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Weekend March 12-13, 2011 Vol XI, Edition 178

www.smdailyjournal.com

12-13, 2011 • Vol XI, Edition 178 www.smdailyjournal.com REUTERS Smoke rises above a town struck by

REUTERS

Smoke rises above a town struck by a tsunami following an earthquake in Miyagi Prefecture,northeastern Japan.

Catastrophic

Scenes of destruction after Japan’s tsunami,quake

By Malcom Foster

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TOKYO — Japan’s northeastern coast was a swampy wasteland of broken houses, overturned cars, sludge and dirty water Saturday as the nation awoke to the devastating aftermath of one of its greatest dis- asters, a powerful tsunami created by one of the strongest earthquakes ever recorded. The death toll from Friday’s mas- sive magnitude 8.9 quake stood at more than 200, but an untold num- ber of bodies were believed to be lying in the rubble and debris, and Japanese were bracing for more bad

See QUAKE, Page 31

Quake causes emergencies at Japanese nuclear reactors

By Mari Yamaguchi and Jeff Donn

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TOKYO — Japan declared states of emergency for ve nuclear reac- tors at two power plants after the units lost cooling ability in the aftermath of Friday’s powerful earthquake. Thousands of residents were evacuated as workers strug- gled to get the reactors under con-

trol to prevent meltdowns. Operators at the Fukushima Daiichi plant’s Unit 1 scrambled ferociously to tamp down heat and

pressure inside the reactor after the 8.9 magnitude quake and the tsuna-

mi that followed cut off electricity

to the site and disabled emergency generators, knocking out the main cooling system. Some 3,000 people within two

See EMERGENCY, Page 31

Some 3,000 people within two See EMERGENCY , Page 31 REUTERS People stand on roof of

REUTERS

People stand on roof of a residential building following an earthquake and tsunami in Sendai,northeastern Japan.

Tsunami crashes into West Coast

California,Oregon sustain most damage

By Jeff Bernard and Jaymes Song

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CRESCENT CITY — The warn- ings traveled quickly across the Pacic in the middle of the night:

An 8.9-magnitude earthquake in Japan spawned a deadly tsunami, and it was racing east Friday as fast as a jetliner. Sirens blared in Hawaii. The West Coast pulled back from the shore- line, fearing the worst. People were warned to stay away from the beaches. Fishermen took their boats out to sea and safety. The alerts moved faster than the waves, giving millions of people across the Pacic Rim hours to pre- pare. In the end, harbors and marinas in California and Oregon bore the brunt of the damage, estimated by authorities to be in the millions of dollars. Boats crashed into each other, some vessels were pulled out to sea and docks were ripped out. Rescue crews searched for a man who was swept out to sea while tak-

See COAST, Page 23

Bay Area skirts heavy damage

STAFF AND WIRE REPORT

Most of the Bay Area was not directly affected Friday by a dead- ly tsunami that hit Japan Thursday night, despite concerns that resid- ual waves crashing onto the California coastline could cause damage or injuries. A tsunami warning was issued early Friday morning in the region after an 8.9-magnitude earthquake off the northeast coast of Japan led to a tsunami that killed hundreds of people. Local damage seems to have been restricted to the Santa Cruz Harbor, but precautions were taken across the Bay Area — including evacuation plans, transit cancellations and school closures — due to wave swells expected just before 8 a.m.

See BAY, Page 23

Youngest murder defendant takes 43-year plea deal

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The county’s youngest murder defendant, known mostly from his escape from juvenile hall and jail- house plot to intimidate witnesses, took a 43-year plea deal Friday rather than face life in prison with- out parole.

Friday rather than face life in prison with- out parole. Josue Orozco Josue Raul Orozco, 20,

Josue Orozco

Josue Raul Orozco, 20, pleaded no con- test to voluntary manslaughter for shooting Francisco Rodriguez, 21, in the back of the head on July

12, 2005 as he ran to safety outside his Redwood City home. Orozco also admitted several gang and wit- ness tampering charges. In return, Orozco received a 43-year sentence

of which he must serve 85 percent.

He has credit for several years served already.

Prosecutor Josh Stauffer called

the resolution good considering his

age and that the rst trial ended with a hung jury. “We were able to secure a very large sentence on a very bad guy,” Stauffer said.

Stauffer and the defense had been discussing a possible plea deal since the end of Orozco’s rst trial, which ended in a mistrial, but nothing was

secure until Wednesday afternoon.

Orozco was just 14 when charged with murder, gun and gang allega- tions in Rodriguez’s death. The case gave Orozco the dubious distinction of being the youngest person ever charged as an adult with murder in San Mateo County. Two years later, he became the rst ward to escape from the county’s recently opened

See OROZCO, Page 23

Two years later, he became the fi rst ward to escape from the county’s recently opened
Two years later, he became the fi rst ward to escape from the county’s recently opened
Two years later, he became the fi rst ward to escape from the county’s recently opened
Two years later, he became the fi rst ward to escape from the county’s recently opened

2 Weekend March 12-13, 2011

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Quote of the Day

“You’re looking at something that’s rupturing

a very significant patch of the

Earth’s crust

If

anyone is in the

position to ride this out, it is the Japanese.”

— David Applegate, senior science adviser at the U.S. Geological Survey

“Quake fth biggest, but Japan ready,” see page 31

Local Weather Forecast

Saturday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain. Highs in the mid 50s. South winds 5 to 15 mph. Saturday night: Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain. Lows in the mid 40s. Southeast winds 5 to 10 mph. Sunday: Rain likely. Highs in the mid 50s. Southeast winds 15 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 70 percent. Sunday night: Rain likely. Lows in the upper 40s. South winds 10 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 60 percent. Monday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain.

rain 60 percent. Monday : Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain. Lotto March 9 Super Lotto

Lotto

March 9 Super Lotto Plus 23 34 42 43 47 21 Mega number
March 9 Super Lotto Plus
23
34
42 43
47 21
Mega number
March 11 Mega Millions 14 19 21 42 45 6 Mega number Fantasy Five 1
March 11 Mega Millions
14 19
21
42
45 6
Mega number
Fantasy Five
1
7
23
27
31

Daily Four

8
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6
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Daily three midday

 
2
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Daily three evening

 
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The Daily Derby race winners are No.3 Hot Shot in first place; No. 2 Lucky Star in second place; and No. 7 Eureka in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:40.56. was clocked at 1:40.56.

in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:40.56. State . . . . .

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Publisher Jerry Lee jerry@smdailyjournal.com

Editor in Chief Jon Mays jon@smdailyjournal.com

Phone:

(650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290

To

ads@smdailyjournal.com

Classieds:

ads@smdailyjournal.com

Events:

calendar@smdailyjournal.com

News:

news@smdailyjournal.com

Delivery:

circulation@smdailyjournal.com

Career:

info@smdailyjournal.com

800 S. Claremont St., Ste. 210, San Mateo, Ca. 94402

800 S. Claremont St., Ste. 210, San Mateo, Ca. 94402 THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. HOCSA
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
HOCSA
©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
TMTEP
ETYOHR
ASIOCL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Ans: A
Jumbles:
Yesterday’s
Answer:
(Answers Monday)
BASIS GUESS AROUND DOCKET
The veterinarian went to the doctor because
he was — SICK AS A DOG
Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club
Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club Snapshot REUTERS The ‘Tree Trunk’ hot

Snapshot

the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club Snapshot REUTERS The ‘Tree Trunk’ hot air balloon, left,

REUTERS

The ‘Tree Trunk’ hot air balloon, left, piloted by Gary Moore of the U.S., and the‘Hopper’piloted by Jonas Doorsselaere of Belgium float in the sky during a test flight over Malaysia’s capital of Putrajaya outside Kuala Lumpu.

Inside

capital of Putrajaya outside Kuala Lumpu. Inside ‘Battle: L.A’ The world is at war See page
capital of Putrajaya outside Kuala Lumpu. Inside ‘Battle: L.A’ The world is at war See page

‘Battle: L.A’

The world is at war

See page 18

Wall Street

Stocks inch higher day after Japan earthquake See page 10

This Day in History

1933

President Franklin D. Roosevelt deliv- ered the rst of his 30 radio “reside chats,” telling Americans what was

being done to deal with the nation’s economic crisis.

In 1664, England’s King Charles II granted an area of land in present-day North America known as New Netherland to his brother James, the Duke of York. In 1864, Ulysses S. Grant was promoted to the rank of gener-

al-in-chief of the Union armies in the Civil War by President

Abraham Lincoln. In 1912, Juliette Gordon Low of Savannah, Ga., founded the Girl Guides, which later became the Girl Scouts of America.

In 1930, Indian political and spiritual leader Mohandas K. Gandhi began a 200-mile march to protest a British tax on salt. In 1938, the Anschluss merging Austria with Nazi Germany took place as German forces crossed the border between the two countries. In 1939, Pope Pius XII was formally crowned in ceremonies at the Vatican. In 1947, President Harry S. Truman established what became known as the “Truman Doctrine” to help Greece and Turkey resist Communism. In 1951, “Dennis the Menace,” created by cartoonist Hank Ketcham, made its syndicated debut in 16 newspapers. In 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson won the New Hampshire Democratic primary, but Sen. Eugene McCarthy of Minnesota placed a strong second. In 1971, Hafez Assad was conrmed as president of Syria in a referendum. Ten years ago: A U.S. Navy jet mistakenly dropped a bomb on

a group of military personnel at a bombing range in Kuwait, killing ve Americans and one New Zealander.

Thought for the Day

“If power corrupts, being out of power corrupts absolutely.” — Douglass (cq) Cater, American author and educator (1923-1995)

(cq) Cater, American author and educator (1923-1995) Actress-singer Liza Minnelli is 65. Birthdays Former MLB

Actress-singer Liza Minnelli is 65.

Birthdays

(1923-1995) Actress-singer Liza Minnelli is 65. Birthdays Former MLB All-Star Darryl Strawberry is 49. Actor Aaron

Former MLB All-Star Darryl Strawberry is 49.

65. Birthdays Former MLB All-Star Darryl Strawberry is 49. Actor Aaron Eckhart is 43. Playwright Edward

Actor Aaron Eckhart is 43.

Playwright Edward Albee is 83. Former Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young is 79. Actress Barbara Feldon is 78. Broadcast journalist Lloyd Dobyns is 75. Singer Al Jarreau is 71. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney is 64. Singer-songwriter James Taylor is 63. Sen. Kent Conrad, D-N.D., is 63. Rock singer-musician Bill Payne (Little Feat) is 62. Actor Jon Provost (“Lassie”) is 61. Author Carl Hiaasen is 58. Rock musician Steve Harris (Iron Maiden) is 55. Actor Jerry Levine is 54. Singer Marlon Jackson (The Jackson Five) is 54. Actor Courtney B. Vance is 51. Actor Titus Welliver is 50. Actress Julia Campbell is 48. ABC News reporter Jake Tapper is 42. Rock musician Graham Coxon is 42. Country musician Tommy Bales (Flynnville Train) is 38.

42. Country musician Tommy Bales (Flynnville Train) is 38. Texas has more beef cows than any

Texas has more beef cows than any other state. Wisconsin has the most dairy cows. *** National Football League (NFL) footballs are made out of cowhide leather, not pigskin. College teams also use leather footballs. ***

Unopened bottles of ketchup can be stored for one year on a cool, dark shelf.

Tightly covered opened bottles of ketchup will last a month in a cool, dark, dry place. *** George Stephen designed his rst kettle- shaped barbecue grill in 1951. At the time he worked for Weber Brothers Metal Works near Chicago. He developed a bar- becue with a lid on it. He added three legs

to the bottom and a handle to the top, and

the Weber grill was born. *** The grill ranks as the fth most popular appliance in American homes. Seventy- six percent of U.S. households own a bar- becue grill. ***

Steamboat Willie, starring Mickey Mouse, was the rst animated cartoon to use sound. It was the rst Mickey Mouse

cartoon. It debuted on Nov. 18, 1928. *** Walt Disney’s (1901-1966) middle name was Elias. Norman Rockwell’s (1894- 1978) middle name was Percevel. *** Do you know the middle names of the fol- lowing presidents? George W. Bush, John F. Kennedy, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Rutherford B. Hayes, Ulysses S. Grant. See answer at end. *** Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) is the medical term for Mad Cow Disease. BSE is a progressive disease that affects the cow’s nervous system. BSE kills all infected cattle. There is no treat- ment or vaccine. Over 97 percent of all BSE cases have been in the United Kingdom. ***

In 1888, Dr. James H. Salisbury, an English physician, believed that eating well-cooked chopped beef three times a

day, with large glasses of hot water, would cure almost any disease or ailment includ- ing anemia, asthma, rheumatism and tuberculosis. Salisbury steak is so called because of that doctor. *** There used to be a cow pasture at the

western edge of what is now San Francisco International Airport. It was part of the Millbrae Dairy, established in

1870. The Millbrae Dairy was consid-

ered the best dairy west of the Rocky Mountains. Borden’s Dairy Delivery Company took over the Millbrae Dairy in

1938.

*** The McDonalds Big Mac was introduced in 1968. The cost was 49 cents. The Egg

McMufn was introduced in 1973, and McDonalds started offering Happy Meals in 1979.

*** The hamburger debuted at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis. Fletcher Davis made them famous by selling them on the midway. His fried ground beef patties served between two slices of homemade bread caused a sensation at the fair. *** The 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis, also known as the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, ran for seven months from April 30 to Dec. 1. Twenty million people visited the fair, for the most part traveling by horse and carriage. *** There is a difference between grilling and barbecuing. Grilling is done over the direct heat of a re. The outside of the meat is seared and concentrates the juices on the inside. Barbecue is the process of cooking meat at low temperature (210 degrees or less) for a long time. *** Answer : George Walker Bush (born 1946), 43rd president; John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-1963), 34th president); Dwight David Eisenhower (1890-1969), 33rd president; Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945), 31st president; Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893), 19th president); Ulysses Simpson Grant

(1822-1885), 18th president.

Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in the weekend and Wednesday editions of the Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? E- mail knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-5200 ext. 114.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Weekend March 12-13, 2011

3

One wish for a million Robux

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Fourteen-year-old Seth Deesub became a millionaire Thursday, although the funds did come with one restriction — they can only be used in the virtual world of ROBLOX. Having 1 million Robux, the virtual curren- cy used in ROBLOX, makes the teen the rich- est player in the history of the virtual game created by the San Mateo company of the same name. Deesub, from Lawndale, Calif., had the chance to not only become a million- aire but meet those who put together the game he enjoys as part of a wish recently granted by the Make-A-Wish Foundation, which grants wishes for children with life-threatening med- ical conditions. Deesub spends lots of time in the hospital, said his father Dusdee who goes by Luke. “He’s not usually talkative,” his mom, Suree Deesub, added. But that was not the case Thursday. Deesub spent four hours at the San Mateo business as an honorary staff member learning the ins and outs of the game, getting a sneak peak of unreleased features and helping design a hooded hat, called dominus frigidus, which will be sold in the world. “Can I buy it first?” an eager Deesub asked his partner in design, Market Manager Christina McGrath, who promised to let him know before it was released for sale. Deesub plays ROBLOX often. The online kids gaming site allows players to be the architects of their own world. Players can build social hangouts, invite others to party, talk online and purchase items — which is where the Robux comes in handy.

purchase items — which is where the Robux comes in handy. HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL ROBLOX Creative

HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL

ROBLOX Creative Director John Shedletsky,left,looks over a collection of business cards with 14-year-old Seth Deesub and his father Dusdee Deesub, who were visiting the San Mateo business Thursday as part of a wish granted by the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

Before Thursday, Deesub had about 600 Robux. When he returns home this weekend, Deesub can start a shopping spree. “I play ROBLOX a lot. I was living a really happy life. And I really didn’t want anything else,” Deesub said when asked why he chose this wish. Deesub asked for the cash and the visit was an extra special treat. And to the teen, these guys were rock stars. After sitting in on a development meeting, he collected the busi- ness card from CEO David Baszucki, whom Deesub had sign his business card. This move

started a larger collection. Deesub asked for the business card and autograph of all 25 employees. Those without cards readily avail- able signed a piece of paper, many adding their in-world user name. “I’d stay at this office all day long if I could,” Deesub said while reviewing his new business card collection. Unless ROBLOX experienced a lot of infla- tion, Deesub thinks the money will last him a long time, which also means his dad won’t be asked to provide access to his credit card any- time soon.

Police reports

When shoppers attack

It was reported that a man in his 60s raised his hand and hit another customer and her small child at 12:53 p.m. Wednesday, March 9 at the Safeway on East Hillsdale Boulevard in Foster City.

BURLINGAME

Petty theft. A locked Trek mountain bicycle, valued at $800, was stolen on the 1200 block of Donnelly Avenue before 1:54 p.m. Thursday, March 10. Reckless driving. A small black imported vehicle was reportedly traveling more than 70 mph on Broadway near Highway 101 at 8:40 a.m., Wednesday, March 9. Health and safety code violation. Five sub- jects were reported smoking marijuana on the baseball field near the play structure on the 1000 block of Burlingame Avenue at 4:21 p.m. Tuesday, March 8. Burglary. A window was smashed on a Lexus on the 400 block of Carolan Avenue before 12:32 p.m. Tuesday, March 8.

FOSTER CITY

Health and safety code violation. A resident on Ursa Lane reported three juveniles possibly smoking marijuana at 6:21 p.m. Wednesday, March 9. Nothing was observed, but adults inside residence were admonished. Burglary. Someone broke into a locked stor- age locker in the hallway next to her unit on Beach Park Boulevard before 6:15 p.m. Wednesday, March 9. Citizen assist. A woman reported finding a dead mouse on her door step on Emerald Bay Lane before 6:22 p.m. Tuesday, March 8. She said she believes it was placed there on pur- pose.

door step on Emerald Bay Lane before 6:22 p.m. Tuesday, March 8. She said she believes
door step on Emerald Bay Lane before 6:22 p.m. Tuesday, March 8. She said she believes
door step on Emerald Bay Lane before 6:22 p.m. Tuesday, March 8. She said she believes
door step on Emerald Bay Lane before 6:22 p.m. Tuesday, March 8. She said she believes

4

Weekend March 12-13, 2011

THE DAILY JOURNAL

4 Weekend • March 12-13, 2011 THE DAILY JOURNAL
4 Weekend • March 12-13, 2011 THE DAILY JOURNAL
4 Weekend • March 12-13, 2011 THE DAILY JOURNAL
4 Weekend • March 12-13, 2011 THE DAILY JOURNAL
4 Weekend • March 12-13, 2011 THE DAILY JOURNAL
4 Weekend • March 12-13, 2011 THE DAILY JOURNAL
4 Weekend • March 12-13, 2011 THE DAILY JOURNAL
4 Weekend • March 12-13, 2011 THE DAILY JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Weekend March 12-13, 2011

5

Competency trial set for former doctor

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The former San Mateo child psychia- trist whose first trial on charges he molested several male patients ended with a hung jury will learn in June if he is competent to stand trial again. The scheduling came a week after William Hamilton Ayres 79, was found competent to stand trial by two of three court-appointed doctors. Ayres, whose defense says is suffering from Alzheimer’s disease-related dementia, requested a jury trial on the matter even before the final doctor report was returned.

matter even before the final doctor report was returned. William Ayres Attorneys previ- ously discussed a

William Ayres

Attorneys previ- ously discussed a May date to accom- modate the defense attorney who is in a different trial and, on Friday, settled for June 6. Ayres is accused of molesting six former

male patients when they were aged 9 to 13 between 1988 and 1996 under the guise of medical exams. In July 2009, jurors deadlocked in varied amounts on nine counts of lewd and lascivious activity. Defense attorney Jonathan McDougall has said his client is anxious to clear his

name. However, a resolution has been a slow time coming. Last year, two doctors found Ayres competent and McDougall sought a jury trial. In January, the morning of trial, one of the doctors informed the court he had changed his opinion, leading to Judge Jack Grandsaert halting proceed- ings and asking for the third report. McKowan has agreed Ayres may have some dementia but has called the con- stant delays defense stall tactics. McDougall has said the stress of the first trial exacerbated Ayres’ deficiencies. Ayres has been free from custody on $750,000 bail since shortly after his 2007 arrest.

Two arrested in Caltrain attack

BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

Two men have been arrested on sus- picion of beating and robbing a man at the Redwood City Caltrain station last week, agency officials said Friday. Desean Walker, 19, and Thomas Nicholas Furman, 18, both of Redwood City, were arrested by tran- sit police on suspicion of robbery and assault with great bodily injury, according to Caltrain officials. The pair was arrested in connection with the March 4 attack that left a 47-

year-old man in critical condition at a hospital, officials said. The victim was attacked by a group of assailants who were trying to rob him as he waited for a southbound train at about 7:30 p.m. that day. Walker was already in custody on unrelated robbery charges when he was arrested for the Caltrain attack, according to officials. Three search warrants were also executed in Redwood City and East Palo Alto in connection with the case, and evidence recovered during the searches has provided investigators

with information that they say will help locate other suspects in the case. “We are confident that everyone will be brought to justice,” Dave Triolo, Caltrain’s chief of protective services, said in a statement. “This incident is an extremely rare occurrence in the Caltrain system and we want to deliver a clear message:

commit a crime and face a swift and effective response from law enforce- ment,” Triolo said. Anyone with information about the case is encouraged to contact Detective Victor Lopez at 622-8048.

S equoia High School’s second annual crab dinner will be held 6:30 p.m. Saturday, March 19 at

Mount Carmel Church, 301 Grand St., Redwood City. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for cocktails and auction, followed at 7:30 p.m. with dinner, raffle and auc- tion. Proceeds go to the Sequoia High

Sport and Spirit Booster Club. Tickets are $45 person. For more infor-

visit

http://sites.google.com/site/sequoia-

boosterclub/crab-dinner. *** Menlo-Atherton High School pres- ents “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” at 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays March 18 through March 26 and 2 p.m. Sunday, March 19. The Menlo-Atherton High Orchestra will provide live accompaniment to the Menlo-Atherton International Thespian Society performers. Tickets

mation

are $12 for adults and $8 for seniors and students. For more information visit www.thecenterat- ma.org.

*** Notre Dame High School, located in Belmont, is hosting a blood drive from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, March 21 in the small gym on the Notre Dame High School campus. Unfortunately, many high school girls do not meet the age or weight requirements and, there- fore, are unable to donate. However, they are encouraging par- ents, their families, friends and residents of the Belmont community to give blood. All presenting donors will receive a T-shirt. To schedule your time to donate, or for more information, contact Erin Connolly at 595-1913 ext. 403 or

information, contact Erin Connolly at 595-1913 ext. 403 or visit www.bloodheroes.com, select DONATE BLOOD and use

visit www.bloodheroes.com, select DONATE BLOOD and use sponsor code NDHS. Notre Dame High School, Belmont is located at 1540 Ralston Ave., Belmont.

*** Sequoia High School’s spring music concert — featuring the orchestra, choir, jazz ensemble and band — will be held 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 22 at Carrington Hall, located on the school’s campus, 1201 Brewster Ave. in Redwood City. Tickets are $5.

Class notes is a twice weekly column dedi- cated to school news. It is compiled by edu- cation reporter Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com.

(650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com. Obituaries Carol Beverley‘Archambault’Dillon Carol
(650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com. Obituaries Carol Beverley‘Archambault’Dillon Carol

Obituaries

Carol Beverley‘Archambault’Dillon

Carol Beverley “Archambault” Dillon, resident of Millbrae, was born in San Francisco Dec. 25, 1928 to Eugene and Imelda

Archambault. She died at the home of her son Martin and his family March 10, 2011. She married David Dillon in 1951 and they raised their family in Millbrae. Carol is survived by her husband David; her son Kevin (Lezli); her daughter Susan Hooley (Jim); and her son Martin (Theresa); grandchildren Katie, Brian, Kelly, Nicholas, Marissa, Lucas, Hannah and Brendan; daughter in-law Terry, mother of Kevin’s

children. She was predeceased by her sister Marilyn Olson. Carol attended Our Lady of Angels grammar school in Burlingame, Mercy High School Burlingame, Class of 1947, and was very proud of earning her associate of arts degree from the College of San Mateo. Carol was a “stay at home mom” and was always there for her husband, children and grandchildren. She always took pride in her family and gave all her grandchildren all the time and love that they deserved, according to her family. A funeral mass will be celebrated 11 a.m. Tuesday, March 15 at Our Lady of Angels Catholic Church, 1721 Hillside Drive in Burlingame. Committal will follow at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery in Colma. Family and Friends may visit Monday after 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. at the Chapel of the Highlands, El Camino Real at 194 Millwood Drive in Millbrae, with a vigil service beginning at 5 p.m.

Fred Spencer

Fred Spencer, born June 14, 1942, died March 10, 2011 in San Mateo at the age of 68. He was the husband of Sharon, father of Billy and Dan, grand- father of Daniel, brother of Nancy, Shirley and the late Pat, Bill and Stan. He was also survived by many nieces and nephews. A native of San Francisco, he was a San Francisco police lieutenant for 30 years. He lived and breathed basketball, and enjoyed golf- ing with friends. Friends are invited to attend a 2 p.m. memorial service Saturday, March 19 at Poplar Creek Grill, 1700 Coyote Point Drive in San Mateo. Donations to the American Cancer Society preferred. Arrangements made by Sneider & Sullivan & O’Connell’s Funeral Home.

to the American Cancer Society preferred. Arrangements made by Sneider & Sullivan & O’Connell’s Funeral Home.
to the American Cancer Society preferred. Arrangements made by Sneider & Sullivan & O’Connell’s Funeral Home.
to the American Cancer Society preferred. Arrangements made by Sneider & Sullivan & O’Connell’s Funeral Home.

6

Weekend March 12-13, 2011

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Enjoy fun time with Mom, Dad or your favorite grown-up. The across clues are for
Enjoy fun time with Mom, Dad or your favorite grown-up. The across clues are for kids and the down clues are for adults.
Cowboy Country
Kids Across
13.
Have you heard?: A herd
2.
1.
Hay there!: When a
cowboy travels with this
four-legged friend, he never
has to stop for gas
of cattle is a group of
To steal cattle (or make a
noise in autumn leaves)
15.
The spiky metal parts on
the back of a cowboy’s
boots (or the pro basketball
3.
3.
The metal clasp in the
center of a belt
team from San Antonio)
In terms of a rider’s 1A, it
goes on a head (or a
homonym of a type of shop
that helps a fiancee’ with
16.
The leather straps a
her big day)
6.
In frontier days, the land on
the Oklahoma side of the
Mississippi River was often
called the Wild
cowboy holds when riding
his horse
4.
Engine-uity: For a modern-
day cowboy, it’s all about
18.
Think thirst: It’s the
container of water a cowboy
the horsepower
5.
“Fan-tastic” seat for a young
son at a Dallas Cowboys
This Week’s Solution
7.
What a cowboy puts his
feet in when he goes for a
ride
(or a camper) carries
19.
A cowboy might choose
ranch dressing to pour on
game
7.
Lateral-moving snake
8.
Chow time at the chuck
wagon: Cowboys on the
his
8.
Fine for an experienced
20.
What a 11D is made of
horse trainer, it’s the
trail knew it was time to eat
when they heard the
21.
You’re likely to find
horseshoes underneath
them
saddle-free way to go
9.
triangle dinner
ring
Outlaw, especially in frontier
days
Paso is a town in Texas
12. Careful, cowboy!: A
rattlesnake, like most
poisonous snakes, has
oval
11.
Parents Down
What a rodeo cowboy uses
to capture a calf
1. Query by country star
14.
Leann Rimes: “
Live Without You?”
Do I
Wild pony, Denver halfback
or 4x4 by Ford
17.
Rancher’s fence entrance
kris@kapd.com
Visit www.kapd.com to join the KAPD family!
3/13/11
© 2011 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by
Tribune Media Services, Inc.
www.kapd.com to join the KAPD family! 3/13/11 © 2011 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Tribune Media
www.kapd.com to join the KAPD family! 3/13/11 © 2011 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Tribune Media
www.kapd.com to join the KAPD family! 3/13/11 © 2011 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Tribune Media
www.kapd.com to join the KAPD family! 3/13/11 © 2011 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Tribune Media
www.kapd.com to join the KAPD family! 3/13/11 © 2011 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Tribune Media
www.kapd.com to join the KAPD family! 3/13/11 © 2011 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Tribune Media

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/STATE/NATION

Weekend March 12-13, 2011

7

Baykeeper, South City reach agreement

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

The city of South San Francisco will reduce sewage spills into the Bay over the next five years, fund a $300,000 grant program for home- owners to make improvements and provide $150,000 for water quality as part of an agreement with San Francisco-based Baykeeper. Baykeeper, an environmental group dedicated to protecting the water quality of the San Francisco Bay, and South San Francisco released a joint press release Friday announcing the two sides had

reached a settlement. In recent years, Baykeeper has brought numerous lawsuits against Bay Area cities to address the problem of sewage spills. “We’re pleased to have secured an agreement with the city of South San Francisco that will reduce sewage spills to the Bay and help improve the overall health of our watershed,” Baykeeper staff attor- ney Jason Flanders wrote in a pre- pared statement. Under the settlement, South San Francisco will reduce spills from the

city’s collection system over the next five years while improving its practices, according to the press release. It will also fund a $300,000 sewer lateral replacement grant pro- gram to provide up to $2,500 to eli- gible South San Francisco home- owners on a first-come, first-served basis for replacement of defective sewer laterals. Lastly, the city will provide $150,000 to the Rose Foundation for Communities and the Environment to fund non- Baykeeper projects to benefit Bay water quality.

Obama,McConnell,agree — and disagree — on budget

By Stephen Ohlemacher

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama and the Senate’s top Republican both declared on Friday they want to take on the huge enti- tlement programs driving America’s long-term deficits — but their lines of attack differed sharply and that could lead to a showdown over gov-

ernment borrowing. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell warned that GOP sena- tors would not vote to increase the federal debt limit unless Obama agreed to significant long-term budget savings that could include cost curbs for Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, laying down a high-stakes marker just weeks before the limit is reached.

Obama said he also wants to tack- le military spending and tax loop- holes — issues on which he can expect Republican opposition. The president said at a news con- ference that he would be ready to dig into the nation’s long-term financial problems after he and lawmakers reach a deal on funding the government through September.

Iowa reps pass bill limiting collective bargaining

DES MOINES, Iowa — The Iowa House approved a bill Friday limit- ing public workers’ collective bar- gaining rights and requiring them to pay more for their health insurance. But while similar legislation reducing the power of unions has passed in states like Ohio and Wisconsin, it is unlikely to become law in Iowa. Democrats who control the Senate there have said they won’t allow debate on the bill backed by Republican Gov. Terry Branstad.

Around the nation

Wisconsin gov. says support will grow for new law

MADISON, Wis. — Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker on Friday signed into law the proposal that eliminates most union rights for public employees, saying he had “no doubt” that support for the measure would grow over time. The gover- nor’s signature on the bill quietly concluded a debate over collective bargaining that provoked three weeks of loud, relentless protests at the Capitol.

DA turns over investigation of S.F. drug cops to FBI

SAN FRANCISCO — District Attorney George Gascon on Friday said an investigation into accusa- tions that police officers conducted illegal searches will be turned over to federal authorities because of new information, as well as complex technical and forensic issues that his office is not equipped to handle. Seven police officers and a ser- geant are under investigation over claims they raided rooms without warrants at a residential hotel

Around the state

known for its drug activity.

EPA: Abandoned mercury mine a toxic hazard

SAN FRANCISCO — An aban- doned mercury mine that for decades has sent polluted, orange waste into a creek that eventually feeds into San Francisco Bay is a threat to human health and should be added to a list of the nation’s worst polluted places, federal envi- ronmental regulators say.

and should be added to a list of the nation’s worst polluted places, federal envi- ronmental
and should be added to a list of the nation’s worst polluted places, federal envi- ronmental
* * * *
*
*
*
*
and should be added to a list of the nation’s worst polluted places, federal envi- ronmental
and should be added to a list of the nation’s worst polluted places, federal envi- ronmental

8 Weekend March 12-13, 2011

LOCAL/WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Giffords:‘Leaps and bounds’ in recovery

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HOUSTON — She can talk, even saying short sentences. With some help, she can walk. She also knows

that she was shot. But for doc- tors, some of the greatest moments in treating Rep. Gabrielle Giffords occur when her true personality shines through and she shares

big grins and excitement over milestones in her recovery from a devastating gunshot wound to the head. “That’s Gabby. It’s a constant, won- derful thing,” said Dr. Dong Kim, a neuroscientist. Doctors provided the new details about Giffords’ condition Friday, their first official update since she began intensive rehabilitation in Houston on Jan. 26. Until now, tidbits of informa- tion came from friends and family, but the doctors, those with the understand- ing and knowledge of what each set- back and step forward means for long- term recovery, remained tight-lipped.

means for long- term recovery, remained tight-lipped. Gabrielle Giffords Gadhafi forces show growing confidence By

Gabrielle

Giffords

Gadhafi forces show growing confidence

By Maggie Michael

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ZAWIYA, Libya — Moammar Gadhafi’s regime showed growing confidence Friday after retaking a strategic near Tripoli following days of relentless shelling against pro- testers-turned-rebels as it strength- ened its hold on the capital and sur- rounding areas. Government forces also captured a key oil town in the east and fought to dislodge rebels who took refuge among towering storage containers of crude oil and gas in nearby facil- ities. Zawiya’s main square, which had been a key center of resistance to

main square, which had been a key center of resistance to Moammar Gadhafi the west of

Moammar

Gadhafi

the west of the capital, bore the scars of battle and the streets were lined with tanks as loyalists waving green flags rallied amid a heavy presence of uniformed pro-Gadhafi

troops and snipers. There was talk of rebel bod- ies having been bulldozed away, and the dome and minaret of the nearby mosque were demolished. With Gadhafi’s men also on the march against rebels in the east, Western nations appeared in disar- ray over how to stop the bloodshed.

‘Tightening noose’ on Gadhafi By Ben Feller ones,” Obama said from the THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
‘Tightening noose’ on Gadhafi
By Ben Feller
ones,” Obama
said
from
the
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
White
House
WASHINGTON — Pledging a
relentless drive to kick Moammar
Gadhafi out of power, President
Barack Obama said Friday the
U.S. and the world community are
“slowly tightening the noose” on
the leader of Libya and will keep
up the pressure. But he would not
commit to intervening at any cost,
warning of potential perils in mili-
tary action.
“It’s going to require some judg-
ment calls, and those are difficult
as Gadhafi’s
violent coun-
teroffensive
against rebels
gained
strength.
Barack Obama
By choosing
tough and even
grisly language when questioned
about Gadhafi at a news confer-
ence, Obama sought to show the
United States would not simply
stand by.

As protests roil neighbors, Saudis quash rallies

By Hassan Ammar and Ahmed Al-Haj

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — A massive show of force by Saudi Arabia’s government snuffed out a Facebook-based effort to stage

unprecedented pro-democracy protests in the capital on Friday, but political unrest and sectarian tensions roiled neighboring Yemen and Bahrain. Yemen’s largest demonstrations in a month were met by police gunfire that left at least six pro-

testers injured and seemed certain to fuel more anger against the deeply unpopular U.S.-allied pres- ident. In Bahrain, a conflict deepened between the island kingdom’s Shiite majority and its Sunni Muslim royal family, whose secu-

rity forces and pro-government mobs attacked demonstrators with tear gas, rocks and swords. U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates visited the tiny country, the home of the U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet, to reassure its rulers of unwavering U.S. support, officials said.

$40M bond measure on June ballot

A $40 million bond measure will go before San Bruno voters in June while the fate of a pos- sible parcel tax is still being discussed. The San Bruno Park Elementary School District has been relying on one-time money — $30.5 million from selling the former Sandburg School site in 2005 — to cover capital projects

as well as gaps in funding. Next year it’s facing

a $1 million shortfall. On Wednesday, the district’s Board of Trustees decided to place a $40 million bond

measure, with a tax rate of $30 per $100,000 of

a property’s assessed value, on a special June 7

ballot, said Superintendent David Hutt. The measure passed 4-1 with Trustee Jim Prescott dissenting. Such a tax requires a 55 percent pas-

sage rate. While a possible parcel tax was also discussed, the board didn’t make a decision.

tax was also discussed, the board didn’t make a decision. Teen charged with making felony threats

Teen charged with making felony threats

A 17-year-old Burlingame High senior from San Mateo arrested Monday morning after post- ing online threats against his school will be charged with a felony for terrorist threats, it was announced Wednesday. The teen was taken into custody two hours after the FBI contacted San Mateo police about an online threat made to a school rally at a

Northern California school, according to a press release written by Lt. Ted Gonzales. Around 9 a.m., the teen, who is not being named because of his age, was booked into Hillcrest Juvenile Hall for a felony violation of terrorist threats.

Missing money linked to former Farm Bureau head

News that former San Mateo County Farm Bureau boss Jack Olsen may have pilfered up to $300,000 from the various nonprofits he worked for has left coastside officials wonder- ing how one man could have created so many problems without anyone noticing. Olsen was the treasurer of the Half Moon Bay Beautification Committee and handled the finances for the Farm Bureau and San Mateo County Fair.

State allows Artichoke Joe’s to reopen

The California Gambling Control Commission has allowed Artichoke Joe’s to reopen after it was shut down March 2 during a two-city raid of it and the Oak Card Club in Emeryville. The commission’s approval was based on new controls being put in place at the card room. “I do not and cannot condone illegal activity at Artichoke Joes,” owner Dennis Sammut said in a prepared statement. “I thank the state for taking these steps to root out this illegal activi- ty. We thought we had the proper security meas- ures and procedures in place to make sure this type of activity did not occur. Clearly, we now know we didn’t do enough and need to do more.”

we now know we didn’t do enough and need to do more.” Houses of Prayer Houses

Houses of Prayer

Houses of Prayer

and need to do more.” Houses of Prayer Houses of Prayer Baptist PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH Dr.

Baptist

PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor (650) 343-5415 217 North Grant Street, San Mateo

Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am Sunday School at 9:30 am

Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org

LISTEN TO OUR RADIO BROADCAST! (KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial) Every Sunday at 5:30 PM

Buddhist

LOTUS BUDDHIST CIRCLE

(Rissho Kosei-kai of SF)

851 N. San Mateo Dr., Suite D San Mateo

650.200.3755

English Service: 4th Sunday at 10 AM Study: Tuesday at 7 PM www.lotusbuddhistcircle.com

Buddhist

SAN MATEO

BUDDHIST TEMPLE

Jodo ShinshuBuddhist (Pure Land Buddhism)

2 So. Claremont St. San Mateo

(650) 342-2541

Sunday English Service & Dharma School - 9:30 AM

Reverend Ryuta Furumoto www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org

Church of Christ

CHURCH OF CHRIST 525 South Bayshore Blvd. San Mateo

(650) 343-4997

Bible School 9:45 AM Services 11:00 AM and 2:00 PM Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 PM Minister J.S. Oxendine

www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm

Congregational

FOSTER CITY ISLAND UNITED CHURCH

Foster City's only three-denomination Church Methodist, Presbyterian (U.S.A.), and United Church of Christ

1130 Balclutha Drive (at Comet)

Worship/Child Care/Sunday School at 10am

All are Welcome! Call (650) 349-3544

Congregational

• THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF SAN MATEO - UCC 225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr. (650) 343-3694 Worship and Church School Every Sunday at 10:30 AM Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM Nursery Care Available www.ccsm-ucc.org

Lutheran

HOPE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH

600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo

Pastor Eric Ackerman

Worship Service 10:00 AM

Sunday School 11:00 AM

Child care provided in the nursery.

Hope Lutheran Preschool admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.

License No. 410500322.

Call (650)349-0100

HopeLutheranSanMateo.org

410500322. Call (650)349-0100 HopeLutheranSanMateo.org Methodist CRYSTAL SPRINGS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday

Methodist

CRYSTAL SPRINGS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday Worship 10:00 AM

Sunday School • Childcare • Drama Choir • Handbells • Praise Band Sunday October 24, 2010 CSUMC will be starting a new Samoan language ministry which starts at 12:00pm. It will be led by Tapuai Louis Vaili Certified Lay Speaker. Everyone is welcome to join us! 2145 Bunker Hill Drive San Mateo • (650)345-2381 www.csumc.org

Non-Denominational

Church of the Highlands

“A community of caring Christians”

1900 Monterey Drive (corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno

(650)873-4095

Adult Worship

Services:

Friday: 7:30 pm (singles) Saturday: 7:00 pm Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am, 5 pm

Youth Worship

Service:

For high school & young college Sunday at 10:00 am

Sunday School

For adults & children of all ages Sunday at 10:00 am Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor

Non-Denominational

REDWOOD CHURCH

Our mission

To know Christ and make him known.

901 Madison Ave., Redwood City

(650)366-1223

Sunday services:

9:00AM & 10:45AM www.redwoodchurch.org

Synagogues

PENINSULA TEMPLE BETH EL

1700 Alameda de las Pulgas San Mateo at Hwy 92 (650) 341-7701

Friday Shabbat Services 6:30 pm Except the last Friday of the Month 7:30 pm

We offer Tot Shabbat, Family Services, Adult Education and Innovative Education Programs for Pre-K thru 12th Grade Join Us! Serving the Peninsula for over 50 years A member of the Union for Reform Judaism

Visit our website www.ptbe.org

Join Us! Serving the Peninsula for over 50 years A member of the Union for Reform

THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Weekend March 12-13, 2011

9

Insiders vow lawsuits to save perks and pork

— Sacramento Bee

A ngered that California might take away their subsidies and tax breaks while it deals with

that pesky little problem — a $26.6 bil- lion deficit — groups that represent redevelopment agencies and enterprise zones are threatening to sue the state and its taxpayers. In so doing, they are revealing why Gov. Jerry Brown deserves even more support as he confronts these entrenched special interests. California faces a financial catastro- phe, requiring sacrifice from all sides. Instead of recognizing that crisis and offering some practicable ways to help keep the state solvent, cities, redevelop- ment agencies and enterprise zone ben- eficiaries are prepared to sue the state in courts, adding to the burden on tax- payers. Businesses and industries that operate in enterprise zones are the most shame-

Other voices

less. For years, they have benefited from the tax credits, operating loss deductions and other breaks that enter- prise zones provide. Yet instead of giv- ing back in a time of need, they are now claiming that California taxpayers are obligated to provide those benefits in perpetuity, or else be found in breach of contract. Using the same logic, homeowners in Sacramento and other cities could sue the state for contract clause violations. After all, we were lured here on the promise of adequate policing and rea- sonably funded schools. How come the state and city aren’t meeting their con- tracts with us? As for the redevelopment agencies, they’ve done nothing but build enemies in the last few weeks with an over-the- top public relations campaign attempt- ing to portray themselves as victims.

Someone should do an audit and find out how much of this campaign is being funded by developers who have been direct recipients of redevelopment subsidies. Especially ludicrous is the League of California Cities claim that eliminating redevelopment would violate Proposition 22, which prevented the state from grabbing funds used for local transportation and other services. As the Brown administration has rightly noted, elimination of redevelop- ment agencies wouldn’t result in a state money grab. It simply would give locals more latitude on how to spend the money. If they wanted to subsidize bars and nightclubs, they could do so. But if they instead wanted to use the money for law enforcement, low- income housing or other local priori- ties, they could do that, too. So let the cities and enterprise zones attempt to intimidate by vowing law- suits. Their threats are only hurting their cause, and helping Gov. Brown’s.

Energy costs’ effects on the economy

— The Dallas Morning News

O il has topped $100 a barrel for the first time since the finan- cial meltdown snapped a bear

trap on the U.S. economy. The nation still hasn’t freed itself, and the prospect of increasingly expen- sive oil isn’t making escape any easier. As oil prices crossed the $100 level, Federal Reserve chair Ben Bernanke tried to reassure Americans that the price spike from political revolt in Libya and Egypt would not scuttle the nation’s modest, tenuous economic recovery. Bernanke might be right, but that doesn’t mean the nation isn’t in

Other voices

line for more economic pain. Some analysts warn that oil prices could soar to $130 a barrel if the unrest spreads to Saudi Arabia and other key oil producers. Even if oil doesn’t reach that level, the price spike already has had an impact. Americans’ confidence in the economy has plummeted from the most positive the Gallup organiza- tion had measured in the last three years. Every additional penny you spend on food or gasoline is a penny you can’t spend in the rest of the economy.

Consumers will hunker down, busi- nesses won’t hire new employees, and banks won’t lend to small businesses. The cost of the energy needed to pro- duce and transport food will make gro- ceries more expensive. Adding to the uncertainty are crises faced by bloated federal and state governments that need to make deep cuts. No doubt, econo- mists, many of whom had been fore- casting modest economic growth this year based in part on the 11th-hour extension of the Bush tax cuts last year, will be revisiting their predictions. Until something approaching certain- ty returns to the chaotic Middle East, oil prices will rise, and we’ll continue to feel pain.

Letter to the editor

Not in favor of Dream Act amnesty

Editor, Mr. Roberto Pablo Pimienta wrote in favor of the DREAM Act which would give amnesty to young people who were smuggled into this country by their parents (“Working for the DREAM Act” guest perspective in the March 2 edition of the Daily Journal). He thinks these children should qualify for citizenship because of their talents, achievements and possible successes. What is his criteria to qualify for this benefit of citizenship? A high IQ? Will his Dream Act amnesty apply to the

school dropout, the gang member or the underachiever? Isn’t the DREAM Act a step in eroding out immigration law? My neighbors from Tonga, Fiji and Mexico don’t see the need for spe- cial treatment. They came here correct- ly and have fear of deportation. He writes that students will not receive financial support for their future careers. No mention that the American taxpayer has been paying for education, social services and medical needs throughout their undocumented lives. He writes that 825,000 undocument- ed youths could contribute to the American economy. He’s talking about taking 825,000 jobs lost to Americans. In addition, these youths have unlimit-

ed extended families that would be allowed to enter the United States and strain the economy and services. Mr. Pimienta writes that some of these gifted students no longer speak their native tongue. Anyone not taking advantage of the language department in most high schools can’t be that bright. Perhaps these educated, talented and caring high achievers could return to their country of citizenship and help educated and reduce poverty to make a better life for those in need.

Art Brown

Menlo Park

Jerry Lee , Publisher Jon Mays, Editor in Chief Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor Erik Oeverndiek,

Jerry Lee, Publisher

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Economic civil war

W ith the election of Ronald Reagan, I commenced with the feeling there was going to, eventually, be a form of rebellion in this country. The thought

seemed irrational for a time because I couldn’t see fertile soil

in this country for such an extreme development. There was near to full employment and the middle class seemed affluent and happy. But that nagging feeling hung on. And now I believe we are seeing fruition of that fear. Such rebellions happen unexpectedly, such as in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya. Who would have expected that a Wisconsin governor, propped up with big time billionaire and corporate money, attempting to dismantle a union would be the catalyst for a movement spreading across the Great Lakes and New England states? Most columnists, fearing to step on worshipper’s toes, have only been referring to the “economic developments of the past 30 years,” not men- tioning that the inception of that economic development was the election of Ronald Reagan, 31 years ago. Frankly, I have been bewil- dered for years that the voting public seemed to be oblivious of what was happening in the redistribution of our country’s wealth, since. Each year, beginning with Reagan’s favoring of, and tax breaks for, the wealthy, and being the godfather or grandfather of deregula- tion of the massive business entities, the very few rich and some corporations were getting even richer. They controlled at least 50 percent of the nation’s wealth, while the middle class, at best, was just holding its own and the poor were even more desperate. Then, I asked myself, where was the middle class outrage at the financial shenanigans that put us into “The Great Recession?” Of course, there has been the conventional blam- ing of welfare cheats and illegal immigrants to scapegoat the disaster. But, now, the piper is being paid. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s legislative initiative hit the middle class directly, right in the solar plexus. Even though most in our land are not in unions, themselves, they know, or sense, since the “Great Depression,” unions have been the

major factor opening the doors to a great army of blue-collar workers into the American middle class. And it is their more educated children who are now manning protest lines against the young Republican guns who are the new governors in Wisconsin, Indiana, Michigan and Ohio, especially, who are, in their view, initiating a coordinated assault upon the last viable bastions of the middle class. So they are coming out to demonstrate in droves. We know that even demonstrations of 70,000 are only the tip of the iceberg, representing millions of affected, their families and friends. I have written several times I believe the Republicans have been misreading the results of the 2010 elections, which for the most part were mindless reactions that turned out some exceptional congressmen and state legislators such as the con- servative Republican senator Bob Bennett of Idaho and Russ Feingold, the very effective Democratic senator from Wisconsin who cooperated with Republicans on some signal legislation. These tens of thousand of protesters are not rabble. Most are professionally trained, solid citizens, established and with families. They had been blindsided by a financial meltdown initiated by the recklessness of the financial world for which they, correctly, feel they bear no responsibly. Now this is something of a “last straw.” While the financial world has been thriving as never before, they are getting angrier and at this point won’t quietly “take it any more!” The legislative move that Walker and his Republican Legislature took to unravel the budget legislation and pass only that portion which takes away almost all bargaining rights from government employees is not the end of it. More demonstrations are planned across the northern tier of states, including a possible high school student walkout on Friday. Signature dates have been scheduled for recall elections for those in the state Senate who have served more than one year. The end of Walker’s one-year term is coming up next year. Ironically, the size of the shortfall in the state is a relative pittance in a state budget of $66 billion and could easily be closed by a small tax increase, but the Republicans are taking

a philosophical stand about that all over the country, which will ultimately redound to their disadvantage. There are, likely, no professional observers who believe

these attacks on the middle class’ last defense line against the developing ruling oligarchy are simply budgetary. More likely,

it is a coordinated conservative attempt to wipe out any organ-

ized resistance to them doing whatever they will with the country. My major fear is that these protests might become violent, pitting citizens against Walker’s National Guard. These things have happened before when I was Middle Western boy and they aren’t pretty.

when I was Middle Western boy and they aren’t pretty. Keith Kreitman has been a Foster

Keith Kreitman has been a Foster City resident for 25 years. He is retired with degrees in political science and journalism and advanced studies in law. He is the host of “Focus on the Arts” on Peninsula TV, Channel 26. His column appears in the week- end edition.

10 Weekend March 12-13, 2011

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Dow 12,044.40 +59.79 10-Yr Bond 3.3930% 0.00 Nasdaq 2,715.61 S&P 500 1,304.28 +14.59 Oil (per
Dow
12,044.40
+59.79
10-Yr Bond 3.3930% 0.00
Nasdaq 2,715.61
S&P 500 1,304.28
+14.59
Oil (per barrel)
101.16
+9.17
Gold
1,421.50

Stocks inch higher

By Francesca Levy and David K. Randall

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Stocks finished a down week with modest gains Friday as investors gauged the fallout from a mas- sive earthquake that struck off the coast of Japan and triggered tsunami waves from Asia to California. The prospect of falling oil demand from Japan sent crude oil prices down to $101 a barrel. Industrial and materials companies rose on expectations that they will benefit from Japan’s rebuilding efforts. One day after its biggest fall since August, the Dow Jones industrial average gained 59.79 points, or 0.5 percent, to 12,044.40. The S&P 500 rose 9.17, or 0.7 percent, to 1,304.28. The Nasdaq compos- ite gained 14.59, or 0.5 percent, to

2,715.61.

In addition to the earthquake, oil prices fell after a scheduled day of protests in Saudi Arabia only drew a few hundred people, and the capital remained quiet. Oil traders have been worried the violence in the Middle East and North Africa would spread to the world’s No. 1 oil exporter. “The market is going to be see-sawing back and forth” until the long-term effects of the unrest in the Middle East and the disaster in Japan become clear, said Anthony Chan, chief economist for J.P. Morgan Wealth Management. The earthquake and oil protests largely

Wall Street

overshadowed a report from the Commerce Department that retail sales rose 1 percent in February, the biggest gain in four months and more than the 0.8 percent analysts had expected. Shoppers laid out more cash for cars, clothing and gadgets in February, leading to an eighth month of gains. Despite Fridays’ gains, each index fin- ished the week lower. The Dow fell 1 per- cent, while the broader S&P index lost 1.3 percent. Stocks fell sharply Thursday on weak economic news from China, the U.S. and Spain combined with a slump in oil com- pany shares. The Dow Jones industrial average had its biggest drop since August 11. Other than several large swings in the past month, stocks have been climbing steadily since September. “It could be time for a well-deserved rest,” said Ryan Detrick, senior technical strategist for Schaeffer’s Investment Research. “The markets had a spectacular six-month rally and now they’re showing some slight cracks.” The quake caused a sell-off in global stock markets, led by sharp drops in insur- ance companies. Japan’s Nikkei closed down 1.7 percent. The yen remained sta- ble, however, because it is seen as a rela- tively safe investment for international traders.

Big movers

Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:

NYSE 99 Cents Only Stores,up $2.90 at $19.58 The discount store chain’s founding family and an investment firm offered to buy the company for $19.09 per share,about $1.3 billion. AnnTaylor Stores Corp.,up $3.08 at $27.29 The women’s clothing chain’s quarterly profit toppedWall Street estimates,and the company gave an upbeat sales forecast for the year. Aeropostale Inc.,down $1.58 at $23.05 The teen clothing seller gave earnings forecasts below Wall Street analysts’expectations as the company’s costs rise. Valero Energy Corp.,up $1.66 at $27.98 The oil refiner agreed to buy Chevron Corp.’s Pembroke refinery assets in the U.K.and Ireland for $1.73 billion. Carnival Corp.,down 51 cents at $39.94 The cruise operator cut its full-year earnings outlook because of rising fuel prices and itinerary changes in the Middle East. NASDAQ RC2 Corp.,up $2.80 at $28.31 Japan’s Tomy Co.will buy the maker of Thomas the Tank Engine train sets and other toys for $640 million. Smith & Wesson Holding Corp.,down 39 cents at $3.50 The gun company said businesses and the government were spending less on its perimeter security systems, and its forecast disappointed. Energy Conversion Devices Inc.,down 68 cents at $2.48 Problems with solar incentives in two key markets has put projects on hold and will likely weigh on the company’s revenue this quarter.

Florida loses $2.4B for high-speed trains

By Joan Lowy

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration has taken back the $2.4 billion allocated to Florida for high- speed trains and is inviting other states to apply for the money, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said Friday. The project, which would have con- nected Tampa and Orlando with high- speed trains, was rejected by Florida Gov. Rick Scott, a Republican. He said he didn’t want to obligate the state to pay for what could be expensive operat- ing costs for the line. However, the Florida Department of Transportation on Wednesday released a study showing the line connecting

Tampa to Orlando would have had an operating surplus in 2015, its first year of operation. It’s still possible for Florida supporters of the project to reapply for the funds without state help if they create a region- al transit authority working in conjunc- tion with Amtrak or another established transportation authority. However, they would have to work swiftly to meet the Transportation Department’s April 4 deadline for applications, a very tight window for such a complex undertaking. “Hope is alive for thousands of good- paying jobs and a modernized trans- portation system,” Sen. Bill Nelson, D- Fla., a supporter of the project, said in a statement. Several states, including New York,

Virginia, Vermont, Delaware and Rhode Island, have asked LaHood for Florida’s rail funds. But the only project that would achieve the high speeds associat- ed with bullet trains in Asia and Europe would be California’s plan for trains traveling up to 220 mph between San Francisco and Los Angeles and between Sacramento and San Francisco. “States across the country have been banging down our door for the opportu- nity to receive additional high-speed rail dollars and to deliver all of its economic benefits to their citizens,” LaHood said in a statement. Scott’s decision was challenged by supporters of the project, but last week the state Supreme Court upheld his right to reject the money.

Fed cuts could hit U.S. housing agencies

By Samantha Gross

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Kevin Gaines and his family got rashes soon after they moved into their new apartment. His son kept getting nosebleeds. The dust made it hard to breathe. When Gaines, a liver transplant recipient, saw yellow mold creeping over the ceiling, he said doctors warned it could cause him to reject his new organ. After Gaines complained, city inspec- tors recorded dozens of code violations and city workers even came in to make repairs. New York City officials warn, howev- er, that budget cuts being pushed by

some members of Congress could deci- mate their housing enforcement efforts,

slicing the funds used to pay inspectors, sue landlords and perform emergency repairs. Around the country, the cuts could also shutter community centers, leave rural water outages unchecked, stymie plans for new housing develop- ments and reduce the money available for fixing broken elevators and leaking roofs in the nation’s public housing. Budget proposals by both the Senate and House of Representatives were voted down Wednesday as lawmakers attempt to wrangle a compromise that would prevent the federal government from shutting down when the latest tem- porary spending measure expires March

18.

Republicans have pushed for deep spending cuts this year to help shrink a deficit that is on pace for a third straight year of topping $1 trillion. Democrats support some cuts but object to the scope of the Republican ideas, arguing that the GOP cuts would unfairly hurt education and support for the poor. Housing and community development officials across the nation are anxiously awaiting word on whether the 62 percent cut to federal Community Development Block Grants proposed by the Republican-controlled House will remain a part of any budget compromise. President Barack Obama has called for a smaller, 8 percent cut to the grants, while the Senate had pushed not to cut

them at all.

Apple fans line up to buy first batch of iPad 2s

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — The updated version of Apple Inc.’s iPad tablet com- puter went on sale Friday afternoon, and was greeted by the now-familiar lines of buyers outside Apple stores. The Cupertino company opened online sales of the iPad 2 at 4 a.m. Eastern time, well before they became

available in East Coast stores at 5 p.m. They were set to go on sale nationwide at the same hour, local time. Apple fans, as usual, were eager to get their hands on the device as they waited at the company’s Apple’s Fifth Avenue store in New York. The line of cus- tomers, including some who traveled from Japan and Russia, snaked through the street-level plaza above the subter-

ranean store while bystanders gawked at the crowd. Employees cheered from inside the store as iPad buyers entered. Alex Shumilov, a customer who traveled from Moscow to snag two iPads, emerged first, beaming while holding one tablet in each hand. The trendy device won’t go on sale outside the United States for another two weeks.

THOUGHTS ARE BACK HOME: JAPANESE BASEBALL PLAYERS TRYING TO GET INFO ON EARTHQUAKE >>> PAGE
THOUGHTS ARE BACK HOME: JAPANESE BASEBALL PLAYERS TRYING TO GET INFO ON EARTHQUAKE >>> PAGE 12
Weekend, March 12-13, 2011
<< MLS kicks off 16th season next week, page 12
• Warriors put up a fight against Orlando, page 13

Serra beats Panthers in annual pitchers’ duel

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Judging by the way he pitched Friday night under the lights at Washington Park, it’s safe to say that Serra’s Thomas Cox is ready for the West Catholic Athletic League baseball season to begin. The junior left-hander crafted a 116-pitch complete game gem against Burlingame in the annual non-league rivalry matchup, leading the Padres to a 3-1 victory. The Panthers’ only run came in the bottom of the fourth and it was unearned. Cox struck out 11, including two in the game’s nal frame.

“I felt good,” Cox said. “Coach has us doing a lot of work, a lot of running, a lot of band work to get our arms in shape for situations like these — even if our pitch count is going up, thanks to coach we still got juice in the tank.” As it turns out, Cox had plenty of juice. He grew stronger as the game wore on and once his team gave him the lead following a three- run top of the fth, Cox’s velocity picked up and he was darn near unhittable. Going into the last part of the seventh inning, he was at 99 pitches. “He was no doubt going back in,” said Serra manager Craig Gianinno about his left-hander and the bottom of the seventh inning. “His

pitch count certainly was a little elevated, but you know, it’s been gradually extended — par- tially the kid deserved to go back out there, he pitched lights out tonight. (He had) command of three pitches, located the fastball on both sides of the plate. What’s more impressive is that he was composed, poised and just makes pitches.” Gianinno’s reference to Cox’s poise and composure was rooted in the way he pitched the bottom of the fourth inning. Cox walked Vince Arobio to start the inning, but got Chris Blanton to hit what looked to be a tailor-made double-play ball. But the throw to second went into right eld, giving the Panthers a free rally.

They’d take advantage of that opportunity in their next at-bat when a passed ball allowed Arobio to score rather easily from third. After walking Saamy Phan, Cox buckled down and got the next three outs, stranding the two Burlingame runners. Burlingame led 1-0 and they had to be pleased with starting pitcher Zach Grotz’s 2011 debut. The right-hander pitched four scoreless innings and overpowered the Padres, recording nine strikeouts in his time on the mound. “He came out did exactly what we asked him to do,” said Burlingame manager Shawn Scott.

See RIVALS, Page 14

said Burlingame manager Shawn Scott. See RIVALS , Page 14 NATHAN MOLLAT / DAILY JOURNAL San

NATHAN MOLLAT / DAILY JOURNAL

San Mateo’s Karyn Jacobs slides safely into home ahead of the throw during the Bearcats’4-1 win over Sacred Heart Cathedral Friday.

Bearcats sink Irish

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

In 2010, the San Mateo High softball team

nished in a three-way tie for the Ocean

Division championship. The Bearcats earned the division’s only Central Coast Section berth based on the power points accumulated throughout the season. Bearcats coach Randy Boardman realized his team had to play good squads to gain the points. It paid off with a playoff berth. Boardman is using the same formula this season, having already played a number of “A” league teams — programs that play in

high-level leagues. San Mateo is not merely playing sacricial lamb either. The Bearcats improved to 3-1 on the season with 4-1 win over visiting Sacred Heart Cathedral Friday afternoon. The Bearcats got a strong pitching perform- ance from Bailey Sutton and just enough offense to pull out the win. “My pitcher wasn’t 100 percent, but she’s gutsy,” Boardman said. “(Then) we got a cou- ple of timely hits. Overall, (we did) pretty good.” Bailey, a junior, is already in her third varsi- ty season and if she pitched in the Peninsula Athletic League’s Bay Division, she would be

a lot more heralded. As it stands, she is still one of the top hurlers in the entire PAL. And even at less than full strength, Bailey had more than enough to shut down the Irish. “She’s one of those girls who is just a soft- ball player,” said Boardman, adding she does- n’t play any other sports. Sutton allowed only one run (unearned) on just two hits in seven innings of work, striking out seven and walking one during her 117- pitch effort. Coming off an ear infection, Sutton started to labor late in the game as her stamina was

See BEARCATS, Page 14

Players decertify,NFL owners lock them out

By Howard Fendrich

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Unable to decide how to divvy up $9 billion a year, NFL owners and players put the country’s most popular sport in limbo Friday by breaking off labor negoti- ations hours before their contract expired. The union decertied; the league imposed a lock- out. Ten players, including MVP quarterbacks Tom Brady and Peyton Manning, sued the

owners in federal court in Minneapolis. Then, at midnight, the owners locked out players, two people with knowledge of the league’s decision told the Associated Press — signal- ing the NFL’s rst work stoppage since 1987. One of the people told the AP that the league informed all 32 teams and the union about the move shortly before 12 a.m. Both spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to release the information. Despite two extensions to the collective bar-

gaining agreement during 16 days of talks overseen by a federal mediator — and previ- ous months of stop-and-start negotiating — the sides could not agree on a new deal. Now they will be adversaries in court: The players already requested an injunction to block a lockout, even before one was in place. As was clear all along, the dispute came down to money. In the end, it appeared the sides were about $185 million apart on how much owners should get up front each season

See NFL, Page 15

owners should get up front each season See NFL , Page 15 TERRY BERNAL Former Burlingame

TERRY BERNAL

Former Burlingame standout Matt Chavez warms up a USF relief pitcher during the Dons’ game Friday night at AT&T Park.

Chavez and USF need each other

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

SAN FRANCISCO — Like many through- out college baseball — due much in part to the dawn of a new era of safer composite bats — University of San Francisco has been mired in offensive woes this season. And while the Dons enjoyed an early lead over UC Santa Barbara yesterday in their opening game of the Cal Baseball Classic at AT&T Park, junior slugger Matt Chavez knelt curiously at the top step of the home-team dugout to watch his team bat throughout the early innings.

Chavez — Burlingame High’s all-time, sin- gle-season home run leader — is currently serving a 19-game suspension for undisclosed reasons. He has yet to play this year, and will not be activated until next weekend at Arizona. “I’d like to not divulge any information,” Chavez said. “Honestly, I’ve served my sus- pension here. I’m going to be back next week. I’ve paid for my mistakes. You know, I’m ready to be back playing baseball.” As the Dons (6-7) would go on to win yes- terday’s low-scoring thriller 3-2, all Chavez could do is sit and watch. At least, that’s how it seemed. Chavez, though, is embracing his duty to the team, and is doing so with a strange calm. Strange, perhaps, because his stature —

a chiseled 6-foot-2, 220-pounds — is natural-

ly imposing. Nonetheless, he is carrying him- self with a strange calm. “I think of it as more that I’m working to be

a player from the bench right now,” Chavez

said. “I’m working to get myself off the bench.

See CHAVEZ, Page 14

12 Weekend March 12-13, 2011

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Japanese players anxious for news

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Boston pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka tried to get in touch with his grandmother. Oakland slugger Hideki Matsui prayed for the victims. Mets reliever Ryota Igarashi stayed up all night to see the devastation. All across spring training, Japanese ballplayers worried Friday about those at home. Hundreds of people were killed or missing after Japan was struck by its biggest recorded earthquake and a massive tsunami. “It’s a tough situation,” Red Sox reliever Hideki Okajima said through a translator. “You can’t control nature, but when some-

thing like this happens, you really realize the power of nature.” Matsuzaka said his parents in Tokyo were all right, but “I haven’t been able to get in touch with my grandmother,” he said. At the Texas camp, pitcher Yoshinori Tateyama stood in front of a TV tuned to CNN. As he watched the pictures, he used his fingers to draw a map of Japan on a table, try- ing to show Rangers teammates Josh Hamilton and Mitch Moreland where the damage occurred. Tateyama said he found out what happened in an e-mail from a friend after the morning workouts. “At that time I realized how big it was,” he said through a translator. More than a dozen players from Japan played in the majors last season. Through his translator, Seattle star Ichiro Suzuki said he hadn’t been able to reach his family with so many cell phone towers down.

“I am deeply concerned and affected by

what is happening in Japan,” Matsui said in a statement before his A’s played the Dodgers. “I pray for the safety of all the people that have been affected and continue to be affected

people that have been affected and continue to be affected Daisuke Matsuzaka by this disaster.” Commissioner

Daisuke

Matsuzaka

by this disaster.” Commissioner Bud Selig said his staff had been in contact with its office in Tokyo. In Japan, baseball games in Tokyo, Chiba and Yokohama were called off, as were all pro sports in the country. “Major League Baseball will certainly provide aid

with the relief efforts in the days and weeks ahead. We will do every- thing we can to help Japan,” Selig said in a statement. The New York Yankees donated $100,000 for relief and rescue efforts in Japan, splitting the total between the Salvation Army and Red Cross. The Oakland Athletics said they would help relief aid by adding a fundraising effort to the previously scheduled Japanese Heritage Day on April 3, when Ichiro and the Mariners visit Matsui and the A’s at the Coliseum. The San Diego Padres are pledged to raise money dur- ing their Japanese Heritage Night on May 20 against Seattle. Beyond baseball, other sports were affected by the magnitude-8.9 earthquake. There was a moment of silence before the NBA game between the Portland Trail Blazers and Bobcats in Charlotte, N.C., and before the Utah Jazz played the Minnesota Timberwolves in Minneapolis. Golfer Ryo Ishikawa woke up and heard about the destruction. He managed to keep his focus and shot a 7-under 65 at the first round of the Cadillac Championship in Doral, Fla. “I was able to communicate with my fami- ly,” Ishikawa said. “If not for that, it would have been extremely difficult.” At the BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament

difficult.” At the BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament in Indian Wells, Calif., Kimiko Date-Krumm wor- ried

in Indian Wells, Calif., Kimiko Date-Krumm wor- ried about loved ones back in Tokyo. “I tried to call my moth- er and she was OK. And this morning my family sent me an e-mail and said everyone was fine,” she said. “But I saw the news

and it is very horrible.” “I’m still in shock. I hope there isn’t any- thing else coming,” she said. Jenson Button, the 2009 Formula One world champion, said he was relieved after reaching his girlfriend by Twitter. The driver said Japanese model Jessica Michibata had been in an underground photo shoot in Tokyo when tremors began to rock the building. “She’s fine, very shaken,” Button said in Spain. “Right now, my thoughts go out to everybody in Japan, particularly in the worst- affected area of Sendai. My heart is with them.” The San Jose Earthquakes of Major League Soccer will donate $1 for every fan who attends their home opener Saturday to victims in Japan. At the Yankees’ training complex in Tampa, Fla., minor league pitcher Kei Igawa was excused from workouts to return to his apart- ment and attempt to reach his family. Yankees general manager Brian Cashman said the team had given Igawa permission to return home if he wants. Cashman lived in Japan as part of an exchange program and went there several years ago when the Yankees opened the regular season in Tokyo. “It’s difficult to watch,” Cashman said. “I think the entire world has Japan in their hearts and minds. We have a lot of friends, relation- ships there.”

Hidecki Matsui

Baltimore pitcher Koji Uehara said his fam- ily was safe, but hadn’t been able to contact some friends. “At this moment, I don’t really know all the details yet, but I am guessing that the damage will be huge, so I am worried,” he said through a translator. Former St. Louis outfielder So Taguchi sent an e-mail from Japan to an American friend. “We are all safe but some of our friends are having hard time. We have been sticking to TV since it happened,” he said. “Would you say hi to the Cardinals for us?” At the Mets’ camp in Port St. Lucie, Fla., Igarashi was with his wife, son and daughter. He tried in the morning to contact family and friends in Japan, but found communication lines shut. By late afternoon, he was able to get through. Igarashi said he learned of the earthquake about 2:30 a.m. in a call from his translator. He put on CNN but because his English is limited, the pitcher said he turned to the Internet. “It’s pretty obvious from watching the imagery on the television screen of what’s going on,” he said. “But to get the details of the tremors in certain areas and the damage I went to the Japanese live stream to find out,” he said. Minnesota second baseman Tsuyoshi Nishioka said he did not know about the dam- age until getting to the ballpark. He found out his family was safe, then debated whether he should play. He did, getting a hit against Boston. “I understand that I’m in an occupation where I can bring hope and energy back home to Japan,” Nishioka said through a translator. “So I wanted to be on the field and think about people back home and give it all out on the field to try and give something back.”

Major League Soccer set for 16th season

By Tim Booth

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — Don Garber could pick from any number of story lines to highlight the upcoming Major League Soccer season. For the commissioner of the MLS, though, nothing tops the creation of a regional rivalry in the Pacific Northwest — one that is likely to become a prototype for others to match, helping the league gain more traction around the country. “It’s a huge deal for us,” Garber said.

“Rivalries are a big part of the DNA of foot- ball overseas and I believe those rivalries drive the passion that makes this sport the beautiful game.” While the idea of Seattle, Portland and Vancouver playing for regional pride has league execs excited, there’s a lot more to MLS 2011. Entering its 16th season, the league has a chance to create the kind of buzz it hasn’t enjoyed since its inception in the mid-90s, even with the likelihood of 2011 being David Beckham’s final year in MLS with the expira- tion of his five-year contract.

Its two biggest markets — New York and

Los Angeles — are home to some of the

league’s biggest stars and could have the two best teams.

A new soccer-specific stadium will open

midseason in Kansas City, while another is under construction in Houston, giving the league another layer of legitimacy. There are individual stories like the return of former U.S. national team striker Charlie Davies with D.C. United and his continued comeback from a car accident that cost him a spot on the 2010 World Cup team, and the pending retirement of former U.S. goalkeeper Kasey Keller at the end of the season. And, of course, there’s the most talked- about MLS rivalry ever taking shape in the Pacific Northwest, with the arrival of the expansion Portland Timbers and Vancouver Whitecaps to sandwich the Seattle Sounders in a fight for Cascadia bragging rights — one that dates back to the old North American Soccer League.

“Entering its 16th season,the league has a chance to create the kind of buzz it hasn’t enjoyed since its inception in the mid-90s,even with the likelihood of 2011 being David Beckham’s final year in MLS with the expiration of his five-year contract.”

“From a soccer perspective, because of the history and the rivalries that already exist, that’s going to be exciting on the field,” ESPN soccer analyst Alexi Lalas said. “And from the business perspective I think that’s going to be exciting because of the way these ownership groups are going about their business given their history there.” The MLS season begins Tuesday night with Seattle hosting Los Angeles. The rest of the schedule begins March 19 with Vancouver hosting Toronto, Seattle at New York, Columbus at D.C. United, Philadelphia at Houston, Chicago at Dallas, Portland at Colorado, Kansas City at Chivas USA and Real Salt Lake at San Jose. Los Angeles hosts New England on March 20. The season concludes in October and fea- tures a new playoff format with the top three teams from each conference and the next four teams with the highest point total — regard- less of conference — qualifying for the post- season. Those four “wild cards” will play each other with the two winners advancing to a tra- ditional eight-team bracket. The MLS Cup will be played at a neutral site again in 2011, but Garber reiterated that it’s a case of “when” not “if” the champi- onship game will move to the home of the team with the highest seed. “I believe that will be a very exiting and compelling format that will not take away from the importance of the regular season as some people believe it might,” Garber said in a phone interview. “I think it will create a race for the playoffs for more teams that will be in it up until the last moment and give us more opportunity for memorable games in the post- season.” From an exposure standpoint, MLS could use the Red Bulls and Galaxy as the class of the league with the star power each brings. They nearly got the perfect scenario last year

with both winning their conferences, only to see an MLS Cup final of FC Dallas and Colorado that helped bring attention in small-

er markets but might have detracted from the

league gaining a wider audience. Both Colorado and Dallas return strong sides, but could find themselves as also-rans this season in a loaded Western Conference where most of the league’s favorites reside. Los Angeles may bring the most star power with Beckham in the final year of his MLS contract, Landon Donovan and the addition of former Red Bulls’ star Juan Pablo Angel. But

most believe the team to beat in the West will be 2009 MLS Cup champion Real Salt Lake with a roster mostly intact from last season and looking to make up for an unexpected and disappointing opening-round playoff exit. RSL is already getting tested before the reg- ular season even begins, advancing to the semifinals of the CONCACAF Champions League. “We really raised the level of expectations for ourselves,” Salt Lake coach Jason Kreis said. While the powers of the West might be the Galaxy and RSL, much of the focus this sea- son will go to the Northwest and the introduc- tion of expansion Portland and Vancouver joining what’s already a rabid fan base in Seattle. The rivalry between the three clubs started in 1974 when Seattle and Vancouver met for the first time in the NASL and was enhanced

a year later when Portland joined the fray.

Now it’s being renewed at the highest level of soccer in the U.S. and Canada.

Portland will play at a renovated PGE Park

in downtown Portland, making its home debut

April 14 against Chicago. Vancouver begins at home March 19 against Canadian rival

Toronto FC, playing the majority of its season

at Empire Field, before moving into a reno-

vated B.C. Place Stadium on Oct. 3 against the Timbers. “I think the biggest challenge is no different than any other team. You’re looking to put a winning group on the field week in, week out,” Portland coach John Spencer said. “A

team that can compete in all different climates and all different time zones. The mentality can’t be any different from any of the other teams in MLS, (like) the Dynamo, the L.A. Galaxy. “The challenges are the same. We have the same salary cap room, the same roster size. So

I think you can go make excuses for yourself

or you can go and try to be as competitive as you can, and that’s what we aim to do.” New York is again favored to win the East,

and this time will get a full season out of strik- er Thierry Henry and defender Rafa Marquez. There’s also midfielder Juan Agudelo, one of the top young stars in the league. “There’s more lights in New York with the designated players,” Red Bulls’ midfielder Mehdi Ballouchy. “That brings a lot of fans, brings a lot of attention to the team. We have

a lot of good players. With a good start to the season, we can do some damage.” While New York is the favorite of most, there is a rising wave of talent coming from Kansas City, with the signing of former Chivas de Guadalajara star Omar Bravo as its second designated player and the midseason opening of Livestrong Sporting Park. There’s also the addition of Houston to the Eastern Conference making the move with the addi- tion of two West Coast teams. The league has 18 clubs overall, with Montreal coming on in

2012.

“We definitely have a better starting point than we did last year. The coaches have emphasized that to us,” Kansas City captain Davy Arnaud said. “Last year, it took us a while to find our identity as a team, what made us successful and got us wins. Now, we know who we are and how we want to play. Everybody knows from day one what is expected of them.”

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Weekend March 12-13, 2011

13

Warriors take down Orlando in overtime

By Antonio Gonzalez

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Monta Ellis had 39 points and 11 assists, Dorell Wright scored 32 points and the Golden State Warriors came back from 21 points down to stun the Orlando Magic 123-120 in overtime Friday night. Stephen Curry added 22 points and 12 assists, and the Warriors made a franchise-record 21 3- pointers to highlight a furious second-half push that toppled the Magic in thrilling fashion. Jason Richardson scored 30 points and Jameer Nelson had 24 points in another underwhelming performance for the Magic against an inferior opponent. They wasted a big lead with a poor defensive effort after the break.

Warriors 123, Magic 120

defensive effort after the break. Warriors 123, Magic 120 Monta Ellis And by the time they

Monta Ellis

And by the time they tried to pull away again, it was just too late. The Warriors couldn’t miss. Orlando went back ahead by ve in the fourth quarter when Golden State started another rally. Wright and Curry each made a 3-point-

er to give Golden State a 98- 94 lead with 1:48 remaining. The teams traded baskets until Ellis turned the ball over with an errant pass that landed in the hands of Nelson. Orlando rushed up court and a

wide-open Hedo Turkoglu hit a 3-pointer from the top of the arc with 8.3 seconds left to tie the score. In a nal chance to win it in regulation, Howard deected a pick-and-roll pass from Curry, and time expired in the scramble for the ball. The extra period provided even more drama. Ellis nished over Turkoglu with a dazzling layup, his back to the basket as he icked it off the glass and in for a three-point play to help put Golden State ahead by four. The Magic answered over and over with big baskets of their own. Jason Richardson’s 3-pointer brought them back within a point. Down by two points in the nal minute of overtime, Nelson stole the inbound pass and seemingly converted a layup for a three-point

play — but Ellis forced a charging call, then made two free throws to put Golden State ahead by four. The Magic had one last chance to send it to a second overtime, with Turkoglu and Richardson each missing 3-pointers in the nal seconds before the buzzer sounded, sending confetti falling from the rafters in one of the biggest wins of the season for Golden State. It was a scene few could’ve imagined early on. The Magic turned things into their own per- sonal highlight show in the rst half: Howard spun baseline for an alley-oop dunk from Jameer Nelson, Richardson had another and a urry of 3- pointers buried the Warriors in a 21-point hole by the second quarter. All they did from there was blow it.

Mahan loses cushion but keeps lead at Doral

By Doug Ferguson

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DORAL, Fla. — Martin Kaymer is the new No. 1 in golf and getting the same kind of respect another No. 1 once did. Never mind that Hunter Mahan had a one-shot lead going into the weekend of the Cadillac Championship after stumbling with a pair of bogeys in the nal hour of his second round Friday for a 1-under 71. It was the guy right behind him who made some players take notice. Kaymer opened his season with an eight-shot win in Abu Dhabi. He went to the top of the rank- ing by reaching the nal of the Match Play Championship. And in his rst start as No. 1., he eased his way to a bogey-free 70 to get within one shot of the lead halfway through this World Golf Championship. “That’s why he’s world No. 1,” Rory McIlroy said. McIlroy had a 69, and was two shots out of the lead. That’s not what concerned him. “Even though Hunter is a couple of shots ahead of me, to give Martin a stroke lead is going to be pretty tough to sort of keep up with him,” McIlroy said.

The 26-year-old “Germanator” is starting to

establish a presence on the leaderboard, much like Tiger Woods did for so many years. For now, Woods is having to settle for middle of the pack. Mahan, who has played beautifully for two days on the Blue Monster and was at 9-under 135, had

a four-shot lead on the back nine until his long

three-putt bogey on the 14th and a poor tee shot that led to bogey on the 16th. That cost him a cush- ion, but not the lead. He will be in the nal group with Kaymer.

Francesco Molinari, going for his second World Golf Championship, had a 68 and joined Kaymer

at 8 under.

Mahan’s nish brought so many others into the

mix.

McIlroy, Matt Kuchar (69) and Nick Watney (70) were among those two shots behind, while Dustin Johnson (69) and Adam Scott (70) were another stroke back. Woods, a three-time winner at Doral, was not among them. Neither was Phil Mickelson. Woods again struggled with his putter, missing four birdie putts inside 10 feet and looking bad at the end. A pair of 6-foot birdie attempts at the 16th and 18th holes never had much of a chance and he wound up with a 74, nine shots behind.

of a chance and he wound up with a 74, nine shots behind. Martinez, Dzinziruk ready
of a chance and he wound up with a 74, nine shots behind. Martinez, Dzinziruk ready

Martinez, Dzinziruk ready for their middleweight fight

By Dave Skretta

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Lou DiBella might have been the only person in the world who didn’t want to see Sergio Martinez defend his mid- dleweight championship against Sergiy Dzinziruk. The wise promoter knew his ghter would be putting his title and reputation on the line against a dangerous, unbeaten junior mid- dleweight champ, one with little name recog- nition in the United States outside the most ardent boxing fans. “It’s no secret that I didn’t like this ght,” DiBella said. “HBO twisted my arm, but I give them credit. This is the best possible opponent in the world to ght Sergio.” The ght will take place Saturday night from the MGM Grand Arena at Foxwoods Resort and Casino in Mashantucket, Conn. HBO will carry it live. “Sergio was a relatively unknown boxer, but he beat Kelly Pavlik and followed that with unquestionably the knockout of the year against Paul Williams,” HBO vice president Kery Davis said. “Sergio is good looking, intelligent and he has charisma. The sky is the limit for him.

“He is ghting the challenge of his life,” Davis said. “Many feel Sergiy Dzinziruk is the No. 1 154-pounder in the world. He is rela- tively unknown. When you put the best mid- dleweight in the world against the best junior middleweight in the world, you should never apologize.” Even though it cost Martinez yet another championship belt. The former junior middleweight champion won the WBC and WBO versions of the 160-

pound title with a bloody decision over Pavlik last spring. Martinez was forced to give up the WBO belt first, when he knocked out Williams last November, then had to give up his WBC championship when he accepted the

ght against Dzinziruk rather than mandatory

challenger Sebastian Zbik. Martinez (46-2-2, 25 KOs) is still recog- nized as the top middleweight in the world, though, regardless of what trinkets are — or are not — strapped around his waist. “Sergio agreed to ght him despite giving up his middleweight belt,” DiBella said. “He wants to leave a legacy of ghting the best, and there’s no doubt that Sergiy is the best.” DiBella said earlier this week that Martinez’s trainer, Gabriel Sarmiento, would not be in the corner Saturday night because of some “personal issues.”

trainer, Gabriel Sarmiento, would not be in the corner Saturday night because of some “personal issues.”
trainer, Gabriel Sarmiento, would not be in the corner Saturday night because of some “personal issues.”

14 Weekend March 12-13, 2011

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

St. Mary’s pads resume with win over Weber St.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MORAGA — Rob Jones had 20 points and 13 rebounds Friday night, lifting Saint Mary’s to a 77-54 victory over Weber State as the Gaels improved their resume for the NCAA tournament selection committee with their 25th win of the season. Mickey McConnell added 15 points and eight assists for Saint Mary’s (25-8), while

Clint Steindl had 13 points, all in the rst half. Trevor Morris, playing in his school-record 121st career game, led Weber State (18-13) with 13 points. Saint Mary’s coach Randy Bennett didn’t

add the game against Weber State until late in the season. He said he wanted to give his team

a tune-up during the layoff between the West

Coast Conference tournament and, hopefully,

a rst-round game in the NCAA tournament. After losing to Gonzaga in the conference tournament nals and failing to earn an auto- matic berth, the Gaels entered Friday’s game with a chance to help or hurt their NCAA tournament chances. “It didn’t hurt,” Bennett said after the win. “I think it could have hurt. That was kind of how I was approaching it. I have no idea how they factor it into the whole deal. All I know

is it’s a win. That’s 25 wins, and we have a pretty good resume.” The Gaels used a 20-2 run to build a 36-20 lead with just over 4 minutes left in the rst half. Steindl, who came off the bench for the third straight game after losing his starting job to Stephen Holt, had nine points during the run, hitting a trio of 3-pointers. McConnell had six points and Jones ve as Saint Mary’s took control.

CHAVEZ

Continued from page 11

I mean, I’m on a suspension, but I still have to keep my mind in it, and put my work in the best possible way I can.” Case in point: when winning pitcher Matt Lujan got into trouble in the sixth inning, Chavez was dispatched to the bullpen as a catcher to warm up a reliever. It isn’t a role that often befalls one of the best hitters on a team. While he was penciled into the heart of the order previous to his suspension by Dons manager Nino Giarratano, Chavez still has to prove his mettle at the Division I level. Last season, he played sporadically after getting off to a poor start. He went on to hit just .224 with two home runs, and had more success as a pitcher in 15 relief appearances.

That’s when talk of a possible full-time con- version to the mound started gathering steam. But a summer stint with the Bedford Bay Sox in the wood-bat New England Collegiate Baseball League reinvigorated his offensive stock. “I was looking to be a two-way player, but I didn’t get to pitch very much,” Chavez said. “They wanted to use me as a hitter because I was hitting pretty well. I was coming off a poor season (at USF), in my opinion, for hit- ting. So, I was just trying to pick up the bat, keep it simple, try to straighten out my approach, and it worked out.” Chavez ended up capturing the league bat- ting championship with a .355 average. With four home runs and 11 doubles, he managed to nish third in the league with a .518 slug- ging percentage. Giarratano is optimistic Chavez will crack the lineup next Sunday when he is reinstated. The Dons can certainly use the offensive re-

power, as they are batting just .239 on the sea- son as a team, with a mere one home run through 13 games. “I’d like to get him in there as soon as we can,” Giarratano said. “We really could use his bat. It would really help us offensively to score more runs and hopefully he will be ready to go.” Giarratano, however, acknowledged Chavez

still needs to face live pitching to get back into baseball shape, and it’s still undetermined as to where he ts on the diamond. He will like- ly DH, but he has experience at pitcher, left

eld and rst base, and is also listed as USF’s third-string catcher. As for now, his most useful position is at bullpen catcher. But, the nostalgia of digging his cleats into the bullpen dirt — where catch- er Buster Posey rst served the Giants before ever getting into a Major League game — wasn’t lost on Chavez. “(Posey) did a lot of different things too, so

hopefully I can work myself to be a Rookie of the Year someday like him,” Chavez said. Perhaps this is what puts the “strange” in his strange calm. Chavez has big-league ambitions — or in his words, hopes — which are not out of the question. And, it’s foresee- able the junior will gather draft stack by June. “He’s plenty draftable,” Giarratano said. “He has raw power, and any time you have raw power, you’re always going to get an opportunity to play.”

Cal Classic schedule

Play continues Saturday at AT&T Park with a three-game bill. Louisiana-Lafayette vs. UC Santa Barbara is scheduled for 11 a.m., Long Beach State vs. USF is scheduled for 3 p.m., and No. 14 Rice vs. No. 20 Cal is set for 7 p.m. Sunday, play concludes with Louisiana- Lafayette vs. USF at 9 a.m., UC Santa Barbara vs. Rice at 12:30 p.m., and Long Beach State vs. Cal at 4 p.m.

BEARCATS

Continued from page 11

sapped from the illness, but the fact her defense committed six errors behind her forced her throw over 30 more pitches. The miscues didn’t hurt the Bearcats — too much. Sacred Heart Cathedral took advantage of an error in the top of the rst inning to score its only run of the game. The Irish’s leadoff hitter, Rebecca Gislow, lofted a y ball to shallow right eld. While the ball was des- tined to fall in for hit, it got by the San Mateo

right elder and allowed Gislow to take sec- ond. A sacrice bunt sent her to third and she scored on an Anna Palter groundout. An error on the San Mateo catcher enabled Raquel Gaffud to reach rst and she moved to second on a stolen base. Sutton struck out Julia Gallegos to end the inning. It was the rst of four inning-ending strike- outs for Sutton — all of which were looking.

San Mateo (3-1 overall) responded with two runs in the bottom of the rst to take the lead for good. Karyn Jacobs led off the inning with

a single to center. Tayler Titus came up and

put down a sacrice bunt, beating the throw to

rst to put runners on rst and second. Both

runners moved up on a passed ball and Jacobs came home on a Francie Cohen groundout, beating the throw home from the rst base- man. Sutton followed and reached on an error with Titus scoring on the play. In the second inning, the Irish picked up their last hit of the game when Natalie Viola singled and went to second when the ball got by the San Mateo left elder. She went to third on a wild pitch but was stranded there. Viola was the last Irish base runner to advance as far as third base and they had only one other advance as far as second base. San Mateo tacked on a run in the fourth when Sutton singled to left. Courtesy runner

Brianna Wong went to second on a groundout and ended up scoring on Carly Baumann’s one-out single to center. The Bearcats added an insurance run in the bottom of the sixth, getting an RBI single from Megan Hughes. The Bearcats wasted little time on offense swinging at pitches. Only ve Bearcats took the count to three balls and all ve of those batters walked. Most of the time, the Bearcats were taking their hacks early in the count. “We’re looking to be aggressive,” Boardman said. “We want them to look for their pitch. If it’s a good one and they can han- dle it, go for it.”

RIVALS

Continued from page 11

“We asked for three innings and he did it — he wanted to go out for the fourth and I allowed him to because he still felt strong. He was very impressive. He’s going to be all right.” Not having Grotz come out for the fth must have been a welcomed sight for the Padres.

They jumped quickly on reliever Nick Baylock, who was ahead 1-2 to both Chris Moreno and Paul Murray but was beaten for extra base hits — the second was triple by Murray that tied the game. Baylock settled

down and it looked like he would get out of the frame with minimal damage, striking out two

of the next three Serra hitters.

But in what might have been the at-bat of the game, Serra’s Austin March singled on an 0-2 pitch, punching the ball into left eld and plat-

an 0-2 pitch, punching the ball into left fi eld and plat- ing Murray. The Padres

ing Murray. The Padres would get another run on a single by Ricky Rolles, scoring March and ending the night for Baylock. “We’ve been working really hard on our two- strike approach. We had opportunities every inning, the whole game, and just could not cap- italize. What’s more impressive is that they went up one run and we answered with three,” Gianinno said. As it turned out, three runs would be more than enough for Cox, who was solid the rest of

the way, surrendering a couple of hits, but get- ting some help by his defense — a 4-6 line- drive double play ended the Panthers’ last real threat of the game in the bottom of the sixth inning. “I’m not upset about the outcome,” Scott said. “Our kids played with an A-league team and held their own.” “Winning is everything to us,” Cox said. “We want to win, but we also want to have fun out there. Tonight was a blast.”

is everything to us,” Cox said. “We want to win, but we also want to have

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Weekend March 12-13, 2011

15

Lawyer who warned Tressel getting death threats

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

COLUMBUS, Ohio — The Columbus lawyer who tipped off Ohio State coach Jim Tressel that two of his players were involved in a federal drug trafcking case has received death threats and now says he regrets ever contacting the Buckeyes coach. “I’m not the Judas in this situation. You know, I feel like Peter, but I’m not the Judas,” attorney Christopher Cicero said in an interview Friday with ESPN’s “Outside The Lines” and reported on ESPN.com. Tressel has admitted he violated NCAA rules for not disclosing information Cicero e-mailed to him. He repeatedly refrained from telling Ohio State’s compliance department or his superiors about potential NCAA bylaw violations involving

superiors about potential NCAA bylaw violations involving Jim Tressel some of his players. Tressel has been

Jim Tressel

some of his players. Tressel has been suspend- ed for the rst two games of the 2011 season and must pay a $250,000 ne. The NCAA could levy additional penalties on Tressel. The coach received a resounding vote of condence from ath- letic director Gene Smith and Ohio State President E.

Gordon Gee at a news conference on Tuesday night.

In the rst e-mail from Cicero, at 2:32 p.m. on

April 2, 2010, Cicero said that Ohio State players were giving autographed Buckeyes football shirts, jerseys and footballs to a Columbus tattoo-parlor

owner who was under investigation by the U.S.

Attorney in a drug-trafcking case. “Just passing this on to you,” Cicero wrote. Exactly four hours later, Tressel replied:

“Thanks. I will get on it ASAP.” However, the coach did not tell Smith or anyone in his compliance department until ofcials pre- sented him with the e-mails in January — more than nine months after star quarterback Terrelle Pryor and four teammates were suspended for the rst ve games of the 2011 season for selling signed jerseys and gloves along with champi- onship rings and trophies for money in addition to getting discounts on tattoos. Cicero said he had received death threats in the past few days since his role in Tressel’s NCAA violation came to light. Yahoo! Sports rst report- ed on Monday that Tressel had prior knowledge of the improper benets involving his players.

“I wanted him to know that the kids had been

hanging out with a person who was the subject of

a federal investigation,” Cicero said when asked

why he told Tressel about the players’relationship with Eddie Rife, the owner of the tattoo parlor. “As

a result of that, I also heard that they had been

exchanging memorabilia with this particular per- son. And I outlined that in the e-mail. I threw it out there.” Tressel said at Tuesday’s news conference that

he did not disclose the information from Cicero because he was concerned about preserving the

condentiality of a federal drug investigation. But Tressel never spoke to any federal agents about the matter and Cicero did not ask him to keep the information to himself until an e-mail on April 16

in which Cicero said he had spoken to Rife in his

ofce the night before.

NFL

Continued from page 11

for certain operating expenses before splitting the rest of the revenues with players — a far cry from the $1 billion that separated the sides for so long. But the NFL Players Association refused to budge any further without getting detailed nancial information for each team. "I would dare any one of you to pull out any economic indicator that would suggest that the National Football League is falling on hard times,” NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith said. “The last 14 days, the National Football League has said, ‘Trust us.’ But when it came time for verication, they told us it was none of our business.” By dissolving and announcing it no longer represents the players in collective bargaining, the union cleared the way for class-action

lawsuits against the NFL, which opted out of the CBA in 2008. The antitrust suit — forever to be known as Brady et al vs. National Football League et al — attacked the league’s policies on the draft, salary cap and free-agent restrictions such as franchise-player tags. Invoking the Sherman Act, a federal antitrust statute from 1890 that limits monop- olies and restrictions on commerce, the play- ers are seeking triple the amount of damages they’ve incurred. That means the stakes here could be in the hundreds of millions.

It could take a month for there to be a ruling

on the union’s injunction request, and antitrust judgments should take longer.

The court ghts eventually could threaten the 2011 season for a league whose past two Super Bowls rank as the two most-watched programs in U.S. television history. The last time NFL games were lost to a work stoppage came when the players struck 24 years ago, leading to games with replacement players.

A lockout is a right management has to shut

down a business when a CBA expires. It

has to shut down a business when a CBA expires. It means there can be no
has to shut down a business when a CBA expires. It means there can be no
has to shut down a business when a CBA expires. It means there can be no

means there can be no communication between the teams and current NFL players; no players — including those drafted in April — can be signed; teams won’t pay health insurance for players; players are not allowed in team facilities. If the lockout lasts long enough, it would lead to the cancelation of games. Even though the NFL is early in its offsea- son — and the regular season is six months away — this is hardly a complete downtime. Free agency usually begins in March, and there are hundreds of free agents now in limbo. Also this month, under a regular sched- ule, team-organized offseason workouts would start. The lockout grinds all such activ- ity to a halt. March and early April are when many spon- sors and corporate partners renew their deals with the NFL, part of why the league says hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue are going to be lost now. “This obviously is a very disappointing day for all of us. I’ve been here for the better part

the

union’s position on the core economic issues has not changed one iota,” New York Giants owner John Mara said. “One thing that became painfully apparent to me during this period was that their objective was to go the litigation route.”

The NFLPA also decertified in 1989. Antitrust lawsuits by players led to a new CBA in 1993 that included free agency, and the union formed again that year. The sides met from 10 a.m. until about 4 p.m. Friday, discussing a new proposal by the

owners. When the possibility of a third exten- sion to the CBA was raised, the union said it

rst wanted assurances it would get 10 years

of audited nancial information. “I will tell you this: Any business where two partners don’t trust each other, any business where one party says, ‘You need to do X, Y and Z because I told you,’ is a business that is not only not run well, it is a business that can never be as successful as it can be,” Smith said.

of two weeks now, and essentially

run well, it is a business that can never be as successful as it can be,”
run well, it is a business that can never be as successful as it can be,”

16

Weekend March 12-13, 2011

THE DAILY JOURNAL

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SPORTS

Weekend March 12-13, 2011

17

SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 vs.
SAT
SUN
MON
TUE
WED
THU
FRI
12
13
14 15
16
17
18
vs. NYR
@ Chicago
@ Stars
vs. Wild
7:30 p.m.
5
p.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
vs.Wolves
@ Kings
vs. Mavs
6 p.m.
7
p.m.
7:30 p.m.
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY

TRANSACTIONS

NHL

ATLANTA

Postma to Chicago (AHL). COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Assigned C KyleWil- son to Springfield (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS—Reassigned Doug Janik to Grand Rapids (AHL). MINNESOTA WILD—Signed G Dennis Endras. NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Reassigned D Teemu Laakso to Milwaukee (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS—Signed D Mark Borowiecki to a two-year contract. PHOENIX COYOTES—Assigned D Chris Summers to San Antonio (AHL). SAN JOSE SHARKS—Signed RW James Liv- ingston. ST.LOUIS BLUES—Assigned F Dave Scatchard to Peoria (AHL).Released F Jim McKenzie and F Blair Riley. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Reassigned G Jaroslav Janus from Norfolk (AHL) to Florida (ECHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Named Ben Guerrero manager of media relations. MLS CHIVAS USA—Acquired M Nick LaBrocca from Toronto FC for F Alan Gordon. Declined contract option on F Jesus Padilla. TORONTO FC—Acquired F Alan Gordon from Chivas USA for MF Nick LaBrocca. Signed MF Gi- anluca Zavarise. VANCOUVER WHITECAPS—Signed F Long Tan and D-MF Blake Wagne. COLLEGE NCAA—Announced Arkansas State must forfeit victories in football and basketball from the 2005- 07 seasons for using 31 ineligible players.Reduced one football and one basketball scholarship for two years.

Paul

THRASHERS—Reassigned

D

DORAL RESULTS

At TPC Blue Monster at Doral Doral,Fla. Purse: $8.5 million

Yardage: 7,334; Par: 72 (36-36) Second Round

Hunter Mahan

Martin Kaymer

Francesco Molinari

Martin Laird

Matt Kuchar

Nick Watney

Rory McIlroy

Aaron Baddeley

Adam Scott

Dustin Johnson

Ernie Els

Luke Donald

Steve Stricker

Padraig Harrington

Kevin Streelman

D.A.Points

Anders Hansen

Vijay Singh

Ryo Ishikawa

Paul Casey

Bill Haas

Charl Schwartzel

K.J.Choi

Charley Hoffman

Robert Karlsson

Seung-yul Noh

Camilo Villegas

Thomas Aiken

Jhonattan Vegas

Miguel A.Jimenez

Kyung-tae Kim

Ian Poulter

Graeme McDowell

Hiroyuki Fujita

Ryan Moore

Rickie Fowler

Louis Oosthuizen

Edoardo Molinari

64-71—

135

-9

66-70

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142

-2

67-75

142

-2

69-73

142

-2

72-70 —

142

-2

71-71 —

142

-2

68-75

143

-1

69-74

143

-1

71-72

143

-1

73-70

143

-1

73-70 —

143

-1

70-73

143

-1

71-73

144

E

70-74

144

E

71-73

144

E

71-73 —

144

E

71-73 —

144

E

NCAA TOURNAMENT

NCAA Automatic Bids

MEN Arkansas-Little Rock,Sun Belt Conference Belmont,Atlantic Sun Conference Butler,Horizon League Gonzaga,West Coast Conference Indiana State,Missouri Valley Conference Long Island University,Northeast Conference Morehead State,Ohio Valley Conference Northern Colorado,Big Sky Conference Oakland,Mich.,Summit League Old Dominion,Colonial Athletic Association

Saint Peter’s,Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference UNC Asheville,Big South Conference Wofford,Southern Conference

WOMEN Arkansas-Little Rock,Sun Belt Conference Connecticut,Big East Conference Duke,Atlantic Coast Conference Gonzaga,West Coast Conference Marist,Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Ohio State,Big Ten Princeton,Ivy League Samford,Southern Conference

MLB SPRING TRAINING

AMERICAN LEAGUE

 

W

L

Pct

Kansas City

9

5

.643

Seattle

7

4

.636

Detroit

10

6

.625

Minnesota

7

6

.538

Texas

7

6

.538

Boston

8

7

.533

Baltimore

6

6

.500

Los Angeles

7

8

.467

Toronto

6

7

.462

New York

6

8

.429

Oakland

6

8

.429

Chicago

5

8

.385

Tampa Bay

5

8

.385

Cleveland

4

8

.333

NATIONAL LEAGUE

 

W

L

Pct

San Francisco

12

4

.750

Atlanta

9

5

.643

Colorado

9

5

.643

Cincinnati

8

5

.615

Washington

8

5

.615

Philadelphia

9

6

.600

Milwaukee

8

6

.571

St.Louis

7

6

.538

New York

7

8

.467

Pittsburgh

7

8

.467

San Diego

6

7

.462

Chicago

6

8

.429

Florida

5

8

.385

Los Angeles

5

10 .333

Houston

5

11

.313

Arizona

5

12 .294

NOTE:Split-squad games count in the stand- ings; games against non-major league teams do not. Friday’s Games Boston (ss) 9,Houston (ss) 3 Philadelphia 13,Baltimore 6 Atlanta 6,N.Y.Yankees (ss) 2 Pittsburgh 8,Tampa Bay 7 Toronto 10,N.Y.Yankees (ss) 3 Minnesota 3,Boston (ss) 2 Detroit 7,St.Louis 4 N.Y.Mets 10,Florida 0 Milwaukee 4,Oakland (ss) 3 L.A.Angels 9,Arizona 8 Texas 5,Cincinnati 5,tie Oakland (ss) 9,L.A.Dodgers 2 Cleveland 5,Seattle 5,tie,10 innings Chicago Cubs 4,Chicago White Sox 3 Colorado 4,Kansas City 3,10 innings Houston (ss) 7,Washington 6 San Francisco 6,San Diego 4

NBA GLANCE

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Atlantic Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

x-Boston

46