frederick
1837
4
M
Grinstead, East
Sussex

Household
MORPHEW, Geo
1816
25
M
Grinstead, East
Sussex

Household
MORPHEW, George
1801

44
40
M
St George Hanover Square
Middlesex

Household
MORPHEW, George
1810
31
M
Grinstead, East
Sussex

Household
MORPHEW, George
1833
8
M
Grinstead, East
Sussex

Household
MORPHEW, George
1829
12
M
Grinstead, East
Sussex

Household
MORPHEW, George
1838
3
M
Lewes Chailey West Firle & Newhaven
Sussex

Household
MORPHEW, Hannah
1830
11
F
Ipswich
Suffolk

Household
MORPHEW, Hannah
1806
35
F
Ipswich
Suffolk

Household
MORPHEW, Hariot
1806
35
F
Whitechapel
Middlesex

HouseholdMORPHEW, Henry18392 MIpswichSuffolkHouseholdMORPHEW,


Humphry182912 MWhitechapelMiddlesexHouseholdMORPHEW, James18383 MBosmere &
ClaydonSuffolkHouseholdMORPHEW, James40 MSuffolkHouseholdMORPHEW, James180536 MSt
George Hanover SquareMiddlesexHouseholdMORPHEW,

45
James181130 MReadingBerkshireHouseholdMORPHEW, James18365 MGravesend &
MiltonKentHouseholdMORPHEW, James182714 MMaidstoneKentHouseholdMORPHEW,
Jane178556 FEpsomSurreyHouseholdMORPHEW,
Jane182615 FRichmondYorkshireHouseholdMORPHEW,
Jane182120 FGreenwichKentHouseholdMORPHEW, Jeffery182120 MFalmouth
UnionCornwallHouseholdMORPHEW, Jeffery183110 MWinchester &
HursleyHampshireHouseholdMORPHEW, Jeffery180140 MAshford, EastKentHouseholdMORPHEW,
Jemmima18374 FEpsomSurreyHouseholdMORPHEW,
John180635 MWisbechNorfolkHouseholdMORPHEW,
John18347 MWisbechNorfolkHouseholdMORPHEW, John18374 MGreat
YarmouthNorfolkHouseholdMORPHEW, John18356 MBillericayEssexHouseholdMORPHEW,
John8 MSuffolkHouseholdMORPHEW, John18347 MIpswichSuffolkHouseholdMORPHEW,
John180041 MGuildfordSurreyHouseholdMORPHEW,
John179150 MShoreditchMiddlesexHouseholdMORPHEW,
John180437 MStepneyMiddlesexHouseholdMORPHEW,
John180140 MStepneyMiddlesexHouseholdMORPHEW,
John182120 MRichmondYorkshireHouseholdMORPHEW,
John177071 MTonbridgeKentHouseholdMORPHEW,
John182516 MElhamKentHouseholdMORPHEW, John180140 MLewes Chailey West Firle &
NewhavenSussexHouseholdMORPHEW, John18329 MLewes Chailey West Firle &
NewhavenSussexHouseholdMORPHEW, Joseph180635 MBosmere &
ClaydonSuffolkHouseholdMORPHEW,
Joseph181427 MGainsboroughLincolnshireHouseholdMORPHEW, Joseph178160 MFalmouth
UnionCornwallHouseholdMORPHEW, Julia18383 FStepneyMiddlesexHouseholdMORPHEW,
Louisa183011 FIpswichSuffolkHouseholdMORPHEW,
Margaret18338 FDroxfordHampshireHouseholdMORPHEW, Margaret18347 FGrinstead,
EastSussexHouseholdMORPHEW, Marion4 FKentHouseholdMORPHEW,
Mary180635 FWisbechNorfolkHouseholdMORPHEW,
Mary182912 FWisbechNorfolkHouseholdMORPHEW, Mary176675 FBosmere &
ClaydonSuffolkHouseholdMORPHEW, Mary180140 FIpswichSuffolkHouseholdMORPHEW,
Mary181229 FKingstonSurreyHouseholdMORPHEW, Mary177170 FSt
PancrasMiddlesexHouseholdMORPHEW, Mary180734 FStepneyMiddlesexHouseholdMORPHEW,
Mary183011 FStepneyMiddlesexHouseholdMORPHEW,
Mary179645 FWhitechapelMiddlesexHouseholdMORPHEW,
Mary179645 FRichmondYorkshireHouseholdMORPHEW,
Mary183110 FRichmondYorkshireHouseholdMORPHEW, Mary182120 FReadingBerkshire

1911 census shows no Morfew

Morfew in 1841 census


Household
MORFEW, Elizabeth
1811
30
F
Bosmere & Claydon
Suffolk

Household
MORFEW, Emma
1829
12
F
Bosmere & Claydon
Suffolk

Household
MORFEW, John
1806
35
M
Bosmere & Claydon
Suffolk

46
Bibliography
Gods War
Christopher Tyerman

Cyprus: society and culture 1191-1374

By Angel Nikolaou-Konnarē, Christopher David Schabel

The crusades: a history

By Jonathan Riley-Smith

The Crusades and the military orders: expanding the frontiers of


medieval ...

By Zsolt Hunyadi, József Laszlovszky, Central European University. Dept. of Medieval


Studies

The Medieval Kingdoms of Cyprus and Armenia

By William Stubbs

47
The Crusades A History of armed pilgrimage and holy war

Geoffrey Hindley

Larousse Encyclopaedia of Ancient and Medieval History

The Black Death


Philip Ziegler

Dictionary of English Surnames

Paper : The Bretons and Normans in England in1066-1154.


The family fief and the feudal monarchy
KSB Keats - Rohan

The debate of the Norman Conquest


Marjorie Chibnall Manchester University Pre

Leper Knights
David Marcombe Boydell

Norman and Anglo-Norman


Participation in the Iberian Reconquista
c.1018 - c.1248
By Lucas Villegas-Aristizábal BA (Hons), MA.
Thesis submitted to the University of Nottingham
for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy

The Domesday Quest


Michael Wood BBc books

Normans and their adversaries


Richard P Abels and Bernard S. Bachrach

Society of Norman Italy


GA Loud and A Metcalfe

The Norman Conquest


England after William the Conqueror

48
Hugh M. Thomas

William The Conqueror


David C. Douglas

Internet resource
A History of Cyprus
http://www.kypros.org/Sxetikos/Library/ByzantineChurches/AHistoryofCyprus-5.htm

Merriam-Webster
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cotton

Catholic Encyclopedia
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04543c.htm

Morffew Family History


http://www.gwydir.demon.co.uk/edkins/others/morffew.htm

Zoe Heukels-Morffew & Nils Visser, Huizen, The Netherlands.


http://morpheweb.com/morffew/morffewpartonetext.doc

Georgia health info


http://georgiahealth.info.gov/cms/root

Cyprus
http://fmg.ac/Projects/Medlands/Cyprus /

Full name directory


http://www.fullnamedirectory.com/page232618.html

49
Planet Murphy
A web site with a lot of information about the Morffew’s and Morphew’s in America.
http:/www.planetmurphy.org/

A Brief history of the Marmelikes and the Revolution in Cyprus in 1425


http://www.daedalus.gr/prdinformatics/HOC/mamelouksinvasionCEn.htm

50