Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 19

-

USS BNTERPRISE ( C V 4 6 5 )
Fleet Post Office
San Francisco 96601

REGISTERED AIR MAIL 2 8 FEB 1975


(Unclassified upon removal of enclosure (1)1

From: Commanding O f f i c e r , USS ENTERPRISE (CVAN 65)


To: Chief of Naval Operations [OP-0502)

Subj : 1974 Command History; forwarding of

Ref: (a) OPNAVINST 5750.12B

Encl: (1) EiB ERPRISE Command History f o r 1974

1. I n accordance with reference (a), enclosures11) i s forwarded as


USS ENTERPRISE (CVAN 65) 1974 Command History.

I
Copy t o : (w/o Annex A encl (1)
Director of Naval History (OP-09B9)
CINBACFLT
COMNAVAIRPAC
USS ENTERPRISE (CVAN-65)

COMMAND HISTORY

CLASSIFIED BY OPNAVINST 5750.12B.


SUBJECT TO GENERAL DECLASSIFICATION
SCHEDULE OF EXECUTIVE ORDER 11652.
DECLASSIFIED ON 21 FEBRUARY 1981
ENTERPRISE 1974

How does a n a i r c r a f t c a r r i e r and i t s crew make t h e t:ransit~.on from t h e


h e c t i c tempo of a war t o t h e l e s s pressured environment: o f a peacetime
Navy? This i s a q u e s t i o n which h a s concerned t h e United S t a t e s Navy
personnel a t a l l l e v e l s of a u t h o r i t y and command - both e l l i s t e d and
o f f i c e r a l i k e . T h i s h i s t o r y answers the q u e s t i o n , i n part, b l d e s c r i b i r q
ENTERPRISE'S overhaul, work-ups, and t h e f i r s t p o r t i o n of h e r f i r s t
peacetime deployment i n eleven (11) y e a r s . I t i l l u s t r a t e s how much of
t h e work done l a s t year would have t o be done i n war or p2acetime. The
c o n s t a n t turnover of personnel, t h e e t e r n a l need f o r maintenarce, new
q q u i p e n t , and new a d d i t i o n s t o 016 equipment a r e probl.ems Paced i n
preceeding y e a r s by ENTERPI.ISE personnel.

The year was a year of p r e p a r a t i o n , of l e a r n i n g and reLearr ing. Once


the sea t r i a l s , " c a r r i e r q u a l s " , and graded e x e r c i s e s were conpleted, we
deployed on t h e f i r s t peact:time c r u i s e i n eleven (11) y e a r s . The problem
t h e n became one of a d j u s t i ~ i gt o t h e changes which had occiurrec i n t h e
n a v i e s of o t h e r c o u n t r i e s E S w e l l a s i n our own Navy.

Perhaps t h e most s i g n i f i c a n t development ENTERPRISE experienced was


t h a t of t h e i n t r o d u c t i o n of new weapons systems. Three! a i r c r z f t i n
p a r t i c u l a r n e c e s s i t a t e d changes i n a number of c a r r i e r e v o l u t i o n s . The
F-14, t h e EA-6B (EXCAP), and t h e anti-submarine warfare) v e r s i c n of t h e
SH-3, r e q u i r e d n o t only neh forms o t support, b u t t h e y n e c e s s i t a t e d t h e
development of new t a c t i c s I n o r d e r t o t a k e f u l l adv3nt.age of khere
c a p a b i l i t i e s . I t i s i n t h e f i e l d s of anti-submarine warfare, e l e c t r o n i c
warfare, and long-range a n t i - a i r warfare t h a t i n n o v a t i v e t a c t i c s have
been under development during t h e l a s t year. The jo3 has o n l l p begun,
however, and much work has been l e f t to the future.
CHRONOLOG' --I974

1-20 J a n I n p o r t Puget : ound Naval Shipyarci

21-24 J a n Sea T r i a l ;

25 J a n - 1 Feb I n p o r t Puget Sound Naval Shipyard

2-4 Feb T r a n s i t t o Alameda, C a l i f o r n i a

3-11 Feb I n p o r t Alameda

12-19 Feb I n d i v i d u a l Ship' s E x e r c i s e

20 Feb - 3 Mar I n p o r t Alameda

4-8 Mar I n d i v i d u a l SF i p ' s E x e r c i s e

9-10 Mar I n p o r t San I i e g o

11-15 Mar I n d i v i d u a l St i p ' s E x e r c i s e

16-17 Mar I n p o r t San Diego

18-22 Mar Refresher Training

23-24 Mar I n port San Diego

25-28 Mar Refresher Training

29 Mar - 5 Apr A t ar-chor San Francisco Bay

6-17 Apr I n p o r t Alameda

18-26 Apr Socal Airops

27 Apr - 6 May I n p c r t Alameda

7-15 May Socal Airops

16 May - 3 June I n p o r t Alameda

4-13 June Socal Airops

14-20 June I n port Alameda

21-28 June Socal Airops

29 June - 3 July A t anchor San Francisco Bay

4-15 J u l y I n pol-t Alamed


1 6- 25 J u l y Socal Airops

26 J u l y - 6 Aug I n p o r t Alamed

7-16 Aug Socal Airops/W PTRAEX

17-18 Aug I n p o r t San D i go

19-26 Aug Socal Airops/O E

27 Aug - 1 6 Sep I n p o r t Alamed,

17-22 Sep T r a n s i t t o Haw'iiian Operating Area

23-23 Sep I n p a r t P e a r l Harbor

24-29 Sep Hawaiian Airops

30 Sep - 1 Oct I n p o r t P e a r l Harbor

2-17 Oct T r a n s i t t o Western P a c i f i c

18-20 Oct I n p o r t Cubi PT Naval A i r S t a t i o n

ZlzOct - 1 NOV P h i l i p p i n e Airops

2-5 Nov I n p a r t Cubi PT Naval A i r S t a t i o n

6-7 Nov Typhoon Evasion

6-10 Nov I n p o r t Cubi PT Naval A i r Statj.on

11-17 Nov Multiplex/Hong Kong T r a n s i t

18-24 NOV I n p o r t Hong Kong

2s Nov - 9 Dec P h i l i p p i n e Airops

13-22 Dec Gult of Tonkin Special Operations

23-24 Dec T r a n s i t t c Cubi PT Naval A i r S t a t i o n

25-31 Dec I n p o r t Cubi PT Naval A i r S t a t i o n


DECLASSIFIED
BASIC NARRATIVE

1. (C) COMMAND ORGANIZATIOE

a. (U) Commanding C f f i c e r . Captain Carol C. SMITH, U. S. Navy

b. (C) Mission and .'unction of i:omrnand. The mission of ENTERPRISE,


a s delineated i n N W I P 11-20 ( 8 ), i s " t o s ~ p p o r tand operate a i r c r a f t , t o
engage i n a t t a c k s on t a r g e t s a f l o a t and #ishore which threaten cur control
of the sea, and t o engage i r sustained operations i n support of other
forces". Delineated t a s k s a r e :

(1) To operate offensively by means of a barkec a i r c r a f t ,


capable of delivering nuclear and non-nuclear weapons, a c a i n s t t a r g e t s
a f l o a t and ashore which threaten our control of t h e sea.

( 2 ) To operate offensively by means of en barkec a i r c r a f t ,


capable of delivering nuclear and non-nuclear weapons, a c a i n s t t a r g e t s
a f l o a t and ashore i n support of other forces.

(3) To defend against airborne, surface ~ n dsul surface


a t t a c k by means of embarked a i r c r a f t a s p a r t of a coordirated cefense
system.

( 4 ) To control a i r c r a t.

(5) To defend against airborn2 attack by means )f s h i p ' s


armament a s p a r t of a coordinated a i r defense system.

(6) To provide commanc f a c i l i t i e s and accommoda:ions f o r


a task force commander and s t a f f .

c. (U) Composition of Command.

(1) Personnel manning l e v e l s a t c r i t i c a l period ; of the


year a r e shown below:

-
1 January 1974 :

Officers :

Ship ' s Con,pany


Civilians

Enlisted:

Ship' s Company
31 December 1974:

Officers :

Ship ' s Company


CVW-14
COMCARGRU SEVEN
Civilians

Enlisted:

Ship' s Company
CVW-14
COMCARGRU SEVEN

( 2 ) P o r t i o n s of Attack C a r r i e r A i r Wing FOURTEEN were


on board from mid-March u n t i l July. The e n t i r e wing came aboard during
July. I t was comprised of VF-1 Wolfpak, VF-2 Bounty Hunters, VA-97
War Hawks, VA-27 Royal Maces, VA-196 Main Battery, VAW-113 Black Eagles,
VAQ-137 Rooks, HS-2 Golden Falcons, and RVAH-12 Speartips. VQ-1's
EA3B Sea Wing detachment was a l s o on board during t h e 1974 phase of
the cruise.

d. ( U ) Location of Homeport. ENTERPRISE was homeported a t


Puget Sound Naval Shipyard a t t h e beginning of t h e year. I n February,
ENTERPRISE was reassigned to h e r previous homeport of Alameda Naval A i r
Station, California.

2. (C) EXTENDED SELECTED RESTRICTED AVAILABILITY

a . The Complete ESRA Overhaul (1-20 January): ENTERPRISE completed


a six month ESRA yard period i n l a t e January. Extensive w r k was done
to many of t h e s h i p ' s major spaces during t h i s time. Much of it was aimed
a t preparing ENTERPRISE f o r t h e F-14 Tomcat. Routine r e p a i r and r e f u r -
bishment were completed i n a l l o t h e r a r e a s .

b. A i r c r a f t Intermediate Maintenance Department: A I M . introduced


maintenance equipnent designed f o r t h e F-14A Tomcat. This involved t h e
new V e r s a t i l e Avionics Ship T e s t (VAST) #12, t h e new I n e r t i a l Platform
Test S t a t i o n , weapons equipnent storage and handling f a c i l i t i e s , a newly
modified j e t engine test f a c i l i t y and completely converted airborne f i r e -
c o n t r o l Avionics Ship #3.

c. 0pbrnXianSbBepartment: ENTERPRISE completed i t s ESRA period


with a complete modernization of t h e Combat Information System. The
Navy's newest generation Naval T a c t i c a l Data System replaced ENTERPRISE'S
f i r s t generation system. The system included consoles, computers,
programming and e q u i p e n t i n t e r f a c e . I t provided ENTERPRISIZ with a new
two-way d a t a l i n k between Combat Information Center (CIC) alld t h e F-14.
A new MK-XI1 AIMS IFF system a l s o provided ENTERPRISE with an increased
a i r c r a f t i d e n t i f i c a t i o n c a p a ~ i l i t yand the addition of HS-2's ASW
equipped helos provided ENTE.XPRISE with i t s f i r s t anti-sulmarine warfare
c a p a b i l i t y . This c a p a b i l i t y was exploited with an i n t e r f a c e between CIC! s
a n t i - s u h a r i n e a i r c o n t r o l l e r s and t h e anti-suhnarine c l a s s i f i c a t i o n and
a n a l y s i s center.

The I n t e l l i g e n c e Center completed making t h e Naval


I n t e l l i g e n c e Processing System Change 19 software and hardware changes
t o i t s computerized i n t e l l i g e n c e system. The Electronic Evaluation
s t a t i o n acquired a new software package which allows it t o process
EA-6B a s well a s RA-5C i n t e l l i g e n c e tapes. The I n t e l l i g e n c e C e n t e r ' s
Storage and Retrieval s e c t i o n received programming which allows it
t o provide computer support for HS-2's anti-submarine e f f o r t . I n
a d d i t i o n , Storage and Retrieval was a b l e t o shorten processing time
with t h e i n s t a l l a t i o n of a Random Access Memory (RAM) u n i t .

d. Weapons Department: The Weapons Department prepart d t o


accept t h e F-14's Phoenix a i r - t o - a i r m i s s i l e . During ESRA, Wetpons
conducted Ships I n s t a l l a t i o n Acceptance Tests on a l l a s p e c t s of t h e
Phoenix m i s s i l e handling and stowage equipment and spaces. Tvm magazines
were modified t o f a c i l i t a t e storage f o r Phoenix.
- e. Supply Department: A Supply Operational Assistance Program
was completed on both t h e Aviation Allowance L i s t and Coordinated
Shipboard Allowance L i s t material. A s a r e s u l t of t h e s e programs,
- ENTERPRHSE began 1974 w i t h an inventory accuracy ( r e a t e r than 90% on
i t s nearly 50,000 shipboard and 14,000 onboard av:.ation r e p a i r p a r t s .

- 3. (C) SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS

a. T r i a l s : (16 January -
1 February): 1:NTERPRISE s a t i s f a c t o r i l y
completed t w o days of "dock t r i a l s " i n l a t e Janual-y. These t r i a l s were
-
designed t o determine i f t h e ship was i n m a t e r i a l condition f o r sea
t r i a l s . The ship then conducted a " f a s t cruise". I n t h i s evolution,
ENTERPRISE remained t i e d t o t h e p i e r , but t h e crerr was p r a c t i c a l l y
- sealed o f f from t h e o u t s i d e world while they conducted some of t h e
d r i l l s they would s h o r t l y be required t o execute z t sea. ENTERPRISE
f i n a l l y conducted her sea t r i a l s between 21-24 Jaraary.
-
Vice Admiral Baldwin, t h e Commander of Naval A i r Force,
P a c i f i c , observed t h a t :
-- "Your thorough, professional F a s t Cruise and Sea T r i a l s
following an Operational Reactor Safeguards exam, conducted i n d i f f i c u l t
i n d u s t r i a l atmosphere, r e f l e c t e d t h e attainment of high standards of
-- material and t r a i n i n g readiness. The r e s u l t a n t m a t e r i a l condition
and degree of completed work a t t h e end of t h i s lengthy a v a i l a b i l i t y
has s e t a goal worthy of any ship i n t n e f l e e t " .
25 November Commander, B r i t i s h Forces, Hong Kong

4 December Honorable W i l l i a m H. Sullivan, U.S. Ambassador


t o t h e Philippines; RADM H. RuiiZ, Flag O f f i c e r
i n Command, Philippine Navy

b. Medical Department A c t i v i t i e s :

1. I n t h e p a s t year t h e Medical Department has increased i t s


o u t p a t i e n t volume by 18%and i t ' s i n p a t i e n t volume by 11%.

2. C a p a b i l i t i e s f o r advanced p a t i e n t c a r e have been increased


with t h e a d d i t i o n of an Intensive Care Unit, a t an o v e r a l l c o s t i n excess
of $20,000. The Intensive Care Unit has proven l i f e saving f o r four
crew members including tw victims of Acute Diabetic Coma. The I n t e n s i v e
Care Unit i s among t h e most modern and well equipped a v a i l a b l e a f l o a t
o r ashore.

3. The Radiation Health Program has been revised due t o t h e


i n i t i a t i o n of thermo-luminescent dosimeters. The continued monitoring
and c o n t r o l of personnel exposure t o ionizing r a d i a t i o n has been g r e a t l y
upgraded. A grade of e x c e l l e n t f o r t h e p a s t ORSE Inspection is evident
of t h i s .

c. Dental Department A c t i v i t i e s : During t h e year 1974, t h e


Dental Department saw a t o t a l of 11, 664 p a t i e n t s . There were 5,058 o r a l
examinations and 6,830 roentgenographic examinations administered.
ENTERPRISE d e n t a l o f f i c e r s i n s e r t e d 478 p r o s t h e t i c appliances, placed
9,387 r e s t o r a t i o n s , performed 1,460 s u r g i c a l procedures, 109 endondontic
treatments and 1,466 periodontal procedures on t h e i r p a t i e n t s . The
d e n t a l t e c h n i c i a n s completed 3,211 stannous f l u o r i d e a n t i - c a r i e s treatments
and 1,960 plaque c o n t r o l i n s t r u c t i o n s . By t h e end of t h e year 41% of t h e
personnel on board were c l a s s I, requiring no d e n t a l treatment. 399
were c l a s s 11, which r e q u i r e r o u t i n e but not e a r l y treatment. I n a d d i t i o n
t o s h i p ' s company and a i r wing personnel, many p a t i e n t s from our e s c o r t
and supply s h i p s received emergency treatment.

d. Communications Department A c t i v i t i e s :

1. August 1974: I n s t a l l e d two AN/FGC-100 t e l e t y p e w r i t e r


banks i n t h e message center. These banks provide more e f f i c i e n t use of
a v a i l a b l e working space, and allow f o r one-operator operation of up t o
e i g h t r e c e i v e t e l e t y p e channels.

2. August 1974: COMFLETRAGRU San Diego and NAVCOMMSTA San


Francisco conducted t h e f i r s t comrnunichtions LOADEX involving an a i r c r a f t
c a r r i e r . ENTERPRISE handled 2,700 messages during t h e 24 hours of t h e
exercise .
--
DECLASSIFIED
Supply and Deck depart men:^ were r e q u i r e d t o work extremely long hours
i n preparing f o r t h e voyatre. For example, members of t h e Deck Depart-
- -
ment spent twelve hour days throughout most of t h e i n - p o r t p e r i o d i n
r e p a i n t i n g t h e h u l l of t h ~ :s h i p .

During t h e 1 a : ; t d a l s of t h e year s p e c i a l f l i g h t s from CONUS


brought i n c r i t i c a l aviat:.on r e p a i r p a r t s . Additional s u p p l i e s and
m a t e r i a l s were prosessed !.ocally and onloaded.

ENTERPRISE took on a l a r g e q u a n t i t y of a v i a t i o n f u e l i n
a d d i t i o n t o t h e l a r g e number of s u p p l i e s .

The year ended w i t h t h e crew o f ENTERPRISE accomplishing t h e


- -
t r a n s i t i o n t o a peacetime deployment while a t t h e same time having developed
i n t o a p r o f e s s i o n a l , h i g h l y t r a i n e d combat u n i t who looked forward t o
t h e challenges of t h e f o r t h coming 1975 Indian Ocean deployment.

4. (C) STATISTICAL DATA

-- a. Distinguished V i s i t o r s :

1 March FADM R. S. Smith, D i r e c t o r Combat Systems


f j i v i s i o n (OP-35)

17-19 March Er. Henry Rowan, Chief o f Naval Operations


Executive Panel

9 April VADM R. Baldwin, Commander, Naval A i r Force,


Pacific

18 A p r i l Lieutenant Governor H. Boucher o f Alaska

14 May V I P s from Inter-American Defense College

16 May RADM E . F. Rectanus, D i r e c t o r o f Naval I n t e l l i g e n c e

10-13 June National F o o t b a l l Lea.gue V i s i t o r s

31 J u l y Navy League V i s i t s bl* Commandant, Marine Corps;


Chief Naval M a t e r i a l ; A s s i s t a n t S e c r e t a r y o f
Commerce f o r Maritime A f f a i r s

2 August Honorable J. Middendorf 111, S e c r e t a r y of t h e Navy

2 5 September VADM J. H. Doyle, Commander, Third F l e e t

27 September ADM Weisner, Commander i n C h i e f , P a c i f i c F l e e t

1 October ADM Noel Gaylor, Commander i n Chief, P a c i f i c

3 October Honorable J . Piddendorf 111, S e c r e t a r y of t h e Navy


DECLASSIFIED
b. Operation Golden Gate (2-4 February): On 30 January, ENTERPRISE
crewmen began loading personal e f f e c t s aboard f o r Operation Golden Gate.
01,eration Golden Gate was designed t o t r a n s p o r t t h e c r e w and t h e i r
f i m i l i e s back t o Alameda i n a novel wly--by c a r r i e r ! A f t e r taking on
1091 c a r s , 90 motorcycles, 45 pickups and campers, 12 b o a t s , and s e v e r a l
t o n s of household goods, CVAN 65 s a i l e d on t h e second day o f February.
6.5 dependents and some 100 p e t s made t h e tm day ENTERPRISE t r i p back
t o San Francisco.

c. I n i t i a l Socal Operations (12-19 February): A f t e r a week of


resettling i n San Francisco, t h e crew of t h e ENTERPRISE p a r t i c i p a t e d
i l l at-sea t r a i n i n g designed t o prepare'them f o r t h e March ~ e f r e i h e r
TI-aining (F?EFTRA) period. During t h e 12-19 February a t - s e a p e r i o d ,
nt!w ENTERPRISE crewmen l e a r n e d General Quarters procedures, "Deep
S l ~ e l t e r " , and o t h e r emergency a c t i o n s and s t a t i o n s t h e y would be r e q u i r e d
t o know and man. Shiphandling, communications, and r a d a r procedures
wt!re a l s o emphasized. I n a d d i t i o n , t h e s h i p conducted a simulated
miderway replenishment (UNREP) t o prepare f o r t h e many UNREP's t h a t
w , u l d be conducted i n t h e near f u t u r e .

The Weapons Department s t a r t e d t a k i n g on t h e ammunition t h e


s h i p would e v e n t u a l l y r e q u i r e during i t s deployment. ENTERPRISE took on
a~r,proximately1500 t o n s o f ammunition before t h e end o f 1974.

d. REFTRA (4-28 March) : ENTERPRISE set s a i l f o r t h e w;-kups and


RE:FTRA a f t e r spending a f o u r t e e n day i n - p o r t period. The f i r s t p a r t
of t h e month w a s spent i n t h e workups, with t h e weekends being G e n t
i n San Diego.

I n mid-March, ENTERPRISE was used by a number o f d i f f e r e n t


squadrons f o r t h e i r c a r r i e r landing q u a l i f i c a t i o n requirements. The s h i p
w ~ sa l s o used a s a t e s t platform f o r t h e F-14 and t h e S-3 Viking. The
F-14 made i t s maiden landing on ENTERPRISE on 18 March.

REFTRA o b s e r v e r s began boarding t h e f i r s t week of March. A l l


a c p e c t s of c a r r i e r o p e r a t i o n s w e r e evaluated. Their v i s i t culminated i n
a graded f i n a l b a t t l e problem designed t o t e s t o v e r a l l c o o l d i n a t i o n of
t k e ship's various organizations.

A f t e r f o u r weeks of o p e r a t i o n s , ENTERPRISE r e t t cned t o homeport


a f t e r having s u c c e s s f u l l y passed t h e t e s t . Commander, Flet t Training
Group commented a s follows:

"Complete p r o f e s s i o n a l d e d i c a t i o n , high m o ~ a l eand hard


work, most e v i d e n t i n outstanding performance during today s f i n a l b a t t l e
problem. Scores of outstanding i n e h i p c o n t r o l and n a v i g a t i o n , communications,
C I C , p e r s c a s u a l t y c o n t r o l and a i r coupled with two excellcmts and one
good a t t e s t t o your high s t a t e of readiness. Your achievement i n
s a t i s f a c t o r i l y s e t t i n g both m a t e r i a l c o n d i t i o n Yoke and Zelra i n d i c a t i v e
of a t t e n t i o n t o d e t a i l a t a l l l e v e l s . Well Done."
DECLASSIFIED
e. C a r r i e r Q u a l i f i c a t i o n s (April - June): ENTERPRLSE spent t h e
remainder of March through mid-April i n port. This "Readin,sss Improve-
ment Training Periodn was used t o send many crewmen t o d i f f z r e n t Navy
Training Schools.

The next four at-sea periods were used to support c a r r i e r


q u a l i f i c a t i o n requirements of CVW-14 and various o t h e r unattached
squadrons. These s h o r t operating periods were q u i t e busy. For example,
t h e r e were 1,177 a r r e s t e d landings during t h e seven day May period.

VA-104, VA-122, VA-125, W..-127, VA-128, VF-101, VF-121,


VMCJ-3, VX-4, VFP-63, and t h e t r a i n i n g cornanand took a d v a n t a ~ eof t h e
opportunity f o r c a r r i e r q u a l i f i c a t i o n t r a i n i n g . I n a d d i t i o n , VAQ-128
conducted " l a s t minute" c a r r i e r q u a l i f i c a t i o n i n July. Given such a
d i v e r s i t y of squadrons, t h e ENTERPRISE f l i g h t deck became t h e temporary
home of every type of U.S. c a r r i e r a i r c r a f t except f o r t h e T-2 and T-28
during t h e months of May and June.

ENTERPRISE received numer&as messages showing a p p r e c i a t i o n


f o r such support. The professionalism and s a f e t y ~ o n s c i o u s n e s sof the
crew were o f t e n commented upon.

The s h i p conducted a few unusual t r a i n i n g evolutions i n


a d d i t i o n t o t h e r o u t i n e of c a r r i e r q u a l i f i c a t i o n . For example,
ENTERPRISE t e s t e d i t s Basic P o i n t Defense Surface M i s s i l e during the
June at-sea period. The e x e r c i s e e n t a i l e d t h e firing of four Sea
Sparrow M i s s i l e s a t maneuvering MQM-74A t a r g e t drones.

There were a l s o several s i g n i f i c a n t events which occurred


during t h e four corresponding in-port periods. On 9 A p r i l , Captain
C. C. Smith r e l i e v e d Rear Admiral E. E. T i s s o t a s Commanding O f f i c e r
" 7
3 of ENTERPRISE. During t h e same ceremony, Vice Adtniral Baldwin presented t h e
Navy Unit Commendation t o Rear Admiral T i s s o t f o r CVAN 6 5 ' s "exceptionally
meritorious s e r v i c e from 3 October t o 22 February 1973 while p a r t i c i p a t i n g
i n interim combat operations i n Southeast Asia i n support of U. S.
National Policy".

Alaska's Lieutenant Governor Henry A.-Kucher v i s i t e d on


18 A p r i l during operations off t h e C a l i f o r n i a coast. M r . Boucher
served on t h e ENTERPRISE'S World War Two predecessor, t h e U 3 S ENTERPRISE
(CV-6). P r i o r t o departure, he presented t h e Captain with 3n ensign
which was flown from t h e CV-6 during World War 11.

The Director of Naval I n t e l l i g e n c e , RADM E. F. R e c t a u s ,


spent t h e morning o f 16 May touring t h e S h i p ' s I n t e l l i g e n c e Center,
and speaking t o i t s i n t e l l i g e n c e personnel.

Representatives of t h e National Football League spent 10-13


June touring t h e ship. The group included M r . Joseph Robbie, owner of
t h e M i a m i Dolphins; M r . Gene Klein, owner of t h e San Diego Chargersf
M r . Bud Grant, coach of t h e Minnesota Vikings; and M r . Dan Devine,
coach of t h e Green Bay Packers.
-
f . Socal Airops (17-25 J u l y ) : ENTERPRISE bSgan preparing f o r
t h e Operational Feadiness Exercise i n mid-July. The 17-25 J u l y at-sea
period was desigr ed to complete s h i p / a i r wing i n t e g r a t i o n i t h e x e r c i s e s
of increasing complexity. Specialized e x e r c i s e s such a s "Komarexes" were
held. A Komarex p i t s t h e a s s e t s of t h e ship-and a i r wirlg a g a i n s t
simulated lbmar surface t o surface m i s s i l e boats.

ENTERPRISE a l s o launched t w o "mini-Alfa" s t r i k e s and donducted


two Readiexes during t h i s period. A "Readiex" i s a nuclear weapons
loading exercise which r e q u i r e s t h e c l o s e c o o r d i d t i o n o f m D s t of t h e
s h i p ' s departments. I t e x e r c i s e s command and c o n t r o l , i n t e l l i g e n c e ,
o p e r a t i o n s , a i r o p e r a t i o n s , and weapons i n a d d i t i o n t o o t h e r functions.

The chip went t o an a c t u a l "General Quarters"' t h e n i g h t


before it returned to Alameda when a f i r e broke o u t i n t h e s h i p ' s newly-
i n s t a l l e d VAST slates. Although t h e f i r e was s e r i o u s , it was extinguished
with no i n j u r y . This f a c t a t t e s t e d t o t h e s k i l l and proficiency of
t h e damage c a n t r c l p a r t i e s .

When t h e s h i p entered p o r t , major VAST space r ? p a i r s had


to be undertaken. There was extensive damage to s e n s i t i v e VAST
e l e c t r o n i c e q u i p e n t . A c r a s h program involving many agencies and
s h i p ' s company personnel was completed with t h e system again becoming
operational withjn two weeks of t h e time of t h e f i r e .

Durirg t h e same (26 J u l y - 6 August) in-port period, t h e crew


learned t h a t the) had earned COMNAVA1RPACmsB a t t l e Efficiency pennant
f o r t h e 1973-74 competitive cycle. This was t h e f i f t h time t h e s h i p
.-. won t h e B a t t l e Efficiency award s i n c e commissioning.

Two c f ENTERPRISE'S departments won f i r s t p l a c e departmental


COMNAVAIRPAC awards. The Engineeringneactor and A i r c r a f t Intermediate
Maintenance Departments came i n f i r s t place f o r s h i p departmental awards.
Combat Information Center and Communications received runner-up awards.

Vice ~ d m i r a lBaldwin gave an i n d i c a t i o n of what it is l i k e


f o r t h e c a r r i e r i n a peacetime environment when he announced t h e awards:

"The r e c e n t competitive c y c l e was a time of v a s t


t r a n s i t i o n f o r NAVAIRPAC u n i t s . During a period of retrenchment from
y e a r s o f rigorous combat a c t i v i t y , you have had t o adapt t o new modes
of operation, confront new problems, and g e n e r a l l y overcome t h e s t r a i n s
which t h e s e years have had on our equiptent and personnel. With
increasingly l i m i t e d a s s e t s , t h i s t r a n s i t i o n has required innovative
management and aggressive leadership a t a l l l e v e l s . NAVAIRPAC u n i t s
have made s i g n i f i c a n t progress toward meeting t h e new g o a l s we have s e t
and I am p a r t i c u l a r l y p r o ~ dof t h e s e ships, departments and squadrons
named i n t h i s message. The competition was extremely c l o s e , and should
be. Congratulatims".
DECLASSIFIED
ENTERPRISE had a number of distincjuished v i s i t o r s t o to.2
o f f t h e in-port period. On 31 J u l y , General Robert E. Cushrnan, Jr.,
t h e Commandant o f t h e b a r i n e Corps, spoke a t :he Navy League c e r e m o ~ i e s
held i n t h e hanger bay of ENTERPRISE. H e was accompanied by Admiral
I s a a c C. Kidd, t h e Chief of Naval M a t e r i a l anti t h e Honorable R. Blackwell,
t h e A s s i s t a n t S e c r e t a r y of Commerce f o r Marit'me A f f a i r s . The Honorable
J. Middendorf 111, S e c r e t a r y of t h e Navy, a l s o v i s i t e d ENTERPRISE i n
c o n j u c t i o n with t h e Navy League Ccmvention.

g. WEPTRAEX, NOREX, FLEETEX, ORE (7-26 August): On 7 August,


ENTERPRISE began h e r l a s t two at-sea p e r i o d s b e f o r e h e r Western P a c i f i c
deployment. The f i r s t period was used i n a Weapons Training Exercise,
i n p r e p a r a t i o n f o r t h e ORE. A f t e r a weekend I n San Diego, ENTERPRISE
began h e r Operational Readiness Exercise with an opposed t r a n s i t '&om
San Diego Bay on t h e morning of 1 9 August. The Operation evolved i n t o
a graded READIEX.

During t h e n e x t t h r e e days, ENTERPRISE p a r t i c . p a t e d i n F l e e t


Exercise BELLCAM. There were numerous " a t t a c k s " by sirnulilted "enemy
s h i p s " , including t h e Hydrofoils FLAGSTAFF and HIGH POINT and, i n
a d d i t i o n , CVW-14 a i r c r a f t operated along with U.S. Marine Corps Harrier
v e r t i c a l takeoff a i r c r a f t .

The Operational Readiness Exercise completed t h e week.


ENTERPRISE a g a i n m e t COMNAVAIRPAC's h . g h performance standards.
ENTERPRISE then r e t u r n e d to Alameda oil 27 August f o r her P r e p a r a t i o n
f o r Overseas Movement Period (POM). '.'he command enjoyed a 50% l e a v e
'
p o l i c y while simultaneously accomplishing t h e many p r e p a r a t i o n s t h t had
t o be made f o r t h e imminent Western P a c i f i c deployment. The six mc~nths
p r i o r t o deployment saw a c o n t i n u a l i n f l u x o f a v i a t i o n r e p a i r part:;
u n t i l approximately 45,000 l i n e items of a v i a t i o n m a t e r i a l were a h ) a r d .
During j u s t t h e f i n a l t h r e e weeks p r i o r t o deployment, ENTERPRISE :.oaded
approximately 300 t o n s o f m a t e r i a l and 360 t o n s of p r o v i s i o n s i n c l ~ t d i n g
i n i t i a l support f o r t h e F-14 and EA-6B a i r c r a f t .

h. WESTPAC T r a n s i t (17 Septerlber -


17 October) : 17 September
- was a s a d day f o r t h e many ENTERPRISE crewmen because t h e s h i p was embarking
on a deployment of u n c e r t a i n d u r a t i o n . This would be t h e n i n t h c r u i s e of
CVAN 6 5 ' s t h i r t e e n y e a r h i s t o r y .
--
The t r a n s i t was l i t e r a l l y q u i e t . ENTERPRISE remained under
e l e c t r o n i c emission s i l e n c e f o r much o f t h e t r a n s i t .

-. A i r Wing t r a i n i n g was n o t completely abandoned however. For


example, t h e ENTERPRISE conducted a "BEAREX" on t h e 22nd o f September. I n
t h i s e x e r c i s e , a P-3B Orion simulated a S o v i e t Bear bomber i n o r d e r t o
- t e s t t h e s h i p ' s a b i l i t y t o d e t e c t and i n t e r c e p t h o s t i l e a i r c r a f t .

Throughout t h e t r a n s i t , t h e Combat Information Center ,issumed


t h e f u n c t i o n of a n t i - a i r , surface/sub-surface, and e l e c t r o n i c w a r f i r e
coordinator f o r t h e e n t i r e f o r c e .
The ENTERPRISE a r r i v e d a t P e a r l Harbor on t h e 23rd f o r a f u l l day
of meetings, resupply operations, and r e c r e a t i o n . I t then conducted a
week of graded f l i g h t operations (COMTUEX 8-74). On t h e 25th, t h e Sea
Sparrow was f i r e d f o r t h e second time of 1974.

On 27 September, Admiral M. Weisner, t h e Commander-in-Chief,


P a c i f i c F l e e t , flew o u t f o r a t e s t hop i n t h e F-14. He had t h e honor
of helping t o make t h e 147,000th a r r e s t e d landing on board ENTERPRISE.

ENTERPRISE returned to P e a r l Harbor on 29 September. Many crew


members had an opportunity t o enjoy Hawaii during t h e two-day stay.
The s h i p arranged f r e e bus s e r v i c e t o downtown Honolulu and o f f e r e d
s p e c i a l s e r v i c e t o u r s of Honolulu and Oahu.

During t h e same period, Admiral Noel Gaylor, t h e Commander-in-Chief,


P a c i f i c , came aboard f o r a s h o r t v i s i t .

The s h i p resumed i t s WESTPAC t r a n s i t on t h e second 6f October. It


was a long t r a n s i t , but t h e time was well used to prepare f ~ imminent
r
South China Sea operations.

There were a l s o a number of r e c r e a t i o n a l a c t i v i t i e s . For example,


t h e r e was a cookout and musical show held on t h e f l i g h t deck a few days
a f t e r t h e c a r r i e r l e f t Pearl. A boxing smoker held on t h e hanger b.g~
was a l s o popular. I n a d d i t i o n , a Captain's Cup s p o r t s tournament was
a l s o held. I t included a wide v a r i e t y of events ranging from bridge t o a n
arduous t h r e e mile run on a very hot f l i g h t deck.

The crew f i n a l l y saw land on t h e 16th. The Philippine g r e e t i n g to


our a r r i v a l was l i t e r a l l y stormy. The s h i p had t o t r a n s i t t h e narrow
Mindor0 S t r a i t s while b a t t l i n g heavy s e a s from Typhoon Carmen. CVAN 65
f i n a l l y docked a t Cubi Point Naval A i r S t a t i o n ' s Leyte P i e r on t h e
evening of t h e 17th.

--
i. P h i l i p p i n e Operations ( 2 1 October -
10 December): Although
most of t h e crew received a t h r e e day r e s p i t e i n Cubi, t h e a i r wing conducted
f l i g h t operations from Cubi P o i n t Naval A i r Stdrtion. ENTERPRISE pulled
o u t on 21 October f o r c y c l i c operations i n t h e Subic Oparea. This period
was necessary i n order to build aircrew proficiency a f t e r a long t r a n s i t
which offered few f l y i n g hours.

Navy Secretary J. Middendorf I11 paid a second 1974 v i s i t to


ENTERPRISE on 31 October - 1 November. H e a l s o presented t h r e e medals t o
CDR Gordon Nakagawa of VA-196 f o r t h e Cammander's "Heroic endeavors, excep-
t i o n a l s k i l l , and devotion t o duty . . . I v while a POW i n Vietnam. CDR
- Nakagawa received a Bronze S t a r i n Lieu of a second Navy Conmendation Medal.

~ovemberwas s i g n i f i c a n t f o r t h e a i r wing i n another way. I t


marked t h e i r end of a year of accident f r e e f l y i n g . This is a record t h a t
few a i r wings match.
DECLASSIFIED
j.. MULTIPLEX and Hong Kong (11-24 November): The ENTERPRISE
p a r t i c i p a t e d i n MULTIPLEX 2-75 during i t s next at-sea period. MULTIPLEX
was an e f f o r t t o t e s t our a b i l i t y t o respond t o d i f f e r e n t l e v e l s of
conflict - counterinsurgency, g e n e r a l naval war, and a l l - o u t nuclear war.
During t h e conventional war phase, ENTERPRISE a i r c r a f t made repeated
" r a i d s " a g a i n s t a wide v a r i e t y of simulated S o v i e t combatants. Such
t r a i n i n g w i l l undoubtedly become a r o u t i n e p a r t of f u t u r e naval t r a i n i n g .
Increasing e f f o r t i s being placed i n t o r e a l i s t i c a l l y simulating t h e t h r e a t s
a c a r r i e r i s l i k e l y t o encounter.

With t h e conclusion of MULTIPLEX, ENTERPRISE proceeded t o


Hong Kong and anchored o u t on t h e morning of t h e 18th. A s it h a s on
o t h e r occasions, t h e s h i p ' s p u b l i c a f f a i r s o f f i c e r provided l a r g e amounts
of sightbeeing information about t h e a r e a . The t o u r s o f f i c e r a g a i n
arranged f o r many t o u r s of t h e a r e a .

CVW-14 received a new Commander on t h e 21st. Commander J. R.


Wilson r e l i e v e d "CAG" Furlong i n a Change-of-Command ceremony held on
t h e hanger deck.

A f t e r a n extremely s h o r t , a l b e i t expensive, week i n Hong Kong,


CVAN 65 s e t s a i l f o r what developed i n t o a month long l i n e period.

The Commander of B r i t i s h Forces i n Hong Kong v i s i t e d ENTERPRISE


a s she l e f t Hong Kong. The a i r wing gave a b r i e f f l i g h t demonstration
i n h i s honor.

k. Bayanihan and Gulf of Tonkin Specops (24 November - 24 December):


CVAN 65 re,turned t o t h e P h i l i p p i n e Oparea and p a r t i c i p a t e d i n Operation
MABLEX/Bayanihan ("working t o g e t h e r " ) on 4-6 December. Bayanihan was a
j o i n t Philippine-U.S. amphibious landing o p e r a t i o n i n which ENTERPRISE
a i r c r a f t provided a i r cover f o r t h e invading f o r c e .

ENTERPRISE had some d i s t i a g u i s h e d v i s i t o r s i n conjunction w i t h


Bayanihan. U.S. Ambassador t o t h e P h i l i p p i n e s , t h e Honorable W i l l i a m
H. S u l l i v a n , was joined by t h e Chief, J o i n t U.S. M i l i t a r y Assistance
Group, and t h e Deputy Commanding General. of t h e P h i l i p p i n e A i r Force,
Navy, and t h e Flag O f f i c e r i n Command o f t h e P h i l i p p i n e Navy.
. -
With Bayanihan completed, ENTERPRISE crewmen began looking
forward t o an in-port holiday period. T h e i r p l a n s changed when t h e J o i n t
Chiefs of S t a f f d i r e c t e d ENTERPRISE t o proceed t o t h e Gulf of Tonkin and
conduct c y c l i c a i r o p e r a t i o n s o f f t h e c o a s t of South Vietnam. A i r
o p e r a t i o n s , o f t e n hampered by t h e very poor weather c o n d i t i o n s , were
conducted under a very c l o s e a i r c o n t r o l .

1. Indian Ocean P r e p a r a t i o n s (25-30 December): ENTERPRISE "made


it" back t o Cubi P o i n t i n time f o r Christmas a r r i v i n g on t h e evening of
24 December. Despite t h e holiday season, ENTERPRISE had t o prepare f o r a
long-term Indian Ocean deployment and a p o s s i b l e round-the-world c r u i s e .
- T r a f f i c t o t a l s f o r 1974:

Month Send
DECLASSIFIED

Receive

Jzn
Feb
Mar
Apr
My
;
Jun
J u ~
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

e. Deck Department Unreps:

1. During t h e p e r i o d 1 March 1974 t o 31 December 1974, Deck


Department conducted 30 underway r e p l e n i s h m e n t s , t r a n s f e r r i n g 2731 t o n s
o f bombs, bomb components, m i s s i l e s , ammunitions, f l e e t f r e i g h t and
s t o r e s . Also t r a n s f e r r e d d u r i n g t h i s p e r i o d were 7,048,000 g a l l o n s o f
JP-5 and 366,875 g a l l o n s o f Naval D i s t i l l a t e . Deck Department a l s o
d e l i v e r e d 611,000 g a l l o n s o f Naval D i s t a l l a t e t o ENTERPRISE e s c o r t s .

2. Underway Replenishments:

1 9 Apr 1974 USS SHASTA (AE-33) 167 t o n s ammo


20 Apr 1974 USS SHASTA (AE-33) 348 t o n s ammo
23 Apr 1974 USS NAVASOTA (AO-106) 312,000 g c l l o n s JP-5
13 May 1974 USS NAVASOTA (AO-106) 323,000 g a l l o n s JP-5
8 Jun 1974 USS STEIN (DE-1065) d e l i v e r 85,000 g c l l o n s ND
24 Jun 1974 USS NAVASOTA (AO-106) 343,000 gc l l o n s JP-5
18 J u l 1974 USS MOUNT HOOD (AE-29) 350 t o n s i m o
19 J u l 1974 USS NAVASOTA (AO-106) 569,000 g a l l o n s JP-5
13 Aug 1974 USS NAVASOTA (AO-106) 774,000 g a l l o n s JP-5
216,000 g a l l o n s ND
23 Aug 1974 USS NAVASOTA (AO-106) 883,000 g a l l o n s JP-5
23 Aug 1974 USS KISKA (AE-35) 91 t o n s ammo
23 Sep 1974 USS CAMDEN (AOE-2) 875 g a l l o n s ND
126,000 g a l l o n s JP-5
20 t o n s s t o r e s
9 Oct 1974 USS STEIN (DE-1065) d e l i v e r 100,000 g a l l o n s ND
9 Oct 1974 USS AGERHOLM (DD-826) d e l i v e r 90,000 g a l l o n s ND
14 Oct 1974 USS STEIN (DE-1065) d e l i v e r 114,000 g a l l o n s ND
14 Oct 1974 USS AGERHOT,M (DD-8 26) d e l i v e r 106,000 g a l l o n s ND
DECLASSIFIED,
17 O c t 1974 USS ?EN (AOE-2) 302 t o n s s u p p l i e s
113 t o n s p r o v i s i o n s
23 t o n s s h i p s stores
24 Oct 1974 USS ENGLAND (DLG-22) d e l i v e r 116,000 g a l l o n s N13
30 O c t 1974 USS TOLOVANA (AO-64) 8!i3,000 g a l l o n s JP-5
l!;0,000 g a l l o n s ND
30 Oct 1974 USS S A N JOSE (AFS-7) :8 t o n s s u p p l i e s
r 4 tons provisions
1 2 t o n s s h i p stores
..
12 Nov 1974 USS MARS (AFS-1) @o t o n s am10
1 2 1 tons provisions
1 3 t o n s ship stores
1 5 Nov 1974 uss KANSAS CITY (AOR-3) 450,000 g a l l o n s JP-5
1 6 Nov 1974 USS PYRO (AE-24) 232 t o n s ammo
29 Nov 1974 uss MARS (AFS-1) 199 t o n s anma
1 7 t o n s stores
3 Dec 1974 USS KANSAS CITY (AOR-3) 1,180,000 g a l l o n s JP-5
3 Dec 1974 USS KANSAS CITY (AOR-3) 1 2 t o n s stores
12 Dec 1974 USS GUADALUPE (AO-32) 415,000 g a l l o n s JP-5
15 Dec 1974 USS WHITE PLAINS(AFS-4) 207 t o n s s u p p l i e s
61 tons provisions
44 t o n s s h i p stores
20 Dec 1974 USNS TALUGA (T-AO-62) 820,000 g a l l o n s JP-5
23 Dec 1974 USS SAN JOSE (AFS-7) 32 t o n s s u p p l i e s
150 t o n s p r o v i s i o n s
6 1 t o n s s h i p s stores

f. A i r O p e r a t i o n s Summarx:

T o t a l nwnber o f a r r e s t e d l a n d i n g s i n 1974 10,168

T o t a l number o f a r r e s t e d l a n d i n g s i n ENTERFRISE 150,441


History.

g. A i r Department Summary:

1. C a t a p u l t o p e r a t i o n s d u r i n g deployment (17 Sep - 3 1 Dec)

Cat 1 Cat 2 Cat 3 Cat. 4 -

No Loads 132 155 157 146


Aircraft
Total
-
1099
1231
-843
998
-920
1077
-
804
950
2. ~ r r e s t i n ggear or)t.rat-ions d u r i n g deployment (17 Sep -
31 Dec) :

Engine Number Arrestments

1
2
3
4
Total

h. Engineering Department summary: I n 1 9 7 4 , t h e Engineering


Department proved i t s e l f i n v a l u a b l e i r support o f t h e s h i p , accomplishing
many t a s k s i n a e f f i c i e n t and p r o f e s s i o n a l manner.

M D i v i s i o n had a busy year overhauling many pumps i n ENTERPRISE'S


four Main Machinery rooms and two A u x i l i a r y Machinery rooms. Main
condensatepumps overhauled included l A , 2A, 3A, and B. Three main
feed b o o s t e r pumps were overhauled. Main feed pumps overhauled t o t a l e d
t h r e e . Moreover, two t u r b i n e r o t o r s were r e p l a c e d on t h e 2B and 2C main
feed pumps. F i r e pump numbers 6,8,10, and 12 were overhauled. Number
one f u e l o i l t r a n s f e r pump was r e b u i l t .

The continued a b i l i t y of t h e s h i p s d i s t i l l i n g p l a n t and water


t r e a t m e n t system t o provide s u f f i c i e n t water t o s a t i s f y a l l demands was
demonstrated by t h e t r a n s f e r of 12,500 g a l s o f feed water upon r e q u e s t
t o a d e s t r o y e r while i n p o r t Subic Bay. Approximately 600,000 g a l s o f
navy d i s t i l l a t e f u e l was t r a n s f e r r e d t o e s c o r t s h i p s from t h e cargo
f u e l s t o r a g e and t r a n s f e r system.

A Division r e p a i r e d a compressor and a c h i l l water a i r


conditioning p l a n t . The speed i n c r e a s e r and compressor i m p e l l e r s were
r e p l a c e d on number 5 E l l i o t low p r e s s u r e a i r compressor. The i n t e r n a l
o i l pump on number f i v e 175 t o n c e n t r i f u g a l c h i l l e d water a i r c o n d i t i o n i n g
p l a n t was overhauled. A sheared p i s t o n connecting rod damaged number t m
c h i l l e d d r i n k i n g water compressor housing. Foreign p a r t i c l e carryover
caused t h e damage and a new compressor i s s t i l l on o r d e r . A D i v i s i o n
implemented a methan r e d u c t i o n program f o r l i q u i d oxygen which proved
suacessful.

R D i v i s i o n d i s t r i b u t e d t h e new Survival Support Device (SSD)


and i n s t a l l e d a charging system f o r same. A Head H a b i t a b i l i t y Shop was
e s t a b l i s h e d t o maintain s a n i t a r y d r a i n l i n e s and head f i x t u r e s .

E ~ i v i s i o ni n s t a l l e d s i x 2000 pound r o a s t ovens on t h e ship.


Moreover, a l l 7 o f ENTERPRISE'S s c u l l a r y machines were overhauled. The
s h i p s TV system underwent changes t h i s year. A new antenna system was
i n s t a l l e d . Moreover, t.he s h i p s entertainment system was incorporated
i n t o t-he TV c i r c u i t r y .