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Volume 9, Number 4

JULY / AUGUST 2007

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N o t a b l e P i o n e e r s

Can you imagine sitting down with the pioneers of any industr y, political action or social movement and listening to them talk not about the past, but about the future? Wouldn’t that make you stop anything you were doing? Then stop right now. Because we’ve pulled together the creative genius and insight of our most notable diversity pioneers, and asked them to share with you their thoughts about what the future holds for diversity. Their answers are— well, diverse. Dive into this lively discussion that begins on page 29. You’ll enjoy reading ever y essay. We’re also proud to announce the winners of our 2007 Innovations in Diversity Awards (page 81). For the second consecutive year, Sodexho took the top honor. Rounding out the top ten, in order, are Royal Dutch Shell, InterContinental Hotels Group, KPMG LLP, Lockheed Martin Corporation, Kaiser Permanente, Best Buy, Dell Inc., MGM MIRAGE, and Credit Suisse. These organizations have initiated D&I plans within the past two years that have delivered a positive outcome on diversity management, employee recruitment and retention, and workplace quality. Eight other companies were given Excellence in Innovation Awards. They are Blue Cross of California, Cardinal Health, Dow Chemical Company, Freescale Semiconductor, Kelly Ser vices, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, New York Life and Wal-Mart. We are impressed with the variety and inventiveness shown by the companies and organizations who are this year’s award-winners. If your diversity initiatives are running out of gas or just plain stalled, you might want to steal an idea from one of these fine organizations. Also featured in this issue is a profile of Jeanetta Darno, director of diversity and inclusion at Cardinal Health. We like introducing people who are making a diversity difference; in fact, we pride ourselves in being the people-centered magazine of diversity.

We’ve packed a lot into 96 pages. Dig in!

John Murphy

Managing Editor

James R. Rector P U B L I S H E R John S. Murphy M
James R. Rector
P U B L I S H E R
John S. Murphy
M
A N A G I N G
E D I T O R
Linda Schellentrager
C
R E A T I V E
D I R E C T O R
Damian Johnson
M
A R K E T I N G
D I R E C T O R
Laurel L. Fumic
C
O N T R I B U T I N G
E D I T O R
Alina Dunaeva
O V E R S E A S
C O R R E S P O N D E N T
Jason Bice
W E B
M A S T E R
L
E T T E R S
T O
T H E
E D I T O R
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In a time of rapid change for our company and for our industry, we believe that

In a time

of rapid change for our company and for our

industry, we believe that the unique perspective of each Pfizer employee is vital. Why? Because the tough health care challenges people are facing today call for new, different, and diverse ways of thinking.

That’s why we’re implementing a global strategy to ensure Pfizer’s culture not only respects, but also leverages each individual employee’s background, character, and life experiences. We’re putting those unique perspectives to

work to fi nd new, innovative solutions for patients, and better ways of working with our customers, our partners , and the communities we serve.

At Pfizer,

we believe diversity means an

inclusive and

empowering work environment. The result? A happier,

healthier tomorrow for us all.

In a time of rapid change for our company and for our industry, we believe that
Volume 9 • Number 4 July / August 2007 29 On the Cover / Special Feature
Volume 9 • Number 4
July / August 2007
29
On the Cover / Special Feature
The Pioneers of Diversity
We asked nearly 40 diversity pioneers to look into their crystal ball and tell us where the
diversity movement was going in the next ten or fifteen years. We found their answers
covered a broad range of outcomes and predictions.
20
A Close-up of Jeanetta Dar no,
Cardinal Health’s Director,
Diversity and Inclusion
Combine a background in business and the military
with an MBA and you have a powerful package.
That’s an apt description of Cardinal Health’s Jeanetta
Dar no, who is responsible for enterprise-wide D&I
efforts that serve more than 40,000 employees
worldwide.
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Volume 9 • Number 4 July / August 2007 81 2007 Inter national Innovation in Diversity
Volume 9 • Number 4
July / August 2007
81
2007 Inter national Innovation in Diversity Awards
Innovation is creativity colliding with opportunity. Some organizations do it well; others
languish, never quite finding the spark that ignites new ideas or makes old ideas fresh.
Here are the best and best-executed innovations of 2006.
departments
8
Momentum
Diversity Who, What, Where and When
14
From My Perspective
by David Casey
Is Normal Really Abnormal?
All of us could benefit from further diversity training precisely because we are normal.
David Casey explains why.
16
Catalyst
LGBT Inclusion at Work
In honor of Pride Month, Catalyst focuses on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender
(LGBT) inclusion at work, with a special focus on an area for which most organizations
have not yet created policies: transgender inclusion.
94
MicroTriggers
Real-Life MicroTriggers
MicroTriggers are those subtle—and not so subtle—behaviors, phrases and inequities
that trigger an instantaneous negative response. Here are more examples submitted
by real people whose identities and places of business are being protected for obvious
reasons.
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[ ] [ B ANK OF THE BB ANK OF THE WW W EST ] EST
[
]
[ B ANK OF THE
BB
ANK OF THE
WW
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WANT TO WORK FOR A
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T TRULY GREAT BANK?
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BANK
AT BANK OF THE WEST, WE BELIEVE OUR CUSTOMERS ARE
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WEL WELL L SERVED SERVED BY BY E EMPLOYEES MPLOYEES WHO WHO ARE ARE WELL WELL SERV SERVED. ED.
Different
Different perspectives generate fresh ideas. That’s why at Bank of the West, we value diversity and
perspectives generate fresh
ideas. That’s why at Bank
of the West, we value dive rsity and
equal equal opp opportunity ortunity for for all all our our employe employees. es. Year Year after after year, year, we we con continue tinue to to grow grow stronger stronger than thanks ks to to our our
unique unique ble blend nd of of people. people. After After all, all, in in to today’s day’s competitive competitive banking banking environment, environment, it it is is our our emplo employees yees with with
innovative innovative ideas ideas that that keep keep us us a a step step ahead ahead of of the the rest. rest.
www.bankofthewest.com
www.bankofthewest.com

Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. M/F/D/V

Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. M/F/D/V

© 2007 Bank of the West. Member FDIC.

© 2007 Bank of the West. Member FDIC.

[ ] [ B ANK OF THE BB ANK OF THE WW W EST ] EST
American Airlines and American Eagle Appoint Four Newest African American Leaders has continued to mentor students
American Airlines and
American Eagle Appoint Four
Newest African American
Leaders
has continued to mentor students
and employees in their professional
growth.
subsidiaries of AMR Corporation.
(NYSE:AMR).
Michael Collins
FORT WORTH, Texas—American
Airlines and its regional affiliate,
American Eagle, have announced their
most recent appointments of African-
American leaders.
David Campbell
Dave Campbell has
been named senior
vice president—
Technical Operations.
He assumes over-
sight for the
Maintenance and
Stores, Flight, and
System Operations
Control (SOC) organizations.
Previously Campbell was the vice pres-
ident for base maintenance at
American’s Alliance Fort Worth and
Kansas City bases. He joined American
Airlines in 1988, ser ving in a variety
of roles. A graduate of Louisiana Tech
University, Campbell holds a bachelor’s
degree in business administration.
Michael Collins has joined American
Airlines as manag-
ing director for
Diversity Strategies
and will lead the
team responsible for
advancing the com-
pany’s efforts in
diversity for
employees, cus-
tomers and suppliers. Collins joins
American from Citigroup in Las
Vegas, Nevada, where he ser ved as
operations manager for Citicards.
Prior to Citigroup, he was the regional
manager for diversity at American
Express. He holds a bachelor’s degree
in business administration from
Illinois State University and an
M.B.A. from the University of North
Carolina at Greensboro.
Catherine M. Coughlin
Named Senior Executive
Vice President and Global
Marketing Officer by
AT&T Inc.
Catherine
Coughlin, former
CEO and president
of AT&T Midwest,
has been named
global marketing
officer by AT&T.
Ms. Coughlin
C o u g h l i n
Eric Stallworth
Lillian Dukes
Lillian Dukes has
been appointed vice
president of
Technical Ser vices
for American Eagle
Airlines. She has
spent more than
20 years in the
aerospace industr y.
Dukes earned a master’s degree in
electrical engineering at Villanova
University and a bachelor’s degree in
electrical engineering and mathematics
from Carnegie-Mellon University. Her
career as an engineer began with
General Electric Aerospace. Dukes has
been widely recognized as someone
making a difference in the technology
industr y. She has spoken internation-
ally on issues facing maintenance
organizations within the airlines and
Eric Stallworth has
joined American
Airlines as manager
of Diversity
Strategies. He will
be responsible for
creating strategies
that strengthen the
company’s
relationships with its employees, its
customers and the communities it
ser ves. A Louisiana native, Stallworth
is a graduate of Xavier University in
New Orleans. He most recently ser ved
as diversity program director for
Rockwell Collins in Cedar Rapids,
Iowa. American Airlines is the world’s
largest airline. American Eagle oper-
ates more than 1,800 daily flights to
more than 160 cities throughout the
United States, Canada, the Bahamas,
Mexico and the Caribbean on behalf
of American Airlines. American
Airlines, Inc. and American Eagle
Airlines, Inc. are
joined
Southwestern Bell in her native St. Louis
in 1979. She has grown with the
company as it evolved from a five-state
telephone operation to the world’s
largest telecommunications ser vices
provider. Today, AT&T leads the indus-
tr y in wireless, business, Internet access,
voice and director y, and is gaining
momentum in the TV market.
In her current position, Ms.
Coughlin oversees brand strategy,
advertising, corporate communications,
corporate responsibility, events and
sponsorships worldwide. She reports
to Chairman and CEO Randall
Stephenson. Ms. Coughlin is charged
with completing the integration of
advertising and communications for
wireless and the Southeast following the
completion of the BellSouth merger late
last year, and further building AT&T ’s
brand and reputation for ser vice among
its customers worldwide.
Ms. Coughlin holds a B.A. in
economics from Northwestern
University and an M.B.A. in finance
from St. Louis University. She ser ves on
the board of directors of several organi-
zations, including Northwestern
University.

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Randall Stephenson Becomes Chairman and CEO of AT&T Inc.

SAN ANTONIO, Texas—Randall Stephenson has been named chair- man of the board and chief executive officer of AT&T Inc., one of the

S t e p h e n s o n
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world’s leading telecommunications companies. Stephenson, 47, succeeded Edward E. Whitacre Jr., who retired from both positions today. Stephenson announced that the following executives will report to him:

Bill Blase, 52, senior executive vice president, Human Resources

Jim Callaway, 60, senior executive vice president, Executive Operations

Jim Cicconi, 54, senior executive vice president, External and Legislative Affairs

Cathy Coughlin, 49, senior executive vice president and global marketing officer

Ralph de la Vega, 55, group president, Regional Telecommunications and Entertainment

Rick Lindner, 52, senior executive vice president and chief financial officer

Forrest Miller, 54, group president, Corporate Strategy and Development

Stan Sigman, 60, president and chief executive officer, AT&T Mobility

Ron Spears, 59, group president, Global Business Ser vices

John Stankey, 44, group president, Operations Support

Wayne Watts, 53, senior executive vice president and general counsel

Ray Wilkins, 55, group president, Diversified Businesses.

“ We are focused on developing innovative ways to meet our customers’ communications needs while providing the best, most reliable and easiest ser vice possible,” said Stephenson. AT&T Inc. (NYSE: ATT) is a pre- mier communications holding company. Additional information about AT&T Inc. is available at http://www.att.com.

Burson-Marsteller Appoints Mireille Grangenois Managing Director of Multicultural Practice

NEW YORK – Burson-Marsteller, a leading global public relations and communications consultancy, has appointed Mireille Grangenois as

G r a n g e n o i s
G r a n g e n o i s

managing director to lead its Multicultural Practice. Grangenois will report to Patrick Ford, U.S. president and CEO, and New York Market Leader Tony Telloni. Grangenois was most recently vice president for advertising at The Baltimore Sun where she helped deliver readership and audience growth, with an emphasis on applying consumer-focused intelligence in product development. A significant part of her strategy was to identify and implement audience building and revenue producing strategies that enhanced the newspaper’s relationship with Maryland’s African-American market. Grangenois earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from New York University. She is currently a trustee of the Center Stage Theater in Baltimore.

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Clinton Names Weldon Latham National Campaign Co-Chair

The Clinton campaign has announced that Washington attor- ney and democratic activist Weldon Latham has been named a national co-chair of Hillar y’s campaign. “My friend Weldon has devoted his career to fostering diversity in public life and the workplace, and I’m honored to have his support,” Clinton said. Latham is a senior partner and chair of the Corporate Diversity Counseling Group at the international law firm Davis Wright Tremaine, with 30 years of experience in corporate law, crisis manage- ment and corporate diversity counseling. “Senator Hillar y Clinton has a strong vision for America’s future,” Latham said. “Among the many formi- dable skills that Hillar y Clinton brings as a presidential candidate is her ability to listen and respond to what Americans are saying. Senator Clinton has assem- bled a team that looks like America, and understands the complex issues that face our nation.” Latham is one of the countr y’s lead- ing experts on discrimination law and corporate diversity. He works with major corporations, government officials and quasi-government agencies when faced with highly-publicized charges of race and gender discrimination. He also advises Fortune 200 CEOs on how to create better and more productive workplaces by fostering diversity and inclusion. Latham has been a long-time Democratic party leader, having been an at-large member and trustee of the Democratic National Committee (DNC), as well as a vice-chair of the Democratic Business Council. He was also an honorar y vice-chair of the Clinton/Gore campaign.

L a t h a m
L a t h a m

Amy Girdwood Promoted to Executive Vice President, Human Resources

SILVER SPRING, Md.—Discover y Communications has announced the promotion of Amy Girdwood to execu- tive vice president, Human Resources. In her new role, Girdwood is responsible for leading the human resources management team sup- porting Discover y’s global work force, covering more than 170 countries and five continents. In her previous roles at Discover y, Girdwood was responsible for providing the first dedicated in-house human resources ser vice to a rapidly expanding, diverse workforce in Europe. Additionally, she re-engineered business structures in Europe and Asia and created a global exchange program to develop talent and regional operations as part of the Discovery Networks International division. Prior to joining Discover y, Girdwood worked at Flextech Television, a London-based cable broadcaster, where she integrated employees into a new entity following two separate company acquisitions, oversaw the launch of a company stock option initiative for all employees and designed a graduate management-training program.

G i r d w o o d
G i r d w o o d

Harley-Davidson Motor Company Promotes Bozeman to VP, Powertrain Operations

MILWAUKEE, Wis.—Harley- B o z e m a n Davidson Motor Company has named Dave Bozeman,
MILWAUKEE,
Wis.—Harley-
B o z e m a n
Davidson Motor
Company has
named Dave
Bozeman, 38, vice
president and gen-
eral manager,
Harley-Davidson
Powertrain

Operations. In his new role, Bozeman will tackle manufacturing process and product development innovation while continuing to oversee the production of transmissions and engines for Harley- Davidson Sportster and Buell motorcycle models. Since joining Harley-Davidson as a manufacturing engineer in 1992, Bozeman has held multiple positions within the company. He earned a bache- lor’s degree in manufacturing engineer- ing technology/mechanical design from Bradley University and a master’s degree in engineering management from the Milwaukee School of Engineering. An avid motorcyclist, Bozeman rides a Harley-Davidson Ultra Classic Electra Glide motorcycle, along with his wife, Dawn, on her VRSCB V-Rod motorcy- cle. The couple has four children and lives in Menomonee Falls, Wis. Harley-Davidson, Inc. is the parent company for the group of companies doing business as Harley-Davidson Motor Company, Buell Motorcycle Company and Harley-Davidson Financial Ser vices.

Denise L. Ramos Joins ITT Corporation as Chief Financial Officer

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White Plains, N.Y. – ITT Corporation (NYSE:ITT) announced that Denise L. Ramos will join the Company as chief financial officer, effective July 1, 2007. Ms. Ramos,

50, currently chief financial officer of Furniture Brands International, will succeed George E. Minnich, 57, who is retiring from the Company. Ms. Ramos brings broad industr y and functional experience to this posi- tion, with almost 30 years of financial assignments at several industr y-leading companies. In her current role, which

she has held since Februar y 2005, Ms. Ramos was instrumental in designing corporate strategy and enhancing the planning process for this $2.4 billion manufacturer, marketer and retailer of residential furniture. Ms. Ramos holds an M.B.A. in finance from the University of Chicago. In making the announcement, ITT Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer Steve Loranger said, “ We are delighted to welcome Denise to the strong leadership team of ITT. I know she will be a tremendous asset to our Company and to our senior leadership team.” ITT Corporation (www.itt.com) supplies advanced technology products and ser vices in several growth markets. ITT is a global leader in the transport, treatment and control of water, waste- water and other fluids. Headquartered in White Plains, N.Y., the company gener- ated $7.8 billion in 2006 sales. In addi- tion to the New York Stock Exchange, ITT Corporation stock is traded on the Euronext and Frankfurt exchanges.

New York Life Announces Executive Promotions in the Office of General Counsel

B a d l e r
B a d l e r

NEW YORK – New York Life Insurance Company has announced that

Sara Badler has been

promoted to senior vice president and deputy general counsel and Richard Taigue has been promoted to first vice president and

deputy general counsel in the Office of

the General Counsel.

Both executives

report to Senior Vice President and General Counsel Thomas English. Ms. Badler is responsible for managing the unit within the Office of General Counsel, which provides legal advice to the Company’s life insurance, annuity, long term care and group operations, its

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11

agency department and to the Company’s retail broker-dealer.

She is

also responsible for the unit, which

provides legal support to the Office of the Chief Investment Officer and on

M&A activity.

Ms. Badler re-joined

New York Life in 2004 as vice president

and associate general counsel.

In 2006,

she was promoted to first vice president

and deputy general counsel. Ms. Badler received a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University, a Juris

Doctorate from Fordham University School of Law and a Master of Science degree from Bank Street College of

Education.

She resides in New York City.

T a i g u e
T a i g u e

Mr. Taigue is now

responsible for managing several areas within the Office of General Counsel, including subsidiar y corporate governance and

oversight of the legal operations for New York Life’s subsidiaries. He is also responsible for managing the intellectual property, commercial contracts and legal risk assessment units of the Office of General Counsel. Mr. Taigue joined New York Life as assistant general counsel in 1990, was promoted to associate general counsel in 1992, elected vice president and associ- ate general counsel in 1995, and became vice president and deputy general counsel in 2004.

Mr. Taigue received a bachelor’s degree from City College of New York, and a Juris Doctorate degree from St. John’s University School of Law. He resides in Lynbrook, N.Y. In addition, Karen Lamp has been promoted to vice president and associate general counsel in the Office of General Counsel, reporting to Senior Vice President and Deputy General Counsel Michael DeMicco. Ms. Lamp is now responsible for helping manage the litigation unit of the

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Office of General Counsel, providing counsel and super- vising junior litiga- tors on the compa- ny’s most significant cases. Ms. Lamp joined the company

in 1991 as assistant general counsel and was promoted to associate general counsel in 1994. Ms. Lamp received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Iowa, and a Juris Doctorate degree from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She resides in New York City. New York Life Insurance Company, a Fortune 100 company founded in 1845, is the largest mutual life insurance

company in the United States and one of the largest life insurers in the world. Headquartered in New York City, New York Life’s family of companies offers life insurance, retirement income and long- term care insurance.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Named Best Diversity Company

SPRINGFIELD, N.J. – Diversity/Careers in Engineering and Information

Technolog y magazine has recognized the U.S. Nuclear Regulator y Commission as a Best Diversity Company. The award is based on the results of an online sur vey in which participants were asked to identify the diversity strengths of corpo- rations, government agencies and other organizations that employ technical professionals. The 100 organizations that scored highest with readers for their support of minorities and women were recognized. The regulator y commission may

display a special icon acknowledging the award in its advertising.

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Northrop Grumman’s Jennifer Murrill Receives Women in Technology Rising Star Award

MCLEAN, Va. – Northrop Grumman Corporation’s (NYSE:NOC) Jennifer Murrill was recognized as a winner by Women in Technology (WIT) at its Eighth Annual Women in Technology Leadership Awards. Ms. Murrill, an employee of Northrop Grumman’s Information Technology (IT) sector, was honored in the Rising Star categor y for demonstrated leadership at an early point in her career. Murrill is a cost analyst for Northrop Grumman IT ’s Intelligence group. In this role, she applies mathe- matical concepts and statistical methods to analyze engineering data in an effort to predict the future cost of complex sys- tems from development, through pro- duction, to operations and support. Murrill is also involved in cost research, data collections, data normalization, and independent cost estimates and methods development for space systems in the intelligence community. “Jenny is highly regarded as a role model within Northrop Grumman and the community,” said Michele Toth, vice president of human resources and administration and competitive excel- lence for Northrop Grumman IT. “She has committed herself to the engineering profession while staying actively involved in her local and academic communities. Her talents and perseverance merit this distinguished award.” Women in Technology is the pre- mier organization contributing to the success of professional women in the greater Washington, D.C., technology community. The awards recognize women who embody WIT ’s spirit to

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“connect, lead, succeed.” (See www.womenintechnology.org.) Ms. Murrill earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in systems and informa- tion engineering from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Northrop Grumman Corporation is a $30 billion global defense and technology company whose 122,000 employees provide innovative systems, products, and solutions in information and services, electronics, aerospace and shipbuilding to government and commercial customers worldwide.

NRC Ranked Best Place to Work in the Federal Government

The Nuclear Regulator y Commission captured the top ranking among large federal agencies in the 2007 Best Places to Work in the Federal Government rankings announced by the Partnership for Public Ser vice and the American University Institute for the Study of Public Policy Implementation. The NRC, along with others, was recognized in a ceremony in Washington, D.C., where NRC Chairman Dale E. Klein said, “ This is a ver y great honor for all the men and women at the NRC, who are committed to our mission of protecting people and the environment. The remarkable dedi- cation and camaraderie at our agency make it a great place to work, and we will work hard to keep it that way.” The NRC is recruiting about 400 employees each year for the next few years because of the expected arrival of close to two dozen applications for new reactor licenses beginning this fall. This ranking, along with new recruiting authority provided by Congress, should assist in the agency’s hiring efforts to maintain an innovative and effective workforce. Rankings are compiled by the Partnership using data from the Office of Management and Budget’s 2006 Federal Human Capital sur vey. This

year, a record 221,000 employees at 283 federal organizations responded. The sur vey data is analyzed by the Partnership to develop detailed rankings of federal agencies. Agencies are ranked according to employee satisfaction and engagement, plus by ten workplace cate- gories including effective leadership, strategic management, teamwork, and training and development, plus pay/ben- efits and work/life balance. As a result of NRC employee responses to the sur vey, the NRC ranked number one in eight of ten categories and scored well above the government- wide average. It ranked consistently higher in three key categories of effective leadership, employee skills/mission match and work/life balance. The NRC also ranked first among all age groups and for black and white employees. Details of the sur vey can be found at: http://www.bestplacestowork.org.

Raytheon Honored by Women in Engineering Programs & Advocates Network

ORLANDO, Fla.—Raytheon Company (NYSE:RTN) received the Breakthrough Award at the 2007 Women in Engineering Programs & Advocates Network (WEPAN) annual conference in Orlando, June 10-13. The Breakthrough Award honors an employer for creating a work environ- ment that enhances the career success of women engineers of all ethnicities. Raytheon was selected for its institutional structures and programs that help foster diversity, especially for its women employees. “Diversity at Raytheon is about inclusiveness, in terms of providing an atmosphere where ever yone feels valued and empowered to perform at a peak level, regardless of the many ways we are all different,” said Lori Berdos, president of Raytheon’s Global Women Network, a companywide employee resource group, which ser ves as a strategic busi- ness partner in building and maintaining a diverse workforce.

Since 1990, WEPAN has honored individuals, programs and corporations for extraordinar y ser vice, significant achievement, model programs, and work environments that support the career success of women engineers. Raytheon was the only organization WEPAN rec- ognized as an entire company this year. Raytheon Company, with 2006 sales of $20.3 billion, is a technology leader specializing in defense, homeland security and other government markets throughout the world. With headquarters in Waltham, Mass., Raytheon employs 73,000 people worldwide.

Nadine Vogel Receives Humanitarian Award

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V o g e l

The New Jersey Broadcasters Association pre- sented the Howard L. Green Humanitarian Award to Nadine Vogel, president of Springboard

Consulting LLC, of Mendham, N.J. The award was given at the Best of the Best awards luncheon as part of the Mid-Atlantic States Broadcasters annual conference at Caesars Palace in Atlantic City, N.J. Presenting the award was Elizabeth

Christopherson, executive director and CEO, NJN Public Television & Radio. Ms. Vogel was honored for having made an outstanding contribution to furthering humanitarian benefits to society, specifically for individuals who either have a disability or have a child or other dependent with special needs. Ms. Vogel has an M.B.A. from Golden Gate University in San Francisco, Calif., and a bachelor’s degree in industrial psychology from the College of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina. She resides in New Jersey with her husband and two daugh- ters, both of whom have special needs.

PPDDJJ
PPDDJJ

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b y D a v i d C a s e y Is Normal Abnormal? “No
b y D a v i d C a s e y
Is Normal Abnormal?
“No matter how
long you have
been a diversity
practitioner,
you must
acknowledge
that our collec-
W hat drives you to educate or train
others on the subject of diversity
management? Better yet, if you face
resistance from others on matters of
diversity education or training, why do
you think they resist? More often than
not it is because of how it is positioned.
Diversity management practitioners
often position educating and training
with fixing something or someone who
is abnormal in their thinking or
approach to managing diversity.
In fact, this was my perspective until
recently. I was attending a meeting of
fellow diversity management practitioners.
One of the featured speakers was
Dr. Samuel Betances, who many
of you know. Dr. Betances challenged us
all to think about how it is normal for
us all to have an unbalanced view of the
world and the people around us.
So, it stands to reason that we ALL
need diversity education and training
because we are normal. Got it? I have
over-simplified a ver y elegant and engag-
ing presentation, but I walked away with
a different way of thinking about how to
position the “what’s in
it for me?” for those
who don’t see the
value in developing a
diversity management
capability.
Why is our abnor-
tive states of
normal may
be skewed by
our abnormal
views of the
(By the way, I’ve got
a little Toby Keith and
Sara Evans on the
iPod!)
All of us could
benefit from further
world.’’
mal normal? Because
we are all shaped by
life experiences and filters that make our
perceptions reality to us when they may
not be reality to others.
Here’s an example. If I were to walk
into a countr y western bar today, I
would have a visceral level of discomfort
and would probably assume that the
patrons would not want me there for no
other reason than the fact that I am
black—and people who like countr y
music do not like black people.
Now I know better than that, but my
life has been shaped by years of media
portrayals and personal experiences that
still give me that unfounded belief. I
know there is no reason to believe that
ever yone who likes countr y is a racist.
That’s one of my abnormal normals.
diversity training
precisely because we
are normal! As you
think about what this means to you,
keep a few things in mind:
• No matter how long you have been
a diversity practitioner, you must
acknowledge that our collective states
of normal may be skewed by our
abnormal views of the world.
• Your perceptions are your reality,
but remember that they are YOUR
reality and may not be THE reality
for others.
So the next time someone tells you they
don’t need diversity training, tell them,
“Sure you do, if you’re normal!”
PPDDJJ
David Casey is VP of Talent Management, and
Chief Diversity Officer, at WellPoint, Inc. His column
appears in each issue of Profiles in Diversity Journal.

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Dell Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month

At Dell, we’re committed to bringing together individuals with diverse backgrounds, thinking, leadership and ideas, and arming them with the best tools to ensure their success. We believe this helps drive innovation and makes Dell a more dynamic company. Through career development, mentoring programs, network groups and products like the Dell Latitude D620 with Intel Centrino Duo Mobile Technology, we offer the resources to help every employee achieve their potential. Our goal is to ensure that Dell is a great place to work, grow and aspire. Success real time. Capture it at Dell.

Dell Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month At Dell, we’re committed to bringing together individuals with diverse backgrounds,

Dell recommends Windows Vista Business

Dell Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month At Dell, we’re committed to bringing together individuals with diverse backgrounds,

CAREERS AT DELL. CONSIDER THE POSSIBILITIES.

Dell Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month At Dell, we’re committed to bringing together individuals with diverse backgrounds,

www.dell.com/careers

Dell and the Dell logo are trademarks of Dell Inc. ©2007 Dell Inc. All rights reserved. Intel, the Intel logo, Intel Inside, the Intel Inside logo, Centrino and the Centrino logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries. Dell Inc. cannot be held responsible for errors in typography or photography. Dell is an AA/EO employer. Workforce diversity is an essential part of Dell’s commitment to quality and to the future. We encourage you to apply, whatever your race, gender, color, religion, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or veteran status.

L G B T I n c l u s i o n a t Wo
L G B T I n c l u s i o n a t Wo r k
B y C a t a l y s t
LGBT Inclusion: Understanding
the Challenges
In honor of Pride Month,
Catalyst focuses on lesbian,
gay, bisexual, and transgender
(LGBT) inclusion at work,
with a special focus on an area
for which most organizations
have not yet created policies:
transgender inclusion.
More and more organizations recognize
that creating a lesbian, gay, bisexual,
and transgender (LGBT) inclusive
workplace is a competitive advantage.
By successfully recruiting, retaining,
developing, and advancing LGBT
employees, organizations increase their
ability to compete effectively for talent,
minimize attrition costs, and gain wider
access to LGBT consumer markets.
Initiatives focused on LGBT employees
are a vital component of a broader
diversity and inclusion strategy. Indeed,
most Catalyst members feature policies
and programs, such as domestic partner-
ship benefits and LGBT employee net-
work groups. While these are important
first steps, LGBT inclusion is a complex
issue and organizations need to do
more to address the concerns of LGBT
employees, especially transgender
employees.
When some people hear about
LGBT-inclusion initiatives, they think
it is a discussion about sexual behavior
in the workplace. As a result, they may
see an individual’s LGBT identity as a
sensitive and private matter that falls
outside of the concern of an employer
and should be left at home.
These beliefs often lie at the heart
of employee resistance to these
initiatives. Therefore, it is important for
diversity practitioners and managers to
communicate that the term “LGBT”
refers to a person’s sexual orientation,
and/or gender identity and mode of
gender expression, not an individual’s
sexual behavior or activity. It is also
critical to underscore that, for ever yone,
sexual orientation, gender identity, and
gender expression are defining
individual characteristics that we all
bring to work.
Gender Identity and Gender
Expression: Transgender
Employees at Work
Transgender inclusion is the protection
and inclusion of employees on the basis
of gender identity and/or gender
expression. Gender identity is defined as
the inner sense of being female or male,
regardless of biological birth sex.
Gender expression is how an individual
manifests a sense of femininity or
masculinity through his or her looks,
behavior, grooming, or dress. Yet gender
identity and gender expression are
different from, and do not predict,
sexual orientation, which is a term
commonly used to refer to a person’s
emotional, romantic, or sexual attraction
to individuals of a particular gender.
Because transgender inclusion is
new territor y for most organizations,
continued on next page

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Leading People. Leading Organizations.
Leading People. Leading Organizations.

I AM

Reginna Burns, SPHR

Sr. HR Director Microsoft

Member since 1997

“SHRM has become a part of who I am as an HR professional and it reminds me that I belong to a profession that has a voice.”

Leading People. Leading Organizations. I AM Reginna Burns, SPHR Sr. HR Director Microsoft Member since 1997
Leading People. Leading Organizations. I AM Reginna Burns, SPHR Sr. HR Director Microsoft Member since 1997
Leading People. Leading Organizations. I AM Reginna Burns, SPHR Sr. HR Director Microsoft Member since 1997
Leading People. Leading Organizations. I AM Reginna Burns, SPHR Sr. HR Director Microsoft Member since 1997
Leading People. Leading Organizations. I AM Reginna Burns, SPHR Sr. HR Director Microsoft Member since 1997

www.shrm.org

L G B T I n c l u s i o n a t Wo
L G B T I n c l u s i o n a t Wo r k
continued
transgender employees are often not
protected by existing sexual orientation
anti-discrimination policies and state-
ments. This lack of policy, combined
with a dearth of public education about
the transgender community, often leads
to misunderstandings and discrimina-
tion at work.
Traditional cultural norms and
stereotypes of gender identity and
gender expression are infrequently
challenged at work. Most employees
conform in behavior and dress to the
gender norms that our culture assigns
to each biological sex. Transgender
employees challenge the norms and
beliefs about the relationship between
gender and biological sex. By disclosing
themselves as transgender in the work-
place, they may do a number of things
that break the mold: change their
names, ask coworkers to refer to them
with a new pronoun (“he” instead of
“she”), and dress in a way that does not
conform to gender norms.
Breaking the “rules” of gender iden-
tity and gender expression is, by nature,
extremely public and sometimes a
necessar y component of transition.
In fact, transgender employees who elect
surger y may have to live their new
gender role for at least one year in order
to be deemed eligible. Therefore,
transgender employees are frequently at
risk of facing extreme discrimination.
Coworkers are often confused about the
process; they may feel uncomfortable
when transgender employees start using
a different bathroom or dressing in a
different manner.
Transgender employees face a diffi-
cult process. They must see a medical
professional and rigorously discuss their
thoughts on their gender identity, may
take hormones, and may participate in
expensive surgery. Society can make this
transition even more arduous—from
strangers questioning gender to coworkers
confused about which pronoun to use—
and the responses are not always positive.
Organizations are often inexperi-
enced in supporting transgender employ-
ees. Rather than letting the arrival of a
transgender employee in an organization
create confusion, organizations can
incorporate transgender education into
LGBT-inclusion efforts, as well as
include gender identity and expression
in diversity and inclusion policies. 1 PPDDJJ
Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading
nonprofit corporate membership research and
advisory organization working globally with
businesses and the professions to build inclusive
environments and expand opportunities
for women and business. To purchase your
copy of Making Change: LGBT Inclusion—
Understanding the Challenges or to down-
load free copies of our research reports, visit
www.catalyst.org.
1
For more information, see Human Rights Campaign,
Transgender Issues in the Workplace: A Tool for Managers
(2004).

have is an important facet of transgender inclusion.

Jenna, a male-to-female transgender employee at a Fortune 500 company, told her supervisor that she was planning to have sex reassignment surgery. She explained that living fully as a woman for at least one year was one of the necessary prerequisites for the surgery. Jenna had always been a top performer in the company, was well-liked by others, and was considered a “team player.” Because this is a key learning opportunity, Jenna’s supervisor needs to be able to turn to a human resources or diversity practitioner on staff for direction on how to manage the situation appropriately, ensuring that Jenna is

supported and that her coworkers are educated on the process. Dealing with the questions, concerns, or even fears that Jenna’s coworkers might

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Bring the world together, and you help develop a better one. In a global marketplace, a
Bring the world together, and you help develop a better one.
In a global marketplace, a rich tapestry of ideas, skills and perspectives is a key competitive advantage.
At Chevron, we support diversity initiatives around the world, fostering growth and opportunity for
everyone. To find out more, visit us at chevron.com.
CHEVRON is a registered trademark of Chevron Corporation. The CHEVRON HALLMARK is a trademark of Chevron Corporation. ©2007 Chevron Corporation.All rights reserved.

Combine a background in business and the militar y with an MBA and you have a powerful package. That’s an apt description of Cardinal Health’s Jeanetta Darno, who is responsible for enterprise-wide D&I efforts that ser ve more than 40,000 employees worldwide.

Please describe Cardinal Health’s global presence. Describe the scope and scale of the company to a reader who may not be familiar with it.

Cardinal Health is ranked No. 19 in Fortune magazine’s Fortune 500. Our success is fueled by more than 40,000 employees in 29 countries, and we operate globally, with business operations on five continents. We provide the health-care industr y with products and ser vices that help hospitals, physician offices and pharmacies reduce costs; improve safety, productivity and profitability; and deliver better care to patients.

How does Cardinal Health define diversity and inclusion, as it relates to the efforts within the company?

We view diversity through a broad lens. We focus on the individual dimensions of diversity that each employee, customer, and recruit with whom we interact represents. And, we also focus on the diversity of the communities where we live and work, and the diversity that exists at the organizational level, too. When we define diversity at an individual or personal level, we focus on primar y dimensions like age, ethnicity, gender, race, sexual orientation, and mental/physical abilities. But we also think it’s important to focus on secondar y dimensions—which happen to be dimensions that don’t instantly come to mind when many people think ‘diversity.’ These secondar y dimensions, like communication

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Interview Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health
Interview
Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health

s t y le, e d u c a t i o n , f a m i l y s t a t u s , m i l i t a r y e x p er ie n ces , p r i m a r y language, income, geographic locations, organizational role and level —even religion, work experience and work style—also have an impact on how we interact with each other. We view inclusion as creating an environment where all employ- ees can reach their maximum potential. It’s the process of leveraging the power of our diverse differences and similarities to better ser ve our customers and to make Cardinal Health a great place to work.

What are the main components of your D&I program? Is the management of D&I programs largely U.S.-based or present throughout the worldwide organization?

The main focus of Cardinal Health’s diversity and inclusion program is to create an environment which unleashes the potential of all employees. We also recognize that we’re operating within an increas- ingly complex workplace and community—so we’re also focused on helping the company effectively manage the challenges and opportunities associated with the ever-evolving marketplace that we operate within. Our diversity and inclusion programs are largely U.S.-based, but as Cardinal Health expands its global presence, we expect to expand our D&I effort to mirror our geographic growth.

Are there unique opportunities in your particular industry for implementing diversity programs?

Yes. As the United States becomes increasingly diverse, so do the healthcare products and ser vices that our workforce, market- place and communities seek. Whether it is due to an aging Baby Boomer generation; increased awareness of specific risk factors a n d h e a l t h i s s u es i n A fric a n - A m eric a n c o m m u n i t ies ; t h e growing affluence of GLBT households; or an influx of immi- grants from other nations; healthcare needs are changing. These changes enable us to leverage diversity as a competitive advantage, because the more diverse our employee base is, the better we’ll be able to develop products and ser vices that reflect a broad range of cultural differences and demands. In this respect, diversity impacts the bottom line in a variety of ways. Diversity helps us foster creativity of thought and innovation. It helps us encourage unique solutions to problems, broaden our awareness of need, and appeal to broader markets.

Do you have any examples of how tapping employee diversity has yielded significant product or profit breakthroughs? Inter-business synergies?

Absolutely. For example, this year alone, Cardinal Health CEO Kerr y Clark has recognized 11 different teams with special awards that recognize customer-driven innovations that are helping to make health care safer and more productive. Each of these teams is comprised of a diverse mix of team members—from engineers to warehouse workers, from marketing specialists to technical consult- ants, from scientists to financial analysts. These teams are geograph- ically dispersed around the countr y. Each of these “Innovation Award” winners recognized a customer need, solicited diverse customer insight to learn more about that need—and then brought diverse internal teams together to create a solution to meet that need. The solutions these teams created leveraged inter-business syner- gies and many were considered break-throughs. For instance, one team created a new product that helps premature infants breathe more easily. This product was such a breakthrough that 95 percent of our hospital customers who tested the product now use it.

Another of the solutions created a software system that would help hospitals provide compassionate care to a greater number of their community’s uninsured.

Headquarters: Dublin, Ohio Web site: www.cardinalhealth.com Primary business: Health care and pharmaceuticals Industry ranking: Cardinal Health
Headquarters: Dublin, Ohio
Web site: www.cardinalhealth.com
Primary business: Health care and pharmaceuticals
Industry ranking: Cardinal Health is ranked No. 19
in the Fortune 500 and is also ranked by Fortune
as the most admired company within its industry
(health-care wholesalers).
2006 revenues: Approximately $81 billion

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Interview Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health
Interview
Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health

Cardinal Health’s Diversity and Inclusion teams host monthly Webinars to share diversity best practices, enterprise-wide.

CORPORATE LEADERSHIP

What resources (financial and manpower) are allocated on diversity? How do these reflect your company ’s leadership commitment to diversity?

When I look at Cardinal Health’s leadership commitment to diversity, I see it reflected at various levels, from our CEO and board of direc- tors to the 40,000 employees across the company. For example, diversity and inclusion is a regular agenda item for our board of directors meetings. D&I is also an ongoing agenda item at each quarterly business meeting hosted by our executive lead- ership team. These venues ensure that we’re constantly fostering meaningful discussion around quantitative and qualitative progress toward our D&I goals. It also ensures that our senior leaders effectively understand, support and feel ownership of our diversity and inclusion initiatives. At Cardinal Health, diversity is a center of excellence, reporting directly to the Chief Human Resource Officer along with the Total Rewards and Talent Management Centers of Excellence. Our team

works with other centers of excellence throughout the company, business leaders, and employees across the countr y. I’m proud of Cardinal Health’s commitment to diversity and inclusion. My second year into the role, we delivered diversity and inclusion training to 99.6% of our employees, directors and above. We continue to sustain that foundation of awareness by ensuring all new directors and above participate in diversity and inclusion train- ing and those below that level enroll in one of our diversity sessions online or on our diversity Web site.

Does your company address diversity in its annual report? Is it important to talk about diversity with shareholders?

Cardinal Health’s commitment to diversity was a key visual theme

for its 2006 annual report. To reinforce our commitment to diversity, the report’s cover prominently featured employees from diverse ages, ethnicities, and backgrounds, spanning 3 countries, to ensure inclusion of the most

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Interview Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health
Interview
Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health

d i v e r s e a r r a y o f C a rd i n a l He a l t h e m p l oy e e s a n d c u s t o m e r s . Prominently featuring employee and customer photos, worldwide, created excitement and a sense of shared ownership for the annual report. We also included key diversity metrics in this year’s annual report, including diverse supplier spend and senior management diversity training statistics. Our employees seemed to really appreciate seeing themselves reflected in what is one of the most important communications materials we produce all year. Our commitment to diversity is also integrated into our EPPIC Core Values, which are the timeless, guiding principles of our culture. Specifically, key diversity-focused values that we regularly communicate to shareholders and employees include:

• We practice inclusion, value diversity and encourage work/life effectiveness

• We embrace a culture of compliance, operate within the letter and spirit of the law and avoid conflicts of interest

• We treat others with dignity, respect and compassion

• We speak up when something is not right and confront the difficult issues

• We recognize the unique contribution of each individual and the value of teamwork

• We encourage respectful debate and disagreement • We communicate openly and candidly

• We enhance the customer experience by seeking opportunities to work globally with customers and others across the organization.

Do you have any programs in place to increase the cross-cultural competence of your senior management team? Can mid-level managers acquire similar training?

In 2003, we rolled out “Inclusion Awareness” training to all employ- ees, which included real-life examples of the business implications of diversity as well as tools and strategies to enhance workplace interactions. The objectives of this training were to:

• Build a common language and foundation for diversity and inclusion at Cardinal Health;

• Increase participants’ understanding of the business case for diversity;

• Engage participants in a positive dialogue that encourages proactive support of Cardinal Health’s initiative; and

• Help participants understand how to apply inclusion principles in the workplace.

So far, 99.6 percent of Cardinal Health directors and above have completed this training. We also plan to roll out diversity and inclusion e-learning curricula to help all employees increase their cross cultural competence.

How are decisions about diversity made in your organization? Is there a diversity council and who heads it up? Who participates?

Decisions about diversity are made on a number of levels at Cardinal Health. First, we have a diversity and inclusion steering council comprised of executives representing each of our business segments. The chair- person for the council is a direct report to our CEO. In addition, the other members of the steering council are also direct reports to segment CEOs or C-level leaders of our corporate functions. Cardinal Health is an $80 billion, geographically-dispersed company—so to make diversity and inclusion ‘real’ for all employ-

ees, we also created segment diversity councils, which play a key role in promoting diversity and inclusion in each of our operating segments. These segment diversity councils are sponsored by a senior executive and are made up of individuals who represent the various businesses and corporate functions. The councils exchange diversity best practices, promote account- ability and align Cardinal Health’s diversity initiatives with segment and corporate objectives across the company. Finally, we have enterprise-wide employee network steering councils: A Minority Leaders Network and a Women’s Initiative Network. The Chief HR Officer and I regularly review the diversity strategy, objectives and progress with our CEO. He sets the overall direction for our initiative.

EMPLOYEE INCLUSIVENESS

How does your company gauge inclusion of employ- ees? What are the tests, measurements and bench- marks (metrics) that indicate where the company is on the inclusion graph?

We measure inclusion of our employees through various means. In many ways, we use the same metrics other companies utilize:

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Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health

Interview Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health Jeanetta Dar no Executive Profile Company: Cardinal Health Title: Director,

Jeanetta Dar no Executive Profile

Company: Cardinal Health

Title: Director, Diversity & Inclusion

Years in current position: Three

Education: M.B.A. from The Ohio State University, a master’s degree in human resources from the University of Central Texas (a Texas A&M campus), and a bachelor’s degree in political science from Jackson State University.

First job: As a junior in high school, I worked as a hostess at the local steak house.

What I’m reading: I am reading three books:

Barack Obama’s The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream; T.D. Jakes Reposition Yourself: Living Life Without Limits;

and a biography of Thomas Jefferson.

Family: I grew up in a military family. My siblings have been spread around the globe. I recently married the love of my life, my best friend. We have two little dogs: a French Mastiff and a white Boxer with a combined weight of 200 lbs.

Interests: Family and travel. Access to higher education and quality education. Leading a healthy lifestyle.

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Interview Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health
Interview
Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health

“ While completing a master’s degree in human resources, I researched the disparities of race relations. That research really piqued my interest in the field, and I imme- diately realized that this was a career I could really feel passionately about.”

Jeanetta Darno

employee engagement, workforce diversity metrics, increased aware- ness through training, number of d i v e r s e s u p p l ie r s , s p e n d w i t h diverse suppliers, employee bene- f i t s . We a l s o b e n c h m a r k o u r progress against other Fortune 100 companies and against rank- ings produced by diversity experts like Catalyst and Diversity Inc.

Some say diversity is a “numbers game.” How does your company know its culture is not just tied up in numbers? How do you celebrate success?

Earlier, I referenced our innova-

t i o n a w a rd s , v a r i o u s le v el s o f training, and how we communi- cate to our employees, customers and suppliers. I believe that how

we communicate, measure, and celebrate diversity are indications that we view diversity as a key pathway to innovation. Celebrating success is critical to ensuring constant progress in any initiative, par- ticularly those related to diversity and inclusion. One of the most successful ways we celebrate success is through our Diversity Best Practice Webinars. We introduced the webinars in Januar y 2006 as a forum for Cardinal Health’s diversity councils— which are located throughout the United States—to share and leverage best practices in diversity and inclusion, enterprise-wide.

Corporate leaders and employees from across the countr y partic- ipate in monthly webinars from the comfort of their own offices, and we invite external speakers to attend virtually, as well. Internal and guest speakers share insights related to topics including building a business case for diversity, how to form employee networks, mentor- ing, the importance of strategic partnerships, benchmarking, gener- ational differences and more. Diversity councils also share their successes and best practices. Following each presentation, we encourage active discussion and Q&A, and then we post the audio and video files of the webinars to our intranet for all employees to access. These webinars provide a regularly-scheduled, replicable forum for our diversity councils to share the exciting progress they’re mak- ing. And, they also fuel excitement and continued momentum for diversity efforts across the organization, because employees and corporate leaders really enjoy and become motivated by learning about progress and best practices from other areas of the company.

How did you get to your present position? What was your career path?

One of my favorite aspects of the diversity and inclusion career path is that there are so many roads that lead people to be involved in the field. I started in this field in 1990. While completing a master’s degree in human resources, I researched the disparities of race relations. That research really piqued my interest in the field, and I imme- diately realized that this was a career I could really feel passionately about. After completing my master’s degree, I held operational, human resources and recruiting roles in a variety of organizations. I ser ved as a captain in the United States Army, worked in the logis- tics team at Wal-Mart and also ser ved as a human resources consult- ant on diversity and talent acquisition issues.

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Interview Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health
Interview
Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health
Interview Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health Cardinal Health’s commitment to diversity is reflected in its companywide
Interview Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health Cardinal Health’s commitment to diversity is reflected in its companywide
Interview Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health Cardinal Health’s commitment to diversity is reflected in its companywide

Cardinal Health’s commitment to diversity is reflected in its companywide career opportunities.

I also took advantage of ever y opportunity for special assign- ments or to ser ve lead roles to support diversity initiatives of the organizations I ser ved. That all ultimately led me here, to Cardinal Health, where I’m now for tunate enough to help lead an enterprise-wide D&I effort that serves more than 40,000 employees worldwide.

Who were/are your mentors? What about their business skill or style influenced you? How did they help in your professional and personal life? Are you mentoring anyone today?

I’ve been inspired by a number of different mentors, each influ- encing me in unique ways at different times in my life. In my high school years, my track coach was an incredible mentor. She helped me understand the critical importance of setting goals, sticking to your commitments and constantly conditioning yourself for constant self-improvement. In the militar y, the commanding officer for my battalion taught me the importance of being prepared prior to taking on any chal- lenge—and the importance of making sure that your team mem- bers are fully prepared, too. From the private sector, two executives at Wal-Mart—Larr y Duff and Mike Duke—taught me how to articulate a vision, develop a strategy and rally support to accom- plish it. If it were not for a combination of all these individuals, I know I wouldn’t be where I am today. That’s one reason why I always feel it’s my responsibility to mentor others—and to encour- age fellow leaders to do the same.

PPDDJJ
PPDDJJ
Interview Jeanetta Dar no Cardinal Health Cardinal Health’s commitment to diversity is reflected in its companywide

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There’s a place where everyone

is welcome. Where everyone is

treated the same. Boeing strongly

supports the never-ending mission

to ensure that every workplace is

that welcome place.

There’s a place where everyone is welcome. Where everyone is treated the same. Boeing strongly supports

Bailey W. Jackson Terrence R. Simmons

George Simons Rafael Gonzalez

Anita Rowe

Gary A. Smith

Francie Kendall

Janet Crenshaw Smith

Myrtha B. Casanova

Sondra Thiederman Lewis Brown Griggs

Trevor Wilson

Alan Richter

Frederick A. Miller

Taylor Cox Jr.

Price M. Cobbs

Steve Hanamura

Armida Mendez Russell

Herbert Z. Wong

T

h

e

P

i

o

n

e

e

r

s

Edward Hubbard Edith Whitfield Seashore

Juan T. Lopez

Marilyn Loden

Michael L. Wheeler Karen M. Stinson Julie O’Mara

Myr na Marofsky

Margaret Regan

Edie Fraser

Patricia Pope

Judith H. Katz

Lee Gardenswartz

Barry and Elsie Y. Cross

Jeff Howard

V. Robert Hayles

R. Roosevelt Thomas Jr.

Mary-Frances Winters

o

f

Kay Iwata

D

i

v

e

r

s

i

t

y

D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R

D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R

Myrtha B. Casanova, Ph.D.

T h e

F u t u r e

H a s

S t a r t e d

It has taken more than a century to develop the corporate operating principles that prevail today in areas of the world with an advanced economy and technology. Yet the key role of people as true drivers of development has been a business strategy only since the ’80s.

UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural

Organization) declared in the 2002 Cultural Diversity Patrimony

of Humanity that ment of humanity.”

“. . .

cultural diversity generates the develop-

By Myrtha B. Casanova, Founder, European Institute for Managing Diversity

In the future, diversity inclusion management will be respon- sible for corporate results. New attitudes and new tools are required. As Albert Einstein once said, “I cannot solve prob- lems with the same tools used to create them.”

• Information: A shrinking world with falling barriers is making it evident that the nature of the world is diverse.

• Governance: China, India and Islamic countries are emerg- ing as new powers on principles that respond to their tradi- tional cultures, rather than to established democratic codes.

• Technology: The United States and Europe will share research and development with China and India, with vast pools of researchers bringing new perspectives.

• Women: The 20th centur y was the era of technology; the 21st centur y will be the era of the feminine.

• Corporate citizenship: The economy will move to agile SMEs (small- and medium-sized enterprises) and micro enterprises, spurred by micro credits granted mainly to women.

• Entrepreneurial regions: In the 19th centur y, companies chose sites close to raw materials. In the 20th centur y, they chose logistics hubs and client proximity. In the 21st century, they must choose sites according to existing profiles of the human resources critical to their businesses.

• Diverse work force: The inclusion, not the segmentation, of diverse profiles of peoples in the organization will generate creativity, innovation and efficiency.

• The business case: Measuring costs and benefits of diversity policies will be a key business imperative for corporations to achieve efficiency in global, diverse environments.

• Time: Measuring people by their results and not by time spent at work will change the values, structure and definition of the business world as the time pattern vanishes.

• Changing demographics: As gender and age become critical indicators, new social transformation behaviors and legisla- tion will emerge to leverage aging populations and the par- ticipation of women.

• Alternative energies: The explosion of developing countries will shift the grounds of growth to alternative energies in a new global balance.

The 15-year scenario is people-centered. It requires a new social contract, profound rethinking, an inclusive process of the diverse peoples that form the global community, respect for cultures and competence. The most challenging policy that leaders must manage in the future is diversity inclusion.

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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R

D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R

Price M. Cobbs, M.D.

W h e r e

A r e

W e

H e a d e d ?

It is a daunting task to contemplate future opportunities and offer predictions for diversity and inclusion over the next 10 to 15 years. Forecasting the future for a field of work in which one has been present from the beginning is tricky. Statements intended as the wisdom of experience may strike readers as the utterances of an old fogey. To further complicate matters, the work performed under the umbrella of diversity and inclusion has a conceptual newness and, as a result, is permeated with the smell of fresh paint.

By Price M. Cobbs

I am reminded of an essay, “Reflections of an Old Hand,” that I prepared for the first symposium of the Diversity Collegium held at Morehouse College in 1993. An excerpt follows:

It is a field which to some appears to have emerged almost

overnight

. . .

[and] the skills and competencies applied

in this work are from divergent places: Organizational devel- opment, training, human resources, education, psychology, law and business management are but a sampling of the disciplines represented.

The emergence of an interdependent global economy means that diversity and inclusion as concepts are much more widespread. What they mean and what organizational and societal issues they bring forth will var y from countr y to coun- tr y and region to region. But as legitimate societal and business goals, they will undoubtedly continue and expand.

Finally, diversity and inclusion are being linked to other global issues such as environmental sustainability and ethics. Where this path may lead is still unsettled, but it means that diversity and inclusion are no longer passing fads, but are entering the realm of core values.

While I once thought ideas emanating from these divergent places would limit the growth of our field, I have come to appreciate the strengths of synergy that derive from a variety of disciplines and backgrounds. In the recent past, what was ini- tially a set of activities aimed at resolving contentious issues, first centering on race and then gender, has now grown into an e n d e a vo r t o p ro d u ce e x p a n d i n g ma n a g eme n t s k i l ls a n d competencies. Much of this progress has occurred because the people developing approaches to these issues brought a variety of perspectives. Research and study on why diversity and inclusion are necessar y for the effectiveness of organizations will continue.

Price M. Cobbs, M.D. is a psychiatrist, author and management consultant.

His most recent book is a memoir,

My American Life: From Rage to Entitlement.

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D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R

Dr. Taylor Cox Jr.

C h a l l e n g e s

a n d

O p p o r t u n i t i e s

F a c i n g

W o r k p l a c e

D i v e r s i t y

a s

a

F i e l d

W i t h i n

O r g a n i z a t i o n a l

D e v e l o p m e n t

The challenges of macroeconomics

Diversity practitioners, perhaps to a greater extent than experts on other organizational challenges, are impacted by the health of the economy. The U.S. economic forecasts indicate a pending crisis in the fiscal soundness of the U.S. government itself due to factors such as unfunded Social Security and Medicare obligations for almost 80 million baby boomers (now moving into their retire- ment years) and the cost of the Iraq war (now estimated at around $2 trillion).

By Taylor Cox Jr., CEO Taylor Cox and Associates

To respond to this challenge, diversity specialists will need to become increasingly multi-skilled. For example, they will need to develop a track record of expertise on team building and effective communication in parallel with diversity dynamics. In addition, we continue to need more and better research, especially on the economics of investments in managing diver- sity and the relative effectiveness of various organizational inter ventions. These steps will help by expanding our capabil- it y t o h a ve p o siti ve ec o n omic imp a ct o n o r g a n iz a ti o n s (through diversity-related inter ventions) and by raising aware- ness of the potential for such impact.

New product development

A second major challenge facing the work on workplace diversity within the organizational development field is that core elements of our traditional product line (e.g., building state-of-the-art affirmative action programs and diversity train- ing) have entered the mature phase of the product life cycle. The working assumption of all who are involved with the diversity agenda in organizations should be that the legal framework for affirmative action will disappear within the next decade. Thus, a shift in product focus is needed here.

In addition, during the past 15 years a majority of U.S. organizations have completed initial diversity training, and many have developed internal expertise for continuing training on diversity fundamentals. What is needed, therefore, is atten-

tion to new product development. For example, organizations will need to shift from traditional affirmative action programs toward other aspects of the equal employment opportunity agenda, such as social-identity-targeted employment prepara- tion efforts and changing sources of supply for labor.

Finally, we will need to look more closely at the use of correlates of race, national origin and gender in selection, for differences such as in ways of thinking and the ability to speak multiple languages.

Other directions for new product development include a move away from general awareness training and toward training targeted to specific, diversity-related dynamics such as race and performance appraisals or social identity effects on communications in groups. Also needed in training are more content on culture, (both organizational and identity-group culture), more integration of diversity content in other training courses, and more development and marketing of nontraining inter ventions such as management systems analysis, executive coaching and strategic planning.

Taylor Cox and Associates is a research and consulting firm founded in 1982 that has worked with dozens of major organizations for educational development.

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P I O N E E R S

Barry & Elsie Cross

U n d e r s t a n d i n g

t h e

P o w e r

D y n a m i c s

o f

G r o u p s

I believe that the future challenge for diversity firms is helping clients win the war for talent. The task of recruiting, retaining, promoting and developing a work force that represents the rapidly changing demographics of America involves more than traditional inclu- sion programs. The best way to win the talent

By Barry Cross, President, Elsie Y. Cross Associates, Inc.

war is to move beyond the bland, politically correct philosophy of inclusion that celebrates individual dif- ferences and start paying attention to the different experiences people have based on their group member- ships, e.g., race, ethnicity, skin color, gender, sexual identity, physical ability, religion and age.

We need to recognize that there are power dynamics attributed to each group membership. We need to ask, “ Who is on top and who is on the bottom of the organization chart? What groups are in and which are out?” If corporate leaders can acknowledge that these dynamics exist in American society, then they should also know that these dynamics spill over into their work environments.

Some organizations are meeting their representation and hiring goals. However, most organizations are not tracking the different employee experiences by group membership. Moving past inclusion means tracking group patterns, not just individual experiences within an organization. Once an organization begins to track dynamics at the group membership level

the next challenge emerges—the power dynamics between these groups.

As American demographics continue to change, so too will the power dynamics shift. This phenomenon can be seen right now in local city governments in New York, Miami, San Francisco, Philadelphia, Chicago, Dallas and Los Angeles. Each city has different demographics and different group hier- archies. Some people-of-color groups have no power or are under-represented. When the group in power is not white, tension still occurs between groups. These intergroup dynam- ics will magnify as Hispanics (of many different ethnic groups and cultures) eclipse blacks as the largest minority group. Understanding power dynamics between groups is a challenge for diversity firms.

Three other dimensions affecting organizations are religion, sexual identity and generational difference. The future chal- lenge for diversity firms is to assist organizational leaders in seeing and working with the power dynamics of these issues at the group and organizational levels.

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D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R

Edie Fraser

D i v e r s i t y

2 0 2 0

P r e d i c t i o n s

By 2020, America and the world will have changed dramatically. In the United States, more than 12 states will have minorities as the majority population. (Right now, there are five states.) Huge demographic shifts prove it is going to be a “New America.” One in every five youths will be Hispanic, or 20 percent of the youth; and the Hispanic population will account for close to 60 million U.S. citizens. Immigration will be the norm as the need for service workers in particular becomes critical.

By Edie Fraser, Chair, Diversity Practice and Managing Director, Diversified Search

Th e tic k ets f o r p resi d e n t, U. S . Se n a te a n d Ho u se o f Representatives, and state houses will reflect diverse slates. In the Senate there will be 26 women senators, five Hispanic senators and three African-American senators. (Right now, there are 16 women, three Hispanics and one African American.)

In Februar y 2007, Har vard University named its first woman president, Drew Gilpin Faust. Half of the Ivy League universities will have women presidents by 2020.

• Board of directors’ representation will have changed. Today women are approximately 15.3 percent of major boards. By 2020, women will be 25 percent of boards here and 40 per- cent in Scandinavia. Minorities will have gained a similar footing on boards.

• Recruiting a senior level diverse executive team will be a top priority.

• We will have 30 women CEOs and 25 minority CEOs.

• Chief diversity officers will report to CEOs and boards and make an average of $350,000 per year base.

• Ch ief

e n v iro nm e n t a l

o fficers

(s u st a i n a b le

d e vel o pme n t

officers) will be in evidence ever ywhere.

• There will be talent wars prompted by a major shortage of talent.

• Diversity as part of the bonus plan will average 20 percent.

• Work life: Half of the work force will be telecommuting and working remotely, and work-life benefits will be universal not only for women, but also for all, as the young and old want different lifestyles. Older workers will be invited to stay on. Few will retire at 65.

• Marketplace: Women and the multicultural marketplace are the backbone of the economy. Women, minorities and GLBT (gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender) groups alone hold the major purchasing power of the economy, account- ing for approximately 88 percent of all sales of products and ser vices. Women and minorities will control 92 percent of the purchasing power by 2020.

• Globalization will be fundamental to success for all those operating in 2020.

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DIVERSITY
DIVERSITY

determines a company’s success.

determines a company’s success.

Eastman Ko dak Company’s commitmen t to diversity and inclusion

Eastman Kodak Company’s commitment to diversity and inclusion

involves involves our our employees, employees, customers, customers, suppliers sup pliers and and communities communities worldwide. wo rldwide.

In our global marketplace, Kodak’s innovations reflect the creativity and

In our global

marketplace, Kodak’s inno vations reflect the creativity

and

rich rich tapestry tapestry of of our our diverse diverse workforce workforce a and nd winning winning culture. culture.

www.kodak.com/go/careers

www.ko dak.com/go/caree rs

DIVERSITY determines a company’s success. determines a company’s success. Eastman Ko dak Company’s commitmen t to
DIVERSITY determines a company’s success. determines a company’s success. Eastman Ko dak Company’s commitmen t to
DIVERSITY determines a company’s success. determines a company’s success. Eastman Ko dak Company’s commitmen t to
DIVERSITY determines a company’s success. determines a company’s success. Eastman Ko dak Company’s commitmen t to
D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
  • D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R S

Lee Gardenswartz, Ph.D.,

D i v e r s i t y

i n

t h e

D e c a d e s

A h e a d

Over the last quarter of a century, diversity has become a common word in the lexicon of business and a strategic issue with bottom- line implications. Most organizations have taken steps to create more inclusion in the workplace and remove discriminatory barriers. While progress has been made in increasing awareness, knowledge and sensitivity, much still needs to be done. The following are a few recommendations.

B

y

L

e

e

G

a

r

d

e

n

s

w

a

r

t

z

,

P

h

.

D

.

,

Approach diversity from a global perspective. As organizations

extend operations around the world and as immigration and

migration bring the world to the workplace, a more global ori-

entation is needed. Leveraging diversity and capitalizing on its

potential benefits will be possible only if organizations work to

increase awareness and knowledge about the cultural differ-

ences in their employee and customer bases. This calls for

developing an attitude and approach that our colleague Dr.

Melanie Trevalon calls “cultural humility.” Tailoring diversity

and inclusion processes to take into account the different polit-

ical, economic, cultural and social factors at play in global

operations is essential.

Use technology creatively to engage and connect staff.

While much diversity training historically has depended on

relationship development through in-person interactions,

innovative ways of building connections and training that

enlist technology need to be created to overcome time and

distance barriers. Examples include virtual team meetings via

teleconferencing and online training.

Recognize generational differences and deal with the

workplace implications they present. Not only does each gen-

eration bring its own set of values, experiences and preferences

to work, but each also brings its own take on diversity. How

diversity looks through the lens of a “20-something” is not

necessarily the same as it looks to a “50-” or “60-something.”

Organizations will need to be cognizant of these variations and

continue to use an evolving approach to defining and manag-

ing diversity.

Take a continuous improvement approach to diversity.

No matter how much work an organization has done or

accomplished through its diversity initiative, it begins again

with each new employee. Training and skill development need

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D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R S

and Anita Rowe, Ph.D.

a n d

A n i t a

R o w e ,

P h

.

D . ,

G a r d e n s w a r t z

&

R o w e

to be continuous. Also needed is an ongoing focus on making

changes, both strategic and tactical, in systems, policies and

feedback loop uncovers new areas of exclusion and new oppor-

tunities for improvement.

Take the next step in diversity by focusing on emotional

intel l i g e nce. De a li ng wit h d iffere n ces tri g g ers emo ti o n a l

responses, from curiosity and excitement to fr ustration,

resistance and anger. Employees need help in managing

these feelings.

The

field of diversity, like

all

of

life, will continue

to

evolve. The best thing a practitioner can do is to be mindful of

the changes as they happen and be open and flexible in

responding to them.

Lee Gardenswartz, Ph.D, and Anita Rowe, Ph.D. are partners in Gardenswartz & Rowe, a manage- ment consulting firm that since 1980 has helped organizations build productive, cohesive work teams, develop inclusive environments and create inter-cultural harmony and understanding in the workplace.

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D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R

Rafael Gonzalez

F u t u r e

P o s s i b i l i t i e s

o f

D i v e r s i t y

After decades of doing corporate diversity work in the United States and internationally, I believe there are some exciting possi- bilities for the future. In the United States, we have an opportunity to leverage two of our greatest strengths: our culture and our intel- lectual flexibility.

By Rafael Gonzalez, Senior Consulting Associate, Leading Edge Associates

Diversity in the future will be full of new opportunities and

familiar challenges. An immediate opportunity is the lack of

skilled workers in the United States. Companies investing

strategically in communities and schools to train diverse young

people in these specialized skills will find a ready and motivated

work force that lives around the corner rather than around

the world.

Innovation will continue to be a vital ingredient to a

successful business. Companies that build diverse teams that

include domestic and international talent and tap into their

unique perspectives will be more in touch with a global

consumer who increasingly wants personalized products and

ser vices. Those companies that are prepared to move quickly

and collaboratively to connect with diverse customers will have

a huge advantage.

The absence of credible leadership has created an opportu-

nity and a challenge for leaders. The United States and the

world are looking for leaders who have a clear vision, leaders

who value inclusion. Leaders need to pay more than lip ser vice

to diversity. If they can find ways to incorporate our countr y’s

strengths to leverage diversity, they will find loyal consumers

ready to believe in an organization that gives them what they

want. Core competencies in creating learning environments,

getting timely results, and understanding and effectively work-

ing with diverse groups will be the difference-makers with cus-

tomers and employees.

Finally, those organizations that are still blind to the need

for diversity in their core strategies and values will feel increas-

ing marketplace and legal pressure to join the 21st centur y.

They will have to move urgently to evaluate their guiding prin-

ciples, learn diversity best practices that may apply to their

situation, and develop a strategic plan that utilizes diversity

to identify and leverage the opportunities that will allow them

to capture the hearts and minds of the consumer.

Rafael Gonzalez has applied human and organizational transformation concepts to diversity for over 25 years. He works with private and public sectors to re-think inclusion as a strategic market- place and community partnership that would be mutually beneficial.

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P I O N E E R

Lewis Brown Griggs

T h e

S p i r i t u a l

D i m e n s i o n

o f

D i v e r s i t y

For diversity consciousness to grow beyond compliance and good business practices, we must expand our inclusion of diverse forms of spirituality in the workplace. We must recognize that we can best continue to teach authentically only what we continue to learn and experience on the ever-growing edge of our own mind, body and spirit.

By Lewis Brown Griggs, Chairman, President and Executive Producer, Griggs Productions

My body is that of an ethnocentric, straight, white, 12th-

generation Anglo-American father of a girl and a boy, with an

Amherst ’70 B.A. and a Stanford ’80 M.B.A., and a golden

retriever in my white Volvo wagon. It was from a near-death

experience 30 years ago on March 11, 1977, that my spirit was

called to develop cross-cultural diversity consciousness within

my mind. I became able to share with others various ways we

might, each in our own self-interest, move beyond compliance,

fairness and equity by fully expressing our own and valuing

each other’s uniquely diverse personal, interpersonal and

organizational potential.

The most passionate and effective interpersonal training

requires more time and money than most organizations can

afford. The future, therefore, calls for more diversity training

videos, guides and e-learning tools to reach all employees at the

least expense. Working from the outside in, managers and

employees continue to need greater consciousness about our

cultural differences, our individual uniqueness, our interper-

sonal relationship dynamics, our capacity to enhance rather

than deplete the energy within ourselves and each other, and

our individual opportunity to maximize our personal, inter-

personal and organizational effectiveness.

The most profound challenge facing us all now is not just

to tolerate kindly the inclusion of various diverse religions, but

to recognize that deep spirituality is at the core of ever y

religion and faith. Spirit is the one thing we have most in

common at the center of the vast diversity in our mind and our

body, which, when fully expressed, will best help us all

maximize our human potential.

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D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R

Steve Hanamura

E n g a g i n g

i n

t h e

D i v e r s i t y

C o n v e r s a t i o n :

A

F o r e c a s t

f o r

t h e

F u t u r e

 

As we look to the future of diversity, it is important to understand its evolutionary process. What began out of compliance became an issue of ethics and good business practices. Today many organ- izations have their own diversity initiatives. Following are my thoughts on critical issues we will need to address in the future.

By Steve Hanamura, President, Hanamura Consulting Inc.

In 10 to 15 years we will be managed and led by Generations

X and Y. These groups believe in work-life balance and high

tech. They value significance more than success. Will they be

able to manage and lead us with the values they ascribe to

today? If these leaders of the future hold true to their values,

we may be able to work in a much more collaborative setting

than we do at the present time.

Currently we are operating globally, but we are thinking

domestically. The notion of patriotism in America, though

ver y important, has sometimes gotten in the way of our ability

to respect and honor those from other countries. We often are

perceived and experienced as arrogant. We need to become

more competent in the culture and language of our global

partners.

We will need to become more unified within our own

industry. The field of education has its own diversity experts, as

does the corporate world. The two groups need to come

together for effective dialogue. We also will need to integrate

diversity as a social justice conversation with diversity as

a globalization construct and align ourselves with the work

that is being performed as a result of the Declaration of

Human Rights.

In order to effectively recruit and retain minorities, organ-

izations will need to become more involved with the local

communities. Effective mentoring and coaching may make it

possible to develop and grow hometown talent for business

success.

I hope one day to attend a diversity conference where peo-

ple with disabilities are a part of the mix. Currently people

with disabilities meet separately and are not a part of the

national diversity movement.

Finally, I believe that the biggest challenge will be the issue

of class. The gap between the “haves” and the “have nots” is

widening, leading to a greater sense of hopelessness. And when

people feel hopeless they resort to violence. This is a sad

commentar y, but we don’t seem to grasp the concept of a level

playing field. So, even as we are seeing now, the violence in our

community and in our world will only increase.

As diversity practitioners, we have a tremendous amount of

work in front of us. The goal beyond diversity is to create an

inclusive environment to allow people to bring all of who they

are to the marketplace.

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D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R

V. Robert Hayles, Ph.D.

A p p l i c a t i o n

I n c l u s i o n

o f

D i v e r s i t y

a n d

K n o w l e d g e

In the world of scientific knowledge, theories that have been vali- dated typically get applied 15 to 25 years later. This is also true for knowledge about diversity and inclusion. The science of this work is now at least 15 years old and more than ready for application.

By V. Robert Hayles, Ph.D., Diversity Consultant

As practitioners and users of such ser vices get smarter, they will

use and demand state-of-the-art implementation. What do we

know now about diversity and inclusion that we have known

for at least 15 years?

1. How individuals grow and change: From research in psy-

chology (clinical, social, neuro, experimental, learning and

memor y, developmental, etc.) we now know what kinds of

inter ventions stimulate knowledge, behavior and attitude

change. We even understand how this knowledge applies to

a small set of specific prejudices, biases, isms and phobias.

2. What impacts group and team performance: From research

in social psychology, organizational behavior, management

science and leadership, we have an understanding of actions

and circumstances that facilitate or detract from high

performance in diverse groups.

3. Which differences matter: We know how some differences

and diversity mixtures affect performance on specific types

of tasks. We know a lot about age, culture, disabilities,

gender, intelligence, job function, personality, political

pluralism, race and sexual orientation. We need more knowl-

edge about other differences, a greater variety of mixtures

and a broader range of tasks.

4. How organizations change and develop: Research-based

change models are abundant. Change and development

models specific to diversity and inclusion have been used

and tested for more than 15 years. Normative paths—from

exclusive homogeneous organizations to inclusive, diverse,

high-performing organizations—are fairly well-defined.

5. Measurement: Validated measurement technologies (includ-

ing software-based tools) have been available for diversity

and inclusion for at least a decade. Some tools have been

around for more than 15 years.

The need for high-impact, cost-effective diversity and

inclusion ser vices is strong today. During the next 10 to 15

years, practitioners must apply the current state-of-the-art

knowledge and fine-tune it in partnership with researchers

and scholars.

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Dr. Jeffrey P. Howard

T h e

N e x t

1 5 , 0 0 0

Y e a r s

o f

D i v e r s i t y

a n d

I n c l u s i o n

 

The diversity and inclusion movement is a creature of the American problem-solving impulse as it relates to the difficulties caused by ill-tempered human reactions to differences. The differ- ences, and the negative reactions to them, are ubiquitous and will last as long as there are human groups to find ways to distinguish themselves from other human groups.

By Dr. Jeff Howard, Founder, J. Howard and Associates, CEO, JPH Lear ning

Defining ourselves relative to others is what human groups do

—often quite inventively. If it’s not race, it’s gender. If not

gender, religion. Or sects within religions. Or language. Or

accent. Or national origin. Or political orientation. Or sexual

orientation. Or anything else that can be used to distinguish

“us” from “them.” With humans, there is always something.

Fixated as we are on the differences between us, humans can

be counted on to continuously generate issues, problems, crises

and wars. (Name a war that wasn’t, at base, “us” fighting

“them” over something they did to us; or because they took

something of value from us; or simply had something of value

that rightfully belonged to us.) We are tremendously adept at

creating and righteously justifying these issues and conflicts,

and we will continue to do so into the indefinite future.

So here’s the good news for the field: There will always be

a need for practitioners of the arts of diversity and inclusion.

In the short term, we really do help by diverting energies away

from the primitive impulses of “us” versus “them” and toward

the rational faculties. We help folks focus attention on the real

value of operating in peace and harmony. (“Can’t we all just get

along?”) And we discover that, with our help, folks can focus

on the positive and behave rationally, at least for a while.

But humans will always revert to human nature. They will

fail to tolerate. They will discriminate, brutalize and worse.

When they grow tired of the mayhem or experience an attack

of rationality, they will turn to us. There will always be a diver-

sity and inclusion business.

Dr. Jeff Howard is the founder and long-time CEO of J. Howard and Associates, a corporate training and consulting firm that became part of the Novations Group, Inc. He is now CEO of JPH Lear ning and works as a consultant to corporate executives and senior managers of Fortune 1000 companies.

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D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R

Dr. Edward E. Hubbard

C o m m e n t s

o n

o f

D i v e r s i t y

t h e

F u t u r e

Predictions: The future of diversity and inclusion work is laced with an abundance of opportunity if we are bold enough to seize it. Some organizations and diversity practitioners are beginning to really understand that diversity and inclusion must be strategically linked to the bottom line and measured in financial and nonfi- nancial terms.

By Dr. Edward Hubbard, Hubbard & Hubbard, Inc.

The successful organizations will use automated technologies

linked to their business systems to strategically utilize diversity

and inclusion techniques to make measurable differences

in organizational performance. The specific savings will be

documented in diversity return on investment (DROI ® ) case

studies. They will put to rest claims that there is little

documented evidence that diversity and inclusion can either

be measured or make a critical difference.

In the future, there will be competency standards for

managers, diversity practitioners and consultants that help

organizations get the best possible support for their diversity

change processes and that weed out those who are not

prepared to deliver proven, diversity-enhanced performance

solutions. In the future, I see diversity and inclusion evolving

as a well-regarded, credible discipline with solid, data-rich

theor y and fully applied sciences to support its value.

Recommendations: When I started this work more than 25

years ago, businesses saw diversity as the right thing to do.

Many looked at me as if I had two heads because I said we

needed to measure diversity. But at some point, when we train

thousands of employees on diversity and start to put a budget

behind these kinds of activities, it will dawn on some executive

to say, “ We’ve spent ‘X ’ amount of dollars on this process

called diversity. What has it yielded? What’s the ROI? Do we

really need this? Where’s credible evidence that this stuff makes

a performance difference in our business?”

I feel diversity practitioners in the future must be driven to

succeed in showing DROI ® . Many of them may be doing

superb work, but without the appropriate measurement tools

and solid diversity metrics in place they will be doomed to fail.

If you can’t communicate what you’re doing in diversity in

financial and other performance terms, you stand a good

chance of being cut out of the budget. It might not be because

you weren’t doing your job. It might be because you just

couldn’t prove it in terms that made business sense. It puts you

in a vulnerable place. The real payoff for us as diversity practi-

tioners should be, in part, seeing an organization grow and

really demonstrate the true, measurable value of utilizing

diverse human capital assets and processes for strategic busi-

ness performance.

DROI ® is a registered trademark of Hubbard & Hubbard, Inc.

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P I O N E E R

Kay Iwata

F a c i n g

F o r w a r d :

O p p o r t u n i t i e s

T h r e e

C r i t i c a l

Facing forward, diversity professionals need to move on three critical opportunities: standardization of the field, global diversity and Gen Y/millennial relevance.

By Kay Iwata, President, K. Iwata Associates Inc.

1. Standardization of the field: As a profession, the field of

diversity is ill-defined at best. There is no agreement upon

basic constructs such as a common language to describe our

work (i.e., the definitions of diversity, inclusion, diversity

management, etc.); validity-checked models and processes;

standards and certification requirements for diversity profes-

sionals; and standard, measurable outcomes. If we, as diver-

sity professionals, both internal and external, don’t seize the

opportunity to fill the void, it will be filled for us.

2. Global diversity: As we struggle for greater clarity on the

domestic front in terms of the nature of our work, the chal-

lenge is even greater for global diversity. In some cultures

there is no word for “diversity.” What are the issues? What

does an effective global diversity strategy look like in other

parts of the world? How do we maintain consistency

while respecting and including the norms of the local

cultural context?

3. Gen Y or millennial relevance: For many diversity practi-

tioners, stereotypes, prejudices and biases have been funda-

mental in developing diversity awareness and sensitivity,

especially across racial lines. In two recent polls conducted

with Gen Ys (ages 18-27, and 76 million strong), 95 percent

said they had friends across racial and ethnic lines, and 60

percent said they dated across racial and ethnic lines. They

don’t deny that racial injustices occur. How do we need

to adjust our approach to make diversity relevant to this

generation?

Recommendations

Standardization of the field and global diversity: We can

address the first two opportunities and leverage our resources

by positioning these as a global endeavor. In other words, we

make the focus worldwide, with the United States being one

member of the global community, rather than starting with the

United States and dealing with the rest of the world as an after-

thought. The first step in making this a reality is to convene a

body to organize a broad, well-balanced and credible group of

thought leaders charged with establishing language, processes

and standards for global diversity.

Gen Y or millennial relevance: This opportunity requires a

three-pronged approach. First is controlling tendencies to

automatically impose historical diversity paradigms on this

generation while dealing with issues that continue to be rele-

vant today. Second is to find out and incorporate what is

meaningful from their diversity perspective. Third is to attract

talented young people from this group into the field to help

shape diversity in the new millennium.

Time is of the essence and the stakes are high. The window

for these opportunities may be closing as we speak.

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D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R

Bailey W. Jackson

S o c i a l T o w a r d

I d e n t i t y

a n d

I n c l u s i o n :

a

H e a l t h y

S o c i a l

S y s t e m

In 10 to 15 years, it is likely that our social identities (race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, class, age, and physical and developmental ability) will be as salient for each individual and to the various structures in our society as they are today.

By Bailey W. Jackson

D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R

Individuals, families, communities, states and nations still will

draw upon the unique social and cultural attributes embedded

in these social identities to shape their self-concept, self-esteem

and way of acting in the world. Organizations’ missions,

values and operating structures also will continue to be influ-

enced by the social identities of those who own them, run

them, work in them and who are ser ved by them. And finally,

the leaders of our nations, their governing bodies and the

citizenr y of our nation-states also will continue to be influ-

enced by the salient social identities of the time.

Hopefully, within the near future, we will have moved from

our current position of tr ying to establish social justice for

members of all social identity groups to making significant

headway toward creating and maintaining societies where

social justice is present, and much of our energy is devoted to

maintenance. Continued vigilance in identifying new and

newly morphed manifestations of social injustice, a.k.a. social

oppression, will be essential as we build both self-renewing

diagnostic systems for identifying manifestations of social

oppression and an automatic response that ensures their

elimination.

At this point it should be clear that we must move toward

the realization, appreciation, and benefits of a diverse, open

and inclusive society. It is also at this point that we will realize

that, to achieve the vision of a free, open, diverse and inclusive

society, we must be able to maintain social justice. The chal-

lenge, therefore, will be to define and embrace more fully a

vision of social justice for individuals, social groups and

nations.

Once social justice is fully affirmed, conditions will be right

for realizing a proactive vision of social and cultural identity-

based inclusion that will foster an inclusive society and an

inclusive social system in which all individuals, groups and

social institutions are not only respected, but also valued and

appreciated for their contributions to a healthy society.

Bailey W. Jackson has done pioneering work in multicultural organizational development, black identity develop- ment and social justice education. His work has served as a foundation for justice and diversity development in public and private organizations, and K-16 schools and campuses.

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Creativity means taking a chance. And that’s the only way to grow.

I’m interested in a lot of different things. At Hallmark— working in several different departments— I’ve had the chance to explore all those interests. With every job, I came in as a beginner and grew to be an expert.

Within one opportunity, there is always another. As a creative person, advancing in my career gives me even more freedom to express myself. I use my mind in ways I never imagined. That’s what lets me say I love where I am and I love what I do.

rachel britt—production art supervisor

Creativity means taking a chance. And that’s the only way to grow. I’m interested in a

live your passion. love your work.

Creativity means taking a chance. And that’s the only way to grow. I’m interested in a

for information on hallmark career opp ortunities, v isit www.hallmark.com/careers.

© 2007 hallmark licensing, inc.

D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R S

Judith H. Katz

I n c l u s i o n

3 . 5 :

O u r

V i e w

o f

t h e

F u t u r e

Through our work over the past 30 years, we have seen several shifts in the approach to diversity and inclusion. During the 1970s and ’80s, the work was focused on compliance—the new Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action laws.

B y

J u d

i

t h

H .

K a t z

a n d

F r e

d

e

r

i

c k

A .

M

i

l

l e

r ,

In the ’90s, developing a solid business case for the benefits of

a diverse workplace became critical. Now, as we enter the 21st

centur y, most organizations no longer are debating the need

for a high-performing, diverse work force.

Young people today expect organizations to have policies,

practices and supports for people of all backgrounds—not just

their particular group. If an organization wants to be success-

ful, respected and attract the best talent, it must take the

necessar y actions to achieve the results that come from having

global cultural competency.

Organizations are being pushed to think differently about

employees and how they work. This is requiring a major shift

from the structures, policies and practices of the Industrial

Revolution, when workers were merely “hands” and “feet.”

Now, creating community within the organization, connect-

ing, collaborating and bringing your brain to work are how

most tasks will be accomplished. This will require global cul-

tural competencies and inclusive behaviors that far exceed

today’s best practices. Emerging technologies are creating the

ability to connect and collaborate anywhere at anytime at

u n p re c e d e n t e d l e v e l s . T h i n k Fl i c k r , Se c o n d L i f e ® ,

InnoCentive ® and YouTube , just a few of the community

platforms and collaborative environments changing how and

with whom we work.

Companies that want to be successful 21st-centur y organ-

izations will need to act in the next 18 to 24 months to create

highly inclusive work environments. Organizations will need

to b e nimb le and fluid, cre a ting network s r a th er than

h i e r a rc h i e s , m ov i n g f r o m c o m m a n d a n d c o n t r o l t o

leveraging knowledge.

Inclusion is the Big Idea for the 21st centur y. Just as the

Internet has evolved into what is now referred to as Web 2.0,

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and Frederick A. Miller

T h e

K a l e e l

J a m i s o n

C o n s u l t i n g

G r o u p

I n c .

Inclusion 3.5 is upon us—differences of perspective, back-

ground and experience that are fundamental to an organiza-

t i o n’s o p e r a t i o n a l s u c c e s s . A s o n e c l i e n t re c e n t l y s a i d ,

“Inclusion changes ever ything—how we make decisions and

problem-solve, what questions we ask, who is at the table and

how we function.”

Inclusion is a sense of belonging that occurs when people

in the organization feel respected, valued and seen for who

they are. It occurs when there is a level of supportive energy

and commitment from leaders, colleagues and others, so that

people—individually and collectively—can do their best work.

Inclusion is one of the key tools to creating organizations

that are truly global, seamless and highly productive. With this

landscape ahead and the realities of our global village, inclu-

sion will be the mindset and skill set for success.

For a Posthumous dedication to Kaleel Jamison, see page 78.

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By Francie Kendall
By Francie Kendall

D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R

Francie Kendall, Ph.D.

C h a n g i n g

t h e

L a n d s c a p e

o f

D i v e r s i t y

a t

I t s

R o o t s

For 35 years, my work has focused on racial justice, particularly in relation to organizational change and white privilege. In that time, I have worked with corporations as they implemented diversity training to address employees’ race and sex biases.

As a consultant, I have been part of diversity initiatives in aca-

demic institutions where goals have included increasing the

recruitment and retention of faculty and students of color

While there have been var ying degrees of success, American

o r g a n iz a t i o n s — c o r p o r a te a n d a c a d e m ic — re m a i n , f o r a l l

intents and purposes, places in which white men are far more

likely to be successful than anyone else. This is not necessarily

because they are the most talented, but because they belong to

a group that receives unearned and disproportionate access to

power, resources and ability to influence. More than any other

time in histor y, we cannot afford to continue doing what we

have always done.

During the next 10 to 15 years, root changes must be made

in the landscape of our corporate and academic worlds:

fundamental changes that require basic shifts in the mind-set

of the institutions. For example, rather than bringing in

people of color to change the organization’s complexion and

then expecting them to act like “honorar y” white people,

institutions must create environments in which all people are

valued because of, not in spite of, who they are in terms of

their race, gender, sexual orientation, ability, religion and

socioeconomic class. This change requires a commitment to

regularly examine and address the biases that are built into the

organizational culture and into its policies and practices.

Determination to make change at all levels is essential to build

an institution in which ever yone has an equitable opportunity

to be successful.

Finally, those of us who are white—men and women—

must work in authentic partnership with people of color to

provide leadership in creating genuinely diverse and inclusive

organizations. We must be clear that we invest our energy

because it is in our best interest to do so. Other wise, nothing

will change. Our challenges for the near future are enormous.

Our responses must be bold and courageous.

Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D., began working actively on white privilege and social justice in 1965. That became her passion and the career path she has followed for the past 40 years. Her books include Diversity in the Classroom and Understanding White Privilege.

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D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R

Marilyn Loden

D i v e r s i t y

a n d

t h e

F u t u r e

As I ponder the future of diversity, I believe we’ve reached a major fork in the road. Depending on decisions made now, diversity’s impact is likely to range from incidental to transformative. This is because its long-term potential is directly linked to alignment with underlying institutional values.

By Marilyn Loden, Founder, Loden Associates, Inc.

When diversity is an outward expression of an organization’s

commitment to employees, communities, the environment

and global society, it can be transformational. When it does

not reflect an organization’s core values, diversity is likely to

produce little meaningful change. As such, I see a future in

which organizations will line up along a continuum. Each

one’s placement will represent the degree to which diversity

reflects its core institutional beliefs about employees, commu-

nities and global society.

At one end will be organizations where diversity is a kind

of window dressing and its primar y value cosmetic. In such

cases, “how we look” will be the principal measure of progress,

rather than “how we operate.” Within this group, I would

expect to find organizations that “talk the talk” of diversity in

advertising campaigns but refuse to pay a living wage to all

employees or provide health care benefits at a reasonable cost.

Somewhere in the middle will be institutions where diversity

and core values do not align. These would be global businesses

that proclaim, “Diversity is the right thing to do,” as they deny

responsibility for environmental stewardship or for ending

unfair labor practices. In each case, we see diversity being little

more than a thin smoke screen used to deflect attention from

greed-driven and unethical core business practices.

At the opposite end of the continuum, I expect to see organ-

izations where diversity is a key element of socially responsible

corporate policy. Employees at ever y level would be treated

with dignity and respect. Differences in wages between execu-

tives and workers would remain reasonable. These organiza-

tions would demonstrate concern for employees by providing

l i v i n g w a g e s , s a f e w o r k i n g c o n d i t i o n s a n d m e r i t - b a s e d

advancement. They would show commitment to communities

by encouraging volunteerism and renewal projects and by

dealing with neighbors in an open, honest and collaborative

manner. Finally, their global business practices would reflect

a fundamental commitment to social justice and environ-

mental stewardship.

While the task of moving organizations up this continuum

will be daunting, it is the critical work that lies before us. For

those comfortable with cosmetic change, this task may appear

too risky. For those committed to fulfilling the promise of

diversity, it is the essential work that must be done now.

Marilyn Loden is the author of award- winning books on diversity manage- ment, with over 20 years of research and consulting experience working with clients in the Fortune 500, federal and state gover nments, higher education and law.

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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R

D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R

Juan T. Lopez

T h e

U n f o l d i n g

D i v e r s i t y

J o u r n e y

Over the next 10 years, I believe these five areas will consume our thinking: talent recruitment/retention, diversity competency, health and wellness, sustainability and globalization. Leading companies are reorienting their business strategies to address these areas. In doing so, internal diversity thought leaders or steering committees are tapped to help shape direction and approach. For example, in the retention area, racial, ethnic and other primary groups will provide candid feedback on exclusive organizational practices. This information will be used to develop performance metrics that hold individuals and organizations accountable for using diverse talent.

By Juan T. Lopez, President, Amistad Associates

The focus on diversity is entering a new phase characterized by

inquir y and study. More time will be devoted to research, sym-

posia and application. New insights and knowledge will be

used by organizations to improve their diversity performance.

The benefits of leveraging diversity will continue to grow in

acceptance across many disciplines. Furthermore, a decrease in

the derision and political scrutiny of diversity will lead to more

academic acceptance of diversity as a legitimate field of study.

Doing business in other countries will require diversity com-

petency. U.S. companies will not get a pass. There’s an expec-

t a t i o n t h a t No r t h A m e r i c a n s w i l l d e m o n s t r a t e f l u i d

cultural competency toward people from different nations,

including sensitivity to political and religious mores. Business

leaders from different countries will bring their international

experience and best practices to corporate headquarters, forc-

ing changes in diversity strategies.

High-performance teams will be linked across multiple func-

tions and different locations. To excel, individuals will be

expected to manage diversity, and organizations will continue

to raise the bar on what is expected. Middle managers will be

a focus in terms of their ability to drive diversity initiatives,

develop talent and change deep-rooted organizational beliefs,

values and practices that undermine diversity competency.

This will be a priority because retention is influenced by the

employee-manager relationship.

Organizations will be scrutinized on how their products

impact the health and wellness of the community. Particular

focus will be on communities of color. PepsiCo is an example

of a company that is committed to creating healthy products

and educating consumers on nutrition and diet.

Environment and sustainability issues are important to

many consumers. The Home Depot and Wal-Mart are mov-

ing toward demanding smarter environmental practices from

their vendors as a condition of doing business. We will see

more organizations making these demands as corporate social

responsibility is expected from the consumer base. It’s no sur-

prise that these companies also have good diversity programs.

Talented people will have more options for where to work.

Future leaders will choose wisely, based on actions, not words.

Juan T. Lopez is co-authoring a book on Latino leadership based on 20-plus years of conducting LLEAD seminars (Latino Leadership Education and Development Program). He also is a co-founder of Diversity 2000, now entering its 14th year as a lear ning community.

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D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R

Myr na Marofsky

K e e p i n g

D o m e s t i c

D i v e r s i t y

A l i v e

i n

a

G l o b a l

M a r k e t p l a c e

Have you noticed the globes and world maps popping up in our offices, touting the foreign countries we visit and our new cultural competency? These are signs of what’s coming fast.

By Myr na Marofsky, former President, ProGroup, Inc.

While offices of global diversity have been around for years,

the emphasis of these offices is increasingly on the global piece

rather than the domestic. Diversity leaders who once enjoyed

having a platform to raise workplace issues near and dear to

them—such as race, gender and sexual orientation—now will

be faced with becoming experts in an often unknown territor y.

Frankly, global has become sexier.

Watch how easily global initiatives will be funded. You

won’t have to prove the business case because countries such as

China are doing it for us. And the events related to the Iraq

war have forced executives and managers to face their lack of

global awareness, so they are open to getting help.

Race, gender, sexual orientation, religion and the many

dimensions of diversity that we have worked so hard to address

over the past 20 years still will be there, but out of the lime-

light. Think about how much more impressive it will be to talk

about a successful diversity training program in Singapore than

to talk about one in Cleveland where a manager learns how to

create a respectful workplace for her black and Latino employ-

ees. For those who never wanted to talk about domestic diver-

sity, the shift in focus will be a relief. They might even get that

checklist they’ve been asking for; only now it will be about how

to interact with people in other countries.

The responsibility of diversity professionals in the years

ahead is to keep both conversations going. We need to pro-

mote understanding of the global arena and at the same time

keep the realities of domestic diversity alive and visible.

We may see a shift in terminology, but whether it’s “inclu-

sion,” “intercultural,” or “intergalactic,” the human element

remains the same. Our work should always be about creating

opportunities for people to do their best in an environment

that respects them, no matter where in the world that may be.

Myr na Marofsky is the former president of ProGroup, Inc. Growing up in the ’60s, Myr na developed sensitivities to issues of social justice that she tur ned into “real” work when she joined Karen Stinson and built ProGroup ® , Inc. in 1986. Her contributions include instructional designs and innovative products.

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D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R

Julie O’Mara

B u i l d i n g

o n

t h e

‘ 9 0 s

F o u n d a t i o n

Over the last several months, I’ve been going through 35 years’ worth of files to move my home and office. It caused me to reflect on the progress of the diversity and inclusion field, the work itself and what I will concentrate on for the next 10 years.

Julie O’Mara, President, O’Mara and Associates

Most good diversity work today is much like the work we did

in the 1990s. Back then, we knew that effective diversity work

w a s a b o u t m o re t h a n h u m a n re s o u rc e p r a c t i c e s a n d

compliance. We knew that it was important to design and sell

products for all customers, and that change-management or

systems-inter vention approaches were more effective than

initiating training programs, even if the programs were out-

standing. We knew that it was important to have a substantial

business case, that the authentic involvement of leaders was

crucial, that relevant ROI measurement sustained continuing

change, and that training was key, but not the only solution.

To move the field for ward, we as diversity professionals

need to:

 

Get

better

at what

we

did in the 1990s. Continuous

improvement that builds on the fine work of the ’90s will be

an important step for ward.

• Take the time to share our best practices with one another.

Many organizations and consultants see the work they do as

a competitive advantage, but we need to be more willing to

share for the greater good of the world.

• Show more leadership in the political arena—as individuals

and as corporations—by pushing heads of state, insurgents

and others with influence to end conflicts that stem from

ethnic, class and gender differences, as well as religious

beliefs and other deeply held convictions.

• Forge strong alliances between the branches of our field—

diversity/inclusion, cross-cultural communication, multi-

culturalism, social justice and diversity management.

• Show more respect for the work done in different sectors.

For example, those working in the corporate arena think

they can’t learn from those working in government, and

vice versa. But good work is often transferable from sector

to sector.

• Think and act globally. It’s catchy to say, “ Think global and

act local.” However, there are times when we need to both

think and act globally, because diversity and inclusion work

is almost always impacted by world events.

Julie O’Mara is a consultant and author, currently working on Diversity Best

Practices Around the World, due out in 2009. She is co-author with Alan Richter of the recently published

Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks, a free online tool.

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Patricia Pope

T h e

F u t u r e

o f

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a n d

I n c l u s i o n

Wouldn’t it be great if diversity experts had a crystal ball to foresee what organizational strategies, if embraced, would promote the active inclusion of all talented people, regardless of their back- ground? Based on my experiences over the last 30+ years, I believe our future opportunities lie in the following areas.

Integration is key. Diversity has been a separate silo, with the focus primarily on training, which I’ve called the “spray and pray” approach. Spray ever yone with training. Pray that it does some good. By definition, diversity refers to all human and o r g a n iz a t i o n a l d i f fere n ces . It’s i n h e re n t i n e v er y t h i n g a n organization does.

By Patricia Pope, CEO, Pope & Associates, Inc.

D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R

Technology is key. Organizations have to do more with less.

The days of conducting two-day diversity sessions are histor y.

We must leverage new technologies to provide the learning

that previously occurred in classrooms.

Safety is key. Initially, some diversity training was perceived

as too confrontational. Then the pendulum swung too far in

the opposite direction. Many programs became entertaining

and fun, and no one felt uncomfortable. The challenge is to

create a safe environment, along with substantive content, to

produce real learning and behavior change.

Culture is key. Training alone is insufficient to create

culture change. No matter how good the training is, if the

organization doesn’t put mechanisms in place to sustain the

learning, participants quickly normalize.

Globalization is key. Many corporations are international in

some way, so the “U.S.-centric” approach to diversity fails to work.

Valuing differences more than conformance is key. Most

organizations operate somewhere between tolerating differ-

ences and managing differences. Valuing differences requires

culture change. That’s far more challenging than organizing a

“Black Histor y Month” event. The paradox of diversity is that

differences won’t be truly valued until they are experienced as

adding value. Yet, it is ver y difficult to add value when one

doesn’t feel valued.

Inclusion is key and the outcome of doing the right work,

with the right people, in the right sequence. If we don’t

proactively seek to include, we unintentionally exclude.

Representation is not necessarily indicative of success. Those

who rise to senior levels often have to conform too much to get

the corner office. Despite the awards companies may receive

for their “good numbers,” without true culture change they

lose the opportunity to leverage these differences.

Our opportunity lies in our willingness to ask the diversity

question on an individual, organizational and societal level.

Were “differences” a factor in this situation? If not, we move

on. If so, we assess how they contributed to the outcome. But

we have to ask. Our tendency to avoid exploring the impact of

differences is our biggest obstacle and our most significant

opportunity in the years ahead.

Patricia C. Pope is also co-founder of Myca-Pope, Inc. which leverages new technologies and Pope’s extensive intellectual property to create award- winning e-lear ning/web-based training.

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Margaret Regan

D i v e r s i t y

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W h a t

D o e s

t h e

F u t u r e

H o l d ?

As a futurist and member of the World Future Society, I have spent the last 20 years researching and preparing clients for the future workplace, work force and marketplace. As I look at the predictions for diversity and inclusion over the next 10 years, I think our opportunities are in three directions—diving deeper, moving forward and upward, and expanding sideways.

By Margaret Regan, President and CEO, The FutureWork Institute, Inc. ®

We will need to go deeper into the traditional issues of race

and gender. We cannot move to true inclusion without aggres-

sively addressing the racism and sexism that still permeate the

halls of corporate America, entertainment, government and

other institutions. The recent incidents with Imus, Michael

Richards and U.S. Senator Biden, as well as the backlash of

Katrina, 9/11 and the Virginia Tech massacre, sound the alarm

to deepen our work, break the silence and push our clients to

make real progress on the traditional issues.

Expanding our horizons sideways will immerse us in newer

issues such as managing religious diversity and generational

issues in the workplace. In the marketplace and the workplace,

the emerging majority and cross-cultural issues will provide

opportunities that many of our organizations are not prepared

to meet. The acceptance of GLBT (gay, lesbian, bisexual and

transgender) employees will continue as societal responses

shift. Emerging technologies will enable people with disabili-

ties to contribute more fully. Our job will be to open the

doors, minds and systems of the organizations we ser ve, so that

they embrace these diverse employees and customers.

And finally, we need to move for ward and upward into the

future by addressing issues that arise as science and technology

give us the ability to change skin color and enhance ourselves

through genetic determination or the implantation of brain

chips. We will need to plan for a generation that will have 10

careers in a lifetime. We will move to the next era of retirement

—rewiring or “rehirement”—as 50 becomes the new 30.

As managers witness the death of distance and per vasive

computing becomes the new reality, we will need to manage a

work force that is virtual and flexible. We will see a dramatic

redistribution of the global demographic picture as the popu-

lation in the developed world declines and retires, and China

and India vie for political and economic dominance on the

world stage. Finally, diversity practitioners will come to see

that the future is not some place where we are going, but one

we are creating. The paths to it are not found, but made; and

the activity of making them will change both us as the makers

and our destination on the journey to inclusion. Are we ready?

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“OUR GREATEST ASSET IS OUR DIVERSITY. TOGETHER, WE DRIVE INNOVATION.”

Earl Exum, Director, Global Repair Services

At Pratt & Whitney, you’ll find diversity at the core of who we are and what we offer. With so many different talents and perspectives, we continue to find a better way. From design to manufacturing to service, from commercial flight to space exploration, we help our customers grow and prosper. Working together, we all succeed. The Eagle is everywhere .

www.pw.utc.com
www.pw.utc.com

D I V E R S I T Y

P I O N E E R

Alan Richter, Ph.D.

T h e

F u t u r e

o f

D i v e r s i t y

Here’s an equation that may explain the future of diversity in the 21st century: (RC) 2 = FoD (Future of Diversity).*

By Alan Richter, President, QED Consulting

The first “R” equals the rate of change. There’s little doubt that

our world is changing ver y fast. The speed of computers dou-

bles ever y 18 months (Moore’s Law), so it’s no surprise that our

lives change so fast. Consider the speed at which new knowl-

edge is accumulated and how fast old knowledge becomes

obsolete. Accelerated change means constant challenges to the

status quo, hence the need to manage across changing differ-

ences is an ever-increasing necessity.

The first “C” equals connectivity. Globalization implies that

the world is shrinking, meaning that more and more connec-

tions are possible today and will expand in the future. Thanks

to the Internet and telephony, we can connect quickly across

the world today, unlike any previous time in histor y, and this

connectivity will expand. Global connectivity is at the heart of

the diversity challenge, as more and more connections will

be across differences that we need to manage peacefully and

effectively.

The second “R” equals reputation. Our organization’s rep-

utation (how it is perceived) will grow in importance as the

world becomes ever more complex, based on the “RC” above.

Diversity (covering inclusion, respect for differences, etc.) and

integrity (covering social responsibility) will become key suc-

cess factors for all global organizations.

The second “C” equals creativity. Creativity certainly con-

tributes to reputation, but more importantly it enables

pioneers to emerge with breakthroughs and best practices.

The links between diversity and creativity (and innovation)

a re c l o s e a n d c o m p l e x , a n d m u c h m o re re s e a rc h i s

needed to explore the connections. But as creativity becomes a

greater business necessity, so does the effective management

of diversity.

So, what is the future of diversity? I believe it’s wrapped up

in these four elements or drivers multiplied together: rate of

change x connectivity x reputation x creativity. The better we

understand each of them and their interconnections, the

better we can grasp the future of diversity.

*This essay is indebted to the book, Blur, by Stan Davis and Christopher Meyer, published in 1999, in which the authors describe the future of business as a blur using the equation: speed x connectivity x intangibles = BLUR.

Alan Richter specializes in the areas of leadership, values, culture and change. Dr. Richter holds a Ph.D. in Philosophy from London University.

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Armida Mendez Russell

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