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MonacoPROFILER

User Guide
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Printed in the U.S.A. ©2003 Monaco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Ver. 4.6 February, 2003

This document contains proprietary information of Monaco Systems, Inc. No part of this manual may be reproduced or
transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, for any pur-
pose, without the express written permission of Monaco Systems, Inc. The software, which includes information con-
tained in any databases, described in this document is furnished under a license agreement or nondisclosure agreement
and may be used or copied only in accordance with the terms of the agreement. It is against the law to copy the software
except as specifically allowed in the license or nondisclosure agreement. Information in this document is subject to
change without notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of Monaco Systems.

All brand or product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders.

Monaco Systems, Inc. • 100 Burtt Road • Andover, MA 01810 • www.monacosys.com PANTONE®, Hexachrome® and
other Pantone, Inc. trademarks are the property of Pantone, Inc.

2
Congratulations

Congratulations

Congratulations on your purchase of MonacoPROFILER—


an application for producing custom ICC (International
Color Consortium) profiles for your input, monitor, and
output devices.

MonacoPROFILER is intended for creative professionals


who require a color-managed production environment.

This guide assumes you have a good understanding of color


theory and color management workflows, and a working
knowledge of your input device, output device and their
associated software.

MonacoPROFILER Package Components


Your MonacoPROFILER package includes the following:

• MonacoPROFILER CD
• MonacoPROFILER User Guide
• IT8 Reflective 5x7 target
• Registration Card
• Software Protection Key (dongle)

3
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Product Registration and Support


So that we can provide you with technical support and keep
you updated with the latest product information, be sure to
complete registration on-line or fill out and return the
enclosed registration card.

For more information on support options, the latest soft-


ware updates, and other helpful information, visit Monaco
Systems at www.monacosys.com. You may also contact us
directly at support@monacosys.com.

Using the Documentation


This guide contains information on the installation and use
of MonacoPROFILER software. It provides general instruc-
tions for using your input device, monitor, and output
device to create ICC profiles, and explains the basics of creat-
ing linked profiles and editing output profiles.

Read... To learn about...


Preface package components
product registration and support
using the documentation
Chapter 1 system requirements, dongle installation
Chapter 2 quick start to using the software
Chapter 3 creating monitor profiles
Chapter 4 creating scanner profiles
Chapter 5 creating digital camera profiles
Chapter 6 creating output profiles
Chapter 7 updating output profiles
Chapter 8 editing output profiles
Chapter 9 creating and editing linked profiles
Chapter 10 viewing output profile gamuts
Glossary useful terms
Release Notes (CD) installation, software changes and additions

4
Table of Contents

Contents
Congratulations........................................................... 3
MonacoPROFILER Package Components .....................3
Product Registration and Support ..................................4
Using the Documentation ...............................................4
1 Installation ............................................................... 9
Minimum System Requirements.....................................9
Software Installation ......................................................10
Installing the Software Protection Key..........................10
2 About MonacoPROFILER ................................... 11
Gold vs. Platinum Editions ............................................12
What You Need To Get Started.....................................12
Quick Start to Using MonacoPROFILER .....................13
3 Creating CRT Profiles .......................................... 15
CRT Profile Basics ..........................................................15
Before You Begin............................................................16
Step 1: Select Device ......................................................17
Step 2: Adjust Monitor..................................................19
Step 3: Measure Lightest Black .....................................21
Step 4: Measure Darkest Black......................................22
Step 5: Set Brightness ....................................................23
Step 6: Measure Display ................................................24
Step 7: Set White Point and Gamma............................25
Step 8: Create Profile .....................................................26
4 Creating LCD Profiles .......................................... 27
LCD Profile Basics..........................................................27
Before You Begin............................................................28
Step 1: Select Device ......................................................29

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 2: Adjust Monitor.................................................. 31


Step 3: Measure Brightest White .................................. 33
Step 4: Set Contrast ....................................................... 34
Step 5: Measure Lightest Black ..................................... 35
Step 6: Measure Darkest Black ..................................... 36
Step 7: Set Brightness .................................................... 37
Step 8: Measure Display................................................ 38
Step 9: Set White Point and Gamma............................ 39
Step 10: Create Profile................................................... 40
5 Creating Scanner Profiles ................................... 41
Scanner Profile Basics .................................................... 41
About Input Targets....................................................... 42
Step 1: Scan the Input Target ....................................... 44
Step 2: Input Target Selection ...................................... 45
Step 3: Acquire Input Target ........................................ 46
Step 4: Identify Crop Marks ......................................... 47
Step 5: Create Profile..................................................... 48
Delta E............................................................................. 48
6 Creating Digital Camera Profiles ....................... 51
Digital Camera Profile Basics ........................................ 52
About Targets for Digital Cameras ............................... 52
Step 1: Capture the Input Target.................................. 53
Step 2: Input Target Selection ...................................... 55
Step 3: Acquire Input Target ........................................ 56
Step 4: Identify Crop Marks ......................................... 57
Step 5: Create Profile..................................................... 58
Delta E Values ................................................................ 59
7 Creating Output Profiles..................................... 61
Output Profile Basics ..................................................... 61
Step 1: Select Profile Data ............................................. 62
Step 2: Select Device...................................................... 64
Step 3: Choose Linearization Options ......................... 65
Step 4: Print Linearization Test Target ........................ 68
Step 5: Locate Anchor Patches...................................... 69
Step 6: Read Linear Patches .......................................... 70
Step 7: Choose Color Patch Options............................ 77
Step 8: Print Color Patches ........................................... 80

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Table of Contents

Step 9: Locate Anchor Patches......................................81


Step 10: Read Color Patches .........................................82
Step 11: Choose Profile Options....................................90
Step 12: Create Profile..................................................101
Data Averaging .............................................................102
8 Updating Output Profiles.................................. 105
Re-linearizing an Output Profile .................................106
Rebuilding an Output Profile ......................................111
9 Editing Output Profiles ..................................... 113
Editing Basics................................................................113
Previewing Edits to the Profile ....................................114
Determining which transform to edit .........................115
Profile Editing Workflow Overview ............................117
Using Profiles with MonacoPROFILER......................118
Working in the Profile Editing Window.....................122
Opening a New Sample Image.....................................123
Setting Profile Options.................................................125
Splitting the View of the Sample Image ......................126
Magnifying and Reducing the View ............................127
Moving the Sample Image ...........................................127
Printing the Sample Image...........................................128
Using the Cross-hair or Eyedropper ...........................128
Viewing Color Values in the Sample Image................129
Adjusting Lightness ......................................................130
Adjusting Saturation ....................................................131
Adjusting Output Curves.............................................132
Editing Color Selectively ..............................................134
Fine Tuning Output Profiles........................................139
Edit Profile White Point...............................................143
Saving Edited Profiles...................................................145
Saving the Sample Image .............................................146
10 Creating and Editing Linked Profiles ............. 147
Linked Profile Basics ....................................................147
Creating Linked Profiles ..............................................148
Step 1: Choose Profile Data .........................................148
Step 2: Choose Profile Options....................................149
Step 3: Create Profile....................................................157

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Editing Linked Profiles ................................................ 158


11 Viewing Output Profile Gamuts ..................... 167
Viewing the Color Gamut Model................................ 168
Comparing Device Color Gamuts............................... 169
Glossary.................................................................... 171
Index ......................................................................... 181

8
Installation

1 Installation
This chapter provides a list of minimum system require-
ments and installation instructions. In addition to a mea-
surement device (see Chapter 2 for a list of supported devices),
you will need the following:

Minimum System Requirements


Macintosh
Power PC® Processor
Mac OS software versions 9.1-9.x
-180 MB of available RAM
Mac OS X version 10.1.4 or higher
-256 MB of available RAM
24-bit display
100 MB of available hard-disk space
USB port
Windows
Pentium® PC or faster processor
Microsoft® Windows 98SE/2000/ME/XP
24-bit display with LUT support
128 MB of available RAM
100 MB of available hard-disk space
USB port

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Software Installation
See the Release Notes on the CD for the most up-to-date
installation instructions.

Installing the Software Protection Key


MonacoPROFILER includes a software protection key—or
dongle. A dongle is used to discourage software piracy.

Computer with one USB port:


If your computer has one USB port and you have more than
one USB device, connect the software protection key via a
powered USB hub (not included) to the computer’s USB
port.

Computer with two USB ports:


If your computer has two USB ports, simply connect the
software protection key to one of the computer’s USB ports.

10
About MonacoPROFILER

2 About MonacoPROFILER
MonacoPROFILER is software that enables you to build ICC-
compliant profiles for input devices, monitors, and output
devices. It also offers a software module that allows you to edit
output profiles to suit your individual color needs.

The Monitor option enables you to calibrate your monitor


and build a custom monitor profile using a supported mea-
surement device. MonacoPROFILER currently supports the
following devices for monitor profiling:
• MonacoSENSOR
• MonacoOPTIX
• X-Rite DTP92
• GretagMacbeth Spectrolino
• GretagMacbeth Eye-One
The Input option enables you to build custom profiles for
scanners and digital cameras.

The Output option enables you to build custom output pro-


files using a supported measurement device, re-linearize out-
put profiles to correct for device drift, and build linked profiles
(CMYK-to-CMYK) for device simulation. MonacoPROFILER
currently supports the following devices for output profiling:
• GretagMacbeth SpectroScan (reflective)
• GretagMacbeth SpectroScan T (transmissive)
• GretagMacbeth Eye-One
• GretagMacbeth Spectrolino
• X-Rite DTP41 AutoScan (reflective)
• X-Rite DTP41/T (transmissive)
• X-Rite Digital Swatchbook (DTP22)

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

• X-Rite Spectrofiler
• Spectrostar Spectrocam

The Editor option gives you powerful output profile editing


tools for adjusting output curves, editing CIELab (L*,a*,b*)
color attributes, customizing gamut compression to affect
color selectively, and fine tuning colors and neutrals in the
profile’s color space.

Gold vs. Platinum Editions


MonacoPROFILER is available in Gold and Platinum Edi-
tions to meet your profiling needs. The Platinum Edition sup-
ports all available options. The Gold Edition supports the
GretagMacbeth® ColorChecker and ColorChecker DC input
targets, multi-ink profile(5, 6, 7, and 8 color), and PANTONE®
Hexachrome® profiling as added options.

What You Need To Get Started


MonacoPROFILER won’t run off the CD; you need to install
it. See the Release Notes on the CD for installation instruc-
tions specific to your operating system.

Make sure all of your devices are properly connected and


working. Set your monitor to maximum bit depth. You
should be thoroughly familiar with the features and func-
tions of your measurement device.

Capture and print some images. You should be comfortable


with the software options and operation of both your input
and output devices.

If you are profiling a scanner or digital camera, have the


correct input target ready. (GretagMacbeth ColorChecker
targets are only supported in the Platinum Edition of Mona-
coPROFILER.)

12
About MonacoPROFILER

Quick Start to Using MonacoPROFILER


Launch the application. When the main window appears, select
a device to profile and follow the on-screen prompts. The wiz-
ard-like user interface will lead you through the process.

You can create profiles for your devices in any order. We rec-
ommend you start with your monitor profile, then input and
output profiles.

When you use the Editor option to edit an output profile,


you’ll want to have your monitor profile loaded as your sys-
tem profile. This will ensure that your displayed image is an
accurate representation of your expected output.

13
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

14
Creating CRT Profiles

3 Creating CRT Profiles


This chapter explains using the software and a supported col-
orimeter to create a profile for a CRT monitor. If you are pro-
filing an LCD device, see Chapter 4: Creating LCD Profiles.

You’ll need the following to get started:


• MonacoPROFILER program
• a supported colorimeter

CRT Profile Basics


CRT monitor profiles are created by using a measurement
device to measure a series of color patches sent to your dis-
play by the software. The collected data is analyzed and used,
along with other desired monitor attributes (gamma and
white point), to calibrate the display and create a custom
profile for your monitor.

The custom profile is based on phosphor measurements and


certain information you supply about your monitor—white
point, gamma, brightness and contrast settings—and is only
valid when the monitor is performing according to those
specifications. Once your monitor is profiled, if you adjust
the monitor’s brightness and contrast controls, the profile is
no longer accurate.

Equally important are the lighting conditions under which


the monitor is viewed. The appearance of a displayed image
is strongly influenced by the ambient lighting in the room.
Any increase in ambient light decreases the effective monitor
gamut. Create your profile using the same ambient lighting
conditions you use in your normal working environment. Set
your desktop pattern to a neutral gray and avoid configuring
your workstation near windows, bright lights or intensely
colored objects. These variables can change your perception
of color.

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Before You Begin


Before you begin profiling your monitor, do the following.

1. Turn your monitor on, and let it warm up for at least one
hour prior to calibrating your display.
2. Clean your CRT (cathode ray tube) screen with a soft,
lint-free cloth and a mild glass cleaner. DO NOT use
household glass cleaners. They can damage the display
surface. Use only cleaners manufactured for monitor dis-
plays. DO NOT spray cleaner directly onto the monitor
screen. Any liquid that seeps into the monitor case could
damage the electronics.
3. Clean the suction cup(s) on the colorimeter using a damp
lint-free cloth. Dust on a cup can cause the colorimeter to
loose suction during the measurement process.
4. Check the current bit depth setting for your monitor. If
necessary, change the display to maximum bit depth.
5. Set your room lighting to the level you typically use when
evaluating images. Avoid bright lights; they may affect the
profiling process. If you are creating a profile to use when
evaluating images for press, turn the room lighting off
with the exception of your viewing booth. In this manner
you replicate the conditions you use to evaluate proofs.
6. Set your desktop pattern to a medium gray or as close to
neutral as possible.
7. Do not use other calibration or gamma correction soft-
ware with MonacoPROFILER, or software functionality
may be impaired. Remove any other monitor calibration
or gamma correction software from your system.
• Macintosh: If using a version of Adobe Photoshop that
includes the Adobe Gamma Control Panel, disable it.
• Windows: If you are using Adobe Photoshop, uninstall
the Adobe Gamma Loader, from you system. Do not
remove the Adobe Gamma Control Panel.

16
Creating CRT Profiles

Step 1: Select Device


1. Launch MonacoPROFILER and click the Monitor icon.
The Select Device window appears. Use this window to
configure the software to use your measurement device.

2. From the Select Device window:


• Select the CRT radio button.
• Choose your measurement device from the Device list.
• If necessary, choose the port your measurement device
is connected to using the Connection Port list.

3. Click the next (>) button to continue.


The application verifies that it can connect with your
device.
Depending on which measurement device you are using,
you may be presented with a window instructing you to
calibrate the device. Follow the onscreen directions.

17
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

If you are using a Windows video card that does not support
WINDOWS color table correction, you may receive the following message:
“Your display device or driver does not support color
table correction. Please continue and the program will
build a monitor profile that can be applied in an ICC
compliant application.”
Continue building your profile. Your operating system
cannot use the profile for system-wide calibration. How-
ever, you can still apply the profile within an ICC compli-
ant application, such as Photoshop 5.0 or later. This will
ensure the accurate display of color in those applications.

18
Creating CRT Profiles

Step 2: Adjust Monitor


Before MonacoPROFILER can create your monitor profile, it
needs certain information about how your monitor is config-
ured to display images. Use the Adjust Monitor window to
adjust your monitor to your desired viewing conditions.

1. Adjust Contrast:
Using your monitor’s contrast control, set the contrast to
the maximum (100%) setting.
2. Adjust White Point:
Using the controls on the front of your monitor or in the soft-
ware associated with your monitor, adjust your monitor’s
white point setting to your preferred viewing conditions.

The hardware white point setting used by your monitor


determines the color of your monitor’s white. When each
of a monitor’s three electron guns are set to maximum,
the lights from the RGB phosphors mix to produce the
monitor’s white point. The color cast of the white point
can be described by specifying its color temperature in
Kelvin.

When adjusting a monitor, your goal is to set the monitor


white point (in Kelvin) to match the temperature of the
lighting conditions you use when viewing displayed

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

images and hard-copy proofs. A white point of 5000 K or


6500 K is typically used in most settings.

select this white point when evaluating images using...


5000 K1 standard D50 viewing booths

6500 K2 daylight conditions


7500 K northern daylight
9300 K uncorrected monitor

1 North American graphic arts industry prepress standard.


2 European graphic arts industry standard; ideal for photography.

For images intended for print, choose a white point that


corresponds to the temperature of your viewing booth. For
example, if you are a designer and use a D50 light booth to
evaluate images, choose the 5000 K white point setting.
3. Adjust Brightness:
Using your monitor’s brightness control, set the bright-
ness to the maximum (100%) setting.
4. Click the next (>) button to continue.

20
Creating CRT Profiles

Step 3: Measure Lightest Black


MonacoPROFILER uses your measurement device to mea-
sure the lightest black that can be output by your monitor.

1. Position Sensor:
Using the appropriate holder and method for your mea-
surement device, attach the device over the image dis-
played on the screen.

2. If your monitor does not have a brightness control, click


Skip and continue with Step 6: Measure Display.
3. Click the next (>) button to continue.

21
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 4: Measure Darkest Black


MonacoPROFILER uses your measurement device to mea-
sure the darkest black your monitor can display.

1. Adjust Brightness:
With the colorimeter still in position, use your monitor’s
brightness control to set the brightness to the minimum
(0%) setting. The contrast setting should remain at 100%.

2. Click the next (>) button to continue.


If the black range of your monitor is too low for accurate
adjustment, you will be presented with additional screens
allowing you to make adjustments visually.

Should this occur, click Continue and continue building


your profile. You will still be able to create a good profile for
your monitor.

22
Creating CRT Profiles

Step 5: Set Brightness


In this step, MonacoPROFILER uses your measurement
device to measure your monitor’s optimal brightness setting.

1. With the colorimeter still in position, click Begin.

2. Set Brightness:
Using your monitor’s brightness control, adjust the
brightness until the bar in the graph falls within the
Good range.

3. Wait a few seconds for the bar to stabilize, then click


Done.
4. Click the next (>) button to continue.

IMPORTANT: Once you have completed this step, do not


change the brightness or contrast controls. If you alter either
of these controls, you will inadvertently change the moni-
tor’s white point.

23
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 6: Measure Display


MonacoPROFILER uses your measurement device to mea-
sure the output of your monitor’s RGB phosphors.

1. With the colorimeter still in position, click Begin.

The program displays a series of color patches and col-


lects the data measured by your device.
2. When measurements are completed, carefully remove the
colorimeter from the display and click the next (>) but-
ton to continue.
NOTE: If the device comes loose during the measurement
process, click Cancel and try again. You may need to
dampen the suction cup(s) with a moist, lint-free cloth
before pressing the device to the display.

24
Creating CRT Profiles

Step 7: Set White Point and Gamma


In this step you are configuring the software to use the same
white point setting you configured the hardware to use in
Step 2. Because the software cannot override the monitor set-
ting, it is important that both settings match.

1. Choose the same white point setting you configured your


monitor to use in Step 2: Adjust Monitor.

2. Select the proper Gamma setting for your platform—1.8


for Macintosh or 2.2 for Windows.
If you are working in an environment with both Macin-
tosh and PC computers, use the same gamma setting on
both systems. Since most PCs cannot be set to 1.8, a target
gamma of 2.2 should be used with Macintosh monitors in
a mixed environment.
3. Click the next (>) button to continue.

25
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 8: Create Profile


You’ve now entered all the information the program needs to
create your monitor profile. The profile you create is only
valid when used with the settings and conditions you used to
build the profile. If you need to view images using different
viewing conditions, create a new profile for each set of view-
ing conditions used. In most cases you will have only one set
of conditions and one monitor profile.

From the Create Profile window:


1. Click Create Profile.
2. Name your profile and click Save. The software will
default to the correct location for storing profiles.
We suggest you use a descriptive name for the profile that
includes the device type, and date created.

Mon_Apple13_02

Monitor profile Apple 2002

3. When the Create Profile window reappears, click


the Home or next (>) button to return to the main
MonacoPROFILER window, or close the program.

Profiles are stored in the following locations:


Macintosh: System Folder:ColorSync Profiles
Mac OSX: /Library/ColorSync/Profiles
Win 98SE/ME: Windows\System\Color
Win 2000: WINNT\System32\spool\drivers\color
Win XP: Windows\System32\spool\drivers\color

NOTE: Make a practice of taping the controls/knobs (if


applicable) once adjustments are properly made. If the
brightness and contrast controls are accidently changed, you
will need to create a new profile for your monitor.

26
Creating LCD Profiles

4 Creating LCD Profiles


This chapter explains using the software and a supported col-
orimeter to create a profile for a laptop or flat panel display
(LCD). If you are profiling a CRT monitor, see Chapter 3:
Creating CRTs.

You’ll need the following to get started:


• MonacoPROFILER program
• a supported colorimeter

LCD Profile Basics


LCD monitor profiles are created by using a measurement
device to measure color data sent to your display by the soft-
ware. The custom profile is based on the collected data and
certain other information you supply about your display—
white point, gamma, brightness and contrast settings.

When profiling an LCD device, only use a colorimeter that


was designed for LCD profiling. The suction cups on devices
intended for CRT profiling will damage an LCD display.

MonacoPROFILER supports the following measurement


devices for profiling LCDs:
• MonacoOPTIX
• GretagMacbeth Spectrolino
• GretagMacbeth Eye-one

27
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Before You Begin


Before you begin profiling your monitor, do the following.

1. Turn your monitor on, and let it warm up for at least one
hour prior to calibrating your display.
2. Configure the colorimeter for use with LCDs.
Caution: Suction cup attachments are not designed for
use with LCD display surfaces. Using a suction cup
device will damage the display. Only use device attach-
ments which are designed for LCDs.
3. Check the current bit depth setting for your monitor. If
necessary, change the display to maximum bit depth.
4. Set your room lighting to the level you typically use when
evaluating images. Avoid bright lights; they may affect the
profiling process. If you are creating a profile to use when
evaluating images for press, turn the room lighting off
with the exception of your viewing booth. In this manner
you replicate the conditions you use to evaluate proofs.
5. Set your desktop pattern to a light gray or as close to neu-
tral as possible.
6. Do not use other calibration or gamma correction soft-
ware with MonacoPROFILER, or software functionality
may be impaired. Remove any other monitor calibration
or gamma correction software from your system.
• Macintosh: If using a version of Adobe Photoshop that
includes the Adobe Gamma Control Panel, disable it.
• Windows: If you are using Adobe Photoshop, uninstall
the Adobe Gamma Loader, from you system. Do not
remove the Adobe Gamma Control Panel.

28
Creating LCD Profiles

Step 1: Select Device


1. Launch MonacoPROFILER and click the Monitor icon.
The Select Device window appears. Use this window to
configure the software to use your measurement device.

2. From the Select Device window:


• Select the LCD radio button.
• Choose your measurement device from the Device list.
• Choose the port your measurement device is con-
nected to using the Connection Port list.

3. Click the next (>) button to continue.


The application verifies that it can connect with your
device.
Depending on which measurement device you are using,
you may be presented with a window instructing you to
calibrate the device. Follow the onscreen directions.

29
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

If you are using a Windows video card that does not support
WINDOWS color table correction, you may receive the following message:
“Your display device or driver does not support color
table correction. Please continue and the program will
build a monitor profile that can be applied in an ICC
compliant application.”
Continue building your profile. Your operating system
cannot use the profile for system-wide calibration. How-
ever, you can still apply the profile within an ICC compli-
ant application, such as Photoshop 5.0 or later. This will
ensure the accurate display of color in those applications.

30
Creating LCD Profiles

Step 2: Adjust Monitor


Before MonacoPROFILER can create your monitor profile, it
needs certain information about how your monitor is config-
ured to display images. Use the Adjust Monitor window to
adjust your monitor to your desired viewing conditions.

1. Adjust Contrast:
Set your monitor’s contrast to the maximum (100%) set-
ting. Note: Some monitors do not allow user adjustments.

2. Adjust White Point:


Using the controls on the front of your monitor or in the soft-
ware associated with your monitor, adjust your monitor’s
white point setting to your preferred viewing conditions.

The hardware white point setting used by your monitor


determines the color of your monitor’s white. When each
of a monitor’s three electron guns are set to maximum,
the lights from the RGB phosphors mix to produce the
monitor’s white point. The color cast of the white point
can be described by specifying its color temperature in
Kelvin.

When adjusting a monitor, your goal is to set the monitor


white point (in Kelvin) to match the temperature of the

31
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

lighting conditions you use when viewing displayed


images and hard-copy proofs. A white point of 5000 K or
6500 K is typically used in most settings.

select this white point when evaluating images using...


5000 K1 standard D50 viewing booths

6500 K2 daylight conditions


7500 K northern daylight
9300 K uncorrected monitor

1 North American graphic arts industry prepress standard.


2 European graphic arts industry standard; ideal for photography.

For images intended for print, choose a white point that


corresponds to the temperature of your viewing booth. For
example, if you are a designer and use a D50 light booth to
evaluate images, choose the 5000 K white point setting.
3. Adjust Brightness:
Using your monitor’s brightness control, set the bright-
ness to the maximum (100%) setting.
4. Click the next (>) button to continue.

32
Creating LCD Profiles

Step 3: Measure Brightest White


The Measure Brightest White window is used to determine
the brightest white that can be displayed by your display.

1. Set your display’s contrast and brightness controls to the


maximum level (100%). If your display does not have a
contrast control, click Skip and continue with Step 5:
Measure Lightest Black.
2. Position the colorimeter over the displayed outline.
3. Click the next (>) button to begin measuring.

*CAUTION: Colorimeters with suction cups are designed


for use with CRT (desktop) monitors. Attaching a colorime-
ter intended for use with a CRT to an LCD (laptop/ flat
panel) may damage the display. To profile an LCD, use a
supported device that is intended for that purpose. Mona-
coPROFILER can be used with the MonacoOPTIX, Gretag-
Macbeth Spectrolino and GretagMacbeth Eye-One devices
to profile LCDs.

33
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 4: Set Contrast


NOTE: The Set Contrast window is used to determine your display’s
In order to obtain unob- optimal contrast setting.
structed readings, you
may need to reposition
your Contrast dialog box.

1. With the colorimeter still in position over it’s outline,


click Begin.
2. Using your display’s contrast control, adjust the contrast
until the right edge of the indicator consistently falls
within the Good range.
3. When the indicator remains within the Good range, click
Done.
4. Click the next (>) button to continue.

IMPORTANT: Once you have completed this step, do not


change the contrast control.

34
Creating LCD Profiles

Step 5: Measure Lightest Black


MonacoPROFILER uses your measurement device to mea-
sure the lightest black that can be output by your monitor.

1. Confirm your monitor’s brightness level is set to 100%. If


your monitor does not have a brightness control, click
Skip and continue with Step 8: Measure Display.
2. With the colorimeter still in position over it’s outline,
click the next (>) button to continue.

35
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 6: Measure Darkest Black


MonacoPROFILER uses your measurement device to mea-
sure the darkest black your monitor can display.

1. Adjust Brightness:
With the colorimeter still in position, use your monitor’s
brightness control to set the brightness to the minimum
(0%) setting. The contrast setting should remain at the set-
ting selected in Step 4.

2. Click the next (>) button to continue.


If the black range of your monitor is too low for accurate
adjustment, you will be presented with additional screens
allowing you to make adjustments visually.

Should this occur, click Continue and continue building


your profile. You will still be able to create a good profile for
your monitor.

36
Creating LCD Profiles

Step 7: Set Brightness


In this step, MonacoPROFILER uses your measurement
device to measure your monitor’s optimal brightness setting.

1. With the colorimeter still in position, click Begin.

2. Set Brightness:
Using your monitor’s brightness control, adjust the
brightness until the bar in the graph falls within the
Good range.

3. Wait a few seconds for the bar to stabilize, then click


Done.
4. Click the next (>) button to continue.

IMPORTANT: Once you have completed this step, do not


change the brightness or contrast controls. If you alter either
of these controls, you will inadvertently change the moni-
tor’s white point.

37
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 8: Measure Display


MonacoPROFILER uses your measurement device to mea-
sure the output of your monitor’s RGB phosphors.

1. With the colorimeter still in position, click Begin.

The program displays a series of color patches and col-


lects the data measured by your device.
2. When measurements are completed, carefully remove the
colorimeter from the display and click the next (>) but-
ton to continue.

38
Creating LCD Profiles

Step 9: Set White Point and Gamma


In this step you are configuring the software to use the same
white point setting you configured the hardware to use in
Step 2. Because the software cannot override the monitor set-
ting, it is important that both settings match.

1. Choose the same white point setting you configured your


monitor to use in Step 2: Adjust Monitor.

2. Select the proper Gamma setting for your platform—1.8


for Macintosh or 2.2 for Windows.
If you are working in an environment with both Macin-
tosh and PC computers, use the same gamma setting on
both systems. Since most PCs cannot be set to 1.8, a target
gamma of 2.2 should be used with Macintosh monitors in
a mixed environment.
3. Click the next (>) button to continue.

39
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 10: Create Profile


You’ve now entered all the information the program needs to
create your monitor profile. The profile you create is only
valid when used with the settings and conditions you used to
build the profile. If you need to view images using different
viewing conditions, create a new profile for each set of view-
ing conditions used. In most cases you will have only one set
of conditions and one monitor profile.

From the Create Profile window:


1. Click Create Profile.
2. Name your profile and click Save. The software will
default to the correct location for storing profiles.
We suggest you use a descriptive name for the profile that
includes the device type, and date created.

Mon_Apple13_02

Monitor profile Apple 2002

3. When the Create Profile window reappears, click


the Home or next (>) button to return to the main
MonacoPROFILER windows, or close the program.

Profiles are stored in the following locations:


Macintosh: System Folder:ColorSync Profiles
Mac OSX: /Library/ColorSync/Profiles
Win 98SE/ME:Windows\System\Color
Win 2000: WINNT\System32\spool\drivers\color
Win XP: Windows\System32\spool\drivers\color

NOTE: Make a practice of taping the controls/knobs (if


applicable) once adjustments are properly made. If the
brightness and contrast controls are accidently changed, you
will need to create a new profile for your monitor.

40
Creating Scanner Profiles

5 Creating Scanner Profiles


This chapter explains creating input profiles for scanners.
You’ll need the following to get started:
• MonacoPROFILER program
• Input target
• Input device being profiled

Scanner Profile Basics


MonacoPROFILER can be used to characterize—or profile—
the behavior of your input device.

Characterization is the process of determining your scanner’s


gamut—or range of colors that it can distinguish. Character-
ization is accomplished by scanning an input target using the
scanner being profiled. The scanned color data is loaded into
MonacoPROFILER, where it is measured and compared to
known reference values for the color patches. The software
then analyzes the data and uses the results to transform the
scanned color data into a common language (color space) that
can be used by your output devices—monitor, proofer, or
press.

When creating a scanner profile, there are a few important


points to remember. Most scanner software allows you to make
adjustments in the scanning process to accommodate a wide

41
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

variety of originals. You should never use these options when


scanning the input target to create your profile or when scan-
ning images for use with a profile. The scanner settings used to
create both the profile and the images for use with the profile
must always be the same. If you alter the scanner settings when
capturing images to use with the profile, the profile will not be
accurate. If you desire to use different settings when capturing
images, create a separate scanner profile for each set of settings
you use.

About Input Targets


MonacoPROFILER ships with a Kodak IT8.7/2 reflective target
and supports the following targets for profiling input devices.

Use this target... when profiling this device


Reflective Scanner Transparency Scanner Digital Camera
Kodak IT8.7/1 X
Kodak IT8.7/2 X X
Macbeth ColorChecker X X
Macbeth ColorChecker® DC X X
HCT Reflective X X
HCT Transmissive X (preferred)

MonacoPROFILER Platinum Edition supports the Gretag-


Macbeth ColorChecker input targets. The Gold Edition does
not support GretagMacbeth targets unless you purchase this
option. If you do not own the required Kodak or GretagMac-
beth target, or you have the Gold Edition and desire to
upgrade, contact Monaco Systems for details and purchasing
information. To purchase a HutchColor HCT target, visit
www.hutchcolor.com.

If you own a supported target, you can use it. However, be


sure you also have the matching reference file for the target
and store it in the proper location for your platform.

NOTE: To obtain a reference file for a Kodak or Monaco Sys-


tems target, go to www.monacosys.com and click Down-
loads>Reference Files.

42
Creating Scanner Profiles

All input targets are used in the same manner. The target is
scanned or captured and the individual patch values are
compared to the values in the target’s corresponding refer-
ence file. The reference file is a numeric representation of the
colors in the input target. Reference files and input targets are
manufactured in matched sets. If you use an incorrect refer-
ence file, the application will create an inaccurate profile.

When prompted by the software, select a reference file by


matching its name to the code on the physical target. For
example, a Kodak reference file named R2199601.q60 would
be interpreted as a Kodak IT8.7/2 reflective target, manufac-
tured in 1996, with a lot number of 01.
R2 1996 01 .q60 Q60 target

reflective year of manufacture lot number

Kodak IT8.7/1 transparency targets in 35mm and 4x5 for-


mats begin with E3 and E1, respectively.

The HutchColor reference file begins with the letters “HCT”


and is followed by the same four digit number that is found
on the target, for example, HCT4006.

Reference File Locations


Reference file locations are system dependent. Reference files
are stored in the following locations:
Macintosh: System Folder:Application Support: Monaco>
IT8 Targets
Mac OS X: /Library/Application Support/Monaco/IT8 Targets
Windows: Program Files \Monaco Systems\MonacoPRO-
FILER\Preferences

43
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 1: Scan the Input Target


Prepare to create your scanner profile by using this procedure
to first scan the input target.

To scan the target using your scanner application:


1. Turn on your scanner and let it warm up.
2. Reflective Scanner:
Remove the target from its protective sleeve and place it
face down on the scanner’s document table so that it pro-
duces a squared right-side-up image when scanned. Be
sure the glass scanning surface is clean. Close the scanner
cover.
If you do not own a Transparency Scanner:
transparency target,
contact Monaco Sys- Position the transparency target in the scanner so that it
tems for details and produces a right-reading (not reversed), right-side-up
purchasing information. image when scanned. Refer to your scanner’s documenta-
tion for more information on positioning images.
3. Launch your scanner application.
4. Disable any auto color-correction options. Make a note of
your scanner settings. In the future, you will need to use
the exact same scanner settings (with the exception of res-
olution) when capturing images to use with the profile.
5. Reflective Scanner: Set your scanning resolution to 200 dpi.
If working with a 35mm Transparency Scanner: Set your scanning resolution to
scan, we recommend 800 dpi for 35mm target scans and 200 dpi for 4x5 target
opening the saved TIFF scans.
into a retouching pro-
gram and cloning out Using higher scanning resolutions is not recommended
any dust and scratches
before loading it into and will not produce better profiles.
MonacoPROFILER. 6. Prescan the target and crop the prescan to the edges of the
target.
7. Scan the target and save the scan as an uncompressed
TIFF file.

44
Creating Scanner Profiles

Step 2: Input Target Selection


Use the Input Target Selection window to identify the input
target and reference file that you are using to create the profile.

1. Launch MonacoPROFILER and click the Input option.


The Input Target Selection window appears.

2. Choose the input target you will use to profile your input
device from the Choose an input target list.
For more information on input targets, see About Input
Targets, earlier in this chapter.
REFERENCE FILE 3. Locate and open the reference file that matches your tar-
LOCATIONS: get from the Choose a reference file list, then click the
next (>) button to continue.
Macintosh: System
Folder: Application Sup- For more information on choosing reference files, see
port: Monaco:IT8 Targets
About Input Targets, earlier in this chapter.
Mac OS X: /Library/ If you do not see the reference file for your target, it may not
Application Support/
Monaco/IT8 Targets be stored in the proper location. If you purchased a transpar-
ency target or are using some other manufacturer’s target,
Windows: Program you should have received a matching reference file. Place the
Files \Monaco Systems\ matching reference file in the proper location for your plat-
MonacoPROFILER\Pref-
erences form (see sidebar). MonacoPROFILER automatically
defaults to this location. If you prefer to store the reference
file in another location, navigate to it by selecting Other...
from the Choose a reference file list.

45
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 3: Acquire Input Target


Use the Acquire Input Target window to load the saved TIFF
file of the target that you scanned in Step 1.

To load a saved scan:

1. Click Load Image. Locate and open the saved TIFF.


A thumbnail of the image appears. If a thumbnail does not
appear, you probably compressed the TIFF scan. The pro-
gram will not open a compressed file. Rescan the target and
save it as an uncompressed TIFF. If the target appears to be
skewed or incorrectly cropped, rescan the target.

2. Click the next (>) button to continue.

46
Creating Scanner Profiles

Step 4: Identify Crop Marks


Use the Crop Target window to identify crop mark locations
for the software. This enables the software to precisely locate
each color patch in the target.

Small squares used Large squares


to locate general areas used to place
to place crop marks crop marks
over crop
marks on
image

1. Use the four small squares (left) to locate each corner


crop mark on the image.
2. Crop the target by positioning the cursor over each crop
mark in the corresponding larger square and clicking the
mouse button.

Four crop mark locations

3. When all crop marks have been placed, click the next button.

47
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 5: Create Profile


MonacoPROFILER has all the information it needs to create
your custom input profile. Use this procedure to create,
name, and save your profile.

1. Click Create Profile.


2. Name your profile and click Save. The software will
default to the correct location for storing profiles.

Profiles are stored in the following locations:


Macintosh: System Folder:ColorSync Profiles
Mac OSX: /Library/ColorSync/Profiles
Win 98SE/ME: Windows\System\Color
Win 2000: WINNT\System32\spool\drivers\color
Win XP: Windows\System32\spool\drivers\color

We suggest using a descriptive name that reflects the


device type, model, and date the profile was created. You
may want to encode any special settings used if you are
creating more than one profile for your device.

Eps_800_0102

Epson scanner model 800 Jan. 2002

3. When the Create Profile window reappears, click the home


or next (>) button to return to the main program window,
or close the program.

Delta E
The Create Profile window displays the Average Delta E values
for your profile.

Average Delta E All is a calculated average representing the


difference between the actual Lab values of the patches and
values of the same patches as captured by your input device
and passed through the input profile.

48
Creating Scanner Profiles

Average Delta E in Gamut is the calculated average of all Delta E


values in the captured target that were within your device’s
gamut.

Percentage In Gamut/Out of Gamut is the percentage of the


patch set that fell within the gamut of your device vs. the per-
centage that fell outside the gamut of your device.

Average Delta E all CMC is a calculated average of the patch


values where a perceived difference can be detected. This
value is lower than the Average Delta E All value because the
human eye is only able to see subtle differences between close
colors when they are in the neutral areas of the color gamut.

The majority of high Delta E readings are caused by scanner


settings that shift the dynamic range of the IT8 during the
scanning process. For this reason, it is important that you
don’t use any preset built-in capture settings when scanning
the target. Most of these settings apply curves that shift the
white and black points and affect the dynamic range of the
final image. When capturing the target, always use your input
device’s default settings.

To a lesser degree, scratches and dust on a transparency tar-


get can affect the quality of a capture. We recommend that
you clean transparency targets with professional film cleaner
and compressed air before scanning.

If working with a drum or a reflective scanner, be sure the


glass scanning surface is clean.

TIP: When working with transparency targets, scan the target


using your scanner application. Open the saved scan into a
retouching program and clone out any scratches or dust that
were captured in the scan. Save the retouched target as an
uncompressed TIFF and re-perform the profiling procedure.

49
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

50
Creating Digital Camera Profiles

6 Creating Digital Camera Profiles


This chapter explains creating digital camera profiles. You’ll
need the following to get started:

• MonacoPROFILER program
• Input target
• Digital camera
• Controlled lighting
• Subject to be photographed

MonacoPROFILER Platinum edition supports the following


input targets for profiling digital cameras:
• GretagMacbeth ColorChecker®
• GretagMacbeth ColorChecker® DC
• Kodak IT8.7/2 reflective
• HutchColor HCT reflective
MonacoPROFILER Gold Edition supports the Kodak IT8.7/2
reflective target. To upgrade a Gold Edition to support Hutch-
Color and GretagMacbeth targets, contact Monaco Systems.

51
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Digital Camera Profile Basics


Digital camera profiles are created by shooting an input tar-
get using the same lighting conditions that will be used to
shoot images in the session. Because of these restrictions,
profiling a digital camera for use in a non-studio setting is
impractical.

Using a consistent light source is critical when creating digi-


tal camera profiles. While scanners have an internally con-
trolled light source, digital cameras do not. In order to create
an accurate digital camera profile, the temperature of the
light source that is used to capture both the input target and
final image must be the same.

As with a scanner profile, a digital camera profile can only be


applied to images shot with the same camera, lighting, and
exposure that were originally used to create the profile. If you
are shooting a series of digital scenes that demand different
configurations of lighting and camera settings, create a new
profile for each separate configuration. In a typical photo ses-
sion, the color temperature of the lighting is not altered and
the resulting profile is valid for all images shot in the session.

About Targets for Digital Cameras


MonacoPROFILER ships with a Kodak IT8.7/2 reflective tar-
get. The Kodak IT8.7/2 reflective target can be used to profile
a digital camera. However, the Macbeth ColorChecker® DC
target was specifically developed for use with digital cameras
and will produce better results. If you do not have the
GretagMacbeth target, contact Monaco Systems for purchas-
ing information.

Whether profiling a digital camera or scanner, input targets


are used in the same manner. The target is shot or captured
and the individual patch values are compared to the values in
the target’s corresponding reference file. The reference file
contains a numeric representation of the colors in the input
target. Reference files and input targets are manufactured in
matched sets. Consequently, it is important that you use the

52
Creating Digital Camera Profiles

correct reference file. If you use an incorrect reference file,


the application will create an invalid profile or not create a
profile at all.

If you own a supported target, be sure you also have the match-
ing reference file for the target and store it in the correct loca-
tion for your platform:
Macintosh: System Folder:Application Support:Monaco:
IT8 Targets
Mac OS X: /Library/Application Support/Monaco/IT8 Targets
Windows: Program Files\Monaco Systems\Monaco
PROFILER\Preferences

When prompted by the software, select a reference file by


matching its name to the code on the physical target. For
example, a Kodak reference file named R2199601.q60 would
be interpreted as a Kodak IT8.7/2 reflective target, manufac-
tured in 1996, with a lot number of 01.

R2 1996 01 .q60 Q 60 target

reflective year of manufacture lot number

Step 1: Capture the Input Target


Use the following guidelines to capture the input target using
your digital camera. Once the target is captured, continue
with Step 2: Input Target Selection to complete creating the
digital camera profile.

1. In a studio setting, set up the scene you desire to shoot.


2. Place the input target in a central location within the
scene, so that its position is parallel to the camera’s back.
3. Illuminate the scene from both sides at a 45° angle—so
that the target is evenly lit. All lights should be of the same
color temperature.
4. Turn off all available auto color correction and color
management options in your camera software. If you are

53
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

not familiar with the location of these options, contact


your camera manufacturer.
5. Determine the correct exposure. A correct exposure will fully
fill a histogram without clipping any highlights or shadows.
6. Manually white balance (sometimes referred to as gray
balance) the image based on manufacturer’s instructions.
7. Configure the camera so the input target fills the view-
finder (cropping out the remainder of the scene), and
capture the target with the white balance setting that you
will use to shoot the scene.
8. Save the image as an uncompressed TIFF.
9. Remove the input target from the scene.
10. Recompose the scene within the viewfinder as desired.
This may include repositioning the lighting as long as the
actual lights, and white balance are not changed.
11. Check the histogram to be sure the new lighting configu-
ration does not result in highlight or shadow clipping.
12. Capture and save the image as an uncompressed TIFF.
13. Open the saved TIFF that includes the input target into a
photo retouching application.
If resizing the target in 14. Crop the image to the edges of the input target and resize
Adobe Photoshop, use the image to result in a 4 MB file.
the Nearest Neighbor
resample method. 15. Save the cropped target as an uncompressed TIFF.

54
Creating Digital Camera Profiles

Step 2: Input Target Selection


This procedure identifies the input target and corresponding
reference file that you used in Step 1.

1. Launch MonacoPROFILER and click the Input option.


The Input Target Selection window appears.

2. Choose the input target you used in Step 1 from the


Choose an input target list.
3. Locate and select the reference file that matches your tar-
get from the Choose a reference file list.
REFERENCE FILE If you do not see the reference file for your target, it may
LOCATIONS: not be stored in the proper location. If you purchased a tar-
get, you should have received a matching reference file.
Macintosh: System
Folder:Application Sup- Place the matching reference file in the correct location for
port:Monaco:IT8 Tar- your platform. MonacoPROFILER automatically defaults
gets to this location. If you prefer to store the reference file in
another location, navigate to it by selecting Other... from
Mac OS X: /Library/Appli-
cation Support/Monaco/ the Choose a reference file list.
IT8 Targets 4. Click the next (>) button to continue.
Windows: Program Files
\Monaco Systems\
MonacoPROFILER\Pref-
erences

55
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 3: Acquire Input Target


1. Select Load Image in the Acquire Input Target window.
2. Locate and open the saved TIFF file of the input target
you created in Step 1.

A thumbnail of the image appears. If a thumbnail does


not appear, you probably compressed the TIFF scan. The
program will not open a compressed file. Reopen the
original image, recrop the image, and save it as an
uncompressed TIFF.
3. Click the next (>) button to continue.

56
Creating Digital Camera Profiles

Step 4: Identify Crop Marks


Identifying crop marks enables the software to precisely
locate each color patch in the target.

1. Use the four small squares (left) to locate each corner


crop mark on the image.

Small squares used Large squares


to locate general areas used to place
to place crop marks crop marks
over crop
marks on
image

2. Crop the target by positioning the cursor over each crop


mark in the corresponding larger square and clicking the
mouse button.

Four crop mark locations

3. When all crop marks have been placed, click the next button.

57
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 5: Create Profile


MonacoPROFILER has all the information it needs to create
your custom camera profile. Use the Create Profile window to
name and save your profile. You can optionally adjust the
lightness setting and save additional profiles.

1. Click Create Profile.

2. Enter a name your profile and click Save. The software


will default to the correct location for storing profiles.

Profiles are stored in the following locations:


Macintosh: System Folder:ColorSync Profiles
Mac OSX: /Library/ColorSync/Profiles
Win 98SE /ME:Windows\System\Color
Win 2000: WINNT\System32\spool\drivers\color
Win XP: Windows\System32\spool\drivers\color

We suggest using a descriptive name that reflects the


device type, model, and date the profile was created. You
may want to encode any special settings used if you are
creating more than one profile for your device.

DC_CaD30_012902

Digital Camera Canon D30 Jan. 29 2002

58
Creating Digital Camera Profiles

3. Adjust Lightness:
When the Create Profile window reappears, adjust the
Lightness setting if desired and save another profile.
The Lightness slider effectively changes the exposure used
to shoot the scene. Using multiple profiles to alter the
exposure or bracket the scene saves memory by not
requiring numerous shots of the scene.
4. When the Create Profile window reappears, click the home
or next (>) button to return to the main program window
or, close the program.

Delta E Values
The Create Profile window displays the Average Delta E values
for your profile.

Average Delta E All is a calculated average representing the dif-


ference between the actual Lab values of the IT8 patches and
values of the same patches as captured by your input device.

Average Delta E in Gamut is the calculated average of all Delta


E values in the captured target that were within your device’s
gamut.

Percentage In Gamut/Out of Gamut is the percentage of the


patch set that fell within the gamut of your device vs. the per-
centage that fell outside the gamut of your device.

Average Delta E all CMC is a calculated average of the patch


values where a perceived difference can be detected. This
value is lower than the Average Delta E All value because the
human eye is only able to see subtle differences between close
colors when they are in the neutral areas of the color gamut.

Some high Delta E readings are caused by poor quality devices


that are not capable of capturing the full color gamut of the
patch set. Of the better quality devices, the majority of high
Delta E readings are caused by device white balance settings
that shift the dynamic range of the input target during the cap-

59
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

ture process. To improve Delta E reading, try adjusting the


white balance in the camera settings and reprofiling the device.

60
Creating Output Profiles

7 Creating Output Profiles


This chapter explains creating RGB, CMYK, PANTONE®
Hexachrome®, and multi-ink (5, 6, 7, and 8 color) output pro-
files. You’ll need the following to get started:

• MonacoPROFILER program
• Layout or imaging application for printing patch layouts
• Calibrated spectrophotometer for measuring color patches
• Media/stock for which you are creating the profile
• Output device being profiled

MonacoPROFILER Platinum Edition supports PANTONE


Hexachrome and multi-ink profiles. The Gold Edition does
not support these options unless you purchased this configu-
ration. If you have the Gold Edition and desire to upgrade,
contact Monaco Systems for details and purchasing informa-
tion.

Output Profile Basics


Output profiles are created by using a measurement device to
measure a set of color patches output from your printing
device. The collected data is used to define the printable
gamut for the device and to build the output profile. In addi-
tion to these measurements, the program optionally linear-
izes the profile by measuring a separate linearization target
and making necessary compensation corrections.

61
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Output profiles are created for specific combinations of


media (paper/film), output resolution, and other printer set-
tings. When creating output profiles, create a profile using
the same combination of media, resolution, and device set-
tings you will use when printing images using the profile.

If you output an image using a profile and change the origi-


nal media, resolution or other device settings that were used
when creating the profile, you will get unpredictable color.
For example, if you desire to use multiple resolution settings
with a glossy photo-quality paper, create a separate profile
for each combination of paper and resolution used.

Step 1: Select Profile Data


This step guides you through the preliminary choices
required to create a new output profile.

1. Launch MonacoPROFILER and click the Output option.

2. Use the Select Profile Data window to select options for


this profiling session.
• Create New Profile is the default selection.
• CMYK is the default selection in the printer type list.

62
Creating Output Profiles

PANTONE Hexachrome and multi-ink options are


not available in the standard Gold Edition of Mona-
coPROFILER. To purchase this option, contact
Monaco Systems.
If you are profiling an RGB, PANTONE Hexachrome, or
multi-ink device, select the appropriate option from the
drop-down list. PostScript devices generally use CMYK pro-
files. Most desktop printers use RGB profiles, even though
the colorants are CMYK. To check what type of profile your
device uses, see your device’s user documentation.
If you creating a multi-ink (5, 6, 7, or 8-color) profile,
click the Edit button to the right of each ink name and
define the Lab values for each color. If you are using
spot colors and do not know the Lab values of the spot
color, obtain the Lab values by using the Photoshop
color picker. The Lab values you enter are used by the
software to create a better screen representation of the
desired color.

You can also rename each ink if desired. The names


you enter are used to label DCS 2.0 format files.
• The Linearize option compensates for non-linear
response by the output device. One cause of this is
dot-gain. When device linearization is “off ”, the out-
put device may print a different percentage of colorant
than was called for by the software. Linearization cor-
rects for this drift by adjusting the output values sent
to the printer.
We do not recommend choosing Linearize unless your
CMYK device or RIP does not have its own lineariza-
tion option. Never choose the Linearize option when
profiling an RGB device unless the device is a true
RGB device. For example, ink jet printers that use
CMYK colorants are not true RGB devices. Examples

63
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

of RGB devices are photographic media printers, such


as the Durst Lambda.
PANTONE Hexachrome device profiles may be linear-
ized. The software does not support linearization for
multi-ink (5, 6, 7, or 8 color) devices.

3. Click the next (>) button to continue.

Step 2: Select Device


Creating an output profile requires measuring color data to
determine the reproducible gamut of your output device.
Measurements can be captured directly by the software using
a supported measurement device or taken off-line using an
unsupported device and imported into the program.

1. Choose your measurement device from the Device list.


If you are working with an unsupported device, select a
similar device from the list. For example, if you are using
a hand held device, select GretagMacbeth Spectrolino, or
Spectrocam Hand Held. The software will generate the
appropriate patch set for your device type based on your
selection. Using this patch set, you will be able to take
measurements, save them as an ASCII text file, and
import them into the program.
Directions for creating ASCII text files are provided later
in this chapter.

64
Creating Output Profiles

2. If applicable, choose the port to which your device is con-


nected. If you are creating an ASCII file with an unsup-
ported device, skip this selection.
3. Click the next (>) button to continue.

Step 3: Choose Linearization Options


If you chose not to take linearization measurements in this
profiling session, skip steps 3 thru 6, and continue with Step
7: Choose Color Patch Options.

NOTE:The Linearization Linearization requires measuring a set of color patches (lin-


option is only available earization target) to determine the linear response of the out-
for RGB, CMYK, and put device. The software automatically generates the patches
PANTONE Hexachrome
devices. Linearization based on information you supply in the Linearization
for multi-ink profiles is Options window.
not supported.
Linearization should only be used if you cannot linearize
your device using your print driver and your device driver’s
color space is the same as the printing technology. For exam-
ple, if you are using a printer using a PostScript or CMYK
driver, linearization is possible; however, you cannot linear-
ize a CMYK printer that uses an RGB driver.

Linearization involves printing a test target. You can choose


to print the test target using MonacoPROFILER or save the
test target for printing from a page layout or graphics appli-
cation. NOTE: Linearization targets for PANTONE Hexach-
rome device profiles must be saved and printed from another
application.

1. Make a selection from the Media Size list.


Choose the size media you will use to print the test target.
If you are using a special size stock for a strip reading
device, choose Custom and enter the dimensions.

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

NOTE: Not all stock sizes are available for all measurement
devices.

2. Choose the Number of Steps to use in the test target.

Steps are incremental percentages of each color from 0% to


100% for CMYK devices, or 100% to 0% for RGB devices.
The more steps measured, the more accurate the profile.

3. Print the test target directly to your output device or save


the test target for printing from a graphics application by
doing one of the following:

66
Creating Output Profiles

NOTE: RGB and CMYK To print the target from MonacoPROFILER:


linearization targets can
be printed directly from • Click Print Patches. When the Print dialog box
MonacoPROFILER. appears, configure the following settings:
If you are profiling a Media or Paper: select the media you will use with the
PANTONE Hexachrome profile and be sure it is loaded in the output device.
device, you must save Resolution: select the resolution you will use when
the target and output it
from another applica- printing images with this profile/media combination.
tion. Auto Color-correction: turn off any auto color-cor-
rection or color management options.
• Print the linearization target.

To save the target for printing from another application:


• Click Save Patches.
• Choose a format from the Format pop-up menu:
DCS 2.0 (Desktop Color Separations) format produces
a single file with a color composite. Select DCS 2.0
when creating a PANTONE Hexachrome profile.
TIFF (Tagged Image File Format) is supported by all
image-editing and page-layout applications. If you are
creating an RGB or CMYK output profile, TIFF is the
only available option.
• Click Save.
• From the File menu, choose Save Session.
Before continuing, you will need to print the saved
test target on the printer you are profiling. You can
leave the program open while you perform this task or
you can save and reopen this profiling session. The
program will open the saved session to this location.

4. Click the next (>) button to continue.


The software verifies that it can communicate with your
device. If it is unsuccessful, a message appears:
To continue and use the soft-
ware without a supported
device, click OK.

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 4: Print Linearization Test Target


If you printed the test target using MonacoPROFILER, skip
this step and continue with Step 5: Locate Anchor Patches.

To print the linearization target from a graphics application:


1. Open the saved linearization test target into a graphics or
layout program that you use.
• If you are using Adobe Photoshop, open a separate file
for each page in the patch set.
• If you are using a layout program, simply add addi-
tional pages for each page in the patch set.
2. Configure the Printer or Print dialog box with the fol-
lowing settings:
Media or Paper: select the media you will use with the
profile and be sure it is loaded in the printer.
Resolution: select the resolution you will use when print-
ing images with this profile/media combination.
Auto color-correction: turn off any auto color-correction
or color management options.
3. Output the test target.

IMPORTANT: Keep a log of the resolution, media type, and


other settings used when outputting targets to create profiles.
You will need to use the same setup when printing images using
the profile. If you will be printing images using different paper
stocks and resolutions, create separate profiles for each combi-
nation.

4. If you closed MonacoPROFILER, reopen the saved profil-


ing session by doing one of the following:
• Locate and double-click on the saved session file.
• Launch MonacoPROFILER and select the Output
option. Select Open Session from the File menu.
Locate and open your saved session.
5. Click the next (>) button to continue.

68
Creating Output Profiles

Step 5: Locate Anchor Patches


This step includes instruction for using the GretagMacbeth
SpectroScan to measure the linearization target. If you are
working with a X-Rite Spectrofiler, see the PDF file on the
MonacoPROFILER CD. If you are working with an ASCII
text file, a hand-held measurement device or a strip reader,
skip this step.

Before performing this task, you should be familiar with


using the functions and controls of your measurement
device.

Locate Anchor Patches Using a Gretag SpectroScan


Perform this procedure using the SpectroScan and the
printed set of linearization patches.

1. The Locate Patches window is provided as an instructional


screen. Perform the on screen instructions, then press the
next (>) button and continue the procedure.
2. When you have completed the procedure, the SpectroScan
automatically starts reading the patches in the correct
sequence. Return to the MonacoPROFILER program to
view the results.

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 6: Read Linear Patches


This step provides instructions for using the Read Linear
Patches window and a measurement device to measure the
linearization test target. It also provides instructions for cre-
ating and using an ASCII text file.

All devices use the Read Linear Patches window to display the
expected and actual Lab values and corresponding curves of
the linearization test patches as they are measured.

When viewing data, select the View Data option to display


color samples and Lab values of the individual patches and
the View Graph option to display a curve representing the
cumulative difference between patches.

Check View Split Patches to view actual and expected color


samples of the individual patches.

Average multiple data sets Export data


for averaging
Imports ASCII data files
Reset all data fields Begin/Resume
measurements

View linearization data


Highlighted patch or column
of patches to be measured
Display actual and
expected color samples

Table Mounted Devices


If you are using a GretagMacbeth SpectroScan, the Read Lin-
ear Patches window automatically fills in the patch values as
they are read. Use the window to view the data. When all
patches have been read, click the next (>) button to continue.

70
Creating Output Profiles

Averaging Multiple Readings/Patch:


The # of readings per patch option is only available when
using a SpectroScan table-mounted device. Use this option to
average multiple measurements of individual patches in real
time. Averaging measurements is useful when profiling devices
with non-uniform output. Settings for this option can be initi-
ated or changed at any time during the measurement process.

To average multiple readings per patch:


• Select a sampling setting from the Readings Per Patch list
in the Options menu.
The application automatically calculates the correct sampling
location(s) within each patch based on the location of the
target’s crop marks. The averaged reading per patch is dis-
played in the Lab fields as each patch reading is completed.
• To change the number of samples per patch, select a new
setting from the pop-up list.

Hand-held Devices
If you are using a hand-held GretagMacbeth Spectrolino,
X-Rite Digital Swatchbook (DTP22), or hand-held, the Read
Linear Patches window prompts you to measure individual
patches by highlighting the correct patch to measure.

1. The software highlights the patch to be measured.


Using your measurement device and the printed patch set,
measure each patch in sequence from top to bottom, read-
ing down each column before moving to the next column.
To ensure proper readings, place a second sheet of white
paper under the patch set when taking measurements.
If you measure an incorrect patch, highlight the correct
patch in the Read Linear Patches window by clicking on it,
and begin re-measuring, starting with the selected patch.
2. When all patches have been measured, click the next (>)
button in the Read Linear Patches window.

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Read Linear Patches Using a Strip-reader


If you are using an X-Rite DTP41 or DTP41/T, the Read Lin-
ear Patches window prompts you to measure a column of
patches by highlighting the correct column to measure.

If you measure an incor- 1. The software highlights the column of patches to be mea-
rect column, highlight sured. Slide the sheet into the device so the lead arrow of the
the correct column in currently highlighted column is under the center line.
the Read Linear Patches
window by clicking on it, 2. Take measurements. When the measurements are com-
realign the strip to the
correct column and pleted, the Read Linear Patches window displays the mea-
begin remeasuring. sured patches and the corresponding density values.
3. Reposition the sheet so the lead arrow of the currently
highlighted column is under the center line.
4. Take measurements. When the measurements are com-
pleted, the Read Linear Patches window displays the mea-
sured patches and the corresponding density values.
5. Continue with the above procedure. When all patches
have been read, click the next (>) button to continue.

72
Creating Output Profiles

Read Linear Patches Using a Spectrocam Strip-reader


If you are using a Spectrocam strip reader, the Read Linear
Patches window prompts you to measure a column of patches
by highlighting the correct column to measure.

Before taking measure- 1. Position the target on the scan plate. The software auto-
ments, check the Spec- matically highlights the first column of patches to be
trocam calibration and measured and displays the patch coordinates.
recalibrate if necessary
using the Device 2. Position the scan ruler over the first column of patches.
Options option.
Each column and row on the printed target is numbered
and lettered.

Import multiple data sets


for averaging Export data
for averaging
Import ASCII data files
Reset all data fields Begin/Resume
measurements
Display linearization data
Highlighted column of
patches to be measured
Patch coordinates of
highlighted column
Calibrate
Display actual and device
expected color samples

3. Position the measurement head over the first patch to be


measured. Press the Begin Scan button onscreen, and
touch the green sensor to start the scan. Move the device
with a steady pace along the scan ruler. If the device stops
before you have completed the column, you may have
moved too slowly or too quickly across the column. If this
occurs, rescan the affected patches.
To rescan patches: Select the first patch to be scanned by
clicking on it in the Read Linear Patches window. Reposi-
tion the measurement head over the corresponding patch
in the printed patch set and press the Begin Scan button.
Touch the green sensor, and begin rescanning.
As each patch is read, the Read Linear Patches window dis-
plays the measured Lab values and a sample of the color.

73
MonacoPROFILER User Guide

HINT: If you have trou- 4. Occasionally the measurement device misreads the white
ble successfully using space between patches and collects incorrect patch data.
the Spectrocam, you To ensure all patches are measured correctly, visually
can adjust the scan rate
by clicking the Device compare the sets of split patches in the Read Linear
Options button and Patches window. Both sides of each split set should appear
adjusting the Scanning similar in color. If necessary, rescan any incorrect patches
Speed slider. before beginning a new column.
5. Continue the process by repositioning the scan ruler over
the next column highlighted by the software and repeat
the procedure.
6. When all columns have been read, click the next (>) but-
ton to continue.

Spectrocam Device Options


If you have trouble successfully using the Spectrocam, you
can adjust the scan rate, recalibrate the device, or check for
problems using the Spectrocam Settings dialog box.

To access the Spectrocam Settings dialog box, select Options


from the Read Linear Patches window.

Scanning Speed
Adjust the rate of scan by using the Scanning Speed slider.

74
Creating Output Profiles

White Calibration
To calibrate the Spectrocam without leaving the program:
1. Click Calibrate.
2. Position the Spectrocam measurement head over the ref-
erence white tile in the Reference Target that you received
with the device, and click Continue.

Diagnostics
To check for problems with the Spectrocam without leaving
the program:
1. Click Diagnose/Fix.
2. Position the Spectrocam measurement head over the ref-
erence white tile in the Reference Target that you received
with the device, and click Continue.

ASCII Text File


If you are manually taking measurements using an unsup-
ported device, use the following procedures to create and
import the data as a text file.

To create and save an ASCII text file:


1. Configure your measurement device to capture data:
• as Lab color
• using a setting of D50 illuminant, 2°observer
• in a tab-delimited format
• using a minimum of two decimal places
2. Make sure the text file has only three columns of data.
Any header text will prevent MonacoPROFILER from
reading the text file.
3. Measure the set of printed linearization patches in
sequence from top to bottom, reading down each column
before moving to the next column on the right.
4. Save the file as ASCII text.

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

To load an ASCII text file:

1. Click Import in the Read Linear Patches window.


2. Locate and open your ASCII text file.
3. Use the Read Linear Patches window to view the patch val-
ues and corresponding curves.
4. When you are finished viewing the data, click the next (>)
button to continue.

000000 0.00000 0.00000


000000 0.00000 0.00000
000000 0.00000 0.00000
000000 0.00000 0.00000
000000 0.00000 0.00000
000000 0.00000 0.00000
000000 0.00000 0.00000
000000 0.00000 0.00000
000000 0.00000 0.00000
Example of a printed 000000
000000
0.00000
0.00000
0.00000
0.00000
linearization patch set 000000 0.00000 0.00000
000000 0.00000 0.00000
and an ASCII text file in 000000 0.00000 0.00000
000000 0.00000 0.00000
a tab-delimited format. 000000 0.00000 0.00000
000000 0.00000 0.00000
Numbers in this exam- 000000 0.00000 0.00000
000000 0.00000 0.00000
ple are placeholders 000000 0.00000 0.00000
000000 0.00000 0.00000
only and not actual 000000
000000
0.00000
0.00000
0.00000
0.00000
patch values. 000000
000000
0.00000
0.00000
0.00000
0.00000
000000 0.00000 0.00000
000000 0.00000 0.00000

76
Creating Output Profiles

Step 7: Choose Color Patch Options


Creating an output profile requires measuring a set of color
patches to determine the reproducible gamut of the device.
MonacoPROFILER automatically generates the patch set
based on the information you supply in the Patch Options
window. You can choose to print the patch set using Mona-
coPROFILER or save the patch set for printing from a page
layout or graphics application.

1. Make a selection from the Media Size list.


Choose the size media you desire to use to print the patch
set. If you are using a special size stock, choose Custom
and input the dimensions.

size media used


# of patches
in selected patch set

scramble patches number of pages


Advanced ink limit options in patch set

save patch set for printing


from another application

print patches directly

2. Choose a setting from the Quality list.


The settings represent the number of patches in the patch
set. The actual number of patches in a particular set varies
depending on the number of inks used and any ink limit-
ing that is applied using the Advanced Options setting.
A larger patch set provides the software with a better sam-
pling of the printer’s output capabilities. This in turn cre-
ates a better profile. There are several settings for CMYK
printers, three settings for RGB, and one for PANTONE
Hexachrome and multi-ink printers.

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

If you are using an automated measurement device, select


a larger patch set. If you are using a hand-held measure-
ment device, and measuring a large patch set is too time
consuming, select a smaller set.
Note for GretagMacbeth SpectroScan users:
If you are using the GretagMacbeth SpectroScan spectro-
photometer to create a CMYK profile, the industry stan-
dard IT8.7/3 Extended printer target becomes an available
Quality choice. In general, better profile quality is obtained
using Monaco color patch targets.
When using the IT8.7/3 Extended target, the Scramble
Patches and Advanced Options settings are not available.
Since ink limiting (Advanced Options) affects the total
number of patches in the target, and changing the stan-
dard IT8.7/3 Extended target is not possible, this option is
not available.
When you choose Linearize, MonacoPROFILER adjusts
the color patch values based on the linearization results.
Because this is not possible with the IT8.7/3 target, the
target is not an available selection when Linearize is
selected.
3. Check Scramble Patches if desired. The Scramble Patches
option reorders the sequence of patches in the target. This
is useful when printing from a device that outputs ink
non-uniformly (presses).

4. Print the patch set directly to your output device or save


the patch set for printing from a graphics application by
doing one of the following:

To print the patch set from MonacoPROFILER:


• If you are printing to a Custom page size, select the
appropriate settings in the File>Page Setup dialog box.
• Click Print Patches. When the Print dialog box
appears, configure the following settings:
Media or Paper: select the media you will use with the
profile and be sure it is loaded in the output device.

78
Creating Output Profiles

Resolution: select the resolution you will use when


printing images with this profile/media combination.
Auto color-correction: turn off any auto color-correc-
tion or color management options.
• Print the color patch set. The software will automati-
cally generate the correct number of pages required
for the complete patch set.

To save the patch set and print from another application:


• Click Save Patches.
• Choose a format from the Format pop-up menu:
DCS 2.0 (Desktop Color Separations) produces a sin-
gle file with a color composite. Select DCS 2.0 when
creating a PANTONE Hexachrome or multi-ink (5, 6, 7,
or 8-color) profile.
TIFF (Tagged Image File Format) is supported by all
image-editing and page-layout applications. If you are
creating an RGB output profile, TIFF is the only avail-
able option.
• Click Save.
• From the File menu, choose Save Session.
Before continuing, you will need to print the saved
test target on the printer you are profiling. You can
leave the program open while you perform this task or
you can save and reopen this profiling session. The
program will open the saved session to this location.

5. Examine the printed patch set.


Ink coverage varies according to printer, ink, and media
used. If the ink coverage is too heavy, adjust the amount
of ink used by using a different Color Patch Ink Limit
setting in the Advanced Options dialog box, and reprint
the patch set before continuing. This ensures that the
printer will not deliver more ink than the media can
absorb. Note that adjusting the Color Patch Ink Limit set-
ting recalculates the number of patches in the patch set.

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 8: Print Color Patches


If you printed the patch set using MonacoPROFILER, skip
this step and continue with Step 9: Locate Anchor Patches.

If you are printing the patch set from a graphics application,


continue with this procedure.

1. Open the saved patch set into a graphics or layout pro-


gram that you use.
• If you are using Adobe Photoshop, open a separate file
for each page in the patch set.
• If you are using a layout program, simply add addi-
tional pages for each page in the patch set.
2. Configure the Print dialog box with the following settings:
Media or Paper: select the media you will use with the
profile and be sure it is loaded in the output device.
Resolution: select the resolution you will use when print-
ing images with this profile/media combination.
Auto color-correction: turn off any auto color-correction
or color management options.
3. Output the patch set. Ink coverage varies according to
printer, ink, and media used. Examine the printed patch
set. If the ink coverage is too heavy, adjust the amount of
ink used by changing the Color Patch Ink Limit setting in
the Advanced Options dialog box. Reprint the patch set
and recheck ink coverage before continuing. Note that
adjusting the Color Patch Ink Limit setting recalculates
the number of patches in the patch set.
4. If you closed MonacoPROFILER, reopen the saved profil-
ing session by doing one of the following:
• Locate and double-click on the saved session file.
• Launch MonacoPROFILER and select the Output
option. Select Open Session from the File menu.
Locate and open your saved session.
5. Click the next (>) button to continue.

80
Creating Output Profiles

IMPORTANT: Keep a log of the resolution, media type, and


other settings used when outputting targets to create profiles.
You will need to use the same setup when processing images
using the profile. If you will be processing images using different
media, paper stocks, or resolutions, create separate profiles for
each combination.

Step 9: Locate Anchor Patches


This step includes instructions for using a GretagMacbeth
SpectroScan to measure the color patch set. If you are work-
ing with an ASCII text file, a hand-held measurement device
or a strip-reader, skip this step.

Before performing this task, you should be familiar with using


the functions and controls of your measurement device.

Locate Patches Using a GretagMacbeth SpectroScan


Perform this procedure using the SpectroScan and the
printed set of color patches.

1. The Locate Patches window is provided as an instructional


screen. Perform the onscreen instructions, then press the
next (>) button and continue the procedure.
2. When you have completed the procedure, the SpectroScan
automatically starts reading the patches in the correct
sequence. Return to the MonacoPROFILER program to
view the results.

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Step 10: Read Color Patches


This step provides instructions for using the Read Patches
window and a measurement device to measure the color
patch set. It also provides instructions for creating and using
an ASCII text file, and importing IT8.7/3 characterization
tables.

All devices use the Read Patches window to display the


expected and actual Lab patch values as they are measured.

Check View Split Patches to view actual and expected color


samples of the individual patches.
Average multiple
data sets Export data
for averaging
Import ASCII data files

Reset all data fields

Highlighted column of
patches to be measured
Display actual and
expected color samples

Table Mounted Devices


3. If you are using a GretagMacbeth SpectroScan, the Read
Patches window automatically fills in the patch values as they
are read. Use the window to view the data. When all patches
have been read, click the next (>) button to continue.
Averaging Multiple Readings/Patch:
The # of readings per patch option is only available when
using a SpectroScan table-mounted device. Use this option to
average multiple measurements of individual patches in real
time. This option is useful when profiling devices with non-
uniform output. Settings for this option can be initiated or
changed at any time during the measurement process.

82
Creating Output Profiles

To average multiple readings per patch:


• Select a sampling setting from the Options>Readings Per
Patch list.
The application automatically calculates the correct sam-
pling location(s) within each patch based on the location
of the crop marks on the target. The averaged reading per
patch is displayed in the Lab fields as each patch reading is
completed.
• To change the number of samples per patch, select a new
setting from the pop-up list.

Hand-held Devices
If you are using a hand-held GretagMacbeth Spectrolino, X-
Rite Digital Swatchbook (DTP22), or hand-held Spectrocam,
the Read Patches window prompts you to measure individual
patches by highlighting the correct patch to measure.

1. The software highlights the patch to be measured.


Using your measurement device and the printed patch set,
measure each patch in sequence from top to bottom, read-
ing down each column before moving to the next column.
To ensure proper readings, place a second sheet of white
paper under the patch set when taking measurements.
If you measure an incorrect patch, click on the correct
patch in the Read Patches window and begin measuring
from that patch.
2. When all patches have been measured, click the next (>)
button in the Read Patches window.

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Read Color Patches Using a Strip-reader


If you are using a supported strip-reader—X-Rite DTP41 or
DTP41/T, the Read Patches window prompts you to measure a
column of patches by highlighting the correct column to measure.

If you measure an incor- 1. The software highlights the column of patches to be mea-
rect column, highlight sured. Slide the sheet into the device so the lead arrow of the
the correct column in currently highlighted column is under the center line.
the Read Patches win-
dow by clicking on it, 2. Take measurements. When the measurements are com-
realign the strip to the
correct column and pleted, the Read Patches window displays the measured
begin remeasuring. patches and the corresponding Lab values.
3. Reposition the sheet so the lead arrow of the currently
highlighted column is under the center line.
4. Take measurements. When the measurements are com-
pleted, the Read Patches window displays the measured
patches and the corresponding Lab values.
5. Continue with the above procedure. When all patches
have been read, click the next (>) button to continue.

84
Creating Output Profiles

Read Color Patches Using a Spectrocam Strip-reader


If you are using a Spectrocam, the Read Patches window
prompts you to measure a column of patches by highlighting
the correct column to measure.

Before taking measure- 1. Position the target on the scan plate. The Read Patches
ments, check the Spec- window highlights the first column of patches to be mea-
trocam’s calibration and sured and displays the patch coordinates.
recalibrate if necessary
by clicking on Device 2. Position the scan ruler over the first column of patches.
Options.
Each column and row on the printed target is numbered
and lettered.

Average multiple data sets

Import ASCII data files Export data


for averaging
Reset all data fields

Highlighted column of
patches to be measured

Patch coordinates of
highlighted column Calibrates
device
Display actual and
expected color samples

3. Position the measurement head (in the scan ruler slot)


over the first patch to be measured. Press the onscreen
Begin Scan button, then touch the green sensor to start
the scan. Move the device with a steady pace along the
scan ruler. If the device stops before you have completed
the column, you may have moved too slowly or too
quickly across the column. If this occurs, rescan the
affected patches.
Select the first patch to be re-scanned by clicking on it in
the Read Patches window. Reposition the measurement
head over the corresponding patch in the printed patch
set and press the Begin Scan button. Touch the green sen-
sor, and begin rescanning.

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

After each patch is read, the Read Patches window updates


to display the measured color values in Lab and a sample
of the color patch.
HINT: If you have trou- 4. Occasionally the measurement device misreads the white
ble successfully using space between patches and collects incorrect patch data.
the Spectrocam, you To ensure all patches are measured correctly, visually
can adjust the scan rate
by clicking the Device compare the sets of split patches in the Read Patches win-
Options button and dow. Both sides of each split set should appear similar in
adjusting the Scanning color. If necessary, rescan any incorrect patches before
Speed slider. continuing with the next column.
5. Continue the process by repositioning the scan ruler over
the next column highlighted by the software and repeat-
ing the procedure.
6. When all columns have been read, click the next (>) but-
ton to continue.

86
Creating Output Profiles

Spectrocam Device Options


If you have trouble successfully using the Spectrocam, you
can adjust the scan rate, recalibrate the device, or check for
problems using the Spectrocam Settings dialog box.

To access the Spectrocam Settings dialog box, select Device


Options from the Read Patches window.

Scanning Speed
Adjust the rate of scan by using the Scanning Speed slider.

White Calibration
To calibrate the Spectrocam without leaving the program:
1. Click Calibrate.
2. Position the Spectrocam measurement head over the ref-
erence white tile in the Reference Target that you received
with the device, and click Continue.

Diagnostics
To check for problems with the Spectrocam without leaving
the program:
1. Click Diagnose/Fix.

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2. Position the Spectrocam measurement head over the ref-


erence white tile in the reference target that you received
with the device, and click Continue.

Importing IT8.7/3 Characterization Tables


MonacoPROFILER can accept IT8.7/3 characterization
tables that conform to the ISO 12642:1996 specification. To
import IT8.7/3 data, you must choose SpectroScan in the
Select Device window.
To load an IT8.7/3 characterization table:
1. Click Import in the Read Patches window.
2. Locate and open your table text file.
3. Use the Read Patches window to view the patch values and
corresponding colors.
4. When you are finished viewing the data, click the next (>)
button to continue.

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Creating Output Profiles

Working with ASCII Text Files


If you are manually taking measurements using an unsup-
ported device, use the following procedures to create, save,
and import the data as a text file. If you close the program to
take measurements, be sure to save your profiling session.

To create and save an ASCII text file:


1. Configure your measurement device to capture data:
• as Lab color
• using a setting of D50 illuminant, 2° observer
• in a tab-delimited format
• using a minimum of two decimal places
2. Make sure the text file has only three columns of data.
Any header text will prevent MonacoPROFILER from
reading the text file.
3. Measure the set of printed color patches in sequence from
top to bottom, reading down each column before moving
to the next column on the right.
4. Save the file as ASCII text.

To load an ASCII text file:


1. Click Import in the Read Patches window.
2. Locate and open your ASCII text file.
3. Use the Read Patches window to view the patch values and
corresponding colors.
4. When you are finished viewing the data, click the next (>)
button to continue.

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Step 11: Choose Profile Options


Available profile options are organized by tabs:
• Use options in the Ink Control tab to specify desired Black
Generation, Maximum Black Ink, and Maximum Total Ink
settings for CMYK, PANTONE Hexachrome, and multi-
ink profiles.
• Use options in the Options tab to choose a default rendering
intent and a look-up table size for the profile.
• Use the Perceptual tab options to set the paper color, Con-
trast, and Saturation options.
• If you are creating a PANTONE Hexachrome or multi-ink
profile, a Spot Color tab becomes available with options
for controlling the use of the additional colorants.

Ink Control Tab


Use the Ink Control tab options to specify how black ink is
used to replace CMY in CMYK, PANTONE Hexachrome, and
multi-ink profiles. In theory, printing using equal amounts
of cyan, magenta, and yellow inks produces black. But in
reality they do not produce a true black. Replacing varying
amounts of CMY inks with black reintroduces a true black
while saving ink in the printing process. The term Black
Generation refers to both the amount of black colorant
available for replacing the CMY colorants, and the method
used.

Using Black Generation has the following advantages:


• increases density and contrast in shadows
• prevents excessive ink buildup (profiles for press)
• saves cost of color cartridges (digital printers/proofers)

Black Generation using MonacoPROFILER can be accom-


plished in three ways:

• When Use automatic settings is selected, the program


automatically determines the optimum amount of black
ink to use as a replacement for the other colorants based

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Creating Output Profiles

on all information supplied for your device. Automatic is


the recommended method when profiling digital printers.
• When UCR (Under Color Removal) is selected, the pro-
gram substitutes black ink for some amount of CMY only
in the neutral and shadow areas of an image. UCR typically
replaces colors in the less saturated colors, where black is
already being used.
• When GCR (Gray Component Replacement) is selected, the
program substitutes black ink for some amount of CMY
throughout an entire image based on the curve settings and
the GCR slider setting you choose. This has the effect of
introducing black into the more highly saturated colors.

To use the automatic black generation setting:


1. Enable the Use automatic settings checkbox.
The software automatically determines the most appro-
priate black generation settings for your device.
2. Change the Maximum black ink available for printing
setting as desired.
This setting represents the maximum amount of black ink
available for printing. The default setting is 100%. Do not
change the default when profiling a digital printer. The soft-
ware will automatically calculate the correct black limit.

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When profiling a printing press, seek the advice of your print


vendor in setting this option.
3. Change the Maximum total ink available for printing
setting as desired.
This setting represents the maximum amount of all inks
available for printing. The default setting is the value previ-
ously entered in the Options dialog box in the Patch Options
window. You can decrease this setting, but you cannot
increase it. If the value is increased, the program will auto-
matically default to the previously selected setting.

To set GCR manually:


1. Uncheck the Use automatic settings checkbox.
2. Enable the GCR radio button.
3. Set the GCR slider to the desired amount of GCR.
The GCR slider controls the amount of black ink that is
used to replace the CMY colorants. Moving the slider to
the left causes less saturated colors, or colors with more
gray component, to be affected. Moving the slider to the
right increases the range of affected colors to include
more saturated colors that have a smaller amount of gray
component.
4. Select a predefined curve from the Level list, or create a
custom curve by selecting a predefined curve and modify-
ing it. For more information, see Creating a Custom Curve
below.
5. Select Intelligent Black if desired.
When Intelligent Black is selected, the program adheres as
closely as possible to the selected Black Generation curve
setting without clipping the available gamut.
For example, if you select a curve with black beginning at
a luminance level of 60, and enable Intelligent Black, the
program will automatically compute some amount of
black to include between the 100 to 60 luminance level in
order to preserve the full gamut. If you desire black to

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Creating Output Profiles

truly begin at a luminance of 60, uncheck the Intelligent


Black option.
6. Change the Maximum black ink available for printing
setting as desired.
This setting represents the maximum amount of black ink
available for printing. The default setting is 100%. Do not
change the default when profiling a digital printer. The soft-
ware will automatically calculate the correct black limit.
When profiling a printing press, seek the advice of your print
vendor in setting this option.
7. Change the Maximum total ink available for printing
setting as desired.
This setting represents the maximum amount of all inks
available for printing. The default setting is the value previ-
ously entered in the Advanced Options dialog box in the
Patch Options window. You can decrease this setting, but you
cannot increase it. If the value is increased, the program will
automatically default to the previously selected setting.

To set UCR manually:


1. Uncheck the Use automatic settings checkbox.
2. Enable the UCR radio button.
3. Select a predefined curve from the Level list, or create a
custom curve by selecting a predefined curve and modify-
ing it. For more information, see Creating a Custom Curve
below.
4. Select Intelligent Black if desired.
When Intelligent Black is selected, the program adheres as
closely as possible to the selected Black Generation curve
setting without clipping the available gamut.
For example, if you select a curve with black beginning at
a luminance level of 60, and enable Intelligent Black, the
program will automatically compute some amount of
black to include between the 100 to 60 luminance level in
order to preserve the full gamut. If you desire black to

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truly begin at a luminance of 60, uncheck the Intelligent


Black option.
5. Change the Maximum black ink available for printing
setting as desired.
This setting represents the maximum amount of black ink
available for printing. The default setting is 100%. Do not
change the default when profiling a digital printer. The soft-
ware will automatically calculate the correct black limit.
When profiling a printing press, seek the advice of your print
vendor in setting this option.
6. Change the Maximum total ink available for printing
setting as desired.
This setting represents the maximum amount of all inks
available for printing. The default setting is the value previ-
ously entered in the Advanced Options dialog box in the
Patch Options window. You can decrease this setting, but you
cannot increase it. If the value is increased, the program will
automatically default to the previously selected setting.

Creating a custom curve:


The program provides five levels of black generation—None,
Light, Medium, Heavy, and Custom.

Each level is represented by a curve. The K% axis represents


the amount of black ink used from 0 to 100%. The L* axis
represents the luminance level of the affected color. The
curve represents the percentage of black ink used to replace
colorants with that particular luminance value. To create a
Custom curve, select a level from the list and modify it as
desired.
• Select the curve you want to edit from the Level list.
• Drag an existing end point or midpoint to reshape the curve.
• Click on the curve to add additional points.
• Macintosh: Drag a point left or right past adjacent points to
remove a point.
Windows: Select point and press delete key.
• Adjust the %K and L* sliders to change the endpoints.

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Creating Output Profiles

Importing and Exporting ink settings:


The program allows you to save and load previously used ink
settings.

To export a group of ink settings, select Export from the Ink


Control Settings list, name your settings, navigate to a location
to save them, and click Save.

To import a group of saved ink settings, select Import from the


Ink Control Settings list, navigate to the saved settings, select
the file, and click Open.

Predefined device settings


MonacoPROFILER provides predefined settings for color
laser, inkjet, newspaper press, and commercial printers. These
settings are intended to be used as a starting point when gener-
ating the correct setting for your device.

To use a predefined device setting:


1. Select your device type from the Ink Control Settings list.
Color Laser
Commercial
Inkjet
Newspaper
Publication
If you previously set an ink limit (Color Patch Ink Limit
setting in Advance Options dialog box or Maximum Ink
amount in the Ink Control tab) that is less than the pre-
defined setting ink limit, the software will adhere to the
previously set ink limit.
2. Continue building your profile.
3. Test the results by using the profile. If needed, return to
the program and use the Update Profile option to further
customize the settings.

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Table Options Tab


Settings in the Table Options tab apply to all output profiles.

1. Choose a default rendering intent.


A rendering intent determines how your profile compresses
color to fit inside the printable gamut of your output device.
All four rendering intents are included in the profile. If
you plan on using a single rendering intent when printing
images, you can select it as the default rendering intent.
The actual intent used when printing images is chosen by
the user when selecting the printer profile from within an
application. If you later desire to use a different rendering
intent for this profile, you can change it at that time.
Perceptual renders the closest possible perceptual match
while preserving subtle color relationships by compress-
ing the entire color gamut and shifting all colors into the
printable color gamut. This intent is used to print color
photographic images.
Saturation maintains original image color saturation
when compressing all colors into the target color space.
This intent is primarily used to reproduce charts, graphs,
or business graphics.
Relative Colorimetric remaps out-of-gamut colors to the
closest reproducible color of the target printer without
affecting other in-gamut colors. This intent can cause two

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Creating Output Profiles

colors in the source color space to become the same in the


target color space.
Absolute Colorimetric remaps colors identically without
making adjustments for the white point or black point
that would affect image brightness.
2. Select a Table Resolution setting.
Table Resolution refers to the size of the LUT (lookup
table) used in the ICC profile or ICC linked profile. The
software uses the LUT to interpolate colors from the
range available. Table Resolution can be thought of as a
cube or node separated into smaller nodes of color. The
number of smaller nodes is defined by the Table Resolu-
tion setting chosen: (9x9x9) or 729 nodes, (17x17x17) or
4913 nodes, (21X21X21) or 9261 nodes, (33x33x33) or
35937 nodes. The node values are either 8-bit or 16-bit.
The combination of Table Resolution/bit-value size deter-
mines the amount of colors available for interpolation.
The size you select is sometimes (but not always) depen-
dent on the ability of your RIP or printer to load and use
the table. A larger table may render color more accurately
depending on the printer being used. Larger profiles take
up more disk space and use more printer memory. If your
RIP or printer cannot load and use a large Table Resolu-
tion/bit-value combination, use a smaller resolution size.
3. Select a Color Value Size.
The Use 16-bit Values checkbox is used to control the
profile size. If you have the memory and disk space avail-
able, we recommend you create and use profiles in 16-bit
format.
4. If you don’t wish to use the other tabs available in Profile
Options, click the next (>) button to continue.

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Perceptual Tab
Use the Perceptual tab options to compensate for the color
of the paper you are using to build the profile and to adjust
contrast and saturation output in the profile.

1. If you desire to neutralize the paper color that you are using
to build the profile, adjust the Neutralize Gray Axis slider.
The Neutralize Gray Axis option adds ink to compensate
for the paper color used to build the profile and ensures
the lightest points in an image appear as gray neutral
rather than the tint of the actual paper.
2. Select a Contrast and Saturation setting if desired.
The Contrast and Satu- The Contrast and Saturation settings affect how out-of-
ration sliders only affect gamut colors are compressed to fit within the printable
the Perceptual render- gamut of your output device. When standard compres-
ing intent. Other render-
ing intents are not sion occurs (using the Perceptual rendering intent), all
affected. colors are proportionally shifted to make room for out-
of-gamut colors. This method of compression, while pre-
serving the relationship between colors, may over-com-
press or under-compress a source gamut, depending on
the size of the target gamut.
For example, when using an output device with a small
gamut, such as a newsprint press, standard compression
may not be sufficient to optimally remap all out-of-
gamut colors into the target gamut. Further compression

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Creating Output Profiles

may be necessary in order to move more compressed col-


ors away from the gamut’s perimeter. This has the effect
of reducing banding in some color gradations, or reduc-
ing the clipping of colors.
When using a device with a large gamut, the standard
compression routine used by the software may over-com-
press the gamut. In this case, it is counter productive
because fewer out-of-gamut colors need to be pulled into
gamut. Reducing the compression will take advantage of
the full gamut available to the device.
The Contrast slider allows you to change the manner in
which the L* channel is mapped. In practical terms, the
Contrast option modifies the luminance range in the
printed image. In general, set the Contrast level high for
devices with a large luminance range—a dye-sub printer
using glossy paper—and low for devices with a small
luminance range, for example, a newspaper press. The
available range is from -50 to 50. A setting of 0 has no
affect on the profile.
The Saturation option changes the manner in which out-
of-gamut colors on the a* and b* axis are remapped. The
Saturation slider allows you to change the overall satura-
tion in printed images. Usage suggestions are the same as
above—set the level higher for devices with a larger gamut
and lower for devices with a smaller gamut. The available
saturation range is from -50 to 50.
We suggest you first create your profile without using these
options, print some images using the profile, then use the
Update Profile option the to enhance color if desired.
3. Select another tab or click the next (>) button to continue.

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Spot Color Tab


Settings to control the additional colorants for PANTONE
Hexachrome and multi-ink profiles are available in the Spot
Color tab.

The Spot Color tab includes three settings—Hue Range, Sat-


uration Range, and Lightness Range—which are used in con-
junction to control the usage of the colorant.

1. Select a colorant from the Spot Color list.


2. Use the Hue Range slider to control the range of hues that
will contain the colorant. As the number increases, the
colorant is introduced to a larger range of adjacent hues.
Selecting 100 introduces the colorant in the maximum
range of hues in the profile. Selecting a low number
restricts the range of hues affected to those most closely
adjacent to the colorant.
3. Use the Saturation Range slider to limit the range of col-
ors in the profile that will be affected by the colorant
based on saturation level.
Using a setting of 10 reduces the affected range to include
only the most highly saturated colors. Using a setting of
90 expands colorant usage to a range of increasingly less
saturated colors.

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Creating Output Profiles

4. Use the Lightness curve to limit the range of colors in the


profile that will be affected by the colorant based on their
lightness level. The horizontal axis represents the light-
ness value from 100 (white) to 0 (black). The vertical axis
represents the percentage of colorant used.
The curve represents the total lightness range affected by the
colorant. Points on the curve represent the percentage of ink
used for any color with that particular lightness value. To be
affected, all colors in the specified lightness range must also
fall within the Hue and Saturation ranges previously defined.
To edit the Lightness Range curve
• Click on the curve to add points.
• Drag a point to reshape the curve.
• Drag a point left or right past adjacent points to
remove a point.

5. Repeat steps 1 through 4 with the remaining spot colors.


6. Select another tab or click the next (>) button to continue.

Step 12: Create Profile


1. Click Create Profile.
2. Name your profile and click Save.
We suggest using a descriptive name for the profile that
includes the device type, media, resolution, and date cre-
ated. This will help you identify the profile in the future.

Eps_850_Gloss_720_0102

Epson printer model 850 glossy paper 720 dpi Jan. 2002

3. When the Profile Complete window reappears, click the


Home or next (>) button to return to the main program
window or close the program.

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Data Averaging
MonacoPROFILER allows you to average patch data to create
a profile that reflects the overall performance of a device over
time. Color patch averaging is most often used when profil-
ing printing presses that cannot maintain consistent quality.

Data averaging is accomplished by printing a linearization or


color patch set, measuring the patch set, and exporting and
saving the measured data. This process is repeated a number
of times to allow normal usage changes to occur within the
device. When the resulting data sets are averaged by the soft-
ware, a profile is created that represents the typical output
that can be expected from the device.

Data Averaging Workflow


1. Configure your patch set as desired using the Linearization
Options or Patch Options window in MonacoPROFILER.
2. Click Save Patches, choose a format, and click Save.
3. Using your normal workflow and the device you are pro-
filing, output the patch set the desired number of times
you would like to use in the averaging process.
4. Return to the Read Linear Patches or the Read Patches
window in the MonacoPROFILER and measure the first
patch set using your measurement device.
5. When all patches have been measured, click Export, and
name and save the data file.
6. Click Reset in the Read Linear Patches or Read Patches
window to clear the data fields.
7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 for the remaining patch sets.

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Creating Output Profiles

8. Click Average... in the Read Linear Patches or Read


Patches window.

9. Click Add, select a saved data file, and click Choose.


10. Continue adding data files. When all data files have been
added, click Done.
The data is averaged and loaded into the data fields in the
Read Linear Patches or Read Patches window.
11. Continue making the profile using the usual procedure.

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104
Updating Output Profiles

8 Updating Output Profiles


There are two options for updating an output profile:

• Re-linearize
The Re-linearize option captures and stores new lineariza-
tion measurements for your output device. The measure-
ments are used by the program to compensate for changes
in colorants, room humidity, or other factors that may
have caused your output device to drift over time.
You can only re-linearize output profiles that were linear-
ized when originally created.

• Rebuild Monaco Profile


There may be occasions when you desire to fine-tune an
output profile by changing the original settings that were
used to create the profile.
You can change profile settings, without taking new patch
readings, by rebuilding the profile using the original profile
data and changing the settings in the Profile Options win-
dow. You can rebuild the following profiles:
• RGB, CMYK, PANTONE Hexachrome, or multi-ink
profiles
• device linked profiles

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Re-linearizing an Output Profile


This procedure re-linearizes an output profile. For this pro-
cedure, you’ll need the following:

• MonacoPROFILER program
• output profile being re-linearized
• your measurement device
• your output device
• media used to create the original profile

Step 1: From the main program window:


Click the Output option.

Step 2: From the Select Profile Data window:


1. Click Update Profile.
2. Click Choose and select the profile you desire to re-lin-
earize. If you select a device-linked profile, the lineariza-
tion data for the destination profile is updated.
3. Select Re-linearize.
4. Click the next (>) button to continue.

Step 3: From the Select Device window:


1. Choose your measurement device from the Device list.
2. Choose the port your device is connected to from the
Connection Port list.
3. Click the next (>) button to continue.

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Updating Output Profiles

Step 4: From the Linearization Options window:


1. Choose the size media loaded in your output device from
the Media Size list. This should be the same stock you
used to perform the original linearization procedure.
2. Choose the number of steps to include in the test target
from the Number of Steps list. For the sake of compari-
son, this should be the same number of steps used in the
original linearization target.
3. Print the linearization test target using one of the following:

To print the target from MonacoPROFILER:


• Click Print Patches. When the Print dialog box
appears, configure the following settings:
Media or Paper: select the media associated with the
profile and be sure it is loaded in the output device.
Resolution: select the resolution associated with this
profile/media combination.
Auto color-correction: turn off any auto color-correc-
tion or color management options.
• Print the linearization target. The software will auto-
matically generate the correct number of pages
required for the complete test target.
• When the target(s) is printed, return to MonacoPRO-
FILER and click the next (>) button to continue.

To save the target and print from another application:


• Choose a format from the Format pop-up menu:
DCS 2.0 (Desktop Color Separations) format produces
a single file with a color composite. Select DCS 2.0
when creating a multi-ink (5, 6, 7, or 8-color) profile.
TIFF (Tagged Image File Format) format is supported
by all image-editing and page-layout applications. If
you are creating an RGB output profile, TIFF is the
only available option.
• Click Save Patches, choose a location to save the file,
and click Save.
• From the File menu, choose Save Session.

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

Before continuing, you will need to print the saved


test target on the printer you are profiling. You can
leave the program open while you perform this task or
you can save and reopen this profiling session. The
program will open the saved session to this location.

Step 5: Print the Linearization Test Target


If you printed the test target directly from MonacoPRO-
FILER, skip this step.

1. Open the saved TIFF file (test target) into a graphics or


page layout program.
2. Configure the Print dialog box with the following settings:
Media or Paper: select the media associated with the pro-
file and be sure it is loaded in the output device.
Resolution: select the resolution associated with this pro-
file/media combination.
Auto color-correction: turn off any auto color correction
or color management options.
3. Print the test target.
4. If you closed MonacoPROFILER, reopen the saved profil-
ing session by doing one of the following:
• Locate and double-click on the saved session file.
• Launch MonacoPROFILER and select the Output
option. Select Open Session from the File menu.
Locate and open your saved session.
5. Click the next (>) button to continue.

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Updating Output Profiles

Step 6: Locate Anchor Patches


If you are using an ASCII text file, a hand-held measurement
device or a strip reader, skip this step, and continue with Step
7: Read Linear Patches.

Using your Gretag SpectroScan, locate the corner anchor


patches. See Chapter 7, Step 5: Locate Anchor Patches, for the
correct procedure.

Step 7: Read Linear Patches


If you are using an ASCII text file, create and load the file. If
you are using a hand-held measurement device or a strip
reader, record the new patch measurements. For these proce-
dures, see Chapter 7, Step 6: Read Linear Patches.

Use the Read Linear Patches window as an informational


window to view the results of linear patch measurements.

When viewing data, use the View Data option to display a


color sample of each measured patch and the corresponding
Lab values. Use the View Graph option to display the curves
for the both the original and new set of measurements.

The View Graph option has two modes. Use the View Differ-
ence mode to view the difference between the new measure-
ments and original measurements, and the View Current
Data mode to display only the new linearization measure-
ments.

You can turn off any particular curve by clicking on its name
in the header.

When ready, click the next (>) button to continue.

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Step 8: From the Create Profile window:


1. Click Create Profile.
2. Name your re-linearized profile and click Save.
3. When the Profile Complete window reappears, click the
Home or next (>) button to return to the main program
window, or close the program.

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Updating Output Profiles

Rebuilding an Output Profile


This procedure rebuilds a printer profile from existing data.
For this procedure, you’ll need the following:
• MonacoPROFILER program
• MonacoPROOF or MonacoPROFILER 3.0 or later output
profile

Step 1: From the main program window:


Click the Output option.

Step 2: From the Select Profile Data window:


1. Click Update Profile.
2. Click Choose and select the output profile you desire to
rebuild.
3. Click Rebuild Monaco Profile.
4. Click Next to continue.

Step 3: From the Profile Options window:


1. Change selections in the Profile Options window as
desired.
2. Click the next (>) button to continue.
For more information see Chapter 6, Step 11: Choose Pro-
file Options.

Step 4: From the Create Profile window:


1. Click Create Profile.
2. Name your new profile and click Save.
3. When the Profile Complete window reappears, click the
Home or next (>) button to return to the main program
window, or close the program.

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112
Editing Output Profiles

9 Editing Output Profiles


This chapter explains using MonacoPROFILER to edit output
profiles. To edit a linked profile, see Chapter 9: Creating and
Editing Linked Profiles. You’ll need the following to get started:

• MonacoPROFILER program
• the output profile you desire to edit***
• the output device associated with the profile
• a profiled monitor (optional)
• a controlled viewing environment
*** The Selective Color option is only available when editing the
Inverse transform in RGB or CMYK output profiles that were
originally created with a Monaco Systems profiling product.

Editing Basics
Create a profile for your output device using the Output
option. Print some images using the profile. If you determine
the profile’s rendering of color is not meeting your expecta-
tions, return to MonacoPROFILER and use the Editor
option to edit the profile.

The Editor option gives you powerful output profile editing


tools for adjusting output curves, editing CIELab (L*,a*,b*)
color attributes, customizing gamut compression to affect color
selectively, fine tuning colors and neutrals, and tweaking the
profile white point. Note: PANTONE Hexachrome and multi-
ink profiles cannot be edited using the Selective Color option.

To edit an output profile, simply use the color tools to alter a


sample image that has been processed using the profile. Once
color edits are made, they are proofed by viewing the sample

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MonacoPROFILER User Guide

image on a calibrated monitor and/or by printing a hard-


copy of the sample image.

When editing is complete, your color edits are saved in the


profile and subsequently applied to all images processed
using the profile. You can optionally apply the edits to the
sample image if desired.

Previewing Edits to the Profile


As you edit via the sample image, you’ll want to preview how
your edits are affecting the profile. There are two methods of
previewing profile edits:
• visually, using the displayed image as a soft proof
• iteratively, by continuously editing and printing the edited
image until you obtain the desired results.

If possible, we recommend using both methods. Soft-proof


your edits as you work and periodically output the sample
image.

Requirements for using soft-proofing include a calibrated mon-


itor, a consistent viewing environment and if you are a Win-
dows user, a video card that supports color-table correction.

If you meet the requirements for soft-proofing, it’s important


that you replicate the ambient lighting conditions that were
used to create your monitor profile. Altering the lighting
conditions will change your perception of color in both the
displayed and printed image.

If you can’t replicate the original lighting conditions, create a


new monitor profile for use now.

If you are unable to accurately soft-proof your edits, print the


image to accurately view the results of your edits.

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Editing Output Profiles

Determining which transform to edit


Output profiles consist of transforms or tables that convert
color data between the color space of the output device and
the color space of the PCS (profile connection space) and
vice versa.

Transforms are labeled A2Bn or B2An, where A is defined as


the color space of the output device, B is Lab or the color
space of the PCS, and n is the selected rendering intent used
for gamut compression during conversions.

The diagram below illustrates how transforms in an output


profile function to deliver accurate color for both printed
output and monitor previewing.

Monitor
Profile
Output Profile

B2An (Inverse)
Lab
A2Bn (Forward)
Output Device
Profile Connection
Space (PCS)

During conversion, image data is transformed from the PCS


(Lab) to the device color space using the preferred gamut com-
pression (rendering intent). The part of the profile that per-
forms this step is defined as the Inverse or B2An transform.

The image data, now in the color space of the output device,
is passed to the printer. In order to accurately preview the
image before it prints, the image data is transformed from
device space back to the PCS using the Forward or A2Bn
transform, and finally passed through the monitor profile to
the display.
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Determining which transform to edit depends on your work-


flow. When you edit the Inverse transform (B2A) in an out-
put profile, both the preview and the print will change
accordingly. This is commonly referred to as WYSIWYG, or
what you see is what you get. As you edit, the preview updates
in real time and when the image is printed, the print reflects
the edits. For example, you have determined that you need to
edit both the preview and the print because you have printed
several images using your profiled output device, and all of
the prints AND previews consistently have a red color cast.
To correct both the preview and the print, simply edit the
preview image until you get the desired results and save the
profile. This is the most common and recommended method
of editing an output profile.

The Forward or A2B transform affects the color conversion


from the device color space back into the PCS. This color
data is further transformed as it passes through the monitor
profile and is used to create the soft proof, or preview image.
Editing the Forward transform corrects the preview or soft
proof. The printed image is not affected. Editing the Forward
transform is only recommended for the expert user who has a
thorough understanding of the affects of editing Forward trans-
forms. If you edit a Forward transform to compensate for a
monitor profile that is improperly displaying soft proofs, the
resulting output profile will only preview images correctly on
that particular monitor.

Editing using the Forward and Inverse transforms option cor-


rects the print but does not change the preview image. This
editing method may seem counter-intuitive because it
requires initially altering the preview image to match a poorly
rendered print. For example, assume you have several images
that all consistently print with an overall reddish cast, AND
the corresponding preview for each image displays correctly.
To edit the profile to affect just the print, load and print a
sample image. Using the printed image as an aim reference,
edit the sample image until it matches the print. Now you
have both a print and a sample image that contain matching
reddish casts. When you save the profile, the software com-
pensates for this seemingly incorrect editing method and cre-
ates a profile that previews and prints images correctly.

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Editing Output Profiles

Profile Editing Workflow Overview


MonacoPROFILER allows you to edit output profiles by mak-
ing adjustments to a sample image. The following is a general
editing workflow. Details for configuring control panels and
using the editing tools are found later in this chapter.

1. Select profile options in the ColorSync control panel


(Macintosh), or in the Default Profile Preferences dialog
box (Windows).
2. Launch MonacoPROFILER and select the Editor option.
3. When prompted, click Load and open the output profile
you desire to edit.
4. The Inverse (B2A) table is selected by default. If you
desire to edit a different table, click More Options to view
the list of editable transforms.
5. Select the radio button for the table you desire to edit,
then click the next (>) button.
A Profile Editing window opens displaying a sample image
with your selected output profile applied.
6. Use the default sample image to edit the profile, or click
the Folder icon to locate and open a different image.
7. If using a different image, select the source profile for the
image from the Image Profile list.
8. Select the rendering intent you desire to edit from the
Rendering Intent list.
9. Print the sample image.
For comparison’s sake, it is important that you print the
image now. Once you begin editing the profile, you will
not be able to print the original image without the profile
edits applied.
When your printer dialog box launches, be sure you are
using the same paper and printer settings that were origi-
nally used to build the profile.
10. Using the color editing tools, edit the image as desired.

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Refer to the Before image and its hard-copy print to view


the color rendered by the original unedited profile.
11. Print the image and view hard-copy results of your edits.
12. When you are satisfied with the results, rename and save
your edited profile by selecting Save Profile from the File
menu.

Using Profiles with MonacoPROFILER


Before using MonacoPROFILER to edit profiles, configure your
system to recognize your monitor and other device profiles.
MonacoPROFILER uses your monitor profile to display images
and device profiles to interpret color values in the sample image.
When you create a monitor profile, MonacoPROFILER auto-
matically loads the profile in the appropriate control panel. If
you experience problems or need to change the default profile,
follow the directions below.

MonacoPROFILER for When you open a sample image, the program automatically
Windows requires defaults to the profiles currently selected in the Default Pro-
Monaco Gamma file Preferences dialog box (Windows), and the Display and
(included as part of
MonacoPROFILER) ColorSync control panels (Macintosh). If you created or
to properly use monitor acquired the sample image using a different profile, you can
profiles created with change the input profile for the image in the Editor window.
MonacoPROFILER.
To configure the Default Profile Preferences dialog box:

1. Access the Default Profile Preferences dialog box by select-


WINDOWS ing File>Options.

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2. Select a device profile to use with RGB sample images from


the RGB Profile list. If all of your images are scanned using
the same scanner, select your scanner profile.
3. Select a profile to use with CMYK sample images from
the CMYK Profile list.
4. Select a profile from the Lab Profile list and click OK.
MonacoPROFILER will default to these selections when-
ever a RGB, CMYK, or Lab sample image is open.

To configure the Display control panel:


1. Access the Display control panel by selecting:
MACINTOSH Apple>Control Panels>Monitor (Mac OS 9), or
Apple> System Preferences>Display (Mac OS X).

Display control panel


used in OS 9

Display control panel


used in OS X

2. Select the Color tab.


3. Select your monitor profile from the profile list.
4. Close the control panel.

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To configure the ColorSync control panel:


1. Access the ColorSync control panel by selecting
MACINTOSH Apple>Control Panels>ColorSync (Mac OS 9), or
Apple>System Preferences>ColorSync (Mac OS X).
2. Select the Profiles tab>Default Profiles for Documents
from the upper-most drop-down list (Mac OS 9).
3. Select a device profile from the RGB Default list.

ColorSync control panel


used in OS 9

ColorSync control panel


used in OS X

MonacoPROFILER will default to this selection whenever


an RGB image is open and Use System Default is selected
in the Image Profile list.
4. Select a device profile from the CMYK Default list.

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MonacoPROFILER will default to this selection whenever


a CMYK image is open and Use System Default is
selected in the Image Profile list.
5. Close the control panel.

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Working in the Profile Editing Window


The Profile Editing window displays an image editing area
and a tool bar for accessing the color editing functions.

Rendering intent Tool bar


being edited
Image or source
profile
Table being edited

Image editing
window containing
sample image

Image magnification

Profile Editing Window Functions (Mac)


MonacoPROFILER provides several tools for profile editing.

Open
Previous Magnify or Display Single Edit lightness Title bar displaying
Window reduce image or Split image and saturation “Image name - profile name”
Move image in Identify or Display color Edit output Edit colors selectively
editing window sample color information curves (RGB & CMYK
values profiles only)

Show/Hide Select a rendering Fine tune colors Save edited


toolbar ICC tag for table intent to edit or neutrals profile
Select source profile Edit Profile
for sample image White Point

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Profile Editing Window Functions (Win)


The windows toolbar offers the same functionality.

Open Edit colors selectively


Previous Magnify or Display Single Edit lightness
reduce image or Split image and saturation (RGB & CMYK
Window profiles only)
Identify or Display color
Move image in Edit output Title bar displaying
sample color information
editing window values curves “Image name - profile name”

Save Select a rendering Fine tune colors


edited intent to edit or neutrals Edit Profile
Open
Image Save profile Print sample Select source profile White Point
image image for sample image

Opening a New Sample Image


The sample image is used as a visual reference to preview the
effects of your edits on the profile. You can use the default
image that appears when the editing window opens or you can
use your own image if it is more appropriate.

We recommend you always edit using the default sample image.


The sample image is provided in Lab color space. This known
image will help us troubleshoot any issues with your profile
without introducing variables caused by an input device.

NOTE: The Editor option If you do use your own image as a visual reference when edit-
does not support DCS ing an output profile, we recommend it be captured using a
format sample images.
profiled high-end device. Use the device profile as your
source or image profile in the profile editing window.

When the sample image is first opened, it is rendered using the


unedited output profile, then displayed in the profile editing
window.

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To open a new sample image:


1. Select File>Open Image.
2. Locate and select the new sample image.
3. Click Choose.

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Setting Profile Options


Use the Rendering Intent list to select the rendering intent
you desire to edit. If you’ve chosen your own image to use as
a sample image, use the Image Profile list to select a source
profile for the image.

To set profile options:


1. Select the rendering intent you desire to edit from the
Rendering Intent list.
Edits will be applied to the selected transform and render-
ing intent, and displayed in the loaded sample image. On
the Mac platform, the ICC standard tag for the selected
transform and rendering intent is displayed below the ren-
dering intent list. The first part of the tag indicates the
transform that you are editing, and last number in the tag
indicates the rendering intent.

A2B1
Forward table Colorimetric rendering Intent

A2Bn = Forward table


B2An = Inverse table
A2Bn & B2An = both Forward and Inverse tables
0 = Perceptual rendering intent
1 = Colorimetric rendering intent
2 = Saturation rendering intent

2. If you’ve chosen your own image, select the source profile


associated with the image from the Image Profile list.
This may be a scanner profile if you are opening a scanned
image, or a monitor profile if the image was created on-
screen, or a working space profile if the image was opened
and worked on in Photoshop. In general, open the profile
that is currently associated with the sample image.
We recommend you always edit your output profiles
using the default sample image. The sample image is pro-
vided in Lab color space. If you are using the sample
image, the program automatically defaults to Lab and no
selections are available in the Image Profile list.

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If you select Use System Default, the application defaults


to the profiles currently selected in the Default Profile
Preferences dialog box (Windows) or the ColorSync con-
trol panel (Macintosh).

Splitting the View of the Sample Image


The sample image can be displayed as a single image or as a
split Before and After image. Toggle between the two Split
View icons to alternate between a single view or the split
Before and After view.
Split Image icon

After image Before image After image

When viewing the split view, the Before image, on the left,
displays the sample image with the original output profile
applied. Use the Before image to evaluate how the original
profile is currently rendering color.

The After image, on the right, displays the same image with any
edits you’ve made to the profile applied to the image. Use the
After image to evaluate how your color edits are affecting the pro-
file. In the single image view, only the After image is displayed.

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When you save the edited profile, the changes you make are
saved in the profile, not in the sample image file. To apply and
save the changes to the sample image, select File>Save Image.

Magnifying and Reducing the View


You can magnify or reduce the view of the sample image
using two methods.

To increase magnification:
Macintosh: Click the Magnifying Glass icon and click on the
sample image. Each click increases magnification. Alterna-
tively, you can choose a percent magnification from the Mag-
nification list located in the lower-left corner of the editing
window.
Windows: Select the Magnifying Glass icon and click on the
sample image, or right-click the mouse and select a setting.

To decrease magnification:
Macintosh: Click the Magnifying Glass icon and
Option>click on the sample image. Each click decreases
magnification. Alternatively, you can choose a percent mag-
nification from the Magnification list located in the lower-
left corner of the editing window.
Windows: Select the Magnifying Glass icon, Alt-click on the
sample image or right-click the mouse and select a setting.

Moving the Sample Image


You can shift the sample image in the Profile Editing window
up, down, left, or right by using the Move tool.

To shift the image within the editing window:


1. Click the Move tool icon.
2. Place the cursor over the sample image. Press and drag
the mouse in the desired direction.

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Printing the Sample Image


The Print option always prints the After image—or the
image with the profile edits applied. Before you begin edit-
ing, print the sample image to evaluate how the unaltered
profile is rendering color. As you edit the profile, periodically
print the sample image to evaluate how the edited profile is
rendering color. If you are not working with a profiled moni-
tor, print the sample image more frequently.

To print the sample image:


1. Select File>Print. The print dialog box for your output
device appears.
2. Configure the dialog box with the same settings used to
create the original profile. Do not select your output pro-
file. The application will automatically apply it to the
image. Check to be sure the same media that was used to
create the original profile is loaded in the output device.
3. Output the sample image.

Using the Cross-hair or Eyedropper


The cursor has three modes, Cross-hair tool, Eyedropper
tool, or pointer. The Cross-hair tool is used to display color
values in the sample image. The Eyedropper tool is used to
sample color values. When the cursor is not over the sample
image, it becomes the standard arrow pointer that is used to
select menu options or tools.

The Cross-hair and Eyedropper tools have hot spots that


must be positioned over the sample image before color val-
ues can be read or sampled. The hot spot is located at the
center of the Cross-hair or the tip of the Eyedropper. The
cursor will automatically change shape between the Cross-
hair, Eyedropper, or pointer depending on its location on the
screen. When sampling colors using the Selective Color or
Fine Tune tools, the Eyedropper automatically appears.
When the Cross-hair tool appears, it is an indication that
color values may be viewed, but not sampled. To sample a

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color using the Eyedropper tool, position the cursor over the
sample image and click the mouse.

Viewing Color Values in the Sample Image


The Color Information window allows you to view color val-
ues for any area under the cursor as it is moved over the sam-
ple image. To access the Color Information window, click the
Color Info icon.

To sample a color value:


1. Click the Color Info icon.
2. Move the cursor over the sample image.
Color values directly under the cursor are displayed in the
color space of the image (Original Image Values), the
color space of the output profile before editing (Before
Editing), and the color space of the output profile after
editing (After Editing).
3. To display the values using a different color space, make a
selection from the color space list. You can view values in
the color space of the image, the profile, and LCh.

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Adjusting Lightness
Use the Lightness curve to selectively adjust the L attribute in
the Lab connection space. Adjusting the L curve adjusts tonal
relationships without affecting color balance. The curve as
presented is linear, with input equaling output. If you are
editing both Forward and Inverse tables, a curve for each
table will appear.

1. Click the Lightness/Saturation Curves icon.


2. Click the Lightness checkbox. Deselect the Saturation
checkbox if necessary.

Curve increasing
overall lightness

Shadow, midtone, and


highlight areas in an
image are affected by
adjusting the lower 25%,
middle 50%, and upper
25% areas of the curve Curve decreasing
respectively. overall lightness

3. Adjust the curve as desired.


• Click any points on the curve that you want to remain
fixed.
• To adjust lightness, enter Input and Output values, or
click the part of the curve you want to adjust and drag
the curve.
• To remove a point:
Macintosh: drag it off the grid
Windows: highlight the point and press Delete
• To reset the curve to a linear state, click Reset.

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Adjusting Saturation
Use the Saturation curve to selectively adjust the color rela-
tionships in the sample image. The curve represents the a
and b color attributes in the Lab connection space. The curve
as presented is linear, with input equaling output. Less satu-
rated colors are located at the bottom of the curve, with
highly saturated colors at the top. If you are editing both For-
ward and Inverse tables, a curve for each table will appear.

1. Click the Lightness/Saturation Curve icon.


2. Click the Saturation checkbox. Deselect the Lightness
checkbox if necessary.
3. Adjust the curve as desired.
• Click any points on the curve that you want to remain fixed.
• To adjust saturation, enter Input and Output values,
or click the part of the curve you want to adjust and
drag the curve.
• To remove a point:
Macintosh: drag it off the grid
Windows: highlight the point and press Delete
• To reset the curve to a linear state, click Reset.

Curve increasing
saturation in lower Curve increasing
saturated colors. overall saturation.

Curve decreasing
Curve decreasing saturation in highly
overall saturation saturated colors.

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Adjusting Output Curves


Use the Output Curves option to selectively adjust CMYK,
RGB, PANTONE Hexachrome, or multi-ink output densities.

The curve as presented is linear, with input equaling output.


Shadow, midtone, and highlight areas in an image are
affected by adjusting the lower 25%, middle 50%, and upper
25% areas of the curve respectively.

When editing both the Forward and Inverse tables in a pro-


file, the curves for both tables will be displayed. Adjusting the
curve in either table will result in the inverse edit in the
remaining table. This insures the color data used for the pre-
view remains accurate. If you are editing both Forward and
Inverse tables, a curve for each table will appear. If you are
editing a single Forward or Inverse table, a single set of curves
will appear.

1. Click the Output Curves icon.


The Output Curves tool appear. Activate the curve you
desire to edit by clicking on the corresponding checkbox.
Deselect other checkboxes.

Macintosh:
One or both of
the tables can be
viewed by toggling
the expand icon.

When one table is


showing, you can
alternate between
the tables by clicking
the swap (<->) icon.

2. Adjust the curve as desired.


• You can click any points on the curve that you want to
remain fixed.

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• Enter Input and Output values, or click the part of the


curve you want to adjust and drag the curve.
• To remove a point:
Macintosh: drag it off the grid
Windows: highlight the point and press Delete
• To reset the curve to its original state, click Reset.

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Editing Color Selectively


Due to gamut compression, not all colors that you desire to
print may be available for printing. The Selective Color
option enables you to control how specific color ranges are
mapped to the device space. With Selective Color you can
identify a color you desire to print (Desired Color), and alter
it to create a new printable color (Printed Color), while con-
trolling its effect on other colors.

NOTE: The Selective Color The Desired Color is identified by sampling values in the
option is only available sample image, adjusting the Lab or LCh sliders to select a
when editing the Inverse
table of RGB and CMYK color, or using a measurement device to capture exact values
profiles. and entering values in the Lab fields.

When the Desired Color is identified, the software automati-


cally displays the closest reproducible match in the Printed
Color fields. The Printed Color is then modified to create an
acceptable replacement by adjusting the Lab values. Finally,
the size of the color range affected by the change is defined by
adjusting the Lightness and Color range sliders.

Options for identifying


the color you desire to
print (Desired Color)
Options for identifying
the new replacement
or closest printable
color (Printed Color)

Options for adjusting


the Range of color
affected by the edits

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Selective Color Tool Quick Reference

A C
B

D F

E G

K
H

I
M
N
L

Use... To...
A New edit a new color
B Delete delete the current color
C Edit List displays the name of the current edit, or
select a previously edited color to edit
D Desired Color identify a color to change by using the
sliders/value fields Lab sliders or entering Lab values
E Desired Color sample view a color sample of the Desired Color
F Printed Color sample identify a replacement or printable color by
sliders/value fields using the Lab sliders or entering Lab values
G Printed Color sample view a color sample of the replacement or printable color
H Lightness range slider select the range of affected lightness values
I Color range slider select the range of affected colors
K Profile Gamut displays a color gamut model of the profile
L Luminance slider change the luminance level displayed
M Luminance value view numerically the currently selected luminance level
N Apply apply the edit to the profile and preview the effects of the edit in
the Profile Editing window

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Workflow for Editing Color Selectively


Use the Selective Color option to selectively adjust individual
colors or a range of color.

1. Click the Selective Color icon in the Profile Editing window.


2. Click New, enter a name for the current edit, and click
OK.

Each new color edit is sequentially named and listed in a


drop-down list. If this is the first color being edited, the
program names it Edit 1. To change the name, highlight
the assigned name and type a new name.

3. Identify a Desired Color.


The Desired Color is the color value you desire to reproduce.
Identify a Desired Color by doing one of the following:
• Sample a color in the image using the eyedropper.
• Click on the Eyedropper in the Profile Editing window.
• Position the eyedropper over the color you desire to
edit in the sample image and click.
• Drag the Desired Color sliders until the desired color
is obtained.
• Using your measurement device, sample a color from
a hard-copy of the image and enter the Lab values in
the Desired Color fields.
• Select a color by clicking on the displayed profile
gamut using the Eyedropper.

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Editing Output Profiles

When you identify a color to edit by sampling color values


from the sample image, the Desired Color and Printed Color
fields display slightly different values for the sampled color.

The Desired Color fields display Lab values that were con-
verted directly from the Image Space to Lab. They are not
processed through the profile. In order to predict the closest
printable color, the Printed Color fields display values that
have been translated from Image Space to the color space of
the output device, and back to Lab. The compression intro-
duced during the color transformation process accounts for
the slight differences in values.

4. Modify the Printed Color.


The values in the Printed Color fields represent the closest
reproducible color for the Desired Color. To modify the
Printed Color, click anywhere in the Printed Color area of
the Selective Color window to make it active. The area
becomes highlighted by a gray (Mac) or black (Win) rectan-
gle. Modify the Printed Color by doing one of the following:

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• Adjust the Printed Color sliders until the desired


color is obtained.
• Enter new Lab values in the Printed Color fields. If
you enter values that are not printable by your device,
an Out of Gamut warning will appear.
• Select a color from the color model using the Eye-
dropper.
You can increase the size of the color model for easier
color selection by selecting the Magnifying Glass icon
from the Profile Editing window.
You can also shift the color model location—up,
down, left, or right by using the Move tool from the
Profile Editing window.

5. Modify the Lightness range and Color range.


The Lightness range and Color range options restrict the
effects of the edit to a specific luminance and color range.
You can increase or decrease the range of effect by adjust-
ing the sliders.

The small cross indicates the location


of the Desired Color.

The arrow indicates the location of


the edited Printed Color.

The circle indicates the range of color


affected by the edit.

6. Click Apply.
When you press this button, all edits in the Edit List are
applied in order to the profile and can be seen in the After
image in the Profile Editing window.

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Deleting Selective Color Edits


You can delete Selective Color edits during or after an editing
session. If you edit a profile and desire to remove the edits at
a later time, you can reopen the profile in the Editor and
delete the Selective Color edit.
To delete a Selective Color edit:
1. Select the color edit from the Edit List.
2. Click Delete.
3. Click Apply.
When you click Apply, the edits remaining in the Edit List
are applied to the profile and the After image in the edit-
ing window updates to reflect the change.

Fine Tuning Output Profiles


The Fine Tune option is only Use the Fine Tune tool to make small precise changes to neu-
available when editing an trals or to make small shifts to a specific color or range of col-
Inverse transform.
ors. When you fine tune an output profile, you edit in the
color space of the associated device. For example, if you are
tuning a press profile, you will edit in CMYK. If you are fine
tuning a multi-ink profile, you will edit in the corresponding
color channels. The Fine Tune tool is always the last tool used
in the editing workflow. and is only available when editing
the Inverse transform of the profile.

Fine Tuning Neutrals


Neutral balance is an important component of good color
reproduction. The grayscale ramp is a tonal scale that repre-
sents the lightest white to the darkest black, with intermedi-
ate levels of gray in between. The goal to fine tuning the
grayscale ramp of the profile is to ensure that neutrals in
images appear visibly gray (no color cast), and that the tones
are evenly distributed over the available dynamic range of the
device. The color balance of the grayscale is affected by mod-
ifying the proportions of color at varying steps in the profile’s
grayscale ramp. The number of steps in the ramp is deter-
mined by the Table Resolution originally used to build the

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profile. For example, if a 9x9x9 Table Resolution setting was


used, the profile’s grayscale ramp includes 9 steps. If the orig-
inal Table Resolution setting was 17x17x17, the number of
steps in the grayscale ramp will be 17.

To fine tune the grayscale ramp:

1. Select the Fine Tune option from the Profile Editing win-
dow toolbar.
2. If not already selected, click the Neutrals tab.
3. Using the Eyedropper, sample a neutral area in the image
that you want to edit.
The software determines the closest tone value to the
selected neutral and highlights that step for editing.
4. Click on the individual colorants in the highlighted step
and modify the values as desired.
5. To accept changes to the grayscale ramp, close the win-
dow (Mac) or select Apply (Win). To reset the ramp to its
original values, click Reset.

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Fine Tuning Colors


Fine tuning a color or range of colors involves modifying the
chromatic component of a color. This is most often used to
eliminate unwanted dots (% ink) by making very small, pre-
cise changes in individual colorants.

name or description
of current edit

original color you


desire to change
new replacement color
range of color
affected by edit
masks image areas
unaffected by edit

To fine tune a color or range of color:


1. Select the Fine Tune option from the Profile Editing win-
dow toolbar.
2. If not already selected, click the Colors tab.
3. Click New and enter a name for the edit.

color sample and Lab


values of selected color
color values of selected color
in color space of profile
name or description
of color edit

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4. Select a color to edit by clicking in the After image with


the Eyedropper.
A sample of the color and its corresponding Lab and col-
orant values appears in the Choose a Color window.
You can increase your view of the sample image for easier
color selection by selecting the Magnifying Glass icon
from the Profile Editing window.
You can also shift the sample image location—up, down,
left, or right by using the Move tool from the Profile Edit-
ing window.
5. Click OK.
6. Select a replacement color by clicking in the After Editing
image with the Eyedropper or entering new colorant val-
ues. To make very precise, small changes, modify the col-
orant’s values.
7. Modify the Lightness Range and Color Range.
The Lightness and Color range options restrict the effects
of the edit to a specific color range. You can increase or
decrease the range of effect by adjusting the sliders.
8. Click the Show range mask in preview checkbox.
The sample image displays only areas of the image that
are affected by the edit. Areas masked out in black are not
changed.
9. To accept changes to the image, close the window (Mac)
or select Apply (Win). To reset the image to its original
color values, click Reset.

Once you define a color, you may need to edit the original
color values or change its name.

To edit the original color selection:


1. Select the Fine Tune option from the Profile Editing win-
dow toolbar.
2. If not already selected, click the Colors tab.

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3. Select the original color you desire to change from the


Color Edits list and click Edit.
4. If you desire to change your original color selection,
choose another color with the Eyedropper or enter new
Lab values.
5. If you desire to change the name of the color, highlight
the original name and type a new description.
6. Click OK.
7. To accept changes to the image, close the Fine Tune win-
dow. To reset the image to its original values, click Reset.

Edit Profile White Point


A profile’s white point tag MonacoPROFILER allows you to edit the values stored in the
is independent of it’s ren- white point tag of an output profile. White point tag values
dering intent tables. You
can edit any output pro- are stored as XYZ tristimulus values, and editable in Lab or
file’s white point tag LCh. Adjusting a profile’s white point enables you to better
regardless of which render-
ing intent is selected, how- match a source device’s paper white when simulating an out-
ever, the white point tag is put device.
only used by the Absolute
Rendering Intent.
When editing a profile’s white point, keep in mind that the
white point tag is only used by a RIP or software that uses the
Absolute Colorimetric rendering intent. Photoshop uses the
white point tag when the Simulate Paper White option is
enabled, regardless of which rendering intent is selected.

When you select Colorimetric in the profile editing window,


the Relative rendering intent is used. Since images are not
displayed using Absolute Colorimetric in MonacoPRO-
FILER, white point edits are not reflected in the sample
image. To view white point edits, save and apply the profile
using the Absolute Colorimetric rendering intent with your
RIP or other image processing software.

The Before and After sam- When editing the white point in a proofing workflow,
ple colors are passed Monaco Systems recommends editing the press profile
through the monitor pro-
file to give you an accurate (source) to achieve a better match between the press and
preview of the paper white. proofer (destination) paper whites. To edit the white point in
a source profile, use the sliders or input fields to adjust the

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values as desired. For example, to add more yellow to the


paper white, adjust the sliders to increase the yellow. Editing
the destination or proofer profile is not recommended. If you
choose to edit the destination profile, you must make the
corrections inversely. For example, to alter the paper white to
be more yellowish, add more blue. Edits made to the destina-
tion profile’s paper white will display inversely when using
the Simulate Paper White option in Adobe Photoshop.

Color sample of
current white point Color sample of
new white point

Click arrow to select


Lab or LCh values Sliders and fields
used to adjust
Stored values for white point values
current white point

To edit a profile white point:


1. Select the White Pt. option from the Profile Editing win-
dow toolbar.
The Profile White Point window appears, displaying a
color sample and values for the stored white point.
2. Click the small arrows and choose Lab or LCh to display
the Before and After values in the desired color space.
3. Edit the After white point by adjusting the sliders or
entering new values in the text fields.
4. To revert back to original values, click Revert; to accept
the new white point values, click OK.

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When you save your editing changes, the original white


point values will be overwritten with the new After values.
Unlike other editing tools, white point edits cannot be
undone once a profile is saved.

Saving Edited Profiles


To save an edited profile:
1. Click the Save Profile icon, select File>Save Profile, or
close the Profile Editing window.
A Save As dialog box appears.
2. Rename the profile, and click Save.
Keep in mind that edits made to the profile only affect the
rendering intent selected in the Rendering Intent list
with the exception of white point tag edits.

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Saving the Sample Image


The sample image is intended to be used as a visual reference
to preview the effects of your edits on the profile. We recom-
mend you always edit using the default sample image. How-
ever, should you desire to use your own image, you can
optionally save the image with all profiles applied.

To save the sample image:


1. Select File>Save Image.
A Save File As dialog box opens.
2. Rename the image if desired.
3. Choose a file format—TIFF, TIFF (with Embedded Pro-
file), or DCS 2.0.
The sample image used when editing RGB or CMYK pro-
files can be saved either as a TIFF file or a TIFF (with
Embedded Profile) file. The DCS 2.0 format is only avail-
able when editing PANTONE Hexachrome or multi-ink
(5, 6, 7, or 8-color profiles).
4. Click Save.

NOTE: When saving a DCS 2.0 image file using a PANTONE


Hexachrome or multi-ink profile (5, 6, 7, or 8-color), the appli-
cation will save the additional channels and label them with the
corresponding channel names used in the profile.

Although the Editor option can save multi-ink files in DCS 2.0
format, it does not support sample images in DCS 2.0 format.
This means once a sample image is saved in DCS 2.0 format,
it cannot be reopened into the Editor.

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Creating and Editing Linked Profiles

10 Creating and Editing


Linked Profiles
This chapter explains creating and editing linked profiles.
You’ll need the following to get started:

• MonacoPROFILER program
• two CMYK printer profiles

Linked Profile Basics


MonacoPROFILER allows you to create a new ICC profile by
linking the data from two existing CMYK printer profiles.

A linked profile allows you to simulate the print output of


one device on another device. This is most often the case
when using a digital printer as a proofing device for a print-
ing press.

You may want to use a linked profile if you have a RIP that
accepts the linked profile format or you use applications that
can apply a linked profile.

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Creating Linked Profiles


This section explains creating a linked profile.

Step 1: Choose Profile Data


1. Launch MonacoPROFILER and click the Output icon.
2. From the Select Profile Data window:
• choose Create Linked Profile.
• click the first Choose button, and select the CMYK
profile for the device you wish to match.
This is the profile for the device you are simulating on
your printer. This is also known as the source profile.
• click the second Choose button, and select the CMYK
profile for your proofing device.
This is also known as the destination profile.

3. Click the next (>) button to continue.


The Profile Options window appears.

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Step 2: Choose Profile Options


The Profile Options window consists of two tabs— Ink Con-
trol and Link Options.

Ink Control Tab


Use the Ink Control tab options to specify how black ink is
used to replace CMY in linked profiles. In theory, printing
using equal amounts of cyan, magenta, and yellow inks pro-
duces black. But in reality they do not produce a true black.
Replacing varying amounts of CMY inks with black reintro-
duces a true black while saving ink in the printing process.
The term Black Generation refers to both the amount of
black colorant available for replacing the CMY colorants, and
the method used.

Using Black Generation has the following advantages:


• increases density and contrast in shadows
• prevents excessive ink buildup (profiles for press)
• saves cost of color cartridges (digital printers/proofers)

Black Generation using MonacoPROFILER can be accom-


plished in three ways:

• When Use automatic settings is selected, the program


automatically determines the optimum amount of black
ink to use as a replacement for the other colorants based
on all information supplied for your device. Automatic is
the recommended method when profiling digital printers.
• When UCR (Under Color Removal) is selected, the pro-
gram substitutes black ink for some amount of CMY only
in the neutral and shadow areas of an image. UCR typically
replaces colors in the less saturated colors, where black is
already being used.
• When GCR (Gray Component Replacement) is selected,
the program substitutes black ink for some amount of
CMY throughout an entire image based on the curve set-
tings and the GCR slider setting you choose. This has the
effect of introducing black into the more highly saturated
colors.

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To use the automatic black generation setting:


1. Click the Use automatic settings checkbox.

The software automatically determines the most appro-


priate ink settings to include in the profile for your
device.
2. Change the Maximum black ink available for printing
setting as desired.
This setting represents the maximum amount of black ink
available for printing. The default setting is 100%. Do not
change the default when profiling a digital printer. The soft-
ware will automatically calculate the correct black limit.
When profiling a printing press, seek the advice of your print
vendor in setting this option.
3. Change the Maximum total ink available for printing
setting as desired.
This setting represents the maximum amount of all inks
available for printing. The default setting is the value pre-
viously entered in the Advanced Options box in the Patch
Options window. You can decrease this setting, but you
cannot increase it. If the value is increased, the program
will automatically default to the previously selected setting.

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To set GCR manually:


1. Uncheck the Use automatic settings checkbox.

2. Click the GCR radio button.


3. Set the GCR slider to the desired amount of GCR.
The GCR slider controls the amount of black ink that is used
to replace the CMY colorants. Moving the slider to the left
causes less saturated colors, or colors with more gray com-
ponent, to be affected. Moving the slider to the right
increases the range of affected colors to include more satu-
rated colors that have a smaller amount of gray component.
4. Select a predefined curve from the Level list, or create a cus-
tom curve by selecting a predefined curve and modifying it.
For more information, see Creating a Custom Curve below.
5. Select Intelligent Black if desired.
When Intelligent Black is selected, the program adheres as
closely as possible to the selected Black Generation curve
setting without clipping the available gamut.
For example, if you select a curve with black beginning at a
luminance level of 60, and enable Intelligent Black, the pro-
gram will automatically compute some amount of black to
include between the 100 to 60 luminance level in order to
preserve the full gamut. If you desire black to truly begin at a
luminance of 60, uncheck the Intelligent Black option.

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6. Change the Maximum Ink settings as desired.


Use the Maximum black ink available for printing
option to specify the maximum amount of black ink
available for printing. The default setting is 100%.
Change the Maximum total ink available for printing
setting as desired.
This setting represents the maximum amount of all inks
available for printing. The default setting is the value pre-
viously entered in the Advanced Options box in the Patch
Options window. You can decrease this setting, but you
cannot increase it. If the value is increased, the program
will automatically default to the previously selected setting.

To set UCR manually:


1. Uncheck the Use automatic settings checkbox.
2. Enable the UCR radio button.
3. Select a predefined curve from the Level list, or create a cus-
tom curve by selecting a predefined curve and modifying it.
For more information, see Creating a Custom Curve below.
4. Select Intelligent Black if desired.
When Intelligent Black is selected, the program adheres as
closely as possible to the selected Black Generation curve
setting without clipping the available gamut.
For example, if you select a curve with black beginning at
a luminance level of 60, and enable Intelligent Black, the
program will automatically compute some amount of
black to include between the 100 to 60 luminance level in
order to preserve the full gamut. If you desire black to
truly begin at a luminance of 60, uncheck the Intelligent
Black option.
5. Change the Maximum Ink settings as desired.
Use the Maximum black ink available for printing
option to specify the maximum amount of black ink
available for printing. The default setting is 100%.
Change the Maximum total ink available for printing
setting as desired.

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This setting represents the maximum amount of all inks


available for printing. The default setting is the value pre-
viously entered in the Advanced Options box in the Patch
Options window. You can decrease this setting, but you
cannot increase it. If the value is increased, the program
will automatically default to the previously selected setting.

Creating a Custom Curve:


The program provides five levels of black generation—None,
Light, Medium, Heavy, and Custom.

Each level is represented by a curve. The K% axis represents the


amount of black ink used from 0 to 100%. The L* axis repre-
sents the luminance level of the affected color. The curve repre-
sents the percentage of black ink used to replace colorants with
that particular luminance value. To create a Custom curve, select
a level from the list and modify it as desired.

• Select the curve you want to edit from the Level list.
• Drag an existing end point or midpoint to reshape the curve.
• Click on the curve to add additional points.
• Drag a point left or right past adjacent points to remove a point.
• Adjust the %K and L* sliders to change the end points.

Importing and Exporting Ink Settings:


The program allows you to save and load previously used ink
settings.

To export a group of ink settings, click Export from the Ink


Control Settings list, name your settings, navigate to a location
to save them, and click Save.

To import a group of saved ink settings, click Import from the


Ink Control Settings list, navigate to the saved settings, select
them, and click Open.

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Predefined device settings


MonacoPROFILER provides predefined settings for color
laser, inkjet, newspaper press, offset, and commercial printers.
These settings are intended to be used as a starting point when
generating the correct setting for your device.

To use a predefined device setting:


1. Select your device type from the Ink Control Settings list.
Color Laser
Commercial
Inkjet
Newspaper
Publication
2. Continue building your profile.
3. Test the results by using the profile. If needed, return to
the program and use the Update Profile option to further
customize the settings.

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Link Options Tab


Use the Link Options to control the color conversion of solid
areas of black, to control the simulation of the paper color
used with the source device, and to select the size of the
lookup table used to create the linked profile.

1. Select your proofing options.


Preserve Black Text preserves the black channel in the
source profile. This prevents black text and areas contain-
ing 100% black from converting to CMY values during
the color transformation process. This can often elimi-
nate registration problems associated with printing thin
text.
When this option is checked, areas of solid black are
locked to reproduce as solid black during the device-to
device color conversion.
When this option is unchecked, areas of solid black are
converted to Lab and then to CMY values.
Preserve Paper Color preserves the color of the paper
stock used to profile the source device.
For example, when you create a linked profile to simulate
the output of a printing press, checking Preserve Paper
Color enables you to simulate the color of the paper used
on the press.

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Enable Preserve Paper Color to simulate the paper color


used with the source device (printing press) on the desti-
nation device (digital proofer).
Disable Preserve Paper Color when you desire to use the
paper white and dynamic range of the destination device
(digital proofer).
2. Select a Table Resolution setting.
Table Resolution refers to the size of the LUT (lookup
table) used in the ICC profile or ICC linked profile. The
software uses the LUT to interpolate colors from the
range available. Table Resolution can be thought of as a
cube or node separated into smaller nodes of color. The
number of smaller nodes is defined by the Table Resolu-
tion setting chosen: (9x9x9) or 729 nodes, (17x17x17) or
4913 nodes, (21X21X21) or 9261 nodes. The node values
are either 8-bit or 16-bit.
The combination of Table Resolution/bit-value size deter-
mines the amount of colors available for interpolation.
The size you select is sometimes (but not always) depen-
dent on the ability of your RIP or printer to load and use
the table. A larger table may render color more accurately
depending on the printer being used. Larger profiles take
up more disk space and use more printer memory. If your
RIP or printer cannot load and use a large Table Resolu-
tion/bit-value combination, use a smaller resolution size.
3. Select a Color Value size.
The Use 16-bit Values checkbox is used to control the
profile size. If you have the memory and disk space avail-
able, we recommend you create and use profiles in 16-bit
format.
4. If you don’t wish to use the other tabs available in Profile
Options, click the next (>) button to continue.

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Creating and Editing Linked Profiles

Step 3: Create Profile


From the Create Profile window:

1. Click Create Profile.


2. Name your profile and click Save.
3. When the Create Profile window reappears do one of the
following:
• click the Home or next (>) button to return to the
main program launcher window
• select File>Quit, to close the program

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Editing Linked Profiles


This section explains editing a linked profile.

The procedures for using the Editor option to edit linked


profiles are similar to the procedures for editing output pro-
files with the few exceptions that are noted here.

• The Fine Tune, Lightness/Saturation, and White Pt. tools


are not available for linked profiles.
• Input Curve adjustments affecting the source profile in the
link are available.
• The Color Info tool displays color values for the source and
destination profile color spaces.

A linked profile is a new profile comprised of two CMYK


output profiles—a source profile and a destination profile.
The source profile represents the device you are simulating,
most often a printing press. The destination profile repre-
sents the output device used as the proofing device.

Editing a linked profile involves using the color tools to alter


a sample image that has been processed using the linked pro-
file. The sample image file is only used as a visual reference to
preview how your edits to the linked profile are affecting its
rendering of color. As color edits are made, they are proofed
by viewing the sample image on a calibrated monitor, and/or
by printing a hard-copy of the sample image to the proofing
device used with the profile.

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Creating and Editing Linked Profiles

Working in the Profile Editing Window


The Profile Editing window contains a toolbar for accessing
color editing tools and an image editing area. The image edit-
ing area is used to view the effects of your edits on a sample
image. A sample image is provided in Lab and automatically
opens when you open a linked profile.

The sample image can be displayed as a single image or a split


Source and Destination image. When viewing the split
image, the Source Image (left), displays the sample image
with the source profile applied. The Destination Image (right)
displays the image with the linked profile applied. In other
words, the Source Image is a simulation of the image as it
prints from the printing press, and the Destination Image is a
simulation of the image as it prints from your proofing
device.

Viewing the Source and Destination Images allows you to


determine what colors are being adversely affected in the
device-to-device color conversion.

Setting Profile Options


If you desire to edit a When editing an RGB or CMYK output profile, the Render-
different rendering ing Intent: list is used to select the rendering intent you
intent, Rebuild the desire to edit. When you edit a linked profile, the Rendering
source profile, and
change the default ren- Intent option is not available.
dering intent using the
Update option. Then Use the Image Profile list to select a source profile for the
create a new linked sample image.
profile.

We recommend you always use the supplied sample image,


which is provided in Lab color space. If you are using this
sample image, the program automatically defaults to Lab set-
ting and the Image Profile list is not available.

If you are using a different sample image, select the profile cur-
rently associated with the image from the Image Profile list.

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Printing the Sample Image


The Print option always prints the Destination Image—or
the image with the linked profile applied.

To print the sample image:


1. Select Print from the File menu. The print dialog box for
your proofing device appears.
2. Configure the dialog box with the same settings used to
create the proofer profile. Check to be sure the same
media that was used to create the original proofer profile
is loaded in the output device.
3. Output the sample image.

Viewing Color Values in the Sample Image


The Color Information window allows you to view color val-
ues for any area under the cursor as it is moved over the sam-
ple image. To access the Color Information window, click the
Info icon.

Color values directly under the cursor are displayed in the


color space of the image profile (Original Image Values), the
color space of the source device (Source Space), and the
color space of the destination device (Destination Space).
The Destination Space represents the linked profile—or
color values as they will print from your proofing device.

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Creating and Editing Linked Profiles

Adjusting Input and Output Curves


Use the Curves options to adjust output densities in the
source and destination portions of the linked profile.

When you edit Input Curves, you affect the source portion of
the linked profile. When you edit the Output Curve, you
affect the destination portion of the linked profile. We sug-
gest starting with the Output Curve.

As you edit the curves, view the Destination Image in the


profile editing window to see the effects of your edits. The
Source Image in the editing window always displays the
image with the unedited source profile applied.

1. Select the Input Curves or Output Curves option.


2. Activate the curve you desire to edit by clicking on the
corresponding checkbox. Deselect other checkboxes.

3. Adjust the curve as desired.


• Click any points on the curve that you want to remain
fixed.
• Enter Input and Output values, or click the part of the
curve you want to adjust and drag the curve.
• To remove a point:
Macintosh: drag it off the grid
Windows: highlight the point and press Delete
• To reset the curve to its original state, click Reset.

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Selective Color Edits in Linked Profiles


Due to gamut compression, not all colors that you desire to
print are available for printing. The Selective Color option
enables you to identify a color you desire to print (Desired
Color), and alter it to create a new printable color (Printed
Color), while controlling its effect on other colors.

The Desired Color is defined as the color that currently prints


from the source profile. The Printed Color is defined as the
replacement color—or the closest reproducible color that
prints on the proofer using the linked profile.

For example, you may be able to print a certain logo color


using the source device—your printing press. However,
when you print the same image using the linked profile, the
printed color doesn’t match the original. You can use the
Selective Color tool to identify the Desired Color—or color
that currently prints on press, and change it to the closest
reproducible color that is printable on your proofing device.

The basic workflow for editing a color is as follows: the


Desired Color values in Lab are identified, then the replace-
ment color values in Lab or LCh are adjusted. Finally, the size
of the range affected by the edit is defined by adjusting the
Lightness and Color range sliders. The color model is used as
a visual aid for identifying colors and understanding the
printable color gamut for the proofing device.

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Creating and Editing Linked Profiles

Workflow for Editing Color Selectively


1. Click the Selective Color option in the Profile Editing
window.
2. Click New. Enter a name for the current edit and click
OK.

3. Identify a Desired Color.


The Desired Color is the color that currently prints using
the source profile. Identify a Desired Color by doing one
of the following:
• Sample a color in the image using the eyedropper.
- Click on the Eyedropper in the Profile Editing window.
- Position the eyedropper over the color you desire to
edit in the sample image and click.
• Drag the Desired Color sliders until the desired color
is obtained.
• Using your measurement device, sample a color from
a hard-copy of the image and enter the Lab values in
the Desired Color fields. (recommended method)
• Select a color by clicking on the color model using the
Eyedropper.
If you choose a color that is outside the gamut of your
device, an Out of Gamut warning appears to the right
of the color sample.

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4. Modify the Printed Color.


When you select a Desired Color, similar values appear in
the Printed Color fields.
The values in the Printed Color fields represent the next
closest reproducible color your proofing device can print
when using the linked profile. Although this is technically
the closest color, it may not be the most visually pleasing,
due to gamut compression.
You can modify the Printed Color, to create a better
visual match, by adjusting the Lab values.
Activate the Printed Color area of the Selective Color win-
dow by clicking on it.

Modify the Printed Color by doing one of the following:


• Adjust the Printed Color sliders until the desired
color is obtained.
• Enter new Lab values in the Printed Color fields.
• Select a color from the color model using the Eye-
dropper.
You can increase the size of the color model for easier
color selection by selecting the Magnifying Glass icon
from the Profile Editing window and clicking on the
model.
You can also shift the color model location—up,
down, left, or right by using the Move tool from the
Profile Editing window.

IMPORTANT: Do not use the eyedropper to select a


replacement color in the sample image or you will alter the
original Desired Color selection.

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5. Modify the Lightness range and Color range.


The Lightness range and Color range options restrict the
effects of the edit to a specific luminance and color range.

You can increase or decrease the range of values affected


by the edit by adjusting the sliders.
You can view the range of effect by referring to the color
model for the device.
• The small cross indicates the location of the Desired Color.
• The arrow indicates the location of the new Printed Color.
• The circle indicates the range of color affected by the edit.
6. Click Apply.
When you press Apply, all edits in the Edit List are applied
to the linked profile in order and can be seen in the Desti-
nation Image (right) in the Profile Editing window.

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Deleting Selective Color Edits


You can delete Selective Color edits during or after an editing
session. If you edit a linked profile and desire to remove the
edits at a later time, you can reopen the profile in the Editor
and delete the Selective Color edit.

To delete a Selective Color edit:


1. Select the color edit from the Edit List.
2. Click Delete.
3. Click Apply.
When you click Apply, the edits remaining in the Edit List
are applied to the profile and the Destination Image in the
Profile Editing window updates to reflect the change.

Saving Edited Linked Profiles


To save an edited linked profile:
1. Close the Profile Editing window.
A dialog box appears, asking if you want to save the profile.
2. Rename the profile if you desire, and click Save.

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Viewing Output Profile Gamuts

11 Viewing Output Profile


Gamuts
MonacoPROFILER provides a feature that allows you to view
the gamut of an output device. (The View Gamut option is
not available on systems running Mac OSX.)

To view the color gamut of an output device:


1. Launch MonacoPROFILER.
2. Select File>View Gamut.
Locate and open the profile for the desired output device.

Reference plane
bisects color space
at L=50

Simulation of device’s
color gamut Color sample

Lab color value


Zoom Tool Move Tool readout
Rotate Tool

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The View Color Gamut window appears, displaying the


profile name in the header and a rotating 3D model of the
device’s color gamut in the image area.

Viewing the Color Gamut Model


Use the following to change your view of the color gamut:

• When the model first appears, it maybe rotating. Click


anywhere in the image window to freeze the image.
• Use the Zoom Tool to move towards or away from the
model by clicking and dragging the mouse down or up,
respectively.
• Use the Rotate Tool to rotate the model by clicking and
dragging the mouse in the direction of the desired rotation.
• Use the Move Tool to move the model left, right, up, or
down by clicking and dragging the mouse in the direction
of desired movement.
• Mac OS9: Use the Lab Readout to view the Lab values of
the color currently under the cursor as it is moved over the
color gamut.
• Use the Color Sample box to view a sample of the color,
defined by the cursor’s current location.

Viewing Individual Colors (Mac OS9)


You can sample an individual color and view its correspond-
ing Lab values. By sampling colors that define the edge of the
gamut, you can determine the limits of the device.

To view individual colors:


Position the cursor anywhere over the gamut of the device. A
sample of the color, defined by the cursor’s location, is dis-
played. Simultaneously, the Lab readout updates to display
the numeric values of the selected color.

168
Viewing Output Profile Gamuts

Comparing Device Color Gamuts


In addition to viewing the color gamut of your device, you can
compare the color gamuts of two or more devices. This exercise
can provide insight into one device’s ability to simulate another.

To view multiple color gamuts:


1. Select File>View Gamut.
An Open dialog box appears. Navigate to the profile for
the desired device, highlight it, and click Open.
2. Repeat the procedure for each desired device.
3. Position the open windows for simultaneous viewing.

Evaluating Luminance
A reference plane divides the gamut in half at the 50% lumi-
nance (L) level. Rotate the model so that the L axis is parallel
to the display. You can now compare the luminance levels of
the selected devices. The luminance range is from 0 to 100.

The model on the left displays a device luminance range of


approximately 90%. The model on the right displays a range
of approximately 50%. This comparison indicates the con-
trast setting may need adjusting to maximize the dynamic
range of the second device.

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Evaluating Saturation
For the following example, rotate the same two gamuts so
that the breadth of the gamuts at the plane of intersection is
displayed.

The model on the left displays a device gamut that is much


larger than the gamut of the device on the right.

This comparison indicates that images output on the second


device may look oversaturated because of the comparatively
smaller gamut. Consequently, this device’s profile may require
a lower Saturation setting to compensate for this factor.

170
Glossary

Glossary

ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Exchange)


A file encoded in the industry-standard representation for
text. ASCII files can be read by most software programs.

ASCII Data File


A series of linearization or color patch measurements saved
in a standard ASCII text format.

brightness
The lightness of a color or tone, regardless of hue or saturation.

calibration
The process of adjusting the performance of input, display,
and output devices to a known state.

characterization
The process of creating a custom profile for an input, display,
or output device by describing the unique gamut of each
device.

chrominance
Exhibiting a color or a mixture of hue and saturation, inde-
pendent of luminance.

CIE
The Commission Internationale d’Eclairage (International
Commission on Illumination), an organization which has
determined many of the standards used in color measurement.

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CIELAB (CIE L*a*b* or CIE Lab)


A color space based on CIE XYZ. The L* value represents
lightness, and a* and b* values are chromaticity coordinates.

CMYK
Cyan (C), magenta (M), yellow (Y), and black (K) are the
inks used in the printing process. A color model based on the
three subtractive colors cyan, magenta, and yellow. Printers
are generally CMYK devices.

colorant
A dye, ink, or pigment that is used to give color to another
material.

color cast
An overall color imbalance in an image.

color gamut
The limited range of colors that can be reproduced by a
device or set of colorants. Color gamuts are device-specific.

colorimeter
An instrument used to read or specify color by measuring the
amount of light transmitted or reflected in tristimulus values.

Color Management System (CMS)


A software system that ensures color consistency and repeat-
ability across all devices in a production workflow.

ColorSync
The Macintosh Operating System’s color management
resource for passing device-specific color profiles.

color space
A mathematical model that is used to describe color, in
which each color is represented by a point in space. Each
color is defined in terms of three numbers and plotted as a
point in space relative to three axes. RGB and CMYK are
examples of color spaces.

172
Glossary

color temperature
A measurement of the color of light in degrees Kelvin. The
lower the temperature the yellower the light appears. The
high temperatures appear bluer. 6500K represents a neutral
gray.

contrast
The variation between the lightest and darkest areas in an
image.

CRT (cathode-ray tube)


The vacuum tube that is used as a display screen in computer
monitors and television sets.

curve
A graph showing the relationship of input values to output
values.

DCS 2.0
DCS is an acronym for Desktop Color Separation. DCS is a
file format, based on the EPS file format, that is used to
exchange bitmap images between prepress applications. DCS
files must be printed with a PostScript printer.

∆E)
Delta E (∆
A computed value that represents how close two colors are to
each other. A difference of 1 ∆E is used as a threshold of what
is perceptible to the human eye. A difference of 6 to 7 ∆E is
considered acceptable in the printing industry.

densitometer
An instrument that measures the ability of a surface to reflect
or transmit light.

density
A computed number representing the ability of a transmis-
sive material to block light, or the ability of a reflective sur-
face to absorb light. The more light blocked or absorbed, the
higher the density. Density values range from approximately
0.05 to 2.5 for reflective targets and from 0.05 to 3.5 for
transmissive sources.

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drift
Small changes in device performance that occur over time.

dynamic range
The range of tones a device is capable of measuring, sensing,
or rendering.

gamma
A number representing the gamma curve of a device. A
gamma of 1.0 represents a linear device. Gamma is associated
with contrast because increasing the gamma increases the
contrast in shadows and midtones while decreasing the con-
trast in highlights.

gamma curve
A plotted curve representing the relationship between input
and output tonal values for a device.

gamut
The limited range of colors reproducible by a given device.

gamut compression
The conversion of color coordinates from a color space with
a larger gamut to the coordinates of a color space with a
smaller gamut.

gamut mapping
The conversion of color coordinates from one color space
into a second color space.

GCR (gray component replacement)


The replacement of some amount of CMY ink in a CMYK
pixel with sufficient black ink to restore the pixel to the origi-
nal appearance.

gray balance
The balance between colorants required to produce neutral
grays with no color bias.

grayscale
A tonal scale that represents the lightest white to the blackest

174
Glossary

black, with intermediate shades of gray in between. A gray-


scale is used as a guide to ensure proper calibration and unbi-
ased color balance settings.

HexachromeR
An ink system developed by PANTONE® which uses six
printing inks—cyan, magenta, yellow, black, and orange and
green (CMYK+OG).

highlight
The lightest or brightest points in an image.

ICC (International Color Consortium)


A committee formed in 1993 to establish standards for elec-
tronic color publishing.

ICC profile
Profile conforming to International Color Consortium pro-
file format standards.

interpolation
A calculated value that falls between two values.

IT8
Industry standard test targets used to characterize input and
output devices.

Kelvin
A system of absolute temperature. For our purposes, the
scale is used for the expressing color temperature of the white
point of the light source in a computer monitor, and the
color temperature of the light source used to view images.

Lab (CIELAB or CIE L*a*b*)

A color space based on CIE XYZ. The L* value represents


lightness, and a* and b* values are chromaticity coordinates.
The Lab color space is used to measure reflective and trans-
missive materials.

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LCh (L*C*h)
A color space that is similar to Lab, but uses lightness,
chrominance, and hue coordinates.

LCD (liquid-crystal display)


The display screen used in laptop computers and flat screen
monitors.

lightness
The variation of a hue along a range from white to black.

linear device
A device in which input values consistently produce equiva-
lent output values across the entire tonal range. Most devices
are non-linear and require some correction to make them
linear.

linearize
The process of making a device linear.

linked profile
Combination of two CMYK output profiles, used to simulate
the output of a source device (usually a printing press) on a
destination device (usually a digital proofer).

luminance
Luminance refers to the measurable aspect of brightness.
Luminance is a measurable quantity, while brightness is per-
ceived. An increase in luminance is usually perceived as an
increase in brightness. The relationship, however, is not lin-
ear. Doubling luminance will not necessarily double per-
ceived brightness.

mask
An image area that is protected from change.

memory colors
Color representing familiar objects, such as blue sky, green
grass, and various skin tones.

176
Glossary

midtone
The middle range of tones in an image.

multi-ink profile
An output profile that uses 5, 6, 7, or 8-colorants.

neutral
An area of color containing no bias: white, gray, or black.

paper white
The color of the paper on which a colorant is printed.

phosphor
A substance which coats the inside of computer monitors,
which glows when struck by certain wavelengths of radiation.

PostScript
A page description language developed by Adobe Systems.

profile
A file containing data for how a device handles or distorts
colors that is used by a color-managed application to correct
the passage of color through the device.

proof
A visual or hardcopy preview of the expected final results of a
printed piece. The visual preview is obtained on a color mon-
itor. A hardcopy preview may be a print from a digital printer
or a press proof.

quarter tones
Tones falling between the shadows and midtones in an image
are called 3/4 tones. Tone between highlights and midtones
are known as 1/4 tones.

reference file
A file that contains data against which other measurements
are compared.

resolution
The number of discrete elements per unit of measure that

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MonacoPROFILER 4.5 User Guide

make up an image, or the number of imaging or sampling


units used in a device.

RIP (Raster Image Processor)


Software or hardware that converts digital image data to bit-
map or pixel format.

RGB
A color model based on the three additive primary colors of
light used in color reproduction — red (R), green (G), and
blue (B). Monitors, scanners, and film recorders are generally
RGB devices. RGB is a relative color space.

saturation
The vividness or purity of a color. The color attribute charac-
terized by the absence or presence of a gray component.

scanner
An electronic device for capturing the tonal and color char-
acteristics of images as digital data.

shadows
The darkest areas in an image.

spectrophotometer
An instrument used to describe or specify color by measur-
ing spectral data.

specular highlight
A highlight lacking ink and brightly reflecting the light
source.

spot color
Additional colorants used in multi-color (5, 6, 7, and 8-
color) printing.

TIFF (Tagged Image File Format)


A format for exchanging bitmap images between applica-
tions. Scans are typically saved in TIFF format.

178
Glossary

tonal range
The maximum range of visible tones in an image.

transformation
An algorithm (mathematical formula) which defines how
colors are converted from one color space to another.

UCR (under color removal)


Subtracting CMY colorants from dark areas and replacing it
with additional black as a means of saving ink on long press
runs and reducing ink in shadows.

white balance
The balance between colorants required to produce neutral
gray with no color bias.

white point
The chromaticity of a light source, often described by refer-
ring to its chromaticity coordinates or the color temperature
of the light source.

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180
Index

Index

Symbols Data File 171


# of readings per patch 71 text file 64, 69, 70, 75, 89
∆E 173 Auto color-correction 68, 79, 107
Average Delta E
A All 48, 59
A2Bn transform 115, 125 all CMC 49, 59
Absolute Colorimetric 97, 143 in Gamut 49, 59
Acquire Input Target window 46, 56 Average option 103
Adjust Monitor window 19, 31 averaging multiple readings 71
adjusting
brightness 20, 32 B
contrast 19, 31 B2An transform 115, 125
input curves 161 Before
lightness 130 Editing values 129
output curves 132, 161 image window 118, 126
saturation 131 Begin Scan 73, 85
white point 19, 31 bit depth 16, 28
Adobe Black Generation 90, 149
Gamma Control Panel 16, 28 levels 153
Gamma Loader 16, 28 black range 22, 36
Photoshop 18, 30, 68 brightness 15, 20, 22, 27, 32, 36, 171
Advanced Options
dialog box 150 C
settings 77, 78, 79, 80 Calibrate option 75, 87
After calibrated monitor 114
Editing values 129 calibration
image window 126, 142 definition 171
ambient lighting 15, 114 camera settings 52
ASCII 171 cathode-ray tube 173

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characterization 171 and gamma 174


scanner 41 and luminance 169
tables 82, 88 controls on CRT 23, 26
Choose controls on LCD 27, 37, 40
a reference file list 45, 55 definition 173
an input target list 45, 55 in shadow areas 90
chrominance 171 monitor 15
CIE 171 profile option 90, 98
CIELab 12, 113, 172, 175 slider 99
cleaning display 16 correct exposure 54
CMS 172 Create
CMYK 172 Linked Profile option 148
driver 65 New Profile option 62
option 62 Profile option 26, 40, 48, 58, 101
Profile list 119 Profile Window 58
Color Profile window 26, 40, 48
cast 172 creating
gamut 172 a custom curve 153
Info tool 129 a linked profile 147
Patch Ink Limit 79, 80 CRT profiles 15
range slider 135 digital camera profiles 51
Sample 168 LCD profiles 27
space 172 output profiles 61
table correction 18, 30 scanner profiles 41
temperature 173 Crop Target window 47, 57
Value Size 97 Cross-hair tool 128
color space 12, 41, 65, 96, 97, 123, 125, CRT 16, 17, 33, 173
129, 137, 139, 158, 159, 160, 167, profile basics 15
172, 174, 175, 176, 179 curve 91, 92, 93, 149, 173
colorant 172 Black Generation 92, 93
colorimeter creating custom 94
definition 172 cumulative difference 70
supported 11 custom 153
ColorSync 172 gamma 174
control panel 117, 126 GCR 91, 149
comparing device color gamuts 169 input 49
Connection Port list 17, 29, 106 Lightness 101, 130
Contrast linearization 70, 109
adjusting monitor 19 output 12, 113, 132

182
Index

Saturation 130 editing


UCR 93, 152 a linked profile 147
custom basics 113
size media 65, 77 color selectively 134
output profiles 113
D profile white point 143
data averaging 102 workflow 117
DCS 2.0 67, 79, 107, 146, 173 Editor option 12, 13, 113, 117
decrease magnification 127 evaluating
Default Profile Preferences 117, 118, luminance 169
126 saturation 170
deleting selective color edits 166 Export option 102
Delta E 48, 59, 173 exporting
densitometer 173 ink settings 153
density 173 Eyedropper tool 128
Desired Color 134
fields 136 F
sample 135 fine
sliders 136 tuning colors 141
desktop pattern 15, 16, 28 tuning neutrals 139
Destination Space values 160 Fine Tune option
Device and Table Resolution 139
calibration window 17 Color Range 142
list 17, 29, 64, 106 Colors tab 141
Options 85, 86, 87 Neutrals tab 140
Diagnose/Fix option 75, 87 Reset 140, 142
digital camera profile Show range mask in preview 142
and Platinum Edition 51 using 140
basics 52 Folder icon 117
Display Format option 79
control panel 118, 119 Forward
dongle 10 table 125, 132
drift 11, 63, 105, 174 transform 115
dynamic range 49, 59, 139, 169, 174
G
E gamma 15, 25, 39, 174
Edit curve 174
button 63 gamut
List 135 compression 162, 174

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mapping 174 Ink Control


GCR 91, 92, 149, 151, 174 Settings option 153
slider 92, 151 tab 90, 149
Gold Edition 12, 42, 51, 61, 63 Input
Good range 23, 34, 37 option 11, 45, 55
gray Target Selection window 45, 55
balance 54, 174 targets 42
component replacement 174 Input Curve option
grayscale 174 Input values 161
ramp 139, 140 Output values 161
GretagMacbeth Resetting 161
Color Checker DC 51 installation 9
ColorChecker 12, 51 dongle 10
Eye-One 11, 33 software 10
Eye-one 27 Intelligent Black 92, 93, 151, 152
Spectrolino 11, 27, 33, 64, 71, 83 interpolation 175
SpectroScan 11, 69, 70, 78, 81, 82 Inverse
table 125, 132
H transform 113, 116
hand-held devices 71, 83 IT8 175
HCT Reflective 42 IT8.7/3 Extended 78, 88
HCT Transmissive 42
Hexachrome 63, 65, 77, 105, 132, 146, K
175 K% axis 153
highlight 175 Kelvin 19, 31, 175
Hue Range slider 100 known reference values 41
HutchColor HCT 51 Kodak IT8.7/1 42, 43
Kodak IT8.7/2 42, 51, 52
I
ICC 3 L
definition 175 L* axis 153
profile 4, 97, 147, 156, 175 Lab 175
identify crop marks 47, 57 Profile list 119
Image Profile 121 Readout tool 168
list 117, 125 LCD 33, 176
Import option 76, 88, 89 measurement devices 27
importing option 29
ink settings 153 profile basics 27
increase magnification 127 Lch 176

184
Index

values 129 Magnifying Glass 127


Level list 92, 93, 94, 151, 152, 153 mask 176
light source 52 Maximum
lighting conditions 15, 19, 32 black ink 91, 93, 150, 152
Lightness total ink 92, 93, 150, 152
definition 176 maximum bit depth 12
range slider 135 Maximum black ink 152
setting for digital cameras 59 Maximum total ink 152
Lightness curve 101, 130 Measure
Input values 130 Brightest White window 33
Output values 130 Darkest Black window 22, 36
linear device 176 Display window 24, 38
Linearization Lightest Black window 21, 35
Options window 65, 107 Media Size list 65, 77, 107
test patches 70 memory colors 176
linearize 11, 61, 65, 176 midtone 177
Linearize option 63, 78 Monaco Gamma 118
linked profile 176 MonacoOPTIX 11, 27
basics 147 MonacoSENSOR 11
creating 148 Monitor option 11, 17, 29
Load Image option 46, 56 More Options 117
loading ASCII text files 75 Move tool 127, 168
Locate Patches window 69, 81 multi-ink
Luminance printers 77
and Black Generation 153 profile 12, 63, 146, 177
and black generation 92, 93, 151, multiple readings per patch 83
152
and chrominance 171 N
and Selective Color 138, 165 Nearest Neighbor 54
definition 176 neutral 15, 16, 28, 49, 59, 91, 177
evaluating 169 Neutralize Gray Axis 98
in curves 94 Number of Steps list 66, 107
range in image 99
slider 135 O
value 135 Open Session 68, 80
opening a sample image 123
M Original Image Values 129, 160
Macbeth ColorChecker DC 42, 52 Out of Gamut warning 163
Magnification list 127 output

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patch set 77 the linearization target 68


profile basics 61 the sample image 128
resolution 62, 67, 68, 79, 80 profile 177
Output curve editing window 122
input values 133 editing workflow 117
output values 133 gamut 135
Reset option 133 storing 48
Resetting 161 proof 177
Output option 11, 62, 68, 80, 106
Q
P Quality option 77, 78
package components 3 quarter tones 177
PANTONE Hexachrome 12, 63, 64, quick start 13
100, 113, 146
paper white 177 R
Patch Options window 77, 92 RAM 9
Percentage In Gamut/Out of Gamut Read
49, 59 Linear Patches window 70, 71, 72,
Perceptual 109
rendering intent 96 Patches window 82, 83
tab 90, 98 Readings Per Patch 71, 83
phosphor 15, 177 Rebuild Monaco Profile 105, 111
Platinum Edition 12, 42, 61 reference file 43, 45, 53, 177
PostScript 177 obtaining 42
devices 63 storing 43
driver 65 reflective
preferred viewing conditions 19 scanner 44
Prescan 44 target 52
previewing edits 114 registration 4
Print Relative Colorimetric 96
color patches 80 Re-linearize 105, 106
dialog box 68, 78, 108 rendering intent
option 128 and gamut compression 115
Patches option 67, 78, 107 list 117, 125
Printed Color 134 Reset
fields 137 Read Linear Patches 102
sample 135 Read Patches 102
sliders 138 resolution 177
printing RGB 178

186
Index

devices 63 Color range 138


driver 65 Deleting 139
phosphors 19, 24, 31 Desired Color 136
Profile list 119 Lightness range 138
RIP 178 linked profile 162
room lighting 16, 28 option 134
Rotate Tool 168 Printed Color 137
quick reference 135
S workflow 136
Saturation Set
Curve Input values 131 Brightness 23
Curve Output values 131 Brightness window 37
definition 178 Contrast window 34
option 90, 98, 99 White Point and Gamma 25, 39
Range slider 100 setting profile options 125
rendering intent 96 shadows 178
Save Show range mask in preview 142
Image option 127 Simulate Paper White 143
Patches option 67, 79, 102, 107 soft proof 114
Session 67, 79, 107 software protection key 10
saving Source Space values 160
ASCII text files 75 Spectrocam
edited linked profiles 166 Hand Held 64
edited profiles 145 Settings dialog 74
profiles 26, 40 strip reader 73
the sample image 146 spectrophotometer 178
scanner Spectrostar Spectrocam 12, 83, 85
definition 178 specular highlight 178
profile basics 41 Split View 126
resolution 44 spot color
Scanning Speed slider 74, 87 definition 178
Scramble Patches 78 lab values 63
Select list 100
Device window 17, 29, 64 tab 100
Profile Data window 62, 148 storing profiles 26, 40, 48, 58
Selective Color strip-reader 84, 85
and linked profiles 163 supported devices 11
Apply 138 system requirements 9
availability 113

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T profiles with MonacoPROOF 118


Table the documentation 4
Options tab 96
Resolution option 97 V
tables 115 View
targets Color Gamut window 168
digital cameras 52 Current Data option 109
scanning resolution 44 Data option 70, 109
supported 42 Difference option 109
TIFF 44, 67, 79, 107, 178 Gamut option 167
with Embedded Profile 146 Graph option 70, 109
tonal range 179 Split Patches 70, 82
toolbar 122 viewing color values 129, 160
transformation 179
transforms 115 W
transparency white balance 54, 60, 179
scanner 44 White Calibration 87
targets 49 white point 15, 19, 25, 31, 39, 179
hardware 19, 31
U White Pt option 144
UCR 91, 93, 149, 152, 179 working environment 15
uncompressed TIFF 46, 54
under color removal 179 X
Update Profile option 106, 111 X-Rite
updating output profiles 105 Digital Swatchbook 11, 71, 83
USB 10 DTP41 11, 72, 84
Use DTP41/T 11, 72, 84
16-bit Values 97 DTP92 11
automatic settings 90, 92, 93, 149, Spectrofiler 12, 69
150, 152
System Default option 120, 126 Z
using Zoom Tool 168

188