Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 10

2011

www.sematanzania.org

Child Protection Programme

C-Sema Group

SEMA TANZANIA CHILD PROTECTION POLICY


This policy document is obligatory for all the Staff, Volunteers and associates of Sema Tanzania. Based on this policy manuscript, every person or associate shall use a clear reporting
and responding structures, as well as consistent crisis management plans as he/she works out own approach to bring child protection to life in Tanzania.
Table of Contents Page Number
SECTION A

0.1 GENERAL INTRODUCTION. . . . . . . 2

1.0 WHAT WE STAND FOR. . . . . . . . 2

2.0 GENERAL FOUNDATION OF OUR CHILD PROTECTION POLICY . . . 3

3.0 SCOPE OF OUR WORKING. . . . . . . 3

4.0 PROLOGUE. . . . . . . . . 4

SECTION B

1. WHO IS A CHILD? HOW IS A CHILD ABUSED? . . . . . 4

2. PURPOSE OF THE CHILD PROTECTION POLICY. . . . . . 4

SECTION C

FOUR MAIN CATEGORIES OF ABUSES. . . . . . . 5

SECTION D

SEMA TANZANIA “BEHAVIOUR CODE” OF CONDUCT. . . . . 6

SECTION E

PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING SUSPECTED ABUSE. . . . . 7

SECTION F

EQUAL RIGHTS OF ALL CHILDREN TO PROTECTION. . . . 8

SECTION G

COMMUNICATING THE CHILDREN SAFETY MESSAGE . . . . . . 8

SECTION H

EDUCATION AND TRAINING FOR CHILDREN’S SAFETY. . . . . 9

C-Sema Group, 17 Sea View-Upanga, P.O. Box 110132 U-Hill, Dar es Salaam
1
Tel: +255 713 223 606/767 269 308, Fax: +255 222 420 702
inf@sematanzania.org, Web: www.sematanzania.org
WELCOME TO SEMA TANZANIA’S CHILD PROTECTION POLICY

SECTION A:

0.1 GENERAL INTRODUCTION

Sema is a Swahili word that literally means speaking. The terminology “SEMA” is focused on providing life skills
rooted in social and financial education to children and young persons. This concept revolves around the belief that
children are powerful agents of social and economic change. Empowering children/young persons to make this
change and break the cycle of poverty means making them aware of what their rights and responsibilities are, and
equipping them with the tools to put those rights into practice.

Sema Tanzania is a Child Protection Programme within C-Sema Group, a dully registered Social Enterprise in
Tanzania.

1. WHAT WE STAND FOR

We are committed to creating and maintaining a caring and protective milieu for Children and Youths which promotes
our foundation values; that is, of preventing and addressing child abuse and exploitation. We strongly condemn all
forms of child abuse and exploitation, be it within or without our organisation, and always respond to any case of
proven, alleged or attempted abuse within our field of influence according to its nature. Our efforts ensure that
mechanisms are in place to raise awareness, aid prevention, encourage reporting and ease response. Our

2
endeavours range from resource management development through training, mentoring, inspiring and counselling to
measures such as suspension, dismissal, or legal action.
C-Sema Group, 17 Sea View-Upanga, P.O. Box 110132 U-Hill, Dar es Salaam
Tel: +255 713 223 606/767 269 308, Fax: +255 222 420 702
inf@sematanzania.org, Web: www.sematanzania.org
2. THE GENERAL FOUNDATION OF OUR CHILD PROTECTION POLICY

Sema Tanzania’s Policy is built on the following;

(i) Our Aim


To promote and appreciate African culture for economic gain & as a way of job creation and poverty
reduction-And to realize, commercialize and promote other cultures found in our society and which
deserves in our views, such promotions.

(ii) Vision
Make every child appreciate life and use available resources to change his/her environment for a better
adult life.

(iii) Mission
Mentor, Inspire and Early Life Counselling towards Economic, Spiritual and Moral Success in Adult Life

(iv) Values
We believe Culture is living: It’s the way of life. We advocate for upholding cultural orientations,
believing that our community, specifically that of the younger generation, deserves rectifying our
mistakes – that is, of undervaluing our own valuable culture.

Advocating for our culture to the Tanzanian public and to the rest of the World would not only
guarantee us dignity, but also will create a local and international market for our films, Music, arts and
drama productions, besides attracting cultural tourists and ethnic researchers.

Self-realization entails self-employment that can best be obtained via cultural advocacy. Policy makers
(the Government) would be made to understand the magnitude of these initiatives that could lead to a
vast improvement of life, specifically of the youths.

Knowledge and skills are the keys to success that is; “Give a Child bread and feed him for a day, but
teach him to farm and feed him for life!"

(v) The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC)
Tanzania has since ratified this Law and mostly adopted it through the Law of the Child Act, 2009.

(vi) The African Charter on the Rights & Wellbeing of Children (ACRWC)
Tanzania is also bound by this document.

(vii) Stakeholders
Experience and input of stakeholders from various works of life, associations and agencies including
children who are important stakeholders and further and fundamentally that great value must be placed
upon their views

3. SCOPE OF OUR WORKING

We work in the best interest of children and a child is our most important consideration. To us, every child has the
right to develop to his or her full potential, to quality education, participation and non-discrimination. We also believe
that everybody has the responsibility to protect children from all forms of abuse, abandonment, exploitation, violence

C-Sema Group, 17 Sea View-Upanga, P.O. Box 110132 U-Hill, Dar es Salaam
3
Tel: +255 713 223 606/767 269 308, Fax: +255 222 420 702
inf@sematanzania.org, Web: www.sematanzania.org
and discrimination. In this policy, specific attention is focused on internal mechanisms to prevent and respond to child
abuse within our Organisation.

4. PROLOGUE

This policy document is obligatory for all the Staff, Volunteers and associates of Sema Tanzania. Based on this policy
manuscript, every person or associate shall use a clear reporting and responding structures, as well as consistent
crisis management plans as he/she works out own approach to bring child protection to life in Tanzania. Every child
is potentially at risk of abuse and exploitation, if his/her rights are contravened causing physical, moral or emotional
harm including beatings, insults, discrimination, neglect, sexual abuse and exploitative labour.1 Some girls or boys
may be more vulnerable to abuse and exploitation, due to various forms of discrimination and marginalisation relating
to their socio-economic status, gender, disability, ethnicity, caste, or living situation. Therefore it is crucial that every
person connected with Sema Tanzania understands child abuse, as well as his or her own role and responsibilities in
protecting children.

SECTION B:

1. WHO IS A CHILD? HOW IS A CHILD ABUSED?

According to the United Nations Child Rights Commission (UNCRC) and the African Charter on the Rights &
Wellbeing of Children (ACRWC) a child is “every human being below the age of 18 years unless national law
recognises the age of majority earlier”.

Section 3 of the Law of the Child Act, 2009 defines Child Abuse as contravention of the rights of the child causing
physical, moral or emotional harm including beatings, insults, discrimination, neglect, sexual abuse and exploitative
labour. Sema Tanzania therefore adopts Law of the Child Act’s definition of Child Abuse recognising further that child
abuse and exploitation takes place in our country and in order to respond to child abuse, it is crucial that we as an
organisation reach a common understanding (with the authorities) as to what child abuse is and in which
circumstances our policies and procedures apply. Sema Tanzania is committed to broader awareness-raising,
prevention and advocacy work within families, communities and national authorities to promote the protection of
children’s rights.

It is often the case that the abuser is a person close to the child and whom the child trusts. Through this policy we
want to positively influence the practices of families within Sema Tanzania programmes and the community. We
further recognises the importance of children’s participation, through Sema Schools Clubs we would empower girls
and boys to speak up against all forms of abuse, acting as agents of self protection and the protection of their peers.

2. PURPOSE OF THE CHILD PROTECTION POLICY

For the purpose of this document Child Protection means keeping children safe and protecting them from harm as an
integral part of the policy and practice in all Sema Tanzania’s activities and programmes. It is not optional. The work
of Sema Tanzania in all of its services, both residential, street and community based should be planned not just to
minimise situations where the harm of children may occur, but also to provide a child-friendly environment. Further
we would ensure that all our working to protect children concur with the provisions of Law of the Child Act, 2009,
specifically, Part III (CARE AND PROTECTION OF A CHILD)

This policy aims at:


 Preventing cases of child abuse and reducing the number of incidents (child-to-child, adult to-child) in
facilities and programmes in each member association, making children aware of their rights and their active
role in child protection,
1. Section 3 of the Law of the Child Act, 2009

C-Sema Group, 17 Sea View-Upanga, P.O. Box 110132 U-Hill, Dar es Salaam
4
Tel: +255 713 223 606/767 269 308, Fax: +255 222 420 702
inf@sematanzania.org, Web: www.sematanzania.org
 Informing children, co-workers, board members, family and community members, volunteers and partners
(sponsors, donors, journalists, governmental authorities, etc.) about the child protection policy and related
procedures (awareness, prevention, reporting, responding),
 Encouraging co-workers directly involved with children to apply the skills needed to contribute to each
child’s development and protection, ensuring that all co-workers have the working conditions needed to
contribute to each child’s
 Development and protection, fostering open and honest discussions on child abuse in national meetings
and workshops
 in all programmes and facilities amongst all stakeholders (children, young adults and their families, child and
youth care co-workers, management staff, board members, programme staff, teachers, maintenance and
security staff , etc.) putting in place fair, secure and transparent reporting channels in all types of
programmes
 Guarantee the right of stakeholders (children, parents, staff) to be heard, forming an active network of
protection so that all children and adults in our organisation are safe and protected
 Within and across all member associations, co-workers strive together for the protection of children.
 Empowering children to speak up against abuse challenging and changing behaviours.

SECTION C:

FOUR MAIN CATEGORIES OF ABUSE:

1. Physical Abuse
It is the actual or potential physical harm caused by an action or lack of action, which is reasonably within the control
of the parent or person in a position of responsibility, power, or trust. Physical abuse may involve hitting, spanking,
shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning and suffocating. It can also mean causing physical harm
to a child by fabricating the symptoms of, or deliberately causing, ill health to a child. It is immaterial whether the
incidents may be single or repeated.

2. Sexual Abuse
It is evidenced by an activity between a child and an adult or another child who, by age or development, is in a
relationship of responsibility, trust or power; the activity being intended to gratify or satisfy the needs of the other
person. Child sexual abuse involves forcing or enticing a child to take part in sexual activities, whether or not the child
is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact and penetrative or non-penetrative acts.
This may also include involving children in looking at, or in the production of, pornographic material, or encouraging
children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways.

3. Neglect and Negligent Treatment


It is the inattention or omission on the part of the caregiver to provide for the development of the child in: health,
education, emotional development, nutrition, shelter and safe living conditions, in the context of resources reasonably
available to the family or caretakers and which causes, or has a high probability of causing, harm to the child’s health
or physical, mental, spiritual, moral or social development. This includes the failure to properly supervise and protect
children from harm as much as is feasible.

4. Emotional Abuse
Is the persistent emotional ill treatment of a child that adversely affects his or her self-perception and development. It
may involve conveying to the child that he or she is worthless, unloved, and inadequate, or there only to meet the
needs of another person; or imposing inappropriate expectations upon him/her acts include restricting movement,
threatening, scaring, discriminating, scape-goating, corrupting, ridiculing, degrading, bullying, humiliating (e.g. asking
potentially embarrassing questions, demanding potentially embarrassing action) or other non-physical forms of
hostile or rejecting treatment.

C-Sema Group, 17 Sea View-Upanga, P.O. Box 110132 U-Hill, Dar es Salaam
5
Tel: +255 713 223 606/767 269 308, Fax: +255 222 420 702
inf@sematanzania.org, Web: www.sematanzania.org
Important Notes

Child-to-Child Abuse allegations or concerns regarding the abuse of a child by another child need to be responded
to with particular sensitivity; nevertheless, they have to be dealt with through the child protection procedures. All work
with young people who have committed abuse requires an effective approach which ensures the protection of people
affected, while at the same time supporting the young person in challenging and changing his/her behaviour. Any
such approach requires:

 The recognition that a child who has abused another child differs significantly from adults who have
committed similar offences, as the child is not fully aware of why he or she has committed abuse and what
the consequences are keeping in mind that the best interest of the child is the primary consideration in all
decisions made - for both the victim and the abuser.

 Violation of Children’s Privacy; the protection of a child’s privacy refers to private data of the child as well
as pictures, texts, films etc. about children which are produced for publicity purposes: any information about
a child’s history, medical condition and family background has to be stored carefully in the Sema Tanzania’s
administration. These data are to be handled confidentially and with discretion.

SECTION D:

SEMA TANZANIA “BEHAVIOUR CODE” OF CONDUCT:

1. Regarding "safety" situations

 ALWAYS treat all children and young people with respect.


 ALWAYS provide an example of good conduct which you wish others to follow.
 NEVER condone or participate in behaviour that is illegal or unsafe.
 NEVER jump to conclusions about others without checking facts.
 NEVER exaggerate or trivialise child harm issues.
 NEVER believe 'it could never happen to me'.
 NEVER take a chance when common sense, policy and practice suggest another more prudent approach.
 NEVER ignore the child protection guidelines & procedures operating within Sema Tanzania.
 NEVER act secretively, even with the best of intentions.
 AVOID being alone with a single child where others cannot witness your behaviour. For example when
meeting children in the office, keep the door open, in a car try to travel with more than person, do not invite
a child to spend time overnight in your home. If you invite a child into your home please be aware that you
will be responsible for any consequences that occur.
 AVOID favouritism or spending excessive amounts of time with one child.
 AVOID placing yourself in a compromising or vulnerable position.
 AVOID doing something that could be misinterpreted by a third party.
 TRY TO ensure that whenever possible there is more than one adult present during activities with children,
or at least that you are within the sight or hearing of others.
 TRY TO meet with a child in a central, public location whenever possible.
 TRY TO respect a child and young person's right to personal privacy.
 TRY TO immediately note, in a designated Sema Tanzania Child Protection Log Book, the circumstances of
any situation which occurs which may be subject to misinterpretation by a third party.

1. Regarding sexual behaviour

 NEVER develop physical/sexual relationships with a child.

C-Sema Group, 17 Sea View-Upanga, P.O. Box 110132 U-Hill, Dar es Salaam
6
Tel: +255 713 223 606/767 269 308, Fax: +255 222 420 702
inf@sematanzania.org, Web: www.sematanzania.org
 NEVER behave physically in a manner that is inappropriate or sexually provocative. Try to be culturally sensitive
in your choice of clothing so that it is not misinterpreted as 'provocative'.
 NEVER engage in or allow sexually provocative games with children to take place.
 NEVER do things of a personal nature that a child could do for him/herself, including dressing, bathing, and
grooming.

2. Regarding physical behaviour

 NEVER hit or otherwise physically assault or physically abuse a child.


 ALWAYS be sensitive in reading the child's signals and comfortableness with your physical contact, such as
holding hands.
 ALWAYS ask permission from children before taking photographs of them. Respect their decision to say 'no' to
photos. Only take photographs that are based on the child's best interest and which do not demean them.

3. Regarding psychosocial behaviour

 NEVER use language that will mentally or emotionally harm a child.


 NEVER suggest inappropriate behaviour or relations of any kind.
 NEVER act in any way that intends to embarrass, shame, humiliate or degrade a child.
 NEVER encourage any inappropriate attention seeking behaviour, such as tantrums by a child.
 NEVER show discrimination of race, culture, age, gender, disability, religion, sexuality, or political persuasion.
 ALWAYS be aware of the power balance between an adult and child, and avoid taking any advantage this may
provide.
 ALWAYS encourage children and young people to feel comfortable to point out attitudes or behaviours that they
do not like.
 ALWAYS remember that special caution is required in moments when you are discussing sensitive issues with
children or young people.

4. Regarding peer abuse

 NEVER allow children to engage in sexually provocative games with each other.
 NEVER allow children to share a bed to avoid sexual abuse.
 ALWAYS be aware of the potential for peer abuse.
 ALWAYS endeavour to protect younger and especially vulnerable children.
 ALWAYS avoid placing children in high-risk peer situations (e.g. unsupervised mixing of older and younger
children).

5. Regarding physical environment

 ALWAYS address specific physical safety issues relative to the local physical environment of Sema Tanzania.

SECTION E:

PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING SUSPECTED ABUSE:

(i) Concern about suspected, witnessed, reported or potential abuse of a child/children by: member or
members of staff; visitors to Sema Tanzania; another child/children at Sema Tanzania residential
centre.

7
(ii) Discuss your concerns with the Child Protection Officer at Sema Tanzania, preferably on the same
working day or within 24 hours of the incident. If the Child Protection Officer is absent, or if your

C-Sema Group, 17 Sea View-Upanga, P.O. Box 110132 U-Hill, Dar es Salaam
Tel: +255 713 223 606/767 269 308, Fax: +255 222 420 702
inf@sematanzania.org, Web: www.sematanzania.org
concerns involve the Child Protection Officer him/herself however, discuss your concerns with Sema
Tanzania's Human Resources / Administration Manager.

(iii) Action is taken by the Child Protection Officer / Human Resources Manager to ensure the child is safe as a
priority and then to investigate the matter. This may require consultation with more senior management
and is guided by the Child Protection Policy and procedures. Further guidance in this respect:

 All decisions must be guided by the best interests of the child. In situations where difficult decisions
need to be made the reporting and reaction protocols must remain child-focused at all times, above and
beyond the demands of bureaucracy.
 If your concerns involve immediate harm to a child, act without delay, as inaction may place the child in
further danger.
 If you know any information about the maltreatment of a child, it is your responsibility to tell someone.
 In certain instances there will be the obligation for Sema Tanzania and its staff and others to report
concerns to the appropriate external bodies, such as the police or social welfare department. This will
usually occur as a consequence of the reporting procedure. However, if urgent action is required in
order to protect children then it may be prior to the reporting procedure.
 The responsibility for investigating allegations of child abuse rests with the Police and Social Welfare
Department. Sema Tanzania's Child Protection Officer may seek legal advice, the advice of the Social
Welfare department or Police in deciding whether a formal referral to the authorities is necessary. If it is
decided that external reporting should not take place then there must be a clear rationale for that
decision which should be recorded. The decision not to report in such circumstances should be
unanimously approved by the Board of Management and the Child Protection Officer.
 If a decision is made to place the child in an alternative place of safety the decision must be based
upon the child's best interests rather than those of convenience.
 A written report with a description of the incident (s), the findings of the investigation and the decisions
and actions taken needs to be prepared by the Child Protection Officer and submitted to the Services
Coordinators and Director as soon as the incident has been invesitigated.

(iv) Involvement of authorities (i.e. local police and/or Social Welfare Department).

SECTION F:

EQUAL RIGHTS OF ALL CHILDREN TO PROTECTION

Abuse happens to male and female children of all ages, races, religions and genders. Some children, such as those
with physical and / or mental disability are particularly vulnerable. Prejudice and discrimination may prevent some
children getting the help that they need. Sema Tanzania commits to taking all the necessary steps to ensure that all
children are protected and receive the support they need.

Child protection procedures, guidance and training help staff to recognise the particular risks faced by some children
and the extra difficulties they face getting help, because of their age, gender, disability, sexual orientation, social
background or culture.

SECTION G:

COMMUNICATING THE "CHILDREN SAFETY" MESSAGE


Sema Tanzania ensures that everyone in the organisation knows how to keep children safe by:

C-Sema Group, 17 Sea View-Upanga, P.O. Box 110132 U-Hill, Dar es Salaam
8
Tel: +255 713 223 606/767 269 308, Fax: +255 222 420 702
inf@sematanzania.org, Web: www.sematanzania.org
 Displaying the Code of Conduct and emergency telephone numbers (including that of the Child Protection
Officer) prominently in Swahili on the walls of the residential centre and at the offices. This acts as a
constant reminder and point of easy reference in times of doubt and emergency.
 Ensuring that all staff have Emergency numbers in their phone address books and they are posted on the
wall next to each office phone.
 Ensuring that Mkombozi's child protection policy and procedures are available on a dedicated 'Child
Protection page' on www.sematanzania.org
 Ensuring that Sema Tanzannia’s representatives promote the Code and highlighting expected behaviour
towards children and young people in all situations where we are responsible for bringing children into
contact with adults. This ensures that children's best interests remain safeguarded even beyond the scope
of the immediate project environment.
 Have both English and Swahili versions of the Code of Conduct’s copies, the Flow Chart for Reporting
Abuse and The Law of the Child Act, 2009 and giving a copy to each child or young person who is at the
residential centre.

SECTION H:

1. EDUCATION AND TRAINING FOR KEEPING CHILDREN SAFE


Everyone in contact with children has a role to play in their protection. They can only carry out this role effectively and
confidently if they have the right attitude towards children, are sufficiently aware of child protection issues and have
the necessary knowledge and skills to keep children safe. Learning opportunities are necessary for staff to develop
and maintain the necessary attitudes, skills and knowledge to keep children safe.

Sema Tanzania offers the learning opportunities for staff to develop and maintain the necessary skills and
understanding to keep children safe. This ensures that all personnel and children themselves understand the
importance of child protection, how to implement policies and procedures and how to work to the same high
standards. This training also helps children know best to protect themselves and make use of the policies and
procedures in place.

2. ACCESS TO ADVICE AND SUPPORT

Child abuse is distressing and can be difficult to deal with. Sema Tanzania has a duty to ensure advice and support
is available to help people play their part in protecting children. Children need someone to turn to when they are
being abused. Often they do not know where to go for help.

3. IMPLEMENTING AND MONITORING THE STANDARDS

To keep children safe, policies, procedures and plans have to be implemented across all parts of our Organisational
departments. Checks and Balances are needed to ensure that this is happening consistently. The views of those
involved inside and outside Sema Tanzania can help to improve the effectiveness of any measures taken.

C-Sema Group, 17 Sea View-Upanga, P.O. Box 110132 U-Hill, Dar es Salaam
9
Tel: +255 713 223 606/767 269 308, Fax: +255 222 420 702
inf@sematanzania.org, Web: www.sematanzania.org