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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.

0 Setup Guide for NFS®

VMware® vCenter
Site Recovery Manager 4.0
&
Network Appliance® Simulator
Setup Guide for NFS
Replications

Cormac Hogan
VMware Global Support Services
September 2009
Rev A

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

Introduction.......................................................................... 3
Requirements........................................................................3
Disclaimer............................................................................. 3
1. NetApp Simulator Network Configuration..........................4
2. NetApp Simulator Storage Configuration......................... 10
3. NetApp Simulator NFS Configuration............................... 16
Part A: Protected Site Setup................................................. 16
Part B: Recovery Site Setup................................................. 22
4. Storage Replication Adapter (SRA) Installation.............. 27
5. Array Managers Configuration......................................... 29
6. Create Protection Group.................................................. 35
7. Create Recovery Plan.......................................................37
8. Test the Recovery Plan.................................................... 40
Trademarks ........................................................................ 45
Summary.............................................................................45
About the Author.................................................................45

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

Introduction
One of the new features of VMware® vCenter Site Recovery Manager 4.0 is the
introduction of support for NFS®. This proven practice will use the Network
Appliance® (NetApp) simulator from NETAPP to demonstrate how to configure
this new feature.

The NetApp simulator is a great Site Recovery Manager learning tool. In this
document, you will be guided through the configuration steps to use SRM 4.0 with
vSphere 4.0 and NetApp. The replication in this example will be done using NFS
volumes.

This setup guide uses a NetApp simulator. However the steps can be used
standard NetApp storage arrays.

The NetApp simulator runs in an Ubuntu Linux VM. The simulator (which is
configured to run inside of the Ubuntu Linux VM) will have its own IP address as it
runs a web based managed interface called FilerView. This same IP is used for
storage connectivity, e.g. iSCSI or NFS.

Warning: The simulator is provided by NetApp on the understanding that it is


only used for testing and training purposes. NetApp does not support use of the
simulator in production environments.

Requirements
You will require a minimum of two ESX servers running ESX 4.0, one at your
production site and one at your recovery site. Various deployment methods can
be used. Discussion on how to do this is beyond the scope of this document. You
will also need a VMkernel network interface configured on the ESX server to
access the NFS shares on the NetApp appliances.

This guide also assumes that you have vCenter 4.0 servers at both the
production and recovery sites. Again, discussions on vCenter deployments are
beyond the scope of this document.

The NetApp appliance VM will require two IP addresses. Therefore you will
require a total of 4 IP addresses for the two appliances (2 IP addresses each).

These simulators require that the vSwitch to which the appliance VM is attached
is placed in promiscuous mode.

Disclaimer
This guide is by no means comprehensive. It is literally a step-by-step guide to
get the NetApp Simulator to a point where it can be used with VMware vCenter
Site Recovery Manager for POC, demonstrations and training purposes. For
production deployments, you are urged to refer to the detailed documentation
provided by both NetApp and VMware. You use this proven practice at your
discretion. VMware and the author do not guarantee any results from the use of
this proven practice. This proven practice is provided on an as-is basis and is for
demonstration purposes only.

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

1. NetApp Simulator Network Configuration


These steps are only necessary if you are using the simulator. If you are not
using the simulator, skip to part 2. The steps here must be carried out on both
the protected and recovery simulator.

This guide assumes the NetApp simulator has already been deployed as a VM on
ESX servers at both the protected and recovery sites. It also assumes that you
have root access to the appliance.

Step 1: Logon to the Ubuntu Linux VM which will run the simulator. Once you
have logged on, open a terminal session from the Applications -> Accessories
> Terminal pull down window.

Step 2: Become super user by typing the command sudo su – to become


superuser. Run a df command. You should notice that the simulator has a file
system layout as follows. The simulator setup files and storage are typically
located in /sim. This /sim is a mount-point for approximately 20GB of storage,
but this is configurable.

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

Step 3: Run an ifconfig –a command. Take note of which network interface is


being used by the Ubuntu OS. In this case it is eth3. You will need this reference
later.

Step 4: If you currently do not have an IP address displayed in the ifconfig -a,
you can assign it either a static IP or pick one up via DHCP. Note however that
the Ubuntu OS does not need an IP address for the simulator to function. to setup
an IP, Go to System > Administration > Network:

Step 5: Provide administrator privileges, and in the Connections tab, select


Wired connection, and click Properties:

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

Step 6: Unselect ‘Enable roaming mode’ and in the Connection Settings, in the
Configuration drop down, choose between a Static IP or DHCP. If choosing
DHCP, simply click OK. If Static is chosen, populate the IP address, subnet Mask
& Gateway address field before clicking OK.

Step 7: Re-run an ifconfig –a command. If there is no change in the IP address,


use the ifdown -a and ifup –a commands to force an update. Your Ubuntu OS
should now have a network interface configured.

Step 8: Change directory to /sim. Run the command setup.sh.

At the point where is asks ‘Which network interface should the simulator use?’,
select the same interface as appeared in the ifconfig output above, in this
example, eth3.

If the script fails with the error:

Loading defaults. Run with -i option to ignore defaults


-t has an invalid network interface of eth2. Use ifconfig to see what
interfaces you have

Rerun the script with the –i <interface> option, e.g. setup.sh –i eth3

Note that the first question is regarding Regeneration MAC address. You
should answer yes if running multiple simulators on the same network to ensure
that each simulator has its own unique MAC address.

Another question which appears during the install is regarding the simulator’s
network interface - Which network interface should the simulator use? [eth2]: If
the interface is not correct, input the correct one, such as eth3.

Note also that this is where you can add additional disks to your simulator. By
default a simulator has 3 disks, all placed in the default aggregate, aggr0. If you
do create more disks, you can use FilerView (UI) or the command line (CLI) to
add the new disks to aggr0 or you can create a new aggregate to add them to.
We will do this later in the setup.

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

In this setup, we will give the simulator an additional 10 disks (of size 1GB each
so it is important to select option ‘f’) as below:

root@student-desktop:/sim# ./setup.sh

Script version 20 (25/Jan/2007)


Loading defaults. Run with -i option to ignore defaults
cat: .ontapversion: No such file or directory
./setup.sh: line 777: [: -lt: unary operator expected
./setup.sh: line 778: [: -lt: unary operator expected
./setup.sh: line 780: [: -ge: unary operator expected
Please ensure the simulator is not running.
Regenerate MAC address? [no]:
Use DHCP on first boot? [yes]:
Ask for floppy boot? [no]:
Your default simulator network interface is already configured to eth3.
Which network interface should the simulator use? [eth3]:
Your system has 386MB of free memory. The smallest simulator memory you should
choose is 58MB. The maximum simulator memory is 346MB.
The recommended memory is 128MB.
How much memory would you like the simulator to use? [128]:
Create a new log for each session? [no]:
Overwrite the single log each time? [yes]:
Your simulator has 3 disk(s). How many more would you like to add? [0]: 10

The following disk types are available in MB:


Real (Usable)
a - 43 ( 14)
b - 62 ( 30)
c - 78 ( 45)
d - 129 ( 90)
e - 535 (450)
f - 1024 (900)

If you are unsure choose the default option a


What disk size would you like to use? [f]:
Disk adapter to put disks on? [0]:
Adding 10 additional disk(s).
./setup.sh: line 1009: [: -lt: unary operator expected
Complete. Run /sim/runsim.sh to start the simulator.

Step 9: Next we start the simulator. Change directory to /sim. Run the
command runsim.sh.

root@student-desktop:/sim# ./runsim.sh
runsim.sh script version Script version 20 (25/Jan/2007)
This session is logged in /sim/sessionlogs/log

NetApp Release 7.2.1: Sun Dec 10 00:23:08 PST 2006


Copyright (c) 1992-2006 Network Appliance, Inc.
Starting boot on Fri Nov 14 13:47:51 GMT 2008
Fri Nov 14 13:47:55 GMT [diskown.isEnabled:info]: software ownership has been
enabled for this system
Fri Nov 14 13:48:01 GMT [fmmbx_instanceWorke:info]: normal mailbox instance on
local side
Fri Nov 14 13:48:01 GMT [fmmb.current.lock.disk:info]: Disk v4.16 is a local HA
mailbox disk.
Fri Nov 14 13:48:02 GMT [raid.cksum.replay.summary:info]: Replayed 0 checksum
blocks.
Fri Nov 14 13:48:02 GMT [raid.stripe.replay.summary:info]: Replayed 0 stripes.
Fri Nov 14 13:48:03 GMT [wafl.maxdirsize.boot.notice:warning]: aggr0: This
volume's maxdirsize (2621KB) is higher than the default (1310KB). There may be
a performance penalty when doing operations on large directories.
Fri Nov 14 13:48:07 GMT [wafl.vol.guarantee.fail:error]: Space for volume vol0
is NOT guaranteed
Fri Nov 14 13:48:07 GMT [wafl.maxdirsize.boot.notice:warning]: vol0: This
volume's maxdirsize (2621KB) is higher than the default (1310KB). There may be
a performance penalty when doing operations on large directories.
Fri Nov 14 13:48:10 GMT [rc:notice]: The system was down for 1993 seconds
Fri Nov 14 13:48:19 GMT [dfu.firmwareUpToDate:info]: Firmware is up-to-date on
all disk drives
add net default: gateway 10.21.71.254

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

Fri Nov 14 13:48:19 GMT [sfu.firmwareUpToDate:info]: Firmware is up-to-date on


all disk shelves.
Fri Nov 14 13:48:19 GMT [iscsi.service.startup:info]: iSCSI service startup
Fri Nov 14 13:48:21 GMT [mgr.boot.disk_done:info]: NetApp Release 7.2.1 boot
complete. Last disk update written at Fri Nov 14 13:14:54 GMT 2008
Fri Nov 14 13:48:21 GMT [mgr.boot.reason_ok:notice]: System rebooted after a
halt command.
CIFS local server is running.
Fri Nov 14 13:48:22 GMT [sfu.firmwareUpToDate:info]: Firmware is up-to-date on
all disk shelves.

Data ONTAP (netapp-sima.csl.vmware.com)


login: Fri Nov 14 13:48:24 GMT last message repeated 11 times
Fri Nov 14 13:48:24 GMT [iscsi.notice:notice]: ISCSI: New session from
initiator iqn.1998-01.com.vmware:cs-pse-d01-0f123b6a at IP addr 10.21.71.120
Fri Nov 14 13:48:24 GMT [sfu.firmwareUpToDate:info]: Firmware is up-to-date on
all disk shelves.
Fri Nov 14 13:48:24 GMT last message repeated 5 times
Fri Nov 14 13:49:12 GMT [nbt.nbns.registrationComplete:info]: NBT: All CIFS
name registrations have completed for the local server.

Step 10: Determine IP address of simulator (this is not the IP of your Ubuntu
OS)

Once the simulator has started, you will be prompted for a login and password.
Login to the simulator. It is running NetApp’s ONTAP® Operating System. Once
you login, run the command ifconfig –a to get the IP address used by the
simulator, e.g.

netapp-sima> ifconfig -a
ns0: flags=848043<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
inet 10.21.69.235 netmask 0xfffffc00 broadcast 10.21.71.255
ether 00:50:56:0f:5b:ab (Linux AF_PACKET socket)
ns1: flags=808042<BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
ether 00:50:56:10:5b:ab (Linux AF_PACKET socket)
lo: flags=1948049<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST,TCPCKSUM> mtu 9188
inet 127.0.0.1 netmask 0xff000000 broadcast 127.0.0.1
netapp-sima>

Step 11: In this example, I already have an IP address associated with my


simulator, but you will need to modify this when setting it up the simulator for the
first time. To change this value, run the command setup when logged into the
simulator. You will need to enter an IP address for interface ns0 along with the
appropriate netmask and gateway.

netapp-simb> setup
The setup command will rewrite the /etc/rc, /etc/exports,
/etc/hosts, /etc/hosts.equiv, /etc/dgateways, /etc/nsswitch.conf,
and /etc/resolv.conf files, saving the original contents of
these files in .bak files (e.g. /etc/exports.bak).
Are you sure you want to continue? [yes]
NetApp Release 7.2.1: Sun Dec 10 00:23:08 PST 2006
System ID: 0099921696 (netapp-simb)
System Serial Number: 987654-32-0 (netapp-simb)
Model Name: Simulator
Processors: 1
slot 0: NetApp Virtual SCSI Host Adapter v0
13 Disks: 10.5GB
1 shelf with LRC
slot 1: NetApp Virtual SCSI Host Adapter v1
slot 2: NetApp Virtual SCSI Host Adapter v2
slot 3: NetApp Virtual SCSI Host Adapter v3
slot 4: NetApp Virtual SCSI Host Adapter v4
13 Disks: 10.5GB
1 shelf with LRC
slot 5: NetApp Virtual SCSI Host Adapter v5
slot 6: NetApp Virtual SCSI Host Adapter v6
slot 7: NetApp Virtual SCSI Host Adapter v7

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

slot 8: NetApp Virtual SCSI Host Adapter v8


4 Tapes: VT-100MB
VT-100MB
VT-100MB
VT-100MB
Please enter the new hostname [netapp-simb]:
Do you want to configure virtual network interfaces? [n]:
Please enter the IP address for Network Interface ns0 [10.21.69.236]:
Please enter the netmask for Network Interface ns0 [255.255.252.0]:
Please enter the IP address for Network Interface ns1 []:
Would you like to continue setup through the web interface? [n]:
Please enter the name or IP address of the default gateway [10.21.71.254]:
The administration host is given root access to the filer's
/etc files for system administration. To allow /etc root access
to all NFS clients enter RETURN below.
Please enter the name or IP address of the administration host:
Please enter timezone [GMT]:
Where is the filer located? [Cork]:
What language will be used for multi-protocol files (Type ? for list)?:
language not set
Do you want to run DNS resolver? [n]:
Do you want to run NIS client? [n]:
The initial aggregate currently contains 3 disks; you may add more
disks to it later using the "aggr add" command.
Now type 'reboot' for changes to take effect.
netapp-simb>

Step 12: Next type reboot at the prompt. This reboots the simulator, not the
Ubuntu OS. Once the simulator is rebooted, make sure that you can ping the IP
address configured in the previous step. If you are unable to ping the simulators
IP address, check:

• vSwitch is set to promiscuous mode and is on the correct network.


• The correct network interface was selected in /sim/setup.sh
• The correct network details were added in the simulator setup.

Step 13: You can now telnet to the simulator and you can also launch the
FilerView® application by pointing a browser at http://X.X.X.X/na_admin. Make
sure you include the na_admin part of the link.

Step 14: Note that your VM does not really need an IP address; only the
simulator needs an IP address. Therefore, you can (if you wish) remove the IP
address associated with the Ubuntu VM by using the following commands as root:

List the current IPs: ip a l


Delete the IP in the VM: ip a d <ip addr>/<netmask> dev ethX
List the current IPs: ip a l

Based on feedback, you may have to do ip a d <ip addr> dev ethX followed by
ip a d <ipa ddr>/<netmask> dev ethX

Remember that these commands are run in the Ubuntu OS – these are not run in
the simulator. After completing this operation, verify that you can still reach your
filer via ping and the web browser.

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

2. NetApp Simulator Storage Configuration


Step 1: In part 1, we created an additional 10 disks during setup. We now want
to make these disks usable. To do this we must place the 10 additional disks into
an aggregate, in this case a new aggregate which we will call aggr1.

In order to present new storage to an ESX host, an aggregate must first be


created. The aggregate will then contain volumes which in turn will contain the
LUNs.

Creation of the aggregate can be done via the CLI or FilerView UI. We will do it
will FilerView. Open FilerView and navigate to Storage -> Disks -> Manage:

Step 2: You can see that we have 13 disks, the 3 original which come with the
simulator and our 10 new ones. The 3 original belong to aggr0. We will put the
other 10 into aggr1. Navigate to Aggregates -> Add:

Step 3: This launches the Aggregrate Wizard. Click Next.

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

Step 4: Accept the defaults in the Aggregate Parameters screen, leaving the
name as aggr1:

Step 5: Accept the default RAID Group Size (16) in the RAID Parameters
screen:

Step 6: Accept the default (Automatic) in the Disk Selection Method screen:

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

Step 7: Accept the default in the Disk Size (Any Size) screen:

Step 8: Change the Number of Disks to 8. You cannot choose 10 since 2 of the
disks that you created are needed as spares in the aggregate.

Step 9: Click Commit & then Close:

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

Step 10: Agg1 has now been created to cater for this. Click Aggregates, and
then Manage to view it.

Step 11: Next create a volume called vol2 in the newly created Aggregate
aggr1 which will hold a LUN which will be presented to the ESX. From the
Volumes item, select Manage to view the current volume.

Step 12: Create a new volume by clicking on Volumes -> Add to create a new
volume. This launches the Volume Wizard. Click Next:

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

Step 13: Leave the Volume Type Selection at the default of Flexible and click
Next:

Step 14: Leave the Volume Name at the default of vol2 and the Language
type at the default of English. Click Next:

Step 15: Change the Containing Aggregate to aggr1 which should have a
capacity of approximately 5GB. Leave the Space Guarantee at volume. Click
Next:

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

Step 16: Change the Volume Size to a value which will be able to hold a VM. In
this example, the volume size is 2000MB (2GB) but you can make it larger or
smaller. You just need to make it a size which can accommodate a VM for SRM
test purposes. Click Next:

Step 17: Click Commit followed by Close. The volume is now created.

Step 18: Repeat this setup on both the protected and recovery NetApp filers.
Both sides should now have a volume of the same size.

That completes the basic storage setup & configuration of the NetApp simulator.
The next part looks at configuring the storage (NFS) on the simulator.

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

3. NetApp Simulator NFS Configuration


Part A: Protected Site Setup
Step 1: Verify the state of the new volume by selecting the Volumes ->
Manage View.

In this particular example, my volume (vol2) is 1600MB in size. Yours may be


different depending on how you configured it in the previous section.

Step 2: We now need to export this volume as an NFS share. Note that NetApp’s
Storage Replication Adapter (SRA) require a persistent export of the NFS share
where you must specify the root IP address and RW IP address of any ESX server
that will mount the share.

You can do this from the UI or you can log into the appliance via telnet and run
the exportfs command. In this example I am granting the ESX server (which has
a VMkernel IP address of 10.21.64.34) access to a volume on my NetApp:

srm-protect> exportfs -p rw=10.21.64.34,root=10.21.64.34 /vol/vol2


srm-protect> exportfs
/vol/vol0/home -sec=sys,rw,nosuid
/vol/vol0 -sec=sys,rw,anon=0,nosuid
/vol/vol1 -sec=sys,rw,nosuid
/vol/vol2 -sec=sys,rw=10.21.66.121,root=10.21.66.121
srm-protect>

Step 3: If you decide to do this via the UI, go to NFS > Manage Exports:

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

Step 4: Note that vol2 currently has RW access to all hosts, and no root access
defined. We must change this in order for the ESX to be able to deploy VMs on
this share, and also to allow the NetApp SRA to discover the LUNs. Click on the
/vol/vol2 link to launch the NFS Export Wizard.

Step 5: In the Export Options window, the Read-Write Access and Security
check boxes are already selected. You will need to also select the Root Access
check box as shown here. Then click Next:

Step 6: Leave the Export Path at the default setting:

Step 7: In the Read-Write Hosts window, click on Add to explicitly add a RW


host. If you leave this window with just the All Hosts check box selected, the
NetApp SRA will not discover these exports. You must add each individual ESX
involved in SRM.

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Step 8: Populate the Host to Add with the (VMkernel) IP address:

In this case I wish to export the NFS share to an ESX host with the VMkernel (IP
storage) IP address of 10.21.67.114.

Step 9: The Read-Write Hosts window should now include my VMkernel IP


address. Click Next to move to the Root Hosts window:

Step 10: Populate the Root Hosts exactly the same way as the Read-Write
Hosts by clicking on the Add button. This should again be the VMkernel/IP
Storage IP address. When this is populated, click Next:

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Step 11: At the Security screen, leave the security flavour at the default of
Unix Style and click Next to continue:

Step 12: Review the summary screen, and click Commit & Close.

Step 13: After running the above commands, returning to the FilerView UI
should result in the NFS -> Manage Exports looking something like this:

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

Step 14: To prepare for replication, you need to ensure that your protected filer
and your recovery filer know about each other. You could use IP addresses, but
you can also use hostnames for the filers. If you decide to use hostnames, you
should populate the hosts file on the protected filer with an entry for the recovery
filer. This can be done thru the UI via Network -> Manage Hosts File.

Step 15: Use the buttons below the host file window to insert new entries and
apply the changes. Click on the window, and then select Insert. This launches a
window to allow you to create a new /etc/hosts line:

Step 16: Once populated with an IP number and official host name, click OK on
the ‘create a new /etc/hosts line’ window followed by Apply on the Manage
Hosts File screen.

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

Step 17: Another step to setup replication is to allow Remote Access between
the protected and recovery filers. This is done in the SnapMirror -> Remote
Access -> Manage view.

Click on the Add Remote Access Entry. Here you can choose to either allow the
remote filer to access individual volumes or all volumes. In this example, I am
allowing the recovery filer to access all volumes on the protected filer:

Step 18: At this point, before we start the replication, it would be a good idea to
mount the share on the protected ESX, and deploy a Virtual Machine to the share
before we start replicating. This will mean that when we do start replication, the
virtual machine files will also be replicated to the recovery site array. Here is an
example.

That completes the protected filer setup. We will next turn our attention to the
recovery filer setup.

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Part B: Recovery Site Setup

Step 1: In this example, we are going to look at volume (file system) replication.
The first thing to do is check that there is a volume already available for
replication on the recovery site. In this our example, the volume is also vol2. So
we will be replicating from vol2 on the protected site to vol2 on the recovery
site.

Step 2: Note that the volume on the recovery NetApp needs to be placed into
restricted mode. You will need to do this in advance of setting up any replication.
Simply select the volume (vol2) in the Volumes > Manage window and click on
the restrict option. Unless the volume is restricted, snap-mirror will not
synchronize the volumes.

The volume should now show a status of restricted.

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Step 3: To prepare for replication, I need to ensure that my protected filer and
my recovery filer know about each other. Therefore I need to populate the hosts
file on the recovery filer with an entry for the protected filer. This can be done
thru the UI via Network -> Manage Hosts File. This is exactly the same as the
step we carried out on the protected filer. Click Apply once the entry is added.

Step 4: Another step to setup replication is to allow Remote Access between the
protected and recovery filers. This is done in the SnapMirror -> Remote Access
-> Manage view. Here you can choose to either allow the remote filer to access
individual volumes or all volumes. In this example, I am allowing the protected
filer (called netappa) to access all volumes on the protected filer:

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Step 5: Now we setup a snapmirror replication to replicate from protected vol2


on the protected filer to recovery vol4 on the recovery filer. This is done on the
recovery site filer via Snapmirror -> Add. Populate the destination volume
(vol2), the source filer (netappa) & the source volume (vol2). The remaining
items can stay at their defaults. It should look like this screen shot here. Click
Add at the bottom of the page to add the snapmirror entry.

Step 6: Once the relationship between protected and recovery filers has been
added, you need to initialize the replication. This is done by going to Snapmirror
-> Manage -> Advanced.

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Step 7: Click on initialize link:

Step 8: Click OK on the ‘are you sure’ popup?

Step 9: Observer the initialization started successfully message:

Step 10: Snapmirror -> Manage gives an overview of the replication status. It
should display a state of Snapmirrored and time lag since last sync.

Step 11: Click on View to get additional details about the replication:

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If you have difficulty getting the replication to work, examine the SnapMirror ->
Log -> Report view for any errors. If you are logged into the filer via telnet, you
may also see some useful errors displayed. Most of the time, the issues are to do
with resolving the hostnames of the simulators or the recovery site volume not
being restricted.

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4. Storage Replication Adapter (SRA) Installation


Note that the NetApp SRA for NAS is different to the NetApp SRA for iSCSI & FC.
Ensure that you install the version required for NAS replication.

Step 1: Launch the NetApp SRA for NAS Installation and click Next on the
Welcome screen.

Step 2: Accept the EULA and click Next

Step 3: Supply User Name/Organization information or accept the defaults and


click Next

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

Step 4: Select Complete installation and click Next.

Step 5: Click Install:

Step 6: Click Finish

This would be an opportune time to read the README file, the Install & Admin
Guide and the Release Notes which accompany the NetApp SRA.

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

5. Array Managers Configuration


The NAS adapter from NetApp provides an additional field called NFS IP Ad-
dresses in the Array Managers Configuration wizard. You can use the NFS IP Ad-
dresses field to enter the IP addresses of the storage controller that are
used to serve NFS from that controller to the ESX hosts. If the controller
uses multiple IP addresses to serve NFS data, these IP addresses are entered in
the NFS IP Addresses field and are separated by commas. If the IP addresses are
not entered then the disaster recovery NAS adapter returns all available IP ad-
dress of the storage controller

Step 1: Click on the SRM icon within vCenter. The assumption is that the
Protected and Recovery site connection/pairing & Inventory Mappings has
already been configured.

Step 2: Click on the Configure link next to Array Managers in the Protection
Setup. This will launch the Configure Array Managers window. Click on the Add
button to add the protected array first.

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Proven Practice: NetApp® & VMware© vCenter SRM 4.0 Setup Guide for NFS®

Step 3: Populate the protected array details. Make sure to select the NetApp
Data ONTAP NAS storage system in case there are multiple SRA managers
available. Click the Connect button.

Note that the NFS IP field can be used to choose a particular network interface to
communicate between the ESX and the filer if the filer has multiple network
interfaces, some of which cannot be reached by the ESX.

Step 4: If the array is discovered successfully, the Array ID and model will
populate. Ensure that the Array ID check box is selected, and then click OK.

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Note – the NetApp NAS SRA will only discover persistently exported volumes. If
they are not persistently exported, the following error will appear during the
Array Managers configuration:

If the array discovery fails, check that your volume is exported correctly from the
protected array:

[2009-06-22 10:38:41.184 02772 verbose 'SysCommandLineWin32'] Starting process:


"C:\\Program Files\\VMware\\VMware vCenter Site Recovery Manager\\external\\perl-
5.8.8\\bin\\perl.exe" "C:/Program Files/VMware/VMware vCenter Site Recovery
Manager/scripts/SAN/ONTAP_NAS/command.pl"
[2009-06-22 10:38:41.778 02772 trivia 'PrimarySanProvider'] discoverLuns's output:
<Response>
[#1] Discover Luns Started
[#1] Collecting NFS export information
[#1] Skipping this path /vol/vol0 since there are no r/w rules
[#1] Skipping this path /vol/vol1 since there are no r/w rules
[#1] Skipping this path /vol/vol2 since there are no r/w rules
[#1] Skipping this path /vol/vol0/home since there are no r/w rules
[#1] Skipping this path /vol/vol3 since there are no r/w rules
[#1] Could not find any exported NFS
[#1] Discover Luns completed with errors
[#1] </Response>
[2009-06-22 10:38:41.778 02772 info 'PrimarySanProvider'] discoverLuns exited with
exit code 0
[2009-06-22 10:38:41.778 02772 trivia 'PrimarySanProvider'] 'discoverLuns' returned
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
[#1] <Response>
[#1] <ReturnCode>4</ReturnCode>
[#1] </Response>
[#1]
[2009-06-22 10:38:41.778 02772 info 'PrimarySanProvider'] Return code for
discoverLuns: 4

srm-protect> exportfs -p rw=10.21.66.121,root=10.21.66.121 /vol/vol3


srm-protect> exportfs
/vol/vol0/home -sec=sys,rw,nosuid
/vol/vol0 -sec=sys,rw,anon=0,nosuid
/vol/vol1 -sec=sys,rw,nosuid
/vol/vol2 -sec=sys,rw,nosuid
/vol/vol3 -sec=sys,rw=10.21.66.121,root=10.21.66.121
srm-protect>

[2009-06-22 10:57:28.106 03900 verbose 'SysCommandLineWin32'] Starting process:


"C:\\Program Files\\VMware\\VMware vCenter Site Recovery Manager\\external\\perl-
5.8.8\\bin\\perl.exe" "C:/Program Files/VMware/VMware vCenter Site Recovery
Manager/scripts/SAN/ONTAP_NAS/command.pl"
[2009-06-22 10:57:28.747 03900 trivia 'PrimarySanProvider'] discoverLuns's output:
<Response>
[#1] Discover Luns Started
[#1] Collecting NFS export information
[#1] Skipping this path /vol/vol0/home since there are no r/w rules
[#1] Skipping this path /vol/vol0 since there are no r/w rules
[#1] Skipping this path /vol/vol1 since there are no r/w rules
[#1] Skipping this path /vol/vol2 since there are no r/w rules
[#1] adding nfs export path=/vol/vol3
[#1] Collecting list of replicated exports
[#1] vol3 has a volume replica /vol/vol3
[#1] Discover Luns completed successfully
[#1] </Response>

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[2009-06-22 10:57:28.747 03900 info 'PrimarySanProvider'] discoverLuns exited with


exit code 0
[2009-06-22 10:57:28.747 03900 trivia 'PrimarySanProvider'] 'discoverLuns' returned
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
[#1] <Response>
[#1] <LunList arrayId="srm-protect_NAS">
[#1] <Lun id="/vol/vol3" nfsName="/vol/vol3">
[#1] <Peer>
[#1] <ArrayKey>srm-recovery_NAS</ArrayKey>
[#1] <ReplicaLunKey>/vol/vol3</ReplicaLunKey>
[#1] </Peer>
[#1] </Lun>
[#1] </LunList>
[#1] <ReturnCode>0</ReturnCode>
[#1] </Response>

Step 5: The protected array is now discovered successfully. The peer array
involved in replications may also be observed at this point. Click Next to move
onto the screen to populate information about the recovery array:

Step 6: At this point, we have not added our recovery array, but this screen does
show you the state of other recovery arrays. Note that the green check mark in
the replicated array pairs indicates a valid in-sync replication between peer
arrays. The NetApp does not yet have one as we haven’t provided recovery array
details. Click Add to populate array information for the recovery array:

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Step 7: Populate the recovery array details. Again, ensure that you select the
NetApp Data ONTAP NAS storage system in case there are multiple SRA
managers available. Click the Connect button.

Step 8: If the array is discovered successfully, the Array ID and model will
populate. Again, ensure that this is selected and click OK.

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Step 8: The recovery array is now discovered successfully. Click OK to move


onto the replicated LUN discovery. If replication is in-place & in-sync between the
local and remote filers, then a green check box should be observed for our filers
in the Replicated Array Pairs.

Step 9: If replication is working correctly, and there is a Virtual Machine on the


share at the protect site, then the LUN discovery should successfully find the
replicated volume. Click Next to verify.

In this case the protected /vol/vol2 is replicated to recovery /vol/vol2.

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6. Create Protection Group


We are now ready to start building our recovery plan. The first step is to create a
protection group which includes all VMs and their respective datastores which we
wish to protect.

Step 1: On the protected site, select Protection Groups, and then click on Create
Protection Group.

Step 2: Enter the name of the Protection Group and the Description:

Step 3: Select the Datastore Group corresponding to your protection side array.
In this case it is called NetApp_217_NAS. You will then be given a list of VMs
which are on the selected datastore group.

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Step 4: Select a placeholder on the recovery site of where to place the VM


configuration files. These placeholder VMs do not consume much space, and are
replaced by the VMs which appear on the replicated LUN in the event of a failover
or test failover. Click Finish.

Step 5: When the Protection Group is created, move on to creation the


associated recovery plan.

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7. Create Recovery Plan


Step 1: Move to the recovery side vCenter, select Site Recovery icon, and then
select Recovery Plans. Click on Create Recovery Plan.

Step 2: Give your Recovery Plan a name. Here I called it RP_N1_NAS.

Step 3: Select the Protection Group that you want to recover. In this example, I
select the Protection Group called PG_N1_NAS that I created earlier.

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Step 4: Modify the timeout value for recovery steps if desired. I have changed
the values from 600 to 60 for test purposes. However making such a change in a
production environment is not advisable as it could lead to your recovery plan
failing.

Step 5: Determine which network to use during tests. Leaving the test network
at Auto will means that the VMs will not come up on a bubble network and will
not impact the still running VMs on the protected site. You do not need to modify
this from the default for the purpose of our tests.

Step 6: Suspend VMs during recovery steps if desired. You do not need to modify
this from the default for the purpose of our tests.

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Step 7: The recovery plan is now created. The next step is to test it.

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8. Test the Recovery Plan


Step 1: On the recovery vCenter, click on the SRM icon, select Recovery Plans
and select the Recovery plan we created previously.

Step 2: Before we begin, telnet onto the recovery filer (using the IP address of
the simulator not the Ubuntu OS) and take a look at the state of the filer.

Step 3: Check the state of the replication:

netappb> snapmirror status


Snapmirror is on.
Source Destination State Lag Status
netappa:vol2 netappb:vol2 Snapmirrored 00:00:06 Idle

netappb> snapmirror destinations


snapmirror destination: no known destinations

Step 4: Check the state of the volume. We are interested in vol2.

netappb> vol status vol2


Volume State Status Options
vol2 online raid_dp, flex snapmirrored=on, create_ucode=on,
snapmirrored convert_ucode=on,
read-only fs_size_fixed=on,
guarantee=volume(disabled)
Containing aggregate: 'aggr1'
netappb>

Step 5: Display the NFS Exports:

netappb> exportfs
/vol/vol0/home -sec=sys,rw,nosuid
/vol/vol0 -sec=sys,rw,anon=0,nosuid
/vol/vol1 -sec=sys,rw,nosuid
/vol/vol2 -sec=sys,rw,nosuid
netappb>

Note that there is no explicit/persistent export of vol2.

Step 6: Finally lets examine the snapshots associated with the replicated vol2 on
the recovery site:

netappb> snap list vol2


Volume vol2
working...

%/used %/total date name


---------- ---------- ------------ --------
0% ( 0%) 0% ( 0%) Sep 25 10:53 netappb(0099921696)_vol2.46
0% ( 0%) 0% ( 0%) Sep 25 10:52 netappb(0099921696)_vol2.45
netappb>

There are two snapshots here, both of which are used by snapmirrror for
replication purposes. Because of the replication being updated every minute,
these snapshot creation times are 1 minute apart.

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Step 7: Now select the Recovery Steps tab and expand all the recovery steps
as shown below. Note that some steps will be done during a real recovery plan
run and some steps will only be done during the test run. We are only going to
implement a test run here. Click on the Test button/icon:

Step 3: Acknowledge the popup warning.

Step 4: We will now take a look at the events occurring on the recovery site filer
during a test of a recovery plan. Telnet onto the recovery NetApp filer and use
the following CLI commands to see events taking place with the storage on the
appliance. Wait for the Prepare Storage step to complete before running the CLI
command.

Since this is a test of a recovery plan, the replicated volume on the recovery site
is not presented to the recovery ESX. Instead we take the latest snapshot of the
recovery site volume, clone it to a ‘pseudo’ LUN (promote) and present this to the
recovery site ESX.

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Step 5: First take a look at the status of the replications:


netappb> snapmirror status
Snapmirror is on.
Source Destination State Lag Status
netappa:vol2 netappb:vol2 Snapmirrored 00:00:24 Idle

netappb> snapmirror destinations


Path Destination
vol2 [clone:testfailoverClone_nss_v10745371_vol2]

Step 6: Take a look at the status of the volumes.


netappb> vol status vol2
Volume State Status Options
vol2 online raid_dp, flex snapmirrored=on, create_ucode=on,
snapmirrored convert_ucode=on,
read-only fs_size_fixed=on,
guarantee=volume(disabled)
Volume has clones: testfailoverClone_nss_v10745371_vol2
Containing aggregate: 'aggr1'

Note the this volume now has clones – testfailoverClone_nss_v10745371_vol2 – this


is a clone of a vol2 snapshot which has been promoted to a volume and will be
presented to the recovery site ESX server for test purposes.

Step 8: Take a look at the status of the clone of vol2 in more detail. Here you
can see the snapshot on which this clone was built.

netappb> vol status testfailoverClone_nss_v10745371_vol2


Volume State Status Options
testfailoverClone_nss_v10745371_vol2 online raid_dp, flex create_ucode=on,
convert_ucode=on, guarantee=none,
Clone, backed by volume 'vol2', snapshot 'netappb(0099921696)_vol2.54'
Containing aggregate: 'aggr1'
netappb>

So you can see that is a clone backed by vol2, but based on snapshot
'netappb(0099921696)_vol2.54'.

Step 9: The following command details additional information about the


snapshots.
netappb> snap list vol2
Volume vol2
working...

%/used %/total date name


---------- ---------- ------------ --------
0% ( 0%) 0% ( 0%) Sep 25 11:08 netappb(0099921696)_vol2.60
0% ( 0%) 0% ( 0%) Sep 25 11:07 netappb(0099921696)_vol2.59
0% ( 0%) 0% ( 0%) Sep 25 11:02 netappb(0099921696)_vol2.54 (busy,snapmirror,vclone)

Note that the snapshot taken at 11:20 is the snapshot which was used to build a
test volume for exporting to the ESX server.

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Step 10: Before we started this test, there were no volumes export to the
recovery site ESX from the recovery filer. Now that we have run the test plan, we
see that there is a volume exported to the VMkernel IP address of the recovery
ESX. This is all handled by the NetApp SRA.
netappb> exportfs
/vol/testfailoverClone_nss_v10745371_vol2 -sec=sys,rw=10.21.67.115,root=10.21.67.115
/vol/vol0/home -sec=sys,rw,nosuid
/vol/vol0 -sec=sys,rw,anon=0,nosuid
/vol/vol1 -sec=sys,rw,nosuid
/vol/vol2 -sec=sys,rw,nosuid
netappb>

Step 11: you may also observe the following messages displayed on the
recovery filer (ONTAP) during a test failover run:

Fri Sep 25 11:02:49 GMT [app.log.info:info]: SRMB: Disaster Recovery NAS Adapter
Storage Replication Adapter 1.4: (1) Test-Failover-start Event: Disaster Recovery NAS
Adapter executed Test-Failover-start operation successfully from OS major version = 5
,minor version = 2 ,package = Service Pack 2 and build = 3790

Step 12: Confirm successful test failover

Step 13: Click the Continue link to end the test failover. Again, using the CLI on
the NetApp appliance, verify various events and operations from a storage
perspective. Wait for the Reset Storage Post Test step to complete first.

Messages on the recovery filer will appear similar to the following:

Fri Sep 25 11:12:59 GMT [wafl.vvol.offline:info]: Volume


'testfailoverClone_nss_v10745371_vol2' has been set temporarily offline
Fri Sep 25 11:13:01 GMT [app.log.info:info]: SRMB: Disaster Recovery NAS Adapter
Storage Replication Adapter 1.4: (3) Test-Failover-stop Event: Disaster Recovery NAS
Adapter executed Test-Failover-stop operation successfully from OS major version = 5
,minor version = 2 ,package = Service Pack 2 and build = 3790

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Step 14: If the test failover operation is successfully stopped, you should notice
that the cloned volume is no longer exported to the recovery ESX server from the
recovery filer:

netappb> exportfs
/vol/vol0/home -sec=sys,rw,nosuid
/vol/vol0 -sec=sys,rw,anon=0,nosuid
/vol/vol1 -sec=sys,rw,nosuid
/vol/vol2 -sec=sys,rw,nosuid

Step 15: If the test failover operation is successfully stopped, you should notice
that the cloned volume no longer exists on the recovery filer:

netappb> vol status vol2


Volume State Status Options
vol2 online raid_dp, flex snapmirrored=on, create_ucode=on,
snapmirrored convert_ucode=on,
read-only fs_size_fixed=on,
guarantee=volume(disabled)
Containing aggregate: 'aggr1'

That completes the setup for Site Recovery Manager with replicated NetApp NAS
devices.

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Trademarks
© 2009 VMware, Inc. All rights reserved. Protected by one or more U.S. Patent
Nos. 6,397,242, 6,496,847, 6,704,925, 6,711,672, 6,725,289, 6,735,601,
6,785,886, 6,789,156, 6,795,966, 6,880,022, 6,944,699, 6,961,806, 6,961,941,
7,069,413, 7,082,598, 7,089,377, 7,111,086, 7,111,145, 7,117,481, 7,149,843,
7,155,558, 7,222,221, 7,260,815, 7,260,820, 7,269,683, 7,275,136, 7,277,998,
7,277,999, 7,278,030, 7,281,102, 7,290,253, 7,356,679, 7,409,487, 7,412,492,
7,412,702, 7,424,710, 7,428,636, 7,433,951, 7,434,002, and 7,447,854; patents
pending.

VMware, the VMware “boxes” logo and design, Virtual SMP, and VMotion are
registered trademarks or trademarks of VMware, Inc. in the United States and/or
other jurisdictions.

All other marks and names mentioned herein may be trademarks of their
respective companies.

Summary
As stated in the introduction, the point of this proven practice is to take the
reader through the steps of setting up replication between a pair NetApp
simulator volumes which are exported as NFS shares to VMare ESX servers, and
then configure VMware vCenter Site Recovery Manager so that a test failover can
be initiated.

The main purpose of this document is to assist in setting up such a configuration


for demo and training purposes, or Proof-Of-Concept purposes. While it may be of
some assistance with deploying a production environment, further reading is
essential to determine best practices.

About the Author


Cormac Hogan is a Staff Technical Course Developer for VMware Global Support
Services (GSS) based out of Cork, Ireland. He develops and delivers training for
the GSS Technical Support Engineers within VMware, primarily on storage and
storage related topics.

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