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The Multiple Sclerosis Resource Centre’s Bi-monthly magazine

January/February 2010

Your

MS

magazine

of

choice

Issue 59

January/February 2010 Your MS magazine of choice Issue 59 CCSVI - Cases; Research; Doctors Gadgets And

CCSVI - Cases; Research; Doctors

magazine of choice Issue 59 CCSVI - Cases; Research; Doctors Gadgets And Gizmos To Make Life

Gadgets And Gizmos To Make Life Easier

Research; Doctors Gadgets And Gizmos To Make Life Easier Multiple Sclerosis Resource Centre Tel: 01206 505444
Research; Doctors Gadgets And Gizmos To Make Life Easier Multiple Sclerosis Resource Centre Tel: 01206 505444

Multiple Sclerosis Resource Centre Tel: 01206 505444 or you can contact us by

email: info@msrc.co.uk

The MS 24 Hour Telephone Counselling Service: 0800 783 0518 & press 1

Website: www.msrc.co.uk

Advertisement

24 37 40 44
24
37
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Contents

6-8. News

Cannabis shows subjective therapeutic benefit for MS spasticity; Ryan McLaughlin launches ‘Fortify Scotland’s School Milk’ campaign; Scottish babies born in April more at risk of MS; Welsh Assembly asked to fund vitamin D campaign; Pregnancy hormone may help MS; Stem cells reverse MS in Australian teenager; New study into fatigue and quality of life in childhood MS; Tysabri – PML count up to 28.

10-12. Postbag

Supplements to improve blood flow; Circulation booster product not for me; Colostrum might help little Sam and others; Extreme stress caused my MS; Give soldiers wheelchairs for instant invisibility; Want to rattle tins – get a dog! Thanks for terrific website; Computer devices keep me sane.

13. Cryptic Crossword

By Charlie Gee

14-23. Chronic Cerebro-Spinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI)

Cases; Research; Attitudes; Campaigns.

24-26. The Ashton Embry Column

CCSVI – The nutrients you need to help venous blood flow.

27. Poem

Pumped For Life, by Jeff White

28. Bits & Pieces

Pre and Probiotics – Trillions of friendly bacteria

29. News

Possible link between Epstein- Barr virus and venous insufficiency in MS; MS in Faroe Islands still high but not of epidemic proportions; More cases of MS following cervical cancer jab in Australia;

30-32. Complementary Therapies - Treating Candida

How MS symptoms can be lessened by treating Candida. By Susie Cornell.

34-36. Carry On Working – Thanks to Assistive Technology

The latest gadgets to help you work with ease.

37. I’m Not Giving Up

Chocolate! Says Janet Orchard

38. I’ve Got Poisons In Me

Even Though I’m On A Detox Diet

Dr Terry Wahls was surprised by how many toxins are in her body.

39. No New Year’s Cheers!

Susan Lambert feels so much better after giving up alcohol.

40-41. A Shopping We Will Go!

Charlie Gee enjoys a trip to his disabled-friendly local Tesco’s.

FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518

January/February - Issue 59

42. Bits & Pieces

Inventor wins award; Get ideas for equipment from the Disabled Living Foundation.

44-46. Life Is For Living

Our Wonderful Mexican Honeymoon, by Sylvia Wright

47. News

Hormone replacement therapy with estriol could help MS women.

48. Bits & Pieces

49. Recipe

Broccoli Lemon Chicken With Cashews – Simple, quick, healthy and very tasty! Takes only 10 minutes to make.

50-51. Short Story

Matching Souls by Graham Millitt. What Jessica desired most was a soul mate.

52. Crossword Answers

53. Competition

Thirsty? Win a Hydrate!

MSRC: 01206 505444

www.msrc.co.uk

3

Editorial

Dear New Pathways Readers

The CCSVI story is hotting up. More people with MS have been travelling to Poland to get the treatment done, with good results. You can read two of these cases on pages 14-16. So why can’t we all get this treatment now? Because doctors around the world are saying that more research needs to be done before we know the procedure is safe and effective. For those with MS who are desperate to get treated before it’s too late for them, this delay is intolerable. If you feel things need stirring up a bit, you can sign one of the petitions about CCSVI, lobby your

symptoms, as Susan Lambert discovered (page 39). To her horror, Dr Terry Wahls (page 38) found out

her

body was full of toxins, and is

stepping up the detox but – despite claims that it’s bad for MS – Janet Orchard (page 37) is not going to give up her beloved chocolate! Read about Sylvia and Steve

Wright’s wonderful honeymoon in Mexico (pages 44-46), Charlie Gee’s brave trip to the local Tesco,

and

our heart-warming short story

‘Matching Souls’ on pages 50-51.

Plus

we have our usual interesting

mix

of Postbag, News, Bits, Recipe

and

Crossword.

Help Us Celebrate Our Tenth Anniversary!!! The next issue of New Pathways will be our
Help Us Celebrate Our Tenth Anniversary!!!
The next issue of New Pathways will be our 60th, when we’ll be celebrating our tenth anniversary. Please join
us in marking this momentous occasion.
If New Pathways has helped you in any way, please write and let us how. For example, have you tried the
Best Bet Diet? Started taking particular supplements? Have you done any particular
complementary therapy as a result of reading about it in
New Pathways? Did you buy some equipment we
mentioned? Did you go somewhere on holiday we
featured or do something inspiring you read about in
one of our ‘Life Is For Living’ features?
Whatever you’ve done, however big or small, we
would love to hear from you.
Please send emails marked New Pathways 10th
Anniversary to: info@msrc.co.uk
I look forward to hearing from you,
With thanks and best wishes,
Judy Graham, Editor
to hearing from you, With thanks and best wishes, Judy Graham, Editor 4 New Pathways Issue

News & Snippets

If you have anything for this section please write to News & Snippets:

New Pathways, MSRC, 7 Peartree Business Centre, Peartree Road,

Breastfeeding Benefits MS Mums

Stanway, Colchester, Essex CO3 0JN

Tel: 01206-505444 Fax: 01206-505449 e-mail:info@msrc.co.uk

Cannabis Shows Subjective Therapeutic Benefit For MS Spasticity Patient’s own subjective views of cannabis as
Cannabis Shows Subjective Therapeutic
Benefit For MS Spasticity
Patient’s own subjective views of cannabis as a
treatment for spasticity rate it more highly than
objective assessments done by scientists.
After reviewing six trials that tested the effects of
tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD)
extracts on spasticity in a total of 481 MS patients,
the authors found “evidence that combined THC and
CBD extracts may provide therapeutic benefit.”
In five of the six double-blind, randomised, placebo-
controlled trials the
researchers analysed,
cannabis-taking
patients reported
decreases in their
spasticity.
“The subjective
experience of
symptom reduction was generally found to be
significant,” wrote the authors, based at the Global
Neuroscience Initiative Foundation in Los Angeles.
However, the authors conceded, “participants of both
active and placebo trials may not be entirely blind
to their treatment status and this may affect
subjective analysis.”
So despite the promising patient reports, MS
patients might not get a green light for this treatment
just yet as objective measures of spasticity failed to
provide significant changes,” the authors concluded
in the paper, published in the journal BMC Neurology.
Reference: Whole plant cannabis extracts in the
treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis: a
systematic review
Shaheen E Lakhan and Marie Rowland
BMC Neurology 2009, 9:59doi:10.1186/1471-2377-9-59
Ryan McLaughlin Launches ‘Fortify Scotland’s School Milk’ Campaign Ryan (right) – young Vitamin D campaigner
Ryan McLaughlin Launches ‘Fortify Scotland’s
School Milk’ Campaign
Ryan (right) – young
Vitamin D campaigner
14 year old Scottish
schoolboy Ryan
McLaughlin of the Shine
on Scotland campaign
has launched a new social
networking campaign to
gain public support for his
idea of adding vitamin D
to all school milk in
Scotland.
Ryan believes that
vitamin D is vitally
important to improving
the health of Scottish
children and wants to
find out how many parents agree with him, using the
social platform Facebook. Ryan is asking parents in
Scotland to join the group and have their say on the
subject.
Ryan says, “Much work still has to be done to get
the RDA (recommended daily allowance) of vitamin D
raised significantly and I will work with all the
authorities involved to get that done. I am positive
that fortifying school milk with vitamin D offers the
best solution to offering protection to all kids
in Scotland.”
Figures compiled by Oxford University for a national
supplementation programme of vitamin D in
Scotland, suggest 2000 cases of MS could be
prevented over the next 10 years and save the UK
economy £4 billion over 25 years.
Dr Sareeram Ramagopalan of Oxford University and
Ryan’s family all gave evidence at the Scottish
Parliament’s Petitions Committee in June 2009 and
told them that Israel was planning to fortify both milk
and flour with vitamin D and that France was
considering it.
New research released by the Scottish government
and an announcement from NHS Scotland, say there
is now an ‘urgent need to educate women and all
pregnant mothers and all children up to the age of 4
should be taking vitamin D every day.’
Source: www.shineonscotland.org.uk/
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=150104
079977&ref=nf
Scottish Babies Born In April More At Risk Of MS Scottish babies born in April
Scottish Babies Born In April
More At Risk Of MS
Scottish babies born in April face an increased risk
of suffering from multiple sclerosis in later life,
possibly as a result of their mothers’ lack of exposure
to sunlight, according to research.
Scientists found mothers who were pregnant during
the autumn and winter were most likely to give birth
to those who would suffer from MS.
The researchers, from Glasgow University and the
city’s Southern General Hospital, believe the spike in
cases among children born in the spring may be due
to a shortage of vitamin D because during a vital
developmental stage their mothers are exposed to
less sunshine.
Vitamin D, which is largely gained through sunlight
and food, is known to regulate a gene that can
predispose individuals to MS. If the gene is passed on
to the unborn child, without being regulated by a
sufficient amount of vitamin D, it could predispose
them to develop the disease in later life.
The new study, published in the European Journal
of Neurology, is the biggest yet carried out in
Scotland, which has the highest rate of MS in the
world, with an estimated 10,500 cases.
The Glasgow researchers examined data on about
1,300 MS patients born in the west of Scotland
between 1922 and 1992. They found that about 400
people born in March, April and May went on to
develop MS, 22 per cent higher than expected.
Almost half of all male and a quarter of female
sufferers were born in April.
By comparison, there were about 16 per cent fewer
MS births in the autumn months. Those born in
November had the lowest incidence of the disease.
Dr Colin O’Leary of the Institute of Neurological
Sciences at the Southern General and co-author of
the study, said several theories about the condition
were being explored. He now plans to carry out a UK-
wide study with Professor George Ebers from Oxford
University’s department of clinical neurology at the
John Radcliffe Hospital.
Professor Ebers said: “The difference in developing
MS in Scotland between being born in April versus
November is an astounding 50 per cent. This is real,
there’s no doubt of a seasonal link. There are different
theories, but I think the April excess of births could be
linked to a sunlight deficiency.
The focus is on trying to prove what the
environmental effect is and, pending conclusive
demonstration of that effect, some people might view
it as prudent to conceive at certain times of the year
to lower their child’s MS risk if there is a history of the
disease in the family.”
Reference: Timing of Birth and Risk of Multiple
Sclerosis in the Scottish Population
Hannah K. Bayes, Christopher J. Weir, Colin O’Leary
European Journal of Neurology Jan 2010; 63:36-40

Welsh Assembly Asked To Fund Vitamin D Campaign

The Welsh Assembly Government has been called upon to fund a campaign about vitamin D deficiency and multiple sclerosis. The MS Society Cymru is calling for ministers to follow Scotland’s lead and raise awareness about the links between the two. Such a campaign would encourage pregnant women and children under

four to take a regular vitamin D supplement. The prevalence of MS is far higher in typically wet and cold countries such as Wales, where 110 people in every 100,000 are living with the condition. Source: Shine On Scotland, December 22nd 2009

Pregnancy Hormone May Help MS Progesterone, a hormone that increases tenfold during pregnancy and is
Pregnancy Hormone May Help MS
Progesterone, a hormone that increases tenfold
during pregnancy and is thought to help the
developing foetus by protecting it from oxidative
stress and aiding neuron development, is now
thought to be useful in treating MS, traumatic brain
injury and stroke by repairing nerve cells.
The hormone, which can cross the blood-brain barrier,
appears to protect neurons in a variety of ways: by
preventing injured brain cells from committing suicide
and also by blocking the agents that break
down the myelin sheath. Progesterone also
seems to prevent one of the main dangers of
brain trauma: swelling.
Reference: Is Progesterone Worth
Consideration as a Treatment for Brain Injury?
Donald G. Stein and Iqbal Sayeed
American Journal of Roentgenology
Volume 94, Issue 1, 20-22, Jan 1, 2010

FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518

MSRC: 01206 505444

www.msrc.co.uk

7

News & Snippets

Stem Cells Reverse MS In Australian Teenager Ben Leahy, a 19 year-old with MS from
Stem Cells Reverse MS In Australian Teenager
Ben Leahy, a 19 year-old with MS from Canberra,
Australia, was in a wheelchair until he had treatment
with his own stem cells. He is now walking.
Mr Leahy underwent a procedure in which his own
(autologous) stem cells were harvested from his bone
marrow, before chemicals were used to destroy all his
existing immune cells in order to‘re-set’ a faulty
immune system. His stem cells were then re-injected.
The operation was done in Sydney.
Neurologist Dr Colin Andrews said the treatment
appeared to have reversed the effects of MS. Ben still
had mild weakness in his right leg and some visual
loss in one eye but appeared to be recovering well.
Dr Andrews said the treatment offered between a
60 per cent and 80 per cent chance of halting the
disease in some patients and a good chance of
reversing it in others. He hopes to start offering it to
some patients, whom he describes as “special cases”
in Sydney and
Melbourne.
Ben’s mother Prue,
who was afraid he was
going to die, says it was
beyond her expectations
to have him walking
again. “What I got was
more than I could have
ever imagined or hoped
Ben Leahy is walking again
for,” she said. Ben says he will now return to school
and hopes to study physics.
A small trial done early this year in the US stopped
MS symptoms and in a few cases reversed
neurological damage.
Source: ABC news story, Australia
www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2009/12/14/2770762.htm
New Study Into Fatigue And Quality Of Life In Childhood MS Little is known about
New Study Into Fatigue And Quality Of Life
In Childhood MS
Little is known about fatigue and quality of life in
childhood MS. Now a study has been carried out to
determine the rate of fatigue and reduced quality of
life in 51 young MS patients.
Fatigue and quality of life were assessed by various
scales and compared against healthy children.
In comparison with healthy samples, childhood MS
patients reported greater difficulties with fatigue,
sleep, cognition, physical limitations and academics. In
addition, parents reported problems with emotional
functioning and tended to report greater fatigue, sleep
and cognitive difficulties than were self-reported.
Expanded Disability Status Scale score was the only
neurologic variable significantly related to fatigue or
quality of life scores. Fatigue was significantly
correlated with reports of sleep difficulties, cognitive
problems and quality of life variables.
These findings suggest that fatigue and poorer
quality of life is a clear concern in childhood MS and
is related to overall physical disability.
Reference:Fatigue and Quality of Life in Paediatric
Multiple Sclerosis
William S MacAllister and Christopher Christodoulou
Multiple Sclerosis, Volume 15, No 12, 1502-1508,
December 1, 2009.
Tysabri – PML Count Up To 28
By the end of 2009, there were a total of 28
patients with MS who had contracted the potentially
lethal brain infection PML (progressive multifocal
leukoencephalopathy).
Manufacturers Biogen Idec say that, even at these
figures, the risk of developing PML is not higher
than expected.
“The risk for patients taking the drug for less than a
year is 0.4 per 1000 and the risk for those taking it for
more than two years is one in 1000, consistent with
what it says on the label,” Biogen’s director of public
affairs, Naomi Aoki, said.
Since the risks increase the longer
a patient takes the drug, the
number of PML cases is expected
to rise. A disproportionate share of the cases have
been detected outside the U.S. Biogen officials believe
a number of factors are at play in this trend but that
the relatively heavier use of other immunosuppressant
treatments in other countries may play a role.
Biogen has been providing monthly updates to
physicians and will provide this information to the
media and investors on request.
Source: Boston Business Journal, January 6, 2010

Postbag Your Letters

Postbag Your Letters

Do you have something to say or helpful information to pass on? Whether it’s gripes and groans, a pat on the back, or hints and tips, we’d love to hear from you. Please write to: Judy Graham, Editor, New Pathways, MSRC, 7 Peartree Business Centre, Peartree Road, Stanway, Colchester, Essex CO3 0JN Tel: 0800 783 0518 or 01206 505444 Fax: 01206 505449 e-mail: info@msrc.co.uk

or 01206 505444 Fax: 01206 505449 e-mail: info@msrc.co.uk Circulation Factors supplement Supplements To Improve Blood

Circulation Factors supplement

Supplements To Improve Blood Flow

Dear New Pathways, I’ve been looking into ways to improve Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI) in MS by taking certain supplements. I’ve been taking horse chestnut for a couple of weeks (as suggested might help in CCSVI). My ability to stand when transferring from chair to toilet has been easier. This week I upped it a little by adding in other ingredients and have started Country Life, BioChem Circulation Factors, ingredients: Niacin (B3), calcium, horse chestnut, butcher’s broom, grape skin extract, prickly ash, hawthorn extract, ginkgo biloba, cayenne and ginger extract. My standing is even better after only 3 days and I crossed my better leg over the weaker one, albeit with a bit of a struggle and only once but it is still exciting. Best Wishes, Janet Orchard, Catalonia, Spain * Also see Ashton Embry’s Column on pages 24/25.

Circulation Booster Product Not For Me

Dear New Pathways, After seeing the adverts on TV

for this Circulation Booster product, I was interested. personally have had MS for

twenty-three years and have the problem of cold feet throughout

the day.

believe there was help out there for me and others suffering from

the same symptom.

I

This advert led me to

I attend a yoga group with ten

others with MS and there was a united interest in this product.

further exploring I was able to see that a thirty day trial was open to

I immediately got on the

phone and ordered one.

In

all.

It

arrived the next day through DHL and I began the trial.

I used the Booster, raising the

power daily. I felt the circulation in my lower legs but no warmth in my feet. After taking my feet off the device there was no feeling of

the circulation continuing.

A week later I took the device to

my yoga class.

the plunge and had a go.

people permanently in a wheelchair felt some difference afterwards and even noticed

warmth to their feet.

both looking to buy the device. The others felt it work whilst trying the circulation booster and

may take the trial themselves. Professional advice came from a physiotherapist and a chiropodist. The former felt it may work for some but also may not be used as

Five people took

Two

They are

but also may not be used as Five people took Two They are The Circulation Booster

The Circulation Booster Made by High Tech Health

regularly as every day.

chiropodist felt that it was not possible to feel any benefit.

Personally I shall not be buying the booster; just returning it

before the end of the trial.

product costs £199.00 but with MS it is VAT free so the actual cost is £173.00. This product is individual; not all people will feel the benefit of this Circulation Booster. Thank you for the trial V Tech V3. www.circulationbooster.co.uk Best Wishes, Ros Barton, Wimborne, Dorset. Ed writes: I bought one of these and have found it rather good. You can really feel the blood pumping up the legs. I keep it on the floor under my desk and use it for half an hour a day while working.

The

The

Colostrum Might Help Little Sam & Others

Dear New Pathways

I am 60 years old and have MS;

I live in Australia and I was

reading Sam’s story (issue 58) and

I got so sad I was crying. I would

like to advise to give children and anybody else who has MS, Colostrum, the first mother’s milk from cows from New-Zealand; also very high in Vitamin D3 and Omega 3 fish oil. Since I started taking Colostrum

I have had no blurred vision and lots of energy. I go to a meeting

where several MS patients tell their stories and can walk again after years in a wheelchair, just by taking Colostrum and other good vitamins.

I wish you all the best.

With kind regards Truus Ed says: We will be doing something on Colostrum soon in New Pathways.

Extreme Stress Caused My MS

Dear New Pathways

I was first diagnosed with MS in

1981 at the age of 29. My father was (and is) a verbally abusive alcoholic. This led to an extreme amount of stress in my life. I went to United States Marine Corps boot camp three weeks after high school graduation and didn’t notice much of a difference. In 1981, when I had my first recognised attack of MS, I had just broken up with my girlfriend. My symptoms were tingling in my left arm and after a couple of weeks my left eye looked to the right and froze.

I then got married, raised two

children and had no symptoms for twenty years except some minor fatigue. In 2001 as my marriage began to deteriorate the symptoms returned. They were different this time; poor balance, drop foot,

urinary incontinence and extreme fatigue. This is where I am now, December 2009. The point of this biography is not to bore you but to say that with my random sample of one (!), I think that MY case of MS was caused by extreme stress over my entire life. When I read about MS and its causes, people are very good and

detailed about the physical aspects of this disease but no one that I am aware of has taken the research one step back and asked “what caused these physical symptoms?”

I am well on the way to getting

rid of the terror and abusive people in my life but I am still stuck with this disease. This is strictly my situation and opinion and I do feel strongly that there is something to it. Martin Scott Ed says: In fact there is some

research on stress and MS and the connection between the two is well recognised. If you go to the msrc website: www.msrc.co.uk and type ‘stress’ in the search field, you will get a lot of interesting information.

search field, you will get a lot of interesting information. Give Soldiers Wheelchairs For Instant Invisibility

Give Soldiers Wheelchairs For Instant Invisibility

Dear New Pathways I can save the United States’ military authorities millions of pounds! Apparently they are spending huge amounts of money on research into ‘invisibility’ so that their troops can infiltrate territory without alerting anyone to their presence. My solution is to give every soldier a wheelchair or mobility scooter. I most definitely assume a cloak of invisibility whilst using mine. Any town centre or shopping mall becomes a moving maze. It’s not just the younger community members - the invisibility works for all age groupings.

Is it just me? Would an extra

loud horn be any help? Suggestions please! The Buggyman and Murphy Barlow, Sheffield

Want to Rattle Tins? Get A Dog

Dear New Pathways,

Want to know the secret to fundraising? Read on.

A few years ago I helped with a

street collection for my local MS

years ago I helped with a street collection for my local MS FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518 Therapy

FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518

Therapy Centre. I was counting the contents of the tins as the collectors returned to base; one tin was four times heavier than the rest. “That’s a good spot you’ve found,” I said to myself. However, the good performance was nothing to do with the location of the collecting. The collector had an old, tubby, arthritic Labrador lying contentedly by his feet. The dog was a magnet for people giving money. Last week I was collecting outside the local Tesco. Trade was OK, then two women arrived to go shopping and left their overweight, cuddly, black Labrador tied up outside the shop near me while they went inside (you know where I am going with this!) Business boomed – it helped that it was half term and children couldn’t resist the dog. So the message is clear and a frisky, agile, thin Terrier won’t do the job. Best regards Jon Grove Lincoln

Terrier won’t do the job. Best regards Jon Grove Lincoln Thanks For Terrific Website Dear New

Thanks For Terrific Website

Dear New Pathways, I just wanted to say a really quick thanks for your website. I was diagnosed with MS in July and have been researching a lot lately. Your site has been by far the most encouraging and I’ve found so much hope through the different pages. Thanks for providing such a variety of opinions on dealing with MS - there is a very open-minded vibe from the site. It has really helped me and given me some more of the hope I quite badly need. Thanks, Cara (from Ireland)

MSRC: 01206 505444

www.msrc.co.uk

11

Postbag Your Letters

Postbag Your Letters

Computer Devices Keep Me Sane

Dear New Pathways,

I am writing to tell how I live

Smart-Nave to control them which cost about £200. The smart-nave is attached to the top
Smart-Nave to control them
which cost about £200. The
smart-nave is attached to the top
of the screen. It sends out 2
infrared beams; they reflect off a
shiny reflective spot in glasses.
www.naturalpoint.com/
I control the computer cursor by
moving my head around and
control the clicking with a dwell
clicker, free on the Internet using
sensory software.
I talk with Say-it-Sam software
www.words-
plus.com/website/products/soft/sa
yitsam.htm
There is free, less efficient
software e.g. on Microsoft
ACCESSORIES/ACCESSIBILITY
folder.
I control television, DVD player,
stereo, etc., even air conditioner
with my laptop via a USB infrared
device that’s relatively cheap.
I realised the importance of my

with severe MS. I overheard nurses saying that it was end stage MS several years ago. It might have been if I had not conspired with a doctor to have me released from hospital! My consultant now says that it is

better to ride out severe infections at home rather than in hospital.

I am now tetraplegic due to a

brain haemorrhage in 2001; I can’t talk or swallow even water. I now only have use of neck muscles. I am living in my own home and I insist on getting into my wheelchair from 10am to 3

pm and from 5pm to 9.30pm.

I am only sane because I can

control a computer in the morning and a laptop in the evening. I use a device called a

and a laptop in the evening. I use a device called a Barry Thorne – sane

Barry Thorne – sane thanks to his high tech gadgets

a Barry Thorne – sane thanks to his high tech gadgets Barry – everything controlled from

Barry – everything controlled from his laptop laptop when it crashed. Without it I would be a gibbering wreck just

able to be in bed. I think without

it I would have been dead ten

years ago.

I used to be a lecturer in Human

Biology and also in Computing. I

was diagnosed with MS in 1989 after walking became difficult and my eyesight was affected. Within

a year I was confined to a

wheelchair after several relapses. I carried on working for another 10 years, lecturing from a wheelchair. After every relapse I gradually

swapped teaching for administrative duties. I was computing which meant that I could work from home if necessary.

I feel better than last year but

gradually deteriorating as usual. When I get tired I cannot move

anything except my neck. I now know what strength and stamina

it needs to keep the mouth from

dropping down. It is a good job that I can control my laptop. Barry Thorne barry.thorne@btopenworld.com Also see article on Assistive Technology on pages 34-36.

Also see article on Assistive Technology on pages 34-36. 1 2 New Pathways Issue 59 January/February

Cryptic Crossword

You’ll need issue 58 of New Pathways to get some of the answers.

1 2 3 4 5 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 17
1
2
3
4
5
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
17
14
15
16
18
17
18
19
20
21
20
22
23
24
25
26
27
27
28
29

By Cryptic Charlie Gee

Answers, with some explanations on page 53

Across

 

Down

1.

Looks on the bright side. (7)

1.

Members of the Hungarian cavalry. (7)

5.

Bach met the Scottish play! (7)

2.

Place where birds settle for a 25 down. (5)

9.

Encircles rod runs us about. (9)

3.

Struggle helplessly to get a 25 down. (7)

10.

A

stuttering friend is overcome with horror. (5)

4.

In sailing you find a 25 down. (4)

11.

As then the capital was big in antiquity. (6)

5.

Sounds like a lady takes charge but really

12.

Makes up. (8)

rules badly! (10)

14.

Broadcast simmers yet they correspond in size

6.

Its pot luck in Monopoly. (6)

and form. (10)

7.

Looking forward to a child possibly. (9)

16.

Shake mostly for a 25 down. (4)

8.

The papal court sounds like sacred water. (4,3)

18.

Singular part of foot for a 25 down. (4)

13.

Brains sound a bit on the dull side. (4,6)

19.

Tint plenty she rode horses in the last issue. (4,6)

15.

He cares more than most men. (4,5)

22.

Novel man a sane doctor who believed chocolate

17.

Rule said about the remainder

was bad for MSers, in the last issue. (4,4)

18.

Leamington and Bath for instance with television

23.

Movement made during warfare. (6)

channel for former chess world champion. (7)

26.

Parts in bits for a 25 down. (5)

20.

Mountain over tear for a shower. (7)

27.

Member of a left wing group in the Labour Party. (9)

21.

To deem broadcast acted in an exaggerated way. (6)

28.

He gives in. (7)

24.

Hundred leg to ascend. (5)

29.

Computer from 2001 a space Odyssey I but for

25.

The children's card game, angle. (4)

a 25 down. (7)

FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518

MSRC: 01206 505444

www.msrc.co.uk

13

CCSVI

CCSVI – More Difficult To Get Treatment Now But More Research Will Be Done

By Ian Cook & Judy Graham

Getting The Treatment

For Europeans, Poland is the main country doing CCSVI

treatment. Another doctor in Italy is also offering it. (See *below). Other countries are listed in the very helpful website

http://liberation-

Progressive MS in 1997 and for the past year has used a wheelchair. He is unmarried and has no children. In November 2009 he travelled to Poland for CCSVI treatment costing 12,000 Zloty (about £2,700). The changes, he says, have been amazing – although he has had a slight set- back recently. “When I first returned from Poland I felt like a condemned man set free. At last I was able to sleep normally, with much reduced spasm and no bladder problems. The spasticity in my legs disappeared, except for some residual spasticity, with much reduced problems upon waking. I no longer felt sick and giddy after moving my head too fast. There was no night time twitching of arms and legs. I found I had stopped choking on food and fluids even when I gulped them down. My senses of taste and smell returned. I first heard about CCSVI in New Pathways where I read Ashton Embry’s feature (NP 57). I tried

without success to get a Doppler scan done at two private hospitals locally. My GP was supportive but it quickly became apparent that it would need to be performed by a skilled operator and only a few people in the world know how to do it. I then emailed Dr Marian Simka who agreed to see me in Poland. The airport and flight and even travelling alone in a wheelchair were no problem. At the hospital in Katowice, Dr Simka, - an angiologist and general surgeon - did the Doppler straight away. The Doppler unit is a little like a bladder scanner. The unit with the screen is smaller than an attaché case - like a fat laptop. Dr Simka turned the screen round so I could see his findings. Sure enough he found flow abnormalities. I couldn’t have been happier. The next day I had an eye examination carried out by an ophthalmologist. They were looking for lesions on the optic nerve and also did a test of peripheral vision. These tests are performed as they are easy tests

treatment.com/liberation-

treatment/researchers

Poland – Inundated With MS Patients

Dr Marian Simka (a man) and his colleague Dr Tomasz Ludyga in Katowice, Poland (see info below) have been very busy performing the Liberation Procedure on MS patients from many countries. Since Dr Simka’s name got about among the MS community, he has been inundated with requests and is overwhelmed. He is planning to treat 100-200 MS patients this year. Ian Cook will be going there in January for treatment and will report back in the next issue of New Pathways. Also planning to go to Poland is Scottish Radio Clyde DJ “Tiger” Tim Stevens, who has primary progressive MS. He will go there in March, hopefully with a TV documentary crew. Many people with MS have already had treatment from Dr Simka in Poland, with mixed results.

Case: Martin Jones:

“Better In Many Respects But Slight Setback.” Martin Jones, 43, a former IT analyst from Reigate in Surrey was diagnosed with Primary

IT analyst from Reigate in Surrey was diagnosed with Primary Martin Jones during the operation 1

Martin Jones during the operation

that would show efficacy of the procedure at any follow up. I then had an MRV scan where I was required to lie in a tunnel like an MRI scanner; it’s different software but the hardware is the same. I was told to strain and breathe out and this made the azygos vein easier to image. The various tests revealed I didn’t have any stenosis of my jugular veins or azygos vein problems but my right jugular vein had an “upside down” valve and my left one had a membrane across it. Problems were congenital, I was born with them. Blood flow was being diverted through peripheral veins impeding drainage of blood from my brain.

peripheral veins impeding drainage of blood from my brain. Martin Jones after the operation In the

Martin Jones after the operation

In the operation I had two small holes in my neck and one in my groin. It is more usual for the whole procedure to be performed through the femoral vein in the groin, as is the case I believe with other types of surgery but my particular case also necessitated a small hole in each jugular vein in my neck. The neck access was so they could destroy the membrane in my jugular vein and correct the valve problem. During the procedure a contrast dye was injected so they could see the blood flow. They decided to treat me with balloon angioplasty rather than use stents. Inflation of the balloon did hurt a fair bit but it wasn’t

agony. It was a kind of severe ache but only lasted a few seconds. As I was sedated it wasn’t a problem. The whole procedure lasted about

90 minutes.

Back in Britain, the day following my return, I gave the

prescription I had been given to a locum GP. The locum wasn’t happy at first but soon relented. The district nurse is visiting me and injects Clexane, a drug used to stop blood clots, which I need for

30 days. I’m also on a similar drug

called Clopidogrel for two months given in tablet form and aspirin possibly for life. Sadly, I have recently had a minor setback and a few MS symptoms have returned. Personally I think this may be associated with a recent bladder infection but I notice that other people who have had the “liberation procedure” for CCSVI such as Gianfranco Campalani (NP 58) have also had subsequent setbacks. I will be going back to Poland shortly to consult the doctors there. I recently spoke to Dr Simka and he said it was likely that my jugular vein had re-occluded and may need a stent rather than balloon angioplasty. In spite of this setback I must emphasise that I do still feel better in many respects.

Case: Edser Donegan:

“Better walking, fatigue gone, balance better.” Edser Donegan, 39, was diagnosed with MS in 2009. He lives in Cork, Ireland with his fiancée Anna. “I was diagnosed in February last year with MS and use a walking stick when I go outside for a walk. My fiancée Anna is Polish. She looked on the Polish MS Forum for help and that’s where we found out about the CCSVI treatment in Katowice. Anna and I flew out from Cork at the end of November last year

FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518

at the end of November last year FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518 Edser Donegan and fiancée Anna with

Edser Donegan and fiancée Anna with Dr Marian Simka

and spent a week in Katowice. The Polish doctors found I had a blockage in the right jugular vein in my neck. They performed

angioplasty and also put in a stent. The procedure was carried out in the evening at 7pm and I spent one night in hospital. I was out the next day by midday. The operation took just over an hour and was not painful. I remember thinking it was like being a spectator at a game – you could watch the vascular surgeon carrying out his work on you on the three to four monitors in the operating theatre. Following the procedure I spent three days resting in a hotel which was just 500 metres from the hospital.

I first knew there was some

improvement ten minutes after the operation when the surgeon, Dr Tomasz Ludyga, shook my hand and said that my hands were warm. (They were always cold before). Since the operation I can walk further – now around 600-800 metres. The fatigue and headaches have gone and my balance is getting better. Anna and I sleep in the same bed now as my jumping in my sleep has gone. Also, things don’t appear to make me as mad

as before and my disability score is down from 6 to 4.

I am currently taking the blood

thinning drug Clexane for 20 days and have been told I will have to take aspirin for the rest of my life. I will return to Poland in March or

MSRC: 01206 505444

www.msrc.co.uk

15

CCSVI

April for a review. The procedure has cost me 14,000 Zloty (Polish money) which is roughly €3250- €3400. I think it has been money well spent.”

Info Box
Info Box

Poland:

Dr. Marian Simka, Department of Angiology, SANA Institute, ul. Wodzislawska 78, 43-200 Pszczyna, Poland. Email: mariansimka@poczta.onet.pl Tel 00 48 32 21 20 498 Please be aware that Dr Simka has been inundated with requests for help from people with MS worldwide and is very busy! To watch a Polish TV item on CCSVI, go to:

http://www.tvs.pl/tv/video,na_wage_zdro

wia,5244.html

Italy

 

Dr Roberto Bergamaschi from Pavia, Italy, says he will start the diagnostic procedure for CCSVI in the spring of 2010 and will consider doing the treatment after that. If you want to go to Italy, it is worth getting on his database for when he starts scheduling patients:

Roberto Bergamaschi, MD, Multiple Sclerosis Centre, Neurological Institute C.Mondino. via Mondino 2, 27100 - Pavia - Italy roberto.bergamaschi@mondino.it

Stanford University, California – Treatment No Longer Available But New Research in Pipeline

Until very recently, treatment for CCSVI was available from Dr Mike Dake at Stanford University in California. However, this is now no longer available, leaving many patients who had booked surgery sorely disappointed. Dr Dake is now doing research on CCSVI to make sure nothing has been overlooked and to make sure they know how to give the best care to patients and give long- lasting benefits. He is putting names on a waiting list and hopes to be

He is putting names on a waiting list and hopes to be Dr Mike Dake treating

Dr Mike Dake

treating again before the end of 2010. Dr Dake has given this explanation to anyone inquiring about the treatment:

“After careful review at Stanford, we have determined that the initiation of a clinical development program leading to a possible clinical trial will be the next step as we examine the possible risks and benefits of balloon angioplasty, with or without venous stenting, for patients with multiple sclerosis. This evaluation will start shortly but it is unlikely that, even given a highly positive outcome, we would be initiating any clinical trial before the second half of 2010 at the earliest. In light of these next steps, I am not currently performing the procedure at Stanford. Please be assured that we will keep your contact information on file and provide appropriate updates of our work on this important issue.” Michael D. Dake M.D., Professor, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery Stanford University School of Medicine, Falk Cardiovascular Research Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5407 Tel 00-1-650- 724-0831 Fax 00-1-650- 725-0533

How Well Does CCSVI Work?

As seen from the cases above and others we have heard about from websites, there seem to be variable results from CCSVI treatment. Some people with MS improve

dramatically, with no or almost no signs and symptoms of MS remaining; others see improvements, but are still left with some MS symptoms. We do not know why some people do better than others.

Does Everyone With MS Have CCSVI?

Dr Zamboni says that every single MS patient he treated in Italy had venous abnormalities. However, we have heard of a few cases of people being told their veins are normal. Lydia Rawlings, 61, from California was in tears to be told this: She says:

“I went to Stanford. Dr Dake did tests. Guess what? NO blocked veins. I was sent home without the procedure. I cried all the way back from Stanford. I was destroyed when Dr. Dake said he couldn’t treat me. I felt sorry for myself for one week and then I pulled myself together. Self pity never helped anyone. Dr. Dake said he had three other patients he couldn’t help. My veins are slightly narrowed but far from blocked so giving me the procedure was a waste of time. I think getting tested for CCSVI is worth it. It didn’t help me but maybe it will help someone else.” Lydia is now exploring to see whether she really does have MS or some other condition.

see whether she really does have MS or some other condition. Dr Paolo Zamboni and his

Dr Paolo Zamboni and his daughter Matilde, 21

UK

UK

Moves are afoot to start scanning in the UK and we hope to be able

Moves are afoot to start scanning in the UK and we hope to be able to report on this exciting news in the next issue of New Pathways.

to start scanning in the UK and we hope to be able to report on this
to start scanning in the UK and we hope to be able to report on this
to start scanning in the UK and we hope to be able to report on this
to start scanning in the UK and we hope to be able to report on this

Advertisement

CCSVI News Update

Research - Canada Takes The Lead

Canada has taken the worldwide lead in setting in motion the most comprehensive trial for CCSVI yet. This is partly due to explosive public interest following strong coverage of CCSVI on Canadian TV, helped by Dr Ashton Embry (see his column pages 24-26). The University of British Columbia Hospital MS Clinic in Vancouver, Canada is planning a study on CCSVI involving 100 MS patients. They want to determine how common vein abnormality is among MS patients and how easy it is to detect such abnormalities using ultrasound and MRI. Unlike in Dr Zamboni’s trial which had no control group, there will be a control group in the British Columbia trial. The research will also be blind so doctors don’t know who is getting the treatment. The control group will not get any treatment on their neck veins.

A Large Demand To Look Into This

“There is a large demand for us to look into this,” says Dr. Anthony Traboulsee, Director of the UBC MS Clinical Trials Research Group. “Patients are very excited. We are very interested ourselves and we want to meet the demand of our patients.” Joining the study will be physicist Alex Rauscher who plans to look at MRI scans of patients to search for evidence of iron deposits in the brain, since some

research has suggested that iron in the brain may contribute to the inflammation and immune system attacks in MS. In the proposed study researchers would closely examine participants’ neck

study researchers would closely examine participants’ neck Brain Scans and stomach veins. Each participant will undergo

Brain Scans

and stomach veins. Each participant will undergo three tests, including an ultrasound, a magnetic resonance imaging test and the insertion of a catheter. In that test, dye is injected to give researchers a closer look at the veins. Only MS participants with blocked or narrowed veins will move on to the second stage of the trial. Half that group will undergo a vein dilation procedure – similar to an angioplasty – to expand the vein; the other half will not. The trial – which is awaiting funding and approval from an ethics committee - will cost nearly $1million for equipment and staff. Some of the funding is coming from the Canadian MS Society, other funding agencies and private donations. If the British Columbia study gets the go-ahead, it will be the most comprehensive of any trial done so far on CCSVI. Patients have not yet (January 2010) been recruited. You are requested not to contact the clinic until they get the go-ahead. We will be covering this in New Pathways and on the MSRC website:

www.msrc.co.uk. Dr Ashton Embry’s Direct-MS, based in Calgary, is involved in raising funds for this study and on April 10th is holding a silent auction. Anyone wishing to donate can do so by going to:

VGH and UBC Hospital Foundation UBC Faculty of Medicine (funds can be specified for CCSVI research) For more info:

www.vchri.ca/s/CTAP_ACTRS_Info.asp?ReportID=377172

To watch the CTV video:

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews

/20091202/ms_latest_091202/20091202?hub=Health

There are also interesting videos of CCSVI on YouTube

The Latest On Dr Paolo Zamboni

The original findings about CCSVI and MS came from Dr Paolo Zamboni, Director of the Vascular Diseases Centre at the University of Ferrara in Milan, Italy. Dr Zamboni’s research was published in The Journal of Vascular Surgery in December 2009. It is called “A Prospective Open-Label Study of Endovascular Treatment of Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency.” The original reason why Dr Zamboni got involved in CCSVI and

MS is because his wife Elena has relapsing remitting MS; originally with eyesight and walking problems. She was one of the first MS patients to be treated by Dr Zamboni in 2007 and since the CCSVI treatment her MS symptoms have gone. Since the explosion of interest about CCSVI Dr Zamboni has been besieged. He says: “I am a scientist fighting a hard battle against a big opposition to endovascular treatment of CCSVI in MS.” We understand this opposition is coming from neurologists around the world.

Research In The UK? We hear rumours from someone recruited that a trial on CCSVI
Research
In The UK?
We hear rumours from
someone recruited that a trial
on CCSVI will take place at a
hospital in the UK.
So far, it is very
hush-hush. If you
are on this trial we
would love to hear
from you.

CCSVI - Attitudes

Attitudes To CCSVI & MS

CCSVI - Attitudes Attitudes To CCSVI & MS Canadian MS Society – ‘A Truly New Avenue

Canadian MS Society – ‘A Truly New Avenue To Explore’.

To begin with, the Canadian MS Society was unimpressed by the CCSVI theory and said as much on its website. Then, after the CTV programme on CCSVI opened the floodgates of public interest, they were forced to change their tune. Now, the Canadian MS Society has invited proposals from Canadian institutions for research into CCSVI. “These (Dr Zamboni’s) early results are encouraging and show that this warrants more study,” said Yves Savoie, MS Society President and CEO. “This is truly a new avenue to explore in MS research and we want to be a part of furthering this investigation.” Also read Dr Ashton Embry’s provocative essay ‘Hope and Elation - Frustration and Anger – Fear and Loathing: The Contrasting Emotional Responses to the Revolutionary Discoveries in MS Made by Dr Zamboni’ on the msrc or Direct-MS websites:

www.msrc.co.uk and www.direct- ms.org/

USA – Call For Worldwide Co-ordinated Research and Thinking Outside The Box

Again after a dramatic change of tune, The National MS Society of America now says it has a commitment to pursuing all avenues of research into the

a commitment to pursuing all avenues of research into the causes and treatment of MS so

causes and treatment of MS so is open to doing research into CCSVI. It has been in touch with other MS societies around the world to discuss this and make sure research is co-ordinated. In December 2009 the Society released an invitation for scientists around the world to submit proposals for research into CCSVI. It is collaborating with the MS Society of Canada and possibly other societies to convene an international panel of experts to conduct an accelerated review of proposals. The NMSS says: “It is important for researchers to think outside the box and we believe Dr. Zamboni has done this. His hypothesis is a path that must be more fully explored and Dr. Zamboni himself has stated that additional research is essential to evaluate it.” Another hopeful development is that the company which makes the Doppler scan is now training more people to use the equipment.

MS Society in UK:

Medical Advisers “Not Convinced” But More Research Welcome.

The MS Society says it is pleased that preliminary research work on CCSVI is being done but its medical advisors have raised doubts about Dr Zamboni’s theory and say that people with MS are unlikely to benefit by any treatments developed to treat CCSVI. However, the Society is prepared to consider research proposals and has issued the following statement:

“The MS Society has read with great interest Dr Zamboni’s work on chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) and has updated the website to reflect the results of these studies.

FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518

the results of these studies. FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518 The MS Society is aware of planned and

The MS Society is aware of planned and ongoing studies regarding CCSVI in MS and is

pleased to see that this preliminary work is being carried forward in

future.

to funding research relevant to MS, including research into CCSVI and will therefore consider applications for funding made to one of the regular grant rounds. The research is currently at a very early stage of development and the Society is monitoring progress of the two ongoing collaborative studies; the first an attempt to treat venous obstruction in 16 individuals using balloon dilation, and the second, a much larger study to evaluate the prevalence of venous obstruction

in people with MS. The outcomes of ongoing studies will be pivotal to determining whether further funding and research is warranted.” http://www.mssociety.org.uk/re search/az_of_ms_research/cd/ccs vi.html http://www.mssociety.org.uk/n ews_events/news/press_releases/ ccsvi_med_advice.html http://www.mssociety.org.uk/n ews_events/news/research/ccsvi. html

The Society remains open

MSRC: 01206 505444

www.msrc.co.uk

19

CCSVI - Attitudes

Medical Advisers “Not Convinced”

The MS Society’s medical advisers, however, remain unconvinced by CCSVI. Research Communications Officer Dr Susan Kohlhaas, said: “Several medical advisers to the MS Society have read through the papers published by Dr Zamboni and have heard him lecture. They are not convinced by the evidence that blockages to draining veins from the brain are specific to people with MS or that this explains the cause of MS at any stage of the condition.” One of the Society’s six medical advisers, Professor Alastair Compston, Head of the Department of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Cambridge, said: “The treatment for CCSVI is not available for patients with multiple sclerosis in the United Kingdom because there is no convincing evidence to suggest that it is safe or beneficial to people with MS. People with MS are unlikely to benefit from treatments that dilate blood vessels.”

MSRC: “A Sea Change in MS Thinking”.

In contrast, the MSRC is very positive about Dr Zamboni’s research. Helen Yates, MSRC Chief Executive, says: “MSRC is very encouraged by the early results of Dr Paolo

“MSRC is very encouraged by the early results of Dr Paolo Helen Yates Zamboni’s work. There

Helen Yates

Zamboni’s work. There is no doubt that this area warrants a great deal more study. This could represent a completely novel approach to MS research which, if proven to be relevant, could be a sea change in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the condition.”

Mixed Reaction From GPs and Neurologists:

From “Very Helpful” to “Alternative Rubbish!”

We have heard that some doctors have been very helpful, while others have poured scorn on the whole idea of CCSVI and MS. Sylvia Wright in Sheffield had no problem when she asked her GP to refer her to have a neck scan done privately. Andrew Watson’s GP was impressed, but not the neurologist.

“I emailed my district nurse with

the CTV broadcast link and followed up with the PUBMED Research paper and asked that she let my GP see them before I made an appointment with him. He was

so impressed, he emailed details to

a neuro he knew. The reply? “The

process is experimental, unproven and not available in the UK.” Another neurologist told this patient: “Dr Zamboni had a motive for doing this research – his wife.” She says: “I was aghast! And he had not even read the research

paper. Luckily, I had a copy for him. I told him it was his duty to be aware of what is going on and many people with MS want to find out more and have a neuro who, if they cannot do anything at this time, is at least supportive. He refused to discuss it. After a few more ‘put downs’ from him, I left having told him my husband would walk over hot coals for me

if it helped and I was glad I wasn’t

married to him!! One reader reported that her GP threw Dr Zamboni’s research papers back at her saying, “It’s alternative rubbish! What have veins got to do with MS?!!!” This GP refused to read the papers and

also refused to send her patient to have her veins scanned, suggesting

it was a waste of NHS money. Please let us know YOUR GP and neurologist stories about CCSVI.

Campaigning, Action And Petitions

There has been a great deal of bally-hoo about CCSVI in Canada and the USA, with TV and press reports but virtually nothing in the UK apart from articles in the Daily Mail on January 12 and the Sunday Mirror on January 17. The difference between the countries may be because movers and shakers such as Dr Ashton Embry in Canada and Joan Beal in the USA have made such a noise about

CCSVI. We need to do the

same here! http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/to

p-stories/2010/01/17/have-

doctors-found-a-cure-for-ms-

115875-21973347/

There is a CCSVI page on Facebook called CCSVI in Multiple sclerosis: Joan Beal, whose husband Jeff has MS, has a post there titled CCSVI in Multiple Sclerosis: What can I do???

Joan and Jeff, both professional

musicians, are avid contributors to the excellent forum:

http://www.thisisms.com/forum-

40.html

Joan says we can all do something to help get CCSVI more widely known and routinely available. Joan’s recommendations are to:

Make sure the health care professional you see for a CCSVI

Advertisement

CCSVI - Campaigning

CCSVI - Campaigning Joan Beal screening has a copy of this PDF to make sure the

Joan Beal

screening has a copy of this PDF to make sure the ultrasound or MRI is performed correctly

http://csvi-

ms.net/files/multiple%20sclerosis

-USG.pdf

Take Dr Zamboni’s research papers to your local university.

The paper can be printed out from:

http://jnnp.bmj.com/content/80/4

/392.full

Call the vascular departments, interventional radiology departments and neurology departments and tell them they should study venous stenosis and reflux in multiple sclerosis patients. Volunteer to let them test you for jugular vein stenosis. This is going to take all the patients and caregivers working together.

Call your local MS societies and tell them they need to fund research into CCSVI NOW.

Write letters to the medical journalists of newspapers and include information and links to the Canadian TV story (see above) Dr. Zamboni’s research paper and the Globe (this is a newspaper in Vancouver) and Mail story. Let people know that there is exciting new research into the cause of MS, and we need to investigate this. http://www.theglobeandmail.com

/news/national/researchers-

labour-of-love-leads-to-ms-

breakthrough/article1372414/

UK Petition

A group of people with MS at the Multiple Sclerosis Forum at the Sanctuary of Healing in Langho, Blackburn, have drawn up a petition which they would like New Pathways readers to sign. They are asking people to send letters to their MP and also to lobby the Minister for Health. The letter to your MP can be adjusted according to where you live. It reads:

Dear There is now worldwide interest in the work of Italian Dr Paolo Zamboni, who has discovered that all MS patients tested by his team had blocked veins in the neck and chest which results in the myelin damage in the brain and spinal cord. The condition is called CCSVI. A simple scan diagnoses the presence of CCSVI. The MS Society UK is very sceptical and dragging their feet, with no plans for research into CCSVI, although there are now 10 planned projects worldwide. This is a radical new approach to the cause and possible treatment of MS-the procedure to correct it appears to be inexpensive, drug free and relatively simple. We are asking everyone affected by MS, their families, friends, MPs, the media and the Great British Public for their support in lobbying the Minister of Health to sanction, as a matter of some urgency, vascular scans and the follow- up treatment for all MS patients in the UK. This is a real breakthrough with the potential to benefit the 100,000 people with MS in the UK; many of them young people in their 20’s, 30’s and 40’s with families and careers. Waiting several years down the

line for action is not an option. We need to know now. As the local MP of several members of the MS Forum we are asking for your interest and support. There is also an online petition to send to the Minister of Health. Every member of the MS Forum (over 20 people with MS) is 100% committed to this campaign.

Petition To Minister Of Health

We, the undersigned, call upon the Minister of Health to authorise immediate vascular scans with a view to the necessary follow-up treatment for CCSVI (Chronic Cerebro Spinal Venous Insufficiency) for all people with Multiple Sclerosis in the UK. For more information go to:

http://www.msrc.co.uk/index. cfm?fuseaction=show&pageid

=2944

http://petitions.number10.go

v.uk/CCSVINOW/

More Info

There is a very comprehensive article about CCSVI by Jack Burks MD, Chief Medical Officer of the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America:

www.msassociation.org/news_ce nter/article.asp?a=ccsvi The best sites for information

and news on CCSVI are http://csvi- ms.net and http://liberation-

treatment.com/liberaton-

treatment/researchers These list places where your veins can be checked, including clinics in Holland and Australia, and where the Liberation treatment is available worldwide. Doctors who want to know more about CCSVI can go to:

http://www.ms-mri.com/news.php Facebook page:

www.ms-ccsvi-uk.org

Bits & Pieces

Stem Cells Trial At UCH London And Addenbrooke’s Cambridge

We understand that a small trial on stem cells for MS will be taking place at University College Hospital London and Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge. All

patients have already been recruited. If you are on this trial, we would love to hear how you get on.

First Tablets To Treat MS 'Twice As Effective' As Beta Interferon The first pills for
First Tablets To Treat MS 'Twice As Effective' As Beta Interferon
The first pills for MS could be twice as effective as
existing treatments.
Fingolimod and Cladribine are the first MS
treatments in tablet form. They could become available
next year. Fingolimod is taken once a day, whereas
Cladribine is taken as a course of up to 40 over a year.
They both seem to be effective at reducing relapses
and holding back disease progression.
Reference: Oral Fingolimod or Intramuscular
Interferon for Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis, New
England Journal of Medicine, January 20, 2010
Winners Of The MSRC Christmas Draw 2009
It’s a prosperous New Year for the five lucky winners of the MSRC Christmas Draw 2009!
First Prize of £1000: Mr and Mrs R Mackie from Helensburgh, near Glasgow.
Second Prize of £500: Sandra Jones from Llanelli
Third Prize of £300: Joyce Nash from Gloucester
Fourth Prize of £150: Mrs L.M Field from Colchester
Fifth Prize of £50: Mr John Floyd from Frinton-on-Sea
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518

MSRC: 01206 505444

www.msrc.co.uk

23

The Ashton Embry Column

CCSVI, Autoimmunity And Nutrition

The Nutrients You Need To Take To Help Venous Blood Flow

By Ashton Embry PhD

Ashton Stirs Up Action in Canada
Ashton Stirs Up Action in Canada
Ashton Stirs Up Action in Canada
Ashton Stirs Up Action in Canada

Ashton Stirs Up Action in Canada

Ashton Stirs Up Action in Canada
Ashton Stirs Up Action in Canada
Ashton Stirs Up Action in Canada
Ashton Stirs Up Action in Canada
I
I

n mid-September it was apparent that MS researchers and MS

societies were either unaware of, or were ignoring, Dr Paolo Zamboni’s revolutionary concept that blocked veins and impaired blood flow from the brain (Chronic Cerebro Spinal Venous Insufficiency - CCSVI) were a key part of the MS disease process and that relief of CCSVI was potentially a very useful therapy. Such a “head-in-the sand” reaction was not in the best interests of persons with MS and it was clear that something had to be done to change this unfortunate situation. So I took action.

done to change this unfortunate situation. So I took action. Nine years ago, I helped a

Nine years ago, I helped a Canadian TV health reporter, Avis Favaro, on a story on the relationship of vitamin D and MS.

Favaro, on a story on the relationship of vitamin D and MS. Ashton Embry PhD Following

Ashton Embry PhD

Following my wife’s suggestion, I contacted Avis regarding Dr Zamboni’s work and she soon became convinced of its great importance. She and her producer, Elizabeth St Phillip, subsequently put together a terrific documentary which was aired in late November. The documentary “went viral” on the web and resulted in greatly increased awareness of CCSVI and of the significant potential of the “liberation” treatment to relieve it. To see the clips and read the stories, go to:

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/Article

News/story/CTVNews/20091215/cc

svi_091215/20091215?hub=Health

Such awareness translated into tremendous public pressure and in November the MS Society of Canada called for research proposals on CCSVI.

http://www.mssociety.ca/en/rele

ases/nr_20091123.htm

(Also see the articles on CCSVI on pages 14-15 and 18-20)

Research In Pipeline

Now that CCSVI can no longer be ignored, conventional medicine is demanding that two fundamental research studies be done before making treatment of CCSVI for MS routinely available. The first one is to prove incontrovertibly that CCSVI is associated with MS. Luckily, a large, comprehensive study which will answer this question is already underway at the University of Buffalo in the US and should be completed by 2011/2012. The second is to show that treatment for CCSVI through vascular procedures works. Treatment of CCSVI will become widely available only after a proper trial demonstrates clear benefits (2015 or later).

Is CCSVI The Main Driver in MS?

Does This Put The Auto-Immune Theory of MS on Scrap Heap?

Before discussing what persons with MS can do in the next 5 plus years during which time CCSVI

treatment is not yet available, I want to address the question of whether or not

treatment is not yet available, I want to address the question of whether or not autoimmunity is actually a part of the MS disease process. The current scientific evidence leaves very little doubt that CCSVI is the main driver of the MS disease process.

that CCSVI is the main driver of the MS disease process. CCSVI causes reduced blood flow

CCSVI causes reduced blood flow from the brain and this is called hypoperfusion. It is established that hypoperfusion can result in both the death of oligodendrocytes (cells that make myelin) and the breakdown of myelin. Notably, Bernie Juurlink described this in a prescient 1998 paper. A recent “smoking gun” paper by John Prineas and colleagues has provided the icing on the cake by demonstrating that oligodendrocyte death and myelin disintegration precede any immune action in the CNS. CCSVI- driven hypoperfusion provides the obvious cause for these critical observations that relegate the popular autoimmune model for MS to the proverbial scrap heap. Hypoperfusion also leads to an up-regulation of adhesion molecules on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) as well as to

inflammation and damage of the BBB through iron deposition. These phenomena collectively allow myelin-sensitive immune cells access to the central nervous system (CNS). Subsequent autoimmune reactions in the CNS result in substantial damage to myelin and axons that, in turn,

result in the clinical disabilities that characterize MS. Thus, although it is R.I.P. for the autoimmune model, it is clear that secondary autoimmunity to myelin

is an important part of MS. This is

supported by the fact that persons with MS are far more likely to carry a specific gene that fosters myelin autoimmunity as well, by other varied data.

fosters myelin autoimmunity as well, by other varied data. Nutritional Strategies To Tackle CCSVI So what

Nutritional Strategies To Tackle CCSVI

So what to do until CCSVI treatment is standard? One option

will be to have CCSVI treatment in

a developing country such as India

and this will appeal to those with money and a high tolerance for risk. However, most persons with MS will have to live with blocked veins and the potentially harmful consequences of such pathology. I suggest that during this time it is essential to use nutritional strategies that offset the effects of both CCSVI and autoimmunity and counter the factors that enhance these disease processes. The nutritional strategies, which have been proposed by Direct-MS, were formulated on the basis that myelin autoimmunity and the

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that myelin autoimmunity and the FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518 breakdown of the blood-brain barrier were the key

breakdown of the blood-brain barrier were the key disease processes in MS. Thus, such strategies are still viable and I would stress the need to avoid dairy, gluten, legumes and allergenic foods and to use strategies to ensure the integrity of the intestinal barrier. These all reduce the production of myelin- sensitive immune cells and consequent autoimmune damage. However, the published recommendations have to be supplemented by strategies that address the presence of CCSVI. Studies on the relationships between blood vessel health/blood flow and nutrition almost exclusively address the health of arteries in regards to preventing and treating cardio-vascular disease. However, they are also applicable to the health of veins and enhanced venous blood flow and are important for offsetting the effects of CCSVI.

flow and are important for offsetting the effects of CCSVI. I was surprised to discover that

I was surprised to discover that almost all the published recommendations for vascular health and improved blood flow are already part of the

MSRC: 01206 505444

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25

The Ashton Embry Column

recommended nutritional recommendations. These include:

Sufficient vitamin D

recommendations. These include: • Sufficient vitamin D • Various B vitamins • Omega 3 EFA intake

Various B vitamins

Omega 3 EFA intake

Use of monounsaturated fat such as olive oil as the main fat type.

monounsaturated fat such as olive oil as the main fat type. Olive oil • Plentiful antioxidants

Olive oil

Plentiful antioxidants through fruits, vegetables and green tea as well as specific supplements such as grape seed extract and ginkgo.

specific supplements such as grape seed extract and ginkgo. • Adequate minerals such as calcium, magnesium

Adequate minerals such as calcium, magnesium and zinc

Substantially reduced consumption of saturated fat and high-glycemic carbohydrates (sugar, grains).

A Few New Supplements And More Of Existing Ones

The changes that seem to be required to ensure CCSVI is

addressed as best as possible are additions of a few new supplements and an increased intake of some of the already recommended supplements. In terms of new supplements, I agree with the recommendations of Joan Beal who has been a tireless promoter of the concept that CCSVI is the primary cause of MS and who has looked at ways to promote vascular health. She suggests that anti-thrombic and anti-inflammatory supplements such as:

Serrapeptase and nattokinase (proteolytic enzymes)

as: • Serrapeptase and nattokinase (proteolytic enzymes) • Curcumin • Bromelain • Iodine I would also
as: • Serrapeptase and nattokinase (proteolytic enzymes) • Curcumin • Bromelain • Iodine I would also
as: • Serrapeptase and nattokinase (proteolytic enzymes) • Curcumin • Bromelain • Iodine I would also
as: • Serrapeptase and nattokinase (proteolytic enzymes) • Curcumin • Bromelain • Iodine I would also

Curcumin

Bromelain

Iodine I would also add acetyl-L- carnitine to the list. In terms of changes to the recommended supplement list on

the Direct-MS website, I would now suggest:

Using enough vitamin D to raise one’s 25D level to 175-200 nmol (6000 – 8000 IU for most) Increasing omega 3 EFA intake to 5 g of DHA+EPA Using all the listed basic antioxidant supplements (rather than 1 or 2).

listed basic antioxidant supplements (rather than 1 or 2). Also take alpha lipoic acid and EGGC

Also take alpha lipoic acid and EGGC (epigallocatechin-3- gallate – the main antioxidant from green tea).T hese need to move to the basic list from the designer list. (See ‘Supplements’ on www.direct- ms.org An increased intake of B vitamins (a B-100 pill) as well as using 2g of no-flush niacin and 1- 2 mg of B12. An updated supplement list which reflects all these changes is now on the Direct-MS website:

www.direct-ms.org For more information on CCSVI, and the current position of the MS Societies, see pages 14-23.

CCSVI, and the current position of the MS Societies, see pages 14-23. 2 6 New Pathways
Poem Pumped For Life by Jeff White My baclofen pump Is an ingenious piece of
Poem
Pumped For Life
by Jeff White
My baclofen pump
Is an ingenious piece of kit
Setting free my body again
Enticing me to get fit
Take your opportunities in life son
My Dad once said to me
I
didn’t know that one day I’d be ill
Or that another I’d be set free
For many years now
I’ve grown so very tired
Losing opportunities of life
But now I really feel wired!
So my tale of woe is not that unusual
1997 is where it began
I
could sit and let MS pull me apart
Or stand up like a man!
For all this there is a downside
That is now I feel the cold
I always felt so bloody hot
Now I’m left just feeling old
Advertisement
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27

Bits & Pieces

Pre- and Probiotics - Trillions Of Friendly Bacteria! Our guts are home to around 100
Pre- and Probiotics -
Trillions Of Friendly Bacteria!
Our guts are home to around 100 trillion bacteria,
amounting to 90-95 per cent of all the cells in
our bodies.
“The average person has around one and a half
kilograms of gut microflora – that’s as big as a
major organ,” says Jeremy Nicholson of London’s
Imperial College,
These microflora affect how well we absorb
nutrients, how much energy we get from food and
how efficiently we break down food and drugs.
Above all, gut microflora are critical to the strength
of the immune system, says Professor Glen Gibson, of
the School of Food Biosciences at Reading University.
“Some 60-70% of our immune system is in our guts.”
Probiotics, usually described as ‘friendly bacteria’,
help restore the balance of gut microflora to keep
us healthy.
Prebiotics provide the food for probiotics to feed on
and help establish the optimum balance of gut
microflora. Prebiotics are non-digestible complex
carbohydrates found in foods such as whole grains,
onions, bananas, garlic, honey, leeks and artichokes.
They include components called
fructooligosaccharides (FOS), inulin and
galactooligosaccharides (GOS). As well as being
present naturally in a wide range of foods they can
also be found in fortified foods and in capsules,
tablets or powders that you sprinkle on food.
Studies have shown that prebiotics
enhance the absorption of
minerals such as calcium
and magnesium. There is
also evidence that they
strengthen immunity and
increase resistance
to infection.
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News & Snippets

Possible Link Between Epstein-Barr Virus And Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency in MS

 
 

An American neurologist, Steven Brenner M.D., has

venous insufficiency with multiple extracranial venous strictures in MS patients. EBV appears to infect endothelial cells and may be important in the pathology of EBV virus. EBV virus has been found to cause deep venous thrombosis in a patient with hereditary thrombophilia. EBV may infect the venous endothelium causing venous thromboses and strictures in the cranial and spinal venous drainage system and perivascular regions of MS lesions in patients with MS. Such venous involvement may be implicated in MS disease involvement. Chronic EBV infection may involve the venous system with secondary effects on the brain and spinal cord in MS.” Reference: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. January 2010, Volume 81, Number 1

come up with a theory that the Epstein-Barr virus may cause MS through involvement of the venous system.

 

In

a letter to the Editor of the Journal of Neurology,

Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, Dr Brenner, from St. Louis VA Medical Centre and Department of Neurology and Psychiatry at St. Louis University, writes:

 

“I

read the article by Zivadinov with reference to the

association of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to gray matter atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Accumulation of EBV infected B cells in meninges and

perivascular regions of MS lesions in 21 or 22 patients with MS was noted as well, indicating direct involvement of the brain and perivascular spaces by EBV in MS patients.

 

A

recent study has indicated chronic cerebrospinal

 

MS In Faroe Islands Still High But Not Of Epidemic Proportions

 

The isolated Faroe Islands experienced an epidemic of MS at the end of the Second World War: In 1945 the rate was 10 per 100,000 population. There was speculation that this was due to the occupation by British troops between 1940 and 1945, who must have brought some toxic substance with them.

that although the incidence of MS in the Faroe Islands was still high at 4.5 per 100,000 annually, this was half what it had been in 1945 and the same as other high-risk areas. Reference: Multiple Sclerosis Incidence In The Faroe Islands 1986-2007

P. Joensen, Acta Neuroiga Scandinavica December 15, 2009, online

 
 

Researchers recently wanted to find out what the rate was between 1986 and 2007. Results showed

More Cases of MS Following Cervical Cancer Jab In Australia The same doctors in Sydney
More Cases of MS Following
Cervical Cancer Jab In Australia
The same doctors in Sydney who first suggested a
possible link between the cervical cancer jab Gardasil
and MS have now reported five new cases of young
Australian women being diagnosed with MS shortly
after having the inoculation.
Dr Ian Sutton, a neurologist at St Vincent’s Hospital
in Sydney, reported five cases last year. Another five –
teenagers and young women in their early 20s- have
since emerged.
These women may have been predisposed to MS or
had a prior history of symptoms. “Gardasil vaccination
is not the cause of MS; whether or not it was a
trigger for episodes of inflammation in the brain in
these rare cases is unclear,” Dr Sutton said.
Symptoms began within three weeks of vaccination
and lasted from weeks to months.
“We have raised the
question: has the vaccine
modified what may have occurred anyway or just
been an additional trigger?” Dr Sutton said.
The cases involving neurological symptoms have
been investigated by an independent panel. The
vaccine has been tested on more than 30,000 women
worldwide, its manufacturer CSL said.
“In spite of reports of some neurological symptoms
occurring after vaccination, when those have been
investigated no causative relationship with the vaccine
has been determined,” company spokeswoman
Rachel David said.
Source: Courier Mail, Queensland, Australia
www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,23739,26476
824-3102,00.html
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MSRC: 01206 505444
www.msrc.co.uk
29

Complementary Therapies

“Eliminating Candida should be the first step in addressing MS”

How MS Symptoms Can Be Lessened By Treating Candida

By Susie Cornell. MBE, DL (Deputy Lieutenant of Essex)

By Susie Cornell. MBE, DL (Deputy Lieutenant of Essex) Susie Cornell C andida is one of

Susie Cornell

Cornell. MBE, DL (Deputy Lieutenant of Essex) Susie Cornell C andida is one of the most

C andida is one of the most common fungi/yeast and produces

78 different toxins inside the body that can poison the nerves and can create a toxic and acidic environment. So eliminating Candida should be the first step in addressing MS because systemic Candidiasis and related fungi or mycotoxins may be an underlying factor in MS. The fungal infection can be yeast, Candida, the fungus Aspergillus or mould. These produce mycotoxins which are poisonous to the body and in MS

may be causing toxicity in the central nervous system.

What Are Mycotoxins?

Mycotoxins are chemicals made by fungi. They are found in grains that have been contaminated with fungi and mould. Alcohol and aflatoxin are both mycotoxins. The most commonly contaminated crops are peanuts, corn and wheat. Some mycotoxins are produced in the body by yeast in the intestines. From the environment,

we can be exposed to mycotoxins through ingestion, inhalation and skin contact.

Systemic Candida

If left unchecked, Candida transforms from a simple, relatively harmless yeast into an aggressive (mycelial) more virulent, fungal form with long roots which penetrate the intestinal lining (leaky gut) so fungi and their poisonous mycotoxins are free to enter the general circulation. This is where Candida becomes systemic, draining you of energy. The immune system does its best to attack this fungus but it is difficult to eliminate because it is being constantly fed on the foods we eat.

because it is being constantly fed on the foods we eat. The E-Lybra Bioresonance machine Diagnosis

The E-Lybra Bioresonance machine

Diagnosis And Treatment

Using the E-Lybra Bioresonance scanning system, I have been able to identify the presence of fungi/mycotoxins in MS. But you can find out for yourself whether you have Candida by doing a simple home test called the Spit Test.

The Spit Test

Immediately after getting up but before you eat or drink anything, fill a clear glass with

water at room temperature. Spit some saliva into the glass of water. Then check from time to time for up to an hour to see what happens to the spit. If Candida is present, you will see one or a combination of these things:

Strings like legs extending into the water from the saliva floating on top.

Cloudy saliva will accumulate at the bottom of the glass

Cloudy bits will remain suspended in the water. The faster and stronger the strings grow and the sooner the saliva sinks, the more Candida is in the sample. If there are no strings and the saliva is still floating after one hour, you probably do not have systemic Candida but may still have a mild problem in the intestines or vagina.

Do You Have Systemic Candida?

The following list will indicate

how severe your Candida is. If you have several, severe symptoms then you are more likely to have systemic Candida.

Spots in front of the eyes or erratic or changeable vision.

Chronic mucus problems, congestion in the throat or sinuses or frequently a runny nose.

Numbness, tingling, burning or stiffness.

Fatigue, lethargy or feeling drained.

General malaise.

Depression, poor memory or feeling spaced-out.

Over-use of antibiotics – the

more frequently you have taken antibiotics the greater the likelihood of Candida.

Digestive problems, constipation, diarrhoea or bloating.

Use of steroids.

Thrush, oral or vaginal, is the most obvious symptom, with vaginal discharge, burning or itching.

Period cramps, irregular periods or premenstrual tension.

Other problems of the reproductive organs such as impotence and loss of sexual desire.

Sensitivity to tobacco smoke, perfumes, insecticides and other chemicals.

Affected on damp or muggy days or in mouldy places.

Chronic fungus infections of the skin or nails such as athlete’s foot, ring worm, jock itch or others.

A furry white coat on the tongue.

Cravings for bread, sugar, sweet foods or alcohol.

Short attention span or irritability.

Muscle aches or weakness.

Pain or swelling in the joints. If you have at least three of the following four symptoms then Candida is almost certainly present. These are:

Craving for sweet foods,

Poor alcohol tolerance

Chemical sensitivity

Bloating

The presence of thrush making Candida a certainty

How To Treat Systemic Candida

• Follow a diet which eliminates food allergies. Candida – as all yeasts – lives mainly on simple carbohydrates, especially sugars from foods, including sugar, sweetened food, fruit and fruit juices, soft drinks, alcohol, flour products, cereal and grain products. Especially

destructive is gluten (from wheat, rye, and barley) as it tends to inflame the intestinal wall, aggravating the leaky gut syndrome caused by Candida. (See Box for all the foods you need to give up.) • Strengthen the immune system. Avoid excessive alcohol, white sugar, white flour products and caffeine. Eat plenty of fruit and vegetables as these contain valuable antioxidants. Have plenty of rest and sleep. During deep sleep, our bodies release potent immune- enhancing substances that strengthen immune function. Drink 6-8 glasses of water per day. Water is necessary for many chemical reactions in the body. Avoid stress. Stress can stimulate immune-suppressing chemicals such as adrenaline. To reduce stress, take up meditation, relaxation or yoga. Take nutritional supplements which help boost the immune system, including Cat’s Claw, vitamins A and C and the mineral zinc. Take magnesium (400 mg/day). Magnesium is involved in transmission of nerve impulses. Food sources include legumes, grains, dark green vegetables and nuts. Also take vitamin D, an anti-mycotoxin. Exercise - A regular exercise programme is recommended to build a strong immune system. Take probiotics. It is important to restore the balance in the intestinal tract. Lactobacillus acidophilus and lactobacillus bifidus are beneficial micro- organisms that help to keep Candida under control. As food supplements they aid digestion, produce certain vitamins and prevent Candida from proliferating.

Alkalize The Gastrointestinal Tract

With Candida and especially

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with leaky gut syndrome the body is generally too acid so it is important to alkalize the system. When the body becomes more acid then it also becomes more sensitive - emotionally as well as physically. The skin and the mucous membranes become very sensitive to irritants and any allergic reactions are greatly intensified. The strongest alkalizing foods are fresh green vegetable juices and vegetable broth. Dissolving dolomite, magnesium oxide or eggshell powder in lemon juice produces an effective alkalizing remedy. • Strengthen the Gut Wall Taking the amino acid L- glutamine before meals helps to protect the cells of the intestinal lining from damage. Glutamine provides energy and is also converted into N-acetyl glucosamine, which is required for regenerating the intestinal wall.

Reinfestation

From time to time a re-infestation can return. Candida and viruses leave spores which may become active again and start to multiply when the conditions are right and our defences are down. This may cause a flare-up of MS symptoms. Emotional stress, too much acidity, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, toxins from drugs, pesticides, chemicals, chronic inflammation, a viral or bacterial infection or a weakened immune system can allow these microbes to re-infest the system.

or a weakened immune system can allow these microbes to re-infest the system. MSRC: 01206 505444

MSRC: 01206 505444

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31

Complementary Therapies

Foods To Avoid On Candida Diet SUGAR – All kinds; maple syrup, corn syrup, date
Foods To Avoid On
Candida Diet
SUGAR – All kinds; maple syrup,
corn syrup, date sugar etc. encourages
the growth of Candida yeast.
FRUIT – Fruit contains natural
sugars that aid the growth of
yeast. Eliminate fresh fruit, frozen,
canned and dried fruit and juice.
YEAST – Avoid Baker’s yeast,
Brewer’s yeast, Marmite and any
other types of nutritional yeast.
BAKED GOODS MADE WITH
YEAST – such as breads, rolls,
crackers, bagels, pastries and
muffins should be excluded.
FOODS CONTAINING GLUTEN –
include wheat, barley, and rye.
This includes products made with
these ingredients such as bread
and pasta.
DAIRY PRODUCTS – Candida
can prevent fats from being
digested so cow’s milk and its
products such as cheese, yogurt
and buttermilk should be avoided.
VINEGAR AND MALT – Avoid all
types of vinegar and any food made
with vinegar, such as mayonnaise,
commercial salad dressing, ketchup,
Worcestershire sauce, steak sauce,
BBQ sauce, soy sauce, mustard,
pickles, pickled vegetables, green
olives, relishes, horseradish,
mincemeat and chilli sauce.
PROCESSED, DRIED, SMOKED
AND PICKLED MEATS – These
foods include smoked salmon,
pickled herring, sausages, bacon,
hot dogs, pastrami, sandwich
meats, salami, corned beef and
pickled meats.
MUSHROOMS – are fungi.
PEANUTS – Peanut butter and
pistachios are thought to have
mould contamination, so avoid
them.
ALCOHOL – All forms of alcohol
should be avoided such as red
wine, white wine, beer, whisky,
brandy, gin, scotch, any fermented
liquor, vodka, rum and all liqueurs.
Cider, root beer, and other
fermented beverages should also
be eliminated.
TEA AND COFFEE – All types of
coffee and tea.
PACKAGED, PROCESSED AND
REFINED FOODS – Canned,
bottled, packaged, boxed and
other processed foods containing
yeast, refined sugar, refined flour,
chemicals, preservatives or food
colouring.

Case: Nicola Smith, 28, diagnosed with MS last year, from Ashtead in Surrey.

“I had reached a dead end with conventional medicine; then I went to see Susie with my fiancé. We both left the session completely bamboozled! It blew our minds; we didn’t understand it and we were honestly very sceptical! However, I started on the programme of detox and support using the various supplements. It was a drastic change for my diet and the supplements were plenty and expensive. It was extremely tough to stick with. I have noticed a gradual, slow, improvement in my various MS symptoms. Most of all, I have never felt so well in myself. Everyone tells me how healthy I look and I feel healthy! When I had a relapse my neurologist was surprised at how quickly I recovered, without the need for any drugs. Susie doesn’t promise to ‘cure’ you, just make

drugs. Susie doesn’t promise to ‘cure’ you, just make Nicola Smith your body strong so that

Nicola Smith

your body strong so that everything is in balance to help you lead a full and healthy life. At first, I really wasn’t convinced, but now, I never look back. I choose to follow this programme, because it makes me feel good and positive about my life. By following it, I feel that I am giving myself the best possible chance to live a full life in the way that I want. I don’t want my old life back, this is me now and I am

learning to love the new me!”

Nicky’s Programme

Nicky’s programme of detox included eliminating the food she was sensitive to. This for Nicky was life changing, as these foods were the ones she liked and craved. A fungus and Candida elimination programme using ECOBALANCE (which is an advanced nutritional supplement programme designed to maintain and restore the ecological balance of the microflora of the intestinal tract) was recommended for at least 3-4 months. Through using E-lybra bioresonance it was possible to identify that Nicky’s body needed endocrine support which included supplements for the adrenal and thyroid glands.

Info Box
Info Box

Susie Cornell MBE.DL, Natural Health Consultant www.susiecornell.com info@susiecornell.com The Cornell Centre, Springhealth Leisure Club Brian Close, Chelmsford, Essex CM2 9DZ Tel: 01245 268098

Advertisement

Assistive Technology

Carry On Working – Thanks to New Technology

By Ian Cook

Carry On Working – Thanks to New Technology By Ian Cook Charles Ellis with his gadgets

Charles Ellis with his gadgets and gizmos

“I couldn’t work with- out all this amazing equipment and I really feel it has given me my life back.”

Not so very long ago, Charles Ellis would have had to give up work completely. Diagnosed with MS 11 years ago, he is in a wheelchair and has very limited movement. But thanks to new technology, specially designed for disabled people, he is able to run his own company. Says Charles, a healthcare management consultant from East Sussex: “Although I am in a wheelchair with very limited movement my working life hasn’t ended. I have just set up my own business called CE Access and my aim is to help companies make their premises and services accessible for disabled people. I have a lot of knowledge in this area and it is a subject I am really passionate about.

I was fully funded through

Access to Work and the assistive technology and equipment they have provided has made it possible for me to continue my working life – for which I am forever grateful! The equipment I now have means I can do almost everything I

could before. As I have very limited dexterity in my hands I have a specially adapted keyboard and a tracker ball mouse.

I also have Dragon Naturally

Speaking ProAccess Platinum, which allows me to talk text into my computer through a wireless

headset, meaning the words appear on the screen in front of me. I can talk away to my PC and create documents even faster than when I used to type! I only touch the keyboard and mouse occasionally.

I couldn’t work without all this amazing equipment and I really

feel it has given me my life back.

I was provided with several

training sessions by Hands-Free

Computing and I would say they

were second to none – completely pitched at the right level for me.”

Cool Technology – A Solution to Every Problem

Is MS causing you problems at work? If so, there’s some good news. There are now some pretty cool, state-of-the-art pieces of technology that can help you and there’s even Government cash to pay for it. In recent years there’s been a huge growth in office equipment for disabled people. Furniture such as specially designed chairs, keyboards and even tracker ball mouses (or mice) are now widely available as are special pen holders and telephones with large buttons. There’s also speech recognition software, which allows you to use your computer by talking at it, and other software packages which help those with eyesight problems.

Get An Access To Work Assessment

With so many products available, where do you begin? The first thing is to arrange for an individual needs assessment through the Government-funded Access to Work scheme. Access to Work also pays for a large proportion of the disability equipment or training which an assessor recommends. At an Access to Work assessment, an assessor will visit you at work and talk through any difficulties with you. They then draft a report outlining what equipment or training they feel you need.

Voice Recognition Software - Dragon NaturallySpeaking ProAccess Platinum

Software - Dragon NaturallySpeaking ProAccess Platinum If using the keyboard is a problem the solution could

If using the keyboard is a problem the solution could be to use voice recognition software. This software package is a bespoke version of Dragon NaturallySpeaking Professional v10 specially designed for people with MS, with the addition of hundreds of invaluable built-in commands, making computer navigation easier and faster. You can create documents, emails and surf the net just by speaking into a hand-held microphone or headset. Speak at your normal speed and your words will appear on your screen at approximately 160 words per minute. The accuracy rate is 99 per cent and this version doesn’t come out with the garble earlier versions used to. Most people will want to use a combination of speech recognition technology alongside a specially designed keyboard and mouse. It is, however, possible to operate your computer totally by using your voice. Dragon NaturallySpeaking ProAccess Platinum is compatible with Dragon v9, 9.5 and v10.

ZoomText Magnifier/ Reader

ZoomText Magnifier/ Reader is a software package that enlarges and enhances everything on your computer screen, making all your applications easy to see and use. The revolutionary new technology displays crystal clear text at all magnifications. The Text Finder makes it easy to locate words and phrases in any programme or document window. Type what you’re looking for and ZoomText finds it in an instant. It also allows you to enhance the size and colour of the mouse pointer and text cursor as well as to change the colour of the screen, helping reduce eye strain.

change the colour of the screen, helping reduce eye strain. Olympus DS2400 Digital Dictation Machine This
change the colour of the screen, helping reduce eye strain. Olympus DS2400 Digital Dictation Machine This

Olympus DS2400 Digital Dictation Machine

This is ideal if you have difficulty taking legible and accurate notes. You can dictate your notes and then turn them into text in Microsoft Word using Dragon NaturallySpeaking (see above). This model is particularly useful for people who have problems using their hands as it has large, easy-to-use controls.

Wanchiks Writer Pen Holder

This is a huge help if you have difficulty holding a pen as it holds it for you. The plastic-covered metal support or “orthosis” hugs the palm for a comfortable

support or “orthosis” hugs the palm for a comfortable Wanchiks Writer Pen Holder fit. No thumb

Wanchiks Writer Pen Holder

fit. No thumb pinch is required. It can be bent to make minor adjustments and can be used with thin ballpoint pens and pencils. It is available for people who are left or right handed and in different sizes.

Microsoft Comfort Curve Keyboard 2000

This keyboard is ideal if you have difficulty pressing the keys of a standard keyboard. Apart from its shape, the keyboard has slim, ‘low-travel’ keys, which require less pressure to operate than many keyboards. Additionally the Comfort Curve keyboard has shortcut keys, which can be set up to perform some operations with a single keystroke.

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MSRC: 01206 505444

www.msrc.co.uk

35

Assistive Technology

Kensington Expert Mouse Trackball With Wrist Rest.

A trackball mouse is a mouse which is big and heavy enough to make computer use easier for those who have problems using their hands, who often struggle with the traditional small and fiddly computer mouse. The Kensington Expert Mouse Trackball is large and heavy enough to reduce the risk of being unintentionally knocked or moved, yet it also responds to the lightest touch. It is suitable for both right and left-handers. The button actions can all be changed to suit the user and are easy to use even with the side of the hand. For example, two of the buttons can be set up as usual for left-click and right-click, and the other two buttons can be set up for double-click and click-drag, thus reducing two of the most common problems of those who have

reducing two of the most common problems of those who have difficulties using their hands. There

difficulties using their hands. There

is also a wrist rest that can be

attached to lift the back of the hand into the correct position. The mouse trackball has software for adapting the control to a user’s preferences.

Jumbo XL keyboard.

This keyboard has chunky one inch square keys that are colour-coded

and easy to find and press, which can also be a great help for those with problems using their hands. The keyboard has separate function keys,

a Windows key and Shift keys on both sides of the keyboard.

a Windows key and Shift keys on both sides of the keyboard. BT Freestyle 610 DECT

BT Freestyle

610 DECT

Digital

Cordless

Phone

This telephone has large buttons, which should help make phone use easier.

has large buttons, which should help make phone use easier. Info Box The information for this
Info Box
Info Box

The information for this article has been provided by the company Hands-Free Computing. Specialists in speech recognition technology, Hands-Free have a team of assessors and trainers based throughout the UK. They have recently developed a unique speech recognition product specifically for those with MS - Dragon NaturallySpeaking ProAccess Platinum. (See above). The company also provides a full support service and will advise you on how to apply to Access to Work for financial help. Hands-Free Computing Ltd Email: enquiries@hands-free.co.uk Website: www.hands-free.co.uk Tel: 0845 899 0880

help. Hands-Free Computing Ltd Email: enquiries@hands-free.co.uk Website: www.hands-free.co.uk Tel: 0845 899 0880

Carers’ Charter To End Poverty

A delegation of Carers UK members went to No 10 Downing Street to hand in the Carers Poverty Charter which calls for urgent action to improve carer finances. The Charter calls on the government to set out a timetable of action to improve carers’ benefits in order to:

• Protect carers from falling into poverty or financial hardship

• Reflect carers’ different circumstances

• Help carers to combine caring with paid work and study

• Be easy to understand and straightforward to claim.

 
New LDN Awareness Website The LDN Aware website http://ldnaware.org has been created as a result
New LDN Awareness Website
The LDN Aware website http://ldnaware.org has
been created as a result of the International LDN
Awareness Week in 2009. The aim is to bring all
advocates of LDN together to give a united global
voice; working together, helping and supporting each
other especially those in
counties where it is very hard
to obtain LDN

Suspect Foods

I’m Not Giving Up Chocolate!

Says Janet Orchard - who also drew the illustrations

Says Janet Orchard - who also drew the illustrations Janet Orchard with her beloved dairy-free chocolate

Janet Orchard with her beloved dairy-free chocolate bars

H ow can one live without chocolate? Not me. After reading the Dr

can one live without chocolate? Not me. After reading the Dr Anna Maas article about how

Anna Maas article about how bad chocolate is for you in the last New Pathways, I stuffed myself full of all the chocolates I could lay my hands on (diligently making sure none of it contained dairy). OK, if it came to a choice between walking again and eating chocolate, I would rather walk but I don’t believe I have a problem with chocolate so I’m not going to give it up. When I had the ELISA food test, which covers 113 foods, it did not show me to be intolerant of chocolate (or, as Dr. Maas suggests, coffee, cinnamon, coriander, cola, nuts, oranges or nutmeg). I take care to lead a healthy life and feel I am not at risk from Dr. Maas’ other pet hates: I do not smoke, do not eat fast food, prepared meats or frozen products, do not use artificial flavours, colours and preservatives or monosodium glutamate (MSG). I make my own herbal teas and only use, on occasion, organic margarine of the best quality and if I gave up wine I think I’d be

of the best quality and if I gave up wine I think I’d be Beans on

Beans on a plate

deported from Spain. I stick religiously to the Best Bet Diet (BBD), which prevents me from eating other things that Dr. Maas decrees off-limits, like liquorice, tomato ketchup, cheese, fruit drops, wine gums, marzipan, gin, beer and whisky.

When Is A Bean Not A Bean?

Because I stick to the BBD I do not eat legumes. Legumes – which include beans - are not allowed by the BBD as they contain lectins, which are proteins implicated as catalysts in some models of the progression of MS. Aha! You might be thinking – cocoa is a bean so it must be a legume! Wrong! Luckily for those of us who cannot live without chocolate or coffee, the cocoa bean (theobroma cacao) and the coffee bean (from the species coffea) have nothing

and the coffee bean (from the species coffea) have nothing Cocoa beans – NOT a legume

Cocoa beans – NOT a legume

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remotely leguminous about them and are safe to eat on the BBD so you don’t have to chuck chocolate or coffee beans in the bin! However, most beans are legumes and should not be eaten on the BBD; e.g. peanut, chickpea, lentil, kidney bean, soy bean, alfalfa, jicama, liquorice, clover and tamarind all belong to the true bean (fabaceae or leguminosae) family. The best way to see whether a bean is a legume or not is to check in the MealSafe spreadsheet (see below).

or not is to check in the MealSafe spreadsheet (see below). Coffee beans – not legumes

Coffee beans – not legumes either

Info Box
Info Box

For more information on lectins http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm?fuseacti

on=show&pageid=2344&CFID=214918&

CFTOKEN=96848046

For MealSafe, an enormous spreadsheet of foods allowed or otherwise on the BBD, (see NP Issue 53) contact Janet Orchard at janetorchard@hotmail.com and in return for a small donation to MSRC, she will forward you an electronic copy. Janet will automatically send a new version of MealSafe to all those who have donated in the past. And if you haven’t got around to it yet, visit https://secure.justgiving.com/process/whi

telabel/default.asp?_whitelabelid=76

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www.msrc.co.uk

37

Toxins

I Have Poisons In My Body – Despite Being on Detox Diet!

By Terry Wahls MD

After a thorough lab test, Dr Terry Wahls found to her surprise that her body had abnormal levels of toxins.

After a thorough lab test, Dr Terry Wahls found to her surprise that her body had
After a thorough lab test, Dr Terry Wahls found to her surprise that her body had
After a thorough lab test, Dr Terry Wahls found to her surprise that her body had
After a thorough lab test, Dr Terry Wahls found to her surprise that her body had
After a thorough lab test, Dr Terry Wahls found to her surprise that her body had
After a thorough lab test, Dr Terry Wahls found to her surprise that her body had
After a thorough lab test, Dr Terry Wahls found to her surprise that her body had
to her surprise that her body had abnormal levels of toxins. I recently completed a toxicology

I recently completed a toxicology profile on myself. Keep in mind that I have been eating 6 plus cups of kale/collards/onion family vegetables every day for nearly two years. Along with that I have been eating foods with bright colours to maximise my antioxidant intake too. In short I have been following a reasonable detoxification diet. However, I did expect that I’d have some evidence of heavy metals because I have come to recognise that heavy metals in the body are often drivers of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. I’ve been taking additional iodine for three months, again to help support my iodine intake. I took the test through a laboratory because I wanted to get a status on my iodine and heavy metals. I was surprised when I got my results:

Fluoride - normal range Iodine - 78% when the goal is 90% so iodine stores are low. I

- 78% when the goal is 90% so iodine stores are low. I Dr Terry Wahls

Dr Terry Wahls

probably need another 3 to 6 months of replacement iodine to get my iodine levels in the fully replaced range. Bromide - three times normal, which means I have bromide in my body. Bromide competes with iodine, driving up the amount of iodine I need. Bromine will be excreted via urine but I need a lot of iodine to do so. Other heavy metals that were toxic:

Aluminium - twice normal. Barium - 20 x normal. Cadmium - slight elevation. Cesium - twice normal. Gadolinium - 100 x normal. Rubidium - slight elevation. Thalium - 10 x normal. Tungsten - slight elevation. Uraniaum - twice normal. Mercury - slight elevation.

How Did These Toxins Get There?

The big questions are: Where did I get these compounds? Am I still taking more into my body? How do I increase my ability to get rid of them? Sources for my heavy metals were probably related to growing up on an Iowa farm, living in communities that used treated river water and living in a home with a shallow well. Notably, I probably had much higher levels two years ago. Since cruciferous, onions and sulphur amino acids induce more enzymes that are used in detoxification, I have been following a good detox

protocol but now I want to do even more. For those of you with an autoimmune disease like MS, consider the possibility that heavy metals in your fat and brain are adding to your disease.

Sources Of Helpful Information

I went out looking for more information on detoxification and came across these sites:

www.radiationdetox.com/ This has Naturopathic, Homeopathic, Nutritional and Medical Ways to detoxify your body of radiation exposure or poisoning. Other sources of information include Mark Hyman MD who has several books. (The Detox Box: A Program for Greater Health and Vitality, 5 Forces of Wellness, Ultra- Metabolism, The UltraMetabolism Cookbook, NutriGenomics, The UltraSimple Diet). Going to his website would provide some information as well. www.drmarkhyman.com Another website I have found helpful is: www.iodine4health.com/ Now I have a reverse osmosis water filter. I take a sauna most days and a clay foot soak. I also take chlorella, spirulina and green tea each day in my morning smoothie. Anyone following Dr Terry Wahls’ diet and neurostim is requested to fill in the surveys about this she has on her website as she needs the data to show whether these help in MS or not. www.terrywahls.com

Giving Up Alcohol

No New Year Cheers – But My MS Is Better For It

Says Susan Lambert, who has given up alcohol for fruit smoothies.

Susan, 38, lives in Guildford with her husband Alan. She was diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS in 1998. Having come from a publishing background, Susan now devotes her time to writing and editing her local MS newsletter.

1998. Having come from a publishing background, Susan now devotes her time to writing and editing
1998. Having come from a publishing background, Susan now devotes her time to writing and editing
1998. Having come from a publishing background, Susan now devotes her time to writing and editing
1998. Having come from a publishing background, Susan now devotes her time to writing and editing
1998. Having come from a publishing background, Susan now devotes her time to writing and editing
her time to writing and editing her local MS newsletter. Hello fruit smoothie, goodbye Pinot Grigio!

Hello fruit smoothie, goodbye Pinot Grigio!

I
I

come from a family of drinkers and was brought up to

appreciate alcohol. A nice glass of wine accompanying a meal with friends and family was convivial; a civilised thing, warm, friendly and sociable. However, the sobering truth is that alcohol and I do not mix. When I recently spent six weeks in a neurological hospital ward with not one alcoholic drink passing my lips I saw dramatic improvements to my MS and a welcome loss of weight. But when I came back home I

embraced the freedom with wild abandon: chocolate, biscuits and my favourite tipple, Pinot Grigio. I was celebrating the fact that I’d made it through what had been a nightmare. Needless to say, the weight piled back on and my MS got worse again. This Christmas, I decided to experiment to see what would happen if I cut down dramatically on my alcohol intake, even though the thought of no wine with an evening meal struck me as bordering on the vulgar! I longed for my little experiment to fail. Alas, failure was not to be. The

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improvements in my MS from cutting back on the alcohol were rapid and dramatic. Within a week,

I felt so much better and stronger. Even so, one night after a particularly trying day my husband and I indulged in a relaxing, well- deserved drinkie. Just a glass and a half, and jolly nice it was too - until some horrible MS symptoms kicked in. That night, I couldn’t sleep. My legs were all a-twitch and restless. The next day I was very wobbly and my horrible, horrible tremors were well and truly back. Drat, drat and double drat. So, how does this little tale end?

I saw in the New Year saying “Cheers!” with a fruit smoothie but giving up alcohol has its advantages. The subsidence of certain symptoms makes it all worthwhile and the discovery of a new-found determination to manage my MS more effectively reveals a side of myself I never knew I had. So no more alcohol! I’ll raise a glass to that!

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39

Life Stories

A Shopping We Will Go!

By Charlie Gee

Thanks to a revamp at his local Tesco and a brand new power wheelchair Charlie Gee has re-discovered the joys of shopping.

Thanks to a revamp at his local Tesco and a brand new power wheelchair Charlie Gee
Thanks to a revamp at his local Tesco and a brand new power wheelchair Charlie Gee
Thanks to a revamp at his local Tesco and a brand new power wheelchair Charlie Gee
Thanks to a revamp at his local Tesco and a brand new power wheelchair Charlie Gee
Thanks to a revamp at his local Tesco and a brand new power wheelchair Charlie Gee
Thanks to a revamp at his local Tesco and a brand new power wheelchair Charlie Gee
Thanks to a revamp at his local Tesco and a brand new power wheelchair Charlie Gee
Charlie Gee has re-discovered the joys of shopping. I n the past few years I’ve found

I n the past few years I’ve found it increasingly difficult to get into the passenger seat of my car. I would grab hold of the handrail above the door and swing myself into the seat but I had to admit eventually it was unsafe and there would have to be a change. About a year ago I got myself a new vehicle, a Renault Autograph. I don’t drive but my special friend, Renée, says I’m the best passenger she’s ever had because I don’t tell her how to drive. The new car is one that I can go straight into the back of in the wheelchair so I don’t have to risk life and limb swinging into the passenger seat. One thing that I don’t like about the new car is that it should have a panoramic window at the front because all I can see is the road in front of me. It is a little frustrating knowing that the countryside around is very beautiful but I can’t see it! Obviously the people who make the cars haven’t sat in the back or they would have put a panoramic window in.

The Best Powered Wheelchair I Have Ever Had

I also have a new powered wheelchair; a Spectra (made by Invacare), which is the best powered wheelchair I have ever had. These two facts have made travelling a lot easier for me. The nearest big town to me is Skipton. I heard that Tesco had just modernised their store which in theory should make it extremely wheelchair-friendly. This conjunction of things happening -

Charlie Gee, lord of the aisles the flashy new wheelchair, the new vehicle and the
Charlie Gee, lord of the aisles
the flashy new wheelchair, the
new vehicle and the store
modernisation - made me want to
do something I hadn’t done in a
long time: go shopping!
Most men would think I must be
wrong in the head to want to go
shopping but until now, my idea of
going out has been a trip to the
doctor or dentist. I go to the
dentist every six months and have
a decent set of gnashers for my
age. I have to look after the bits of
me that work because there isn’t
that much that does.
I read New Pathways each issue
and see that people do the most
amazing things like skydiving and
going to Kenya. Paraplegics have
sailed around the world for God’s
sake. Surely going to the supermarket
should hold no fears for me?
The reason why going to the
supermarket filled me with such
foreboding is because I am not a
filled me with such foreboding is because I am not a competent driver. I have never

competent driver. I have never driven a car because I am so absent-minded. If I had driven a car I’m sure I would have killed somebody by now - probably me! Besides, it’s bad form for a vegetarian of 40 years standing to go around knocking people down like it was some sort of video game! You only need to take a look

at the skirting boards in my house to see what sort of driver I am.

I had visions of me driving into

a display with cans of beans, Laurel

and Hardy style, scattering them in all directions. Now with the modernisation of Tesco, maybe it would be less daunting!

I would use my new motorised

wheelchair for the journey. (I keep wanting to call it my electric chair but that probably isn’t the right terminology!) On entering the store I was pleasantly surprised at how much

room I had to manoeuvre. Even I could steer down the aisles without feeling nervous about hitting anything.

Temptation At Every Corner

I haven’t been shopping in a while and one thing that struck me was how temptation lurks at every corner. I am a careful eater and have two Belgian chocolates every day. I am for quality not quantity; you won’t find me scoffing a Mars bar. My carers are amazed at my self-discipline because when they open a box of chocolates they have to finish them. I did have just one Belgian chocolate a day up until last Christmas when I upped it to two over the Christmas period. However, when the Christmas period finished I never went back to one. Even with my will of iron I was sorely tempted at times by all the

goodies on display. There was one aisle in particular that had cream cakes all down one side. The aroma was wafting in front of my nose and it was all I could do to go by. I just looked straight ahead and increased my speed. Thankfully there weren’t any cans of beans on display at the end of the aisle because I was so distracted there could have been a calamity! I can understand how people without my iron will can slip down the slippery slope! I am sure the cheese counter was now on a lower level than it used to be. When I am sitting in my power chair I am only about 4’6” tall and yet I still looked down on the cheese display. Studying the display I noticed a cheese I haven’t seen for many years, Jarlsburg. I went through a spate of having it but then for some reason it drifted out of my consciousness. Now there it was, next to the Gorgonzola. Jarlsburg is very smooth and has

holes in just like the cheese you will find in a Pixie and Dixie cartoon! It isn’t at all crumbly; perfect for me who has trouble eating a sandwich with hands that feel as though I am wearing boxing gloves. I wasn’t completely good and did buy some ‘bad for me stuff’; I bought some Ben & Jerry’s Chunky Monkey ice cream. When it came to leaving there wasn’t even a queue; it was straight through the checkout. All in all I had an enjoyable shopping experience and think I will go more often in future. It has also made me think more adventurously again; not around the world in a yacht, skydiving or anything like that. I think my skydiving days are over; after all I have now just turned 60. I shocked myself just now because I used to be young once! As John Lennon said, ‘Life is something that happens while you’re busy making other plans’.

that happens while you’re busy making other plans’. So much choice! So much temptation! FREEPHONE: 0800

So much choice! So much temptation!

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MSRC: 01206 505444

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41

TopBits Heading& Pieces

Inventor Wins Award

Ablequip, a company set up by Mike Spencer, who has MS, has won a place in the Top 100 Businesses, an award made by Barclays Trading Places. Mike invented the Wheel-Link, which allows you to carry a wheelchair on the back of a mobility scooter so you can use a wheelchair in places like small shops, where a large scooter is too big. This is how Mike came up with the idea: “One day I had to go to my village shop so I took myself off on my scooter. Somehow I managed to nudge the fruit and vegetable display and sent oranges and aubergines everywhere - much to the amusement of the other shoppers who had already scattered out of the way. Although everyone was really good about it, and I smiled and thanked them for their help in sorting out the mess, inside I was bursting with frustration. When I got home I thought, I can’t carry on like this; I have to find a way of getting into the shops and manoeuvring without worrying about crashing into things.” Mike realised what he needed was a rack he could attach to the back of his scooter that would carry his wheelchair. He searched but there was nothing available in the entire world, so Mike invented his own! Apart from providing a useful new mobility product, the invention and setting up a business have given a big boost to Mike. He says: “I have relapsing and remitting MS and although I do have difficulty in getting myself up in the morning and getting around during the day, some days can be more difficult than others. However (and I find this difficult to describe accurately) I cannot tell you enough about how wonderful the wonderful moments can be even though my health is at a low ebb. Due to MS, I had to retire from a major job quite a few years ago and during those first few years I was regretful of the change in my life. I had in some way

felt that I had lost my way. I felt redundant and useless as a husband, as a father and as a worker. But then came my idea that within the disabled environment and marketplace there is an enormous amount of untapped resources, which could be utilised in the right circumstances. My experiences since that difficult day of crashing into the vegetables helped me realise that even during the ups and downs, it is possible to see life in a different way. Seeing life in that different way has had an undoubtedly amazing effect on me and my health. I have found that self esteem can make such a marvellous difference to one’s life. I also now feel I have something to live for. Sometimes out of the most difficult circumstances the greatest things can be achieved. I would never have had the time to meet so many people, talk to them, and find something much more important to do if I had been fully able-bodied. www.ablequip.com

to do if I had been fully able-bodied. www.ablequip.com Mike Spencer and his Wheel-Link invention Get

Mike Spencer and his Wheel-Link invention

Get Ideas For Equipment From The Disabled Living Foundation The Disabled Living Foundation (DLF) is
Get Ideas For Equipment From
The Disabled Living Foundation
The Disabled Living Foundation (DLF) is the UK’s leading source of
free impartial, expert information and advice on equipment and
gadgets to help make daily life easier for disabled people.
Further information and advice: www.livingmadeeasy.org.uk
or Tel 0845 130 9177. The helpline is open from 10am-4pm
Monday to Friday and calls are charged at the local rate.

Advertisement

Life Is For Living

Our Incredible Mexican Honeymoon – Beautiful Beaches, Aztec Pyramids, Fried Cactus And A Hot Time In Acapulco!

By Sylvia Wright

Fried Cactus And A Hot Time In Acapulco! By Sylvia Wright O ur honeymoon to Mexico

O ur honeymoon to Mexico turned out to be

one of the best trips yet, because unlike our other trips, there was no mad schedule or long flights so this time we could just enjoy the luxurious hotels and resorts we visited.

We took a two-hour flight from Miami to Cancun in Mexico and

settled into a beautiful hotel right on the beach. Steve went straight out to see the beach on our doorstep and the amazing breakers.

I had a rest and struggled with

the bed because it was too high

and I wasn’t relaxed because wheelchair access into the

bathroom was difficult (and I never know when I’m going to need the loo urgently!).

I awoke from a short nap feeling

hot as it was quite humid and I felt terrible to be in such a perfect place and yet feel miserable. I felt as though the only imperfect thing about the place was me and that was an awful way to feel - believe me. Steve returned on a high from the beautiful beach and I didn’t want to spoil things for him! It was decided, however, that we should move to a less ‘perfect’ room,

which had better disabled access. The legs were also removed from the bed to lower it and this really helped me. We appreciated this being done as it wasn’t officially allowed but it did the trick.

Unbelievably Beautiful Beach

After some marital hanky panky I went out with Steve to the beach and pool and could not believe the beauty of the resort we were in. I enjoyed the cold waves as they washed over me. The next day we relaxed on the beach and swam in the pool. It was wonderful to have a peaceful and relaxing time together. The following day we travelled in style in a mini bus, booked just for the two of us (Steve spared no expense!) out to Chichen Itza (also known as cheesy pizza!). This was a three hour drive and the mini-bus was a big bonus for me I was able to discreetly wee into my commode pot when I needed to go so we didn’t have to stop. I could also lie-down and have a snooze so all in all I felt like a real princess! At Chichen Itza we booked into the Hacienda Hotel. Our room was

like a cabin out in the woods amid the hugest palm-trees; access was good and we were very comfortable. That night we enjoyed a delicious Mexican meal, which was very Best Bet Diet friendly. I discovered on this trip that Mexican food is wonderful and far, far better than any Mexican food I have ever eaten outside of Mexico!

Wonder And Horror At The Pyramids

The next day after breakfast we took the short walk through the wood to the Mayan City of Chichen Itza with its wonderful pyramids. The place had an eerie feel to it. Not surprising when you consider what went on there. We overheard a guide say that the people who were sacrificed had their backs broken on the altar; that way they were still conscious and the arch of the back made the heart pop out when the cut was made but unlike in the Mel Gibson film, the bodies weren’t thrown down the steps. How nice of them we thought. We were left with a feeling of wonder as well as horror. The following day we travelled by minibus once again to the

Cancun beach

Teotihuacan airport and then flew to Mexico City. In Mexico City we stayed in another

Teotihuacan

airport and then flew to Mexico City. In Mexico City we stayed in another beautiful hotel. Again the bed was too high for me but I managed with a stool. After a fantastic breakfast buffet we took a tour with our guide, Daniel, around Mexico City in a car. Mexico City was surprisingly clean and unpolluted. In the afternoon we had a lovely time in the city’s zoo, which was huge and free to visit! After another night in our luxurious hotel, Daniel drove us out to Teotihuacan (which I still cannot pronounce but Steve can correctly and at a record speed!), the Aztec pyramids.

Chichen Itza

Built thousands of years ago, the Aztecs discovered these pyramids and no one knows who built them. It’s an absolutely stunningly beautiful area. As a disabled person I felt very lucky to visit such an amazing site.

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lucky to visit such an amazing site. FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518 Mexican meal after visiting Teotihuacan It

Mexican meal after visiting Teotihuacan

It was quiet and magnificent. I was carried down some steps and then drove around the site on my mobility scooter (I’m not married to the “scooter-man” for nothing!). Steve climbed the steep steps on the magnificent pyramids, all the way to the very top! After visiting Teotihuacan, we enjoyed a delicious Mexican meal. Steve even ate fried cactus, which tasted rather nice, and we were given Mexican hats to wear and were serenaded by three men playing guitars. It was all so insanely Mexican I could not help but laugh. After the meal we were given a cactus demonstration by a larger than life Mexican and made to drink (non-alcoholic) tequila slammers

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45

Life Is For Living

with salt and lemon juice as well as a cactus juice full of vitamins and minerals, which had aphrodisiac properties. After all this I wasn’t just tired, I was cream-crackered and was happy to collapse into the car and

rest on the journey home and then recover back at the hotel!

A Hot Time In Acapulco

The next day we flew to Acapulco, where we once again checked into a fabulous hotel close

where we once again checked into a fabulous hotel close Diving off the cliffs at Acapulco

Diving off the cliffs at Acapulco

to the beach. A singer was singing in the bar and we enjoyed a loud rendition of YMCA with a Mexican accent to which Steve danced on our balcony in a hilarious manner. You just had to be there! I nearly died laughing! We were happy to find a huge Walmart across the road, where we could buy fresh, cheap food and where we met a Mexican Santa! The day after we went on a tour of Acapulco and saw the famous cliff-divers diving off the cliff into the sea (and I thought I was mad!). They jumped as the tide came in and plunged into the sea from a great height. It was phenomenal. I couldn’t stay too long though as it was a boiling hot, sunny day so I was happy to retreat to the air- conditioning in the car and drive back home. Later that day I got really pampered with a massage from two Mexican ladies on the beach for an hour and after this I had my hair-braided by them, which made me feel like a new woman! It was an amazing end to an incredible holiday! The following day we flew back to the Florida Keys and were reunited with our little boy Marcus, who had had such a good time with Tigga and Ben, he’d hardly noticed we’d been away!

with Tigga and Ben, he’d hardly noticed we’d been away! Sylvie with her hair-braided! 46 New

Sylvie with her hair-braided!

News & Snippets

Hormone Replacement Therapy With Estriol Could Help MS Women

An American study on the hormone replacement therapy drug Trimesta has received a large cash injection to greatly increase the number of women taking part. This means that 16 US clinics can be involved in the trial, rather than the original 9. Trimesta, which is taken by mouth once a day, has molecules which modulate the immune system and are anti-inflammatory. It has been approved and marketed throughout Europe and Asia for approximately 40 years for the treatment of post- menopausal hot flushes but has never been introduced in North America or used as a treatment for MS. Estriol, the active ingredient in Trimesta, is a weak estrogenic-based molecule that is produced in the placenta by women during pregnancy. It plays an important role in protecting the foetus during pregnancy. Estriol is also thought to be responsible for the spontaneous remission of Multiple Sclerosis during pregnancy, especially during the third trimester. Adeona Pharmaceuticals, Inc., the makers of Trimesta, has announced that the ongoing clinical trial on Trimesta for MS being conducted by Dr. Rhonda Voskuhl, Director, University of California Los Angeles Multiple Sclerosis Program, has received an additional $860,440 in grant funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Dr Voskuhl is the world-leading researcher on hormones and MS. The current phase II/III clinical study is a double- blind, placebo-controlled trial taking place at sixteen sites in the US and will enrol up to 150 female Multiple Sclerosis patients. The researchers will administer Trimesta along with Copaxone to women between the ages of 18-50 who have been recently diagnosed with relapsing- remitting MS. This ongoing clinical trial previously received a $5 million grant from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS) in partnership with the National MS Society’s Southern California chapter, with support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). According to Dr. Voskuhl,

Institutes of Health (NIH). According to Dr. Voskuhl, “This additional funding has already had a very

“This additional funding has already had a very positive impact on our trial. It has greatly increased the rate of enrolment by supporting the addition of 9 more clinical sites, bringing the total up to 16 sites across the US. We were extremely pleased that our trial was deemed important enough to be supplemented with these additional funds.” Trimesta (oral estriol) has previously completed an initial 22-month, crossover Phase I/II clinical trial in the US for the treatment of MS in relapsing remitting patients, with highly encouraging results. In this phase it was used on its own and not in combination with Copaxone. The results showed that MS disease activity decreased during the treatment period as compared to a six-month pre-treatment baseline period. The number and volume of lesions significantly decreased. Following a six-month drug holiday during which the patients weren’t on any drug therapies, Trimesta therapy was started up again for four months. The relapsing-remitting MS patients again demonstrated a decrease in the number and volume of lesions compared with original baseline scores. Cognition also improved by 14% after taking Trimesta. In the current phase II/III study, Trimesta is being given orally once-a-day versus placebo to 150 female relapsing- remitting MS patients in combination with Copaxone. The main aim of the study is to find out the effects of the combined treatment combination on relapse rates at two years, with an analysis after one year. The study will use standard clinical measures of MS disability as well as MRI and cognition tests. As of January 2010, the study was approaching 50% enrolment with the rate of enrolment benefiting significantly from the expansion of clinical sites. www.adeonapharma.com

from the expansion of clinical sites. www.adeonapharma.com FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518 MSRC: 01206 505444 www.msrc.co.uk 4
from the expansion of clinical sites. www.adeonapharma.com FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518 MSRC: 01206 505444 www.msrc.co.uk 4

FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518

MSRC: 01206 505444

www.msrc.co.uk

47

Bits & Pieces

Having A Child Has Protective Effect On MS Say Researchers Women with MS who have
Having A Child Has Protective Effect On MS Say Researchers
Women with MS who have given birth have a
reduced risk of being severely disabled, according to
research in Belgium.
Three hundred and thirty female patients were
followed to see what the long-term effects of
childbirth were on disease progression.
They found that women with MS who had given birth
to children after disease onset took longer to reach a
score of 6 on the disability scale compared to
those who had not had children. The
researchers say that these results seem to
support a possible favourable long-term effect
of childbirth on the course of MS.
Reference: Long-Term Effects of Childbirth
in MS. D’hooghe MB, J Neurol Neurosurg
Psychiatry. 2009 Nov 25, 2009.

Fish Oils Slow Ageing

 

Fish oil may really be an ‘elixir of youth’ because of its effects on biological ageing, according to a new American study. Now scientists believe they have found out exactly why fish oil is so beneficial to health. Although the discovery was made in a group of heart patients, the claims about the benefits of fish oils also apply to other conditions such as MS. Omega 3 fatty acids found in oily fish like salmon, mackerel and sardines help guard a protective cap within cells which shields DNA and helps to determine how long the cells will live.

The latest study of 608 patients, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, showed that omega 3 fatty acids slowed by almost a third the rate at which cell caps, called telomeres, shorten. Telomeres that are too short can eventually cause the cell to die. Patients with high levels of omega 3 in their diets over five years had longer telomeres than those with low levels of omega 3. Association of Marine Omega-3 Fatty Acid Levels With Telomeric Aging in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease Ramin Farzaneh-Far, MD Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)

Tests on rats showed that the animals lived around a third longer when fed a diet high in omega 3.

2010;303(3):250-257.

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Advertisement

Recipe

Broccoli Lemon Chicken With Cashews

Simple, Quick & Very Tasty! Takes 10 minutes to make.

(Taken from BBC Good Food)

Ingredients

10 minutes to make. (Taken from BBC Good Food) Ingredients • 1 tbsp sunflower oil •

1

tbsp sunflower oil

340g pack of mini chicken breast fillets

2

garlic cloves, sliced

200g pack tenderstem broccoli; stems halved if very long

200ml chicken stock

1 heaped tsp cornflour

1 tbsp clear honey

The zest of half a lemon and the juice of a whole one

A large handful of roasted cashews

Salt and pepper

Method

Heat the oil in a large frying pan or wok. Add the chicken and fry for 3-4 minutes until golden.

Remove chicken from the pan. Add the garlic and broccoli. Stir fry for a minute or so then cover and cook for

2 minutes more, until almost tender.

Mix the stock, cornflour and honey well, then pour into the pan and stir until thickened.

Tip the chicken back into the pan and let it heat through, then add the lemon zest and juice and cashew nuts. Season to taste. Stir and then serve straight away with basmati rice.

My Feet In The Snow By Katy Pitsi, January 2010 I sat by my door
My Feet In The Snow
By Katy Pitsi, January 2010
I sat by my door looking out at the cold and the snow,
which had frozen over night. I wondered if I could
make it the few metres to my car
would
my walking
frame slip
?
Would my feet pick up enough to get
through my padded pathway
?
I just had to try. Taking
a deep breath I followed my frame down onto the
white path. Should I just turn back
now
?
Lifting my frame through the
snow, my feet somehow followed; I
was walking in the snow
what
a
feeling! As I got to the gate, my car
almost in reach but looking so far
away
I
turned back slowly, heading
back into the warm. I’d done what
I’d wanted to; I had put my feet in
the snow !
What a feeling! Katy Pitsi with her
feet in the snow

FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518

MSRC: 01206 505444

www.msrc.co.uk

49

Short Story

Matching Souls What Jess Desired Most Was A Soul Mate

By Graham Millitt

Graham Millitt, 44, is the carer of his partner Edana who was diagnosed with MS
Graham Millitt, 44, is the carer of his partner Edana who was
diagnosed with MS in 1999, two weeks after they met on the
internet. He works nights at an Asda distribution centre in
Grangemouth, Central Scotland and cares for Edana during
the day. They live in Stenhousemuir near Falkirk. His hobby is
to climb Scottish mountains.
This story is semi autobiographical. Graham says: “I was
living in Skegness on my own when I met a lovely Scottish
Graham Millitt
woman called Edana on a chat room and over a period of a few weeks we became
very close. I decided to jump on a train and meet her. The weekend went that well
that I never returned home. Two weeks later Edana had an appointment with a
neurologist and was told she had MS. She explained what it all meant and the
problems she would face. I think she expected me to run out of the room but it made
no difference to me!
That was ten years ago and we still feel the same, we fight it head on. We also had a
daughter together with Cerebral Palsy - but to look at her you wouldn’t know. She
was our ninth child. We have both had a child that has died so now there are seven
children but only three live with us. Busy life!”
F
F

or three years, Jess had been in a wheelchair due to her MS. She lived

alone but managed. The one thing she desired most in life was a soul mate, someone to share her woes and smiles and most of all someone to share her life with. Jess had been married before but he was an uncaring and violent sort and when she was diagnosed with MS five years ago he blamed her for ruining his life and left. So there she sat, aged 32, lonely and single, with an unknown future. One day she was out shopping. She sat staring at the road and thought all she had to do was to wait for a bus, roll her wheels onto the road and it would all be over. No more pain and misery, no more lonely nights. She rolled forward

ever so slowly, her inner voice pushing her on. She moved between two park cars, the sound of a lorry approaching. Alex was watching Jess from a little way off. He had noticed her earlier in the shops and was drawn to her striking looks. It was a few minutes before he noticed the wheelchair but he did see the sadness in her eyes. He moved closer, not knowing what her intentions were as she edged between the parked cars. He watched as she closed her eyes with a tear escaping from them. He rushed forward to block Jess’s route to meet her maker.

A Halo of Sunlight

Jess opened her tear-filled eyes and saw a man with a halo of

sunlight behind him. “Now, now, we won’t have a pretty lady like you making a mistake now, shall we?” Jess just stared in awe; speechless. It was a few minutes before her brain re-engaged. Jess then lifted her arms for comfort and Alex accepted her. She sobbed uncontrollably for what seemed to Alex an age. Alex’s soothing words broke through her barrier of sadness and slowly Jess came out of her fear and quietly said to Alex, “Thank you”. Alex pushed Jess back onto the pavement and carried on down the street; Jess didn’t object. Then they turned into the churchyard where Alex found a bench where they could sit and talk. Alex was a stranger to women. He had never really had a steady

girlfriend and at 42 he still lived alone. He liked his own company and was set in his ways. He had a routine that never changed; up in the morning, breakfast; then off to work and home for tea and crashed out in front of the TV. Today had been different though. He had woken up at the usual six o’clock but five minutes later someone from his workplace rang to say there had been a burst pipe and the office was closed for the day. Now, here he was, sitting on a bench in the churchyard with a woman whose life he had just saved. Jess slowly opened her mouth and said, “What’s your name? I’m Jess”. “Alex” he said in a quiet voice. Jess soon opened up and began to tell Alex all about her MS; her nights of pain and how she couldn’t go too far in case she had an accident due to her bladder problems. Alex sat there listening to her intently and when she had finished talking he said: “You still look normal to me!” Alex continued: “Everybody in this world has problems, some more serious than others. If you were taken short and wet yourself, it’s just the same as a man in a car running out of petrol”. Jess started to understand his way of thinking and began to laugh and cry at the same time. They sat there talking for hours, both warming to each other. They agreed to meet each other again the next day at the bench as they said their goodbyes. They met the following day. In fact they were so eager to meet again that they were both early. Day after day they met at the bench, sometimes spending all afternoon talking and laughing together. It was Jess who took their relationship a step further by inviting Alex over for dinner on a Saturday evening, which he promptly accepted. Alex turned up at Jess’s house with a big bunch of flowers and a

bottle of wine. Jess was falling for Alex. As for Alex, he saw Jess as a beautiful woman, not a disabled woman in a wheelchair.

Love Blossomed

The evening went with much laughter, the food and the wine went down a treat. It was like watching love blossoming on a tree. Hands were held and compliments flowed; it was like a love story. Alex stood up and moved around the table where he bent down to kiss Jess. Their lips met but this time Jess was ready for him and responded eagerly. He then lifted her into his arms. Jess went willingly into the night with Alex. Their union was magical. Their friendship and love grew as they planned their future together. Jess was still worried that Alex didn’t know what he was letting himself in for but Alex knew and on one of their bench days, as they called them, Alex explained that he knew he would be Jess’s carer. He had read up on MS on the internet and knew what was involved - so much so that Alex had said he was looking forward to washing Jess’s back, which sent her into fits of laughter. She stared into his eyes and all she saw was love shining back at her. She was so happy and she knew she had found her soul mate.

A Real Gem

Alex turned out to be a real gem. He cared for her with a passion that Jess could never have known before. It wasn’t long before Alex moved in with Jess and they both started to talk about marriage. On one summer’s day when Alex returned home from work Jess was in the kitchen with a very worried look on her face. “What’s wrong” he asked? Jess had in her hands a pregnancy testing kit, which showed a positive result. Alex

FREEPHONE: 0800 7830518

clicked – she was pregnant! Alex was in a state of sheer joy and with tears rolling down his cheeks he fell to his knees and asked the love of his life to marry him. Jess accepted. Luke was born two months before the wedding day.

Where Was The Bridegroom?

And so the big day had arrived; a day which they had both longed for. The church was packed. Jess was already there; but where was Alex, the bridegroom? After twenty minutes news reached the church that there had been a terrible car crash and that the victims had been rushed to hospital. In her wedding dress, Jess fled to the hospital with friends and family. They heard that someone had died in the crash; but who? The wait to find out was horrendous; all Jess could do was cry and pray for her soul mate. Jess sat there in her wheelchair with her face in her hands. As she looked up to the heavens in silent prayer she glanced down the corridor. A man in a wheelchair was approaching her. It was Alex with a broken leg. The bride and bridegroom embraced each other and as they stared into each others eyes with joy Alex said “Is it my turn for a bed bath?” The marriage ceremony took place three months later and their love still blossoms to this day.

ceremony took place three months later and their love still blossoms to this day. MSRC: 01206

MSRC: 01206 505444

www.msrc.co.uk

51

Competition

Thirsty? Win A Hydrant!

L
L

iving with MS can be thirsty work due to the drugs that are sometimes used. Being able to reach a drink

easily without needing to ask for help can make a huge difference to staying properly hydrated. The Hydrant solves this issue in a simple way – hook it on to a bed, chair or wheelchair and suck the drink through the tube. It gives you independent access to fluids at all times New Pathways has 5 Hydrants (retail £12.95) to give away courtesy of Hydrate for Health Ltd. Simply send your name, address, telephone number and email address to:

Hydrate Competition, MSRC, 7 Peartree Business Centre, Peartree Road, Stanway, Colchester CO3 0JN The five winners will be drawn from the postbag on March 1, 2010. For more information and testimonials from current users:

www.hydrateforhealth.co.uk or Tel: 07813 013779

users: www.hydrateforhealth.co.uk or Tel: 07813 013779 Name: Address: Postcode: Tel No: E-mail address:
Name: Address: Postcode: Tel No: E-mail address: Photocopies not accepted
Name:
Address:
Postcode:
Tel No:
E-mail address:
Photocopies not accepted
Postcode: Tel No: E-mail address: Photocopies not accepted 5 2 New Pathways Issue 59 January/February 2010
Postcode: Tel No: E-mail address: Photocopies not accepted 5 2 New Pathways Issue 59 January/February 2010

Cryptic Crossword Answers

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By Cryptic Charlie Gee

Across

Down

 

5.

Bach met the Scottish play! (7) ANAGRAM

2.

Place where birds settle for a 25 down. (5)

9.

Encircles rod runs us about. (9) ANAGRAM

A

bird settles on a PERCH

10.

A stuttering friend is overcome with horror. (5)

3.