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PROPOSAL

Minority Mentoring Pilot Program:


A Pipeline to High-Skill Manufacturing Careers

Submitted to the Dayton Foundation


January 12, 2011
by
Dayton Public Schools
Sinclair Community College
Dayton Tooling & Manufacturing Association
Contents
CHALLENGE 1

SOLUTION 1

OPPORTUNITY 2

PILOT PROGRAM STRATEGY 4

INVESTMENT & ROI 11

BOTTOM LINE 12

ATTACHMENTS
ƒ Pilot Program Precursor: DTMA Regional Bots Program
ƒ Roles & Responsibilities: Mentors & Mentor Companies
ƒ Roles & Responsibilities: Pilot Program Coordinator
ƒ Ponitz Career Technology Center: Enrollment Projections

Primary Contact

LINNAE CLINTON
Director, Office of Career-Technical & Adult Education
Dayton Public Schools
(937) 542-7355
lclinton@dps.k12.oh.us
PROPOSAL | MINORITY MENTORING PILOT PROGRAM

Challenge

For more than 100 years, the Dayton region has been a global leader in the skilled manufacturing
arena. This industry sector offers individuals diverse opportunities for long-term career growth and
significant income potential. In 2010, area machinists earned an average of $41,600 (or $20 per hour),
and with overtime, annual incomes approached $60,000 per year. (Dayton Tooling & Manufacturing
Association, 2010 Wage Data)

Minorities are under-represented in manufacturing and machining careers for various reasons. Many
people view such jobs as dirty, dangerous and undesirable. Many manufacturers have left the region,
taking jobs and opportunity with them. Skilled-trade positions were traditionally occupied by white
males and new jobs were filled using a relationship-based apprentice model. Fathers and uncles
recommended sons and nephews for on-the-job training and apprenticeship programs. The de facto
result was a reduced flow of minority workers into the skilled manufacturing ranks.

These challenges raise important questions. Specifically, are there ways to boost the number of
minority students who pursue high-skill manufacturing career pathways? Are there ways to ensure
these students acquire the education and qualifications that close the opportunity gap and lead to high-
skill, high-wage manufacturing and machining employment?

Solution

The solution is to develop an effective program that matches minority students with select mentors
from manufacturing and machining environments. Mentors are the missing link in a well-structured
career education strategy. The mentor concept emulates aspects of traditional skilled-trade relationship
models and provides a method for helping students place learning in context and connect education
and hands-on experiences to career opportunities and employment.

This proposal makes the case for creating a pilot program to build and implement the processes and
components necessary to test the manufacturing mentor premise. The program establishes a pipeline
that has the potential to grow from eight students in 2011 to more than 50 students by 2014.

There are other community mentoring initiatives devoted to personal development and counseling. The
proposed Minority Mentoring Pilot Program is therefore focused explicitly on education, career and
employability in the manufacturing sector and the development of an adaptable model for work-based
mentor relationships.

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PROPOSAL | MINORITY MENTORING PILOT PROGRAM

Opportunity

The Dayton region is uniquely positioned to develop, launch and sustain the manufacturing mentor
program and establish this pipeline of job-ready students. Several critical elements provide a solid
foundation for success.

First, there is a pre-existing base of community support. Individuals, like John Moore, and organizations,
like the Dayton Foundation, have a demonstrated interest in and commitment to solving the identified
problem. Both have contributed to the development of this proposal.

The proposed program leverages existing programs, initiatives and


resources to establish a pipeline of job-ready students.

Second, regional industry leaders are already active in two complementary programs, the Tech Prep
Showcase and the Bots Program, which serve as general models for the proposed pilot. The annual
Showcase partners industry and professional organizations and individuals with high school career
technology programs to design and execute job-related projects. Each year, the Dayton Tooling &

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PROPOSAL | MINORITY MENTORING PILOT PROGRAM

Manufacturing Association (DTMA) and its member


companies collaborate with regional high schools
DTMA Regional Bots Program
through the highly successful DTMA Regional Bots
The Bots Program is a career awareness
Program. In addition, the association has been directly
initiative that exposes students to career
involved and member companies have provided opportunities in the advanced
feedback, guidance and letters of commitment in manufacturing industry. Students design
support of this proposal. The Bots Program description and build custom, remote-controlled robots,
and mentor agreement are included as attachments. when they enter into DTMA-produced
competitions. Through this experience,
students gain practical knowledge of math,
Third, critical education infrastructure and
science, engineering and manufacturing.
partnerships already exist. The David H. Ponitz Career These students are then more likely to
Technology Center was established in 2009, through a pursue careers in advanced manufacturing
unique collaboration between Dayton Public Schools and engineering, which helps ensure
and Sinclair Community College. Ponitz CTC offers the industry continues to attract the highly
skilled workers it needs to thrive.
Industrial/Engineering Systems (IES) career community,
which has stringent academic and performance
standards for admission. The IES program flows
seamlessly into Sinclair’s engineering technologies
The Ponitz CTC & Sinclair Partnership
programs, where varied certificate and degree tracks
Seamless career pathways
prepare students for careers or further education at a
four-year institution. Ongoing collaboration aligns expectations,
criteria & support services

Fourth, the program leverages existing career Enhanced technology & equipment
purchased by the college
discovery programs. The MEtaMorph 9th Grade Career
Exploration program is embedded as a required Designated college faculty work with
Ponitz faculty
component of the Ponitz CTC general curriculum.
MEtaMorph, developed by the Miami Valley Tech Prep Senior-to-Sophomore program awards
college credit
Consortium in 2005, incorporates the Kuder Navigator.
Together, these programs help students explore career Full scholarships for all qualifying Ponitz
CTC graduates
options and define an educational plan to achieve their
career goals. Coop work experiences offered through
the college-level program

Finally, the proposed pilot blends with and enhances Employment assistance provided by
the College & Career Resource Center/
community endeavors focused on similar issues. The
Academic Resources Center (ARC)
Mentoring Collaborative of Montgomery County is just
one example.

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PROPOSAL | MINORITY MENTORING PILOT PROGRAM

Pilot Program Strategy

The Minority Mentoring Pilot Program is designed to leverage existing community strengths to
maximize outcomes. This section describes key program components, critical roles, relationships and
responsibilities, and the anticipated timing and sequence of events. Together, these elements comprise
a workable plan of action.

Program Snapshot

The elements below provide a compact overview of the program purpose, method and baseline. The
specific identified deliverables establish a foundation for near-term success and long-term
sustainability.

PURPOSE Design, build, test, refine and implement a sustainable manufacturing mentoring
program targeted to minority students and capable of being expanded to all CTC
career communities

METHOD Conduct defined activities for up to four years to build student interest in and
capabilities for employment in high-skill manufacturing and machining positions

BASELINE Provide mentors for up to 8 students in 2011


Develop capacity to provide mentors for up to 52 IES students by 2013

DELIVERABLES Establish a results-based program that marshals people, processes, technology and
resources to achieve the defined goals and objectives

Specific deliverables include


ƒ Pilot Program Plan of Action
ƒ Student Eligibility Criteria
ƒ Mentor Eligibility Criteria
ƒ Student Orientation Program
ƒ Mentor Activity Plans
ƒ Mentor Training Program
ƒ Mentor Training & Operations Manual
ƒ Continuous Improvement Plan
ƒ Program Expansion Plan
ƒ Periodic Progress Reports

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PROPOSAL | MINORITY MENTORING PILOT PROGRAM

Roles, Relationships & Responsibilities

The pilot effort requires significant cooperation and collaboration among a range of organizations and
individuals. The roles, relationships and responsibilities of each are highlighted below. More detailed
descriptions are included as attachments.

PARTNERSHIP Dayton Foundation


Dayton Tooling & Manufacturing Association
Dayton Public Schools
Sinclair Community College
Committed Companies & Individuals

OWNERS Dayton Tooling & Manufacturing Association


Dayton Public Schools
Sinclair Community College
Provide program guidance and oversight
Manage overall performance, direction and deliverables
Coordinate and track funding and in-kind contributions
Implement and oversee continuous improvement processes and expansion plans
Connect with other community-based mentor initiatives
Connect with regional minority leadership organizations, partner with minority-
owned manufacturers and recruit minority mentors
Explore ways to introduce K-8 students to manufacturing opportunities
Provide regular progress reports to the full partnership

COORDINATOR Position to be Filled


Conduct focus groups with existing Bots students, mentors and teacher
Create a detailed action plan for each stage of the pilot program
Establish eligibility criteria for students and mentors
Develop and conduct orientation/training for students, mentors and faculty
Manage, coordinate and facilitate day-to-day program functions
Collaborate with other mentoring initiatives
Conduct periodic and annual review and refinement processes
Provide regular progress reports to the program owners

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PROPOSAL | MINORITY MENTORING PILOT PROGRAM

MENTOR Dayton Supply & Tool Company


COMPANIES Dysinger, Inc.
Gem City Engineering & Manufacturing
Commit to providing mentors for the program
Assist in identifying and developing effective mentoring activities
Provide release time and resources to support mentors and mentor activities

MENTORS Pilot Group


Complete and pass a BCI background check
Help define student eligibility criteria
Contribute to student and mentor orientation program development
Recommend and help develop job-related mentoring activities
Complete the mentor orientation program
Commit to and conduct monthly mentoring activities with student participants

FACULTY Dave Andrews, Engineering Technology Teacher, Ponitz CTC


Help define student eligibility criteria and select pilot participants
Help define mentor eligibility criteria
Contribute to student and mentor orientation program development and
participate as needed
Recommend and help develop job-related mentoring activities
Participate in mentoring activities as appropriate
Assist in participant and program reviews, evaluations and refinements

In every sector, lucrative jobs remain unfilled because employers are unable to find applicants with the
right combination of critical traits, core competencies and job-specific skills. This is true for many high-
skill manufacturing positions as well.

The mentor’s chief responsibility is to provide targeted activities that support students as they develop
a full range of success factors crucial in the work world. These factors along with existing and possible
mentor activities are highlighted in the following illustration.

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PROPOSAL | MINORITY MENTORING PILOT PROGRAM

Mentors will provide targeted activities that support students as they develop
a full range of success factors crucial in the work world.

* Existing activities that currently occur without the benefit of a mentor


The Success Factor model is adapted from What Employers Really Want: The Insider’s Guide to Getting a Job (Hawk, 1998)

Timeline

The program will start in January 2011 and continue through August 2014. Briefly, the Minority
Mentoring Pilot Program consists of four stages:

ƒ Stage 1 – Build Pilot (Jan 2011 – Aug 2011)


Develop key program components

ƒ Stage 2 – Launch Pilot (Sep 2011 – Aug 2012)


Test mentor concept by focusing on the Engineering Technologies program

ƒ Stage 3 – Implement Program (Sep 2012 – Aug 2013)


Refine and solidify program components

ƒ Stage 4 – Expand Program (Sep 2013 – Aug 2014)


Extend program to encompass the entire IES career community

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PROPOSAL | MINORITY MENTORING PILOT PROGRAM

STUDENT BENCHMARKS

Engineering Technology (ET) students enter the mentoring program in their Junior year. Eligibility is based on a variety of
performance factors, including grades and evaluations from Bots mentors and the Engineering Technology teacher. Each year,
a new group of Juniors will enter the pipeline. By 2013, the program will grow to include 51 ET students and expand to the
entire IES community (35 students). Enrollment figures reflect the most accurate projections available.

Details regarding academic criteria, performance, college credit, scholarships and the
Ponitz CTC/Sinclair partnership are in the Ponitz CTC Educational Plan. Details

CAREER
100% Employed
related to career planning and preparation are in the MEtaMorph Executive in high-skill, high-wage
Snapshot and the impact analysis, the Research Report for the Ninth manufacturing positions
Grade Career Exploration Guarantee Project.

Scholarship: 75% are eligible Scholarship: 75% are eligible


POSTSECONDARY

Readiness: 100% require no Readiness: 100% require no


developmental coursework developmental coursework
Coop: 50% participate Coop: 50% participate
Credentials: 85% complete Credentials: 85% complete
postsecondary program postsecondary program

Bots: 100% participate Bots: 100% participate Bots: 100% participate


SENIORS

Mentor Program: 100% Mentor Program: 100% Mentor Program: 100%


participate participate participate
Transition: 60% pursue Transition: 60% pursue Transition: 60% pursue
postsecondary postsecondary postsecondary

Bots: 8 participate Bots: 12 participate Bots: 14 participate Bots: 17 participate


JUNIORS

Mentor Program Mentor Program Mentor Program Mentor Program


100% apply 100% apply 100% apply 100% apply
100% complete orientation 100% complete orientation 100% complete orientation 100% complete orientation
80% receive Mentors 90% receive Mentors 90% receive Mentors 90% receive Mentors
Expand to IES Community:
35 new Juniors

STAGE 1 | BUILD PILOT 2 | LAUNCH PILOT 3 | IMPLEMENT PROGRAM 4 | EXPAND PROGRAM


TIME JAN 2011 – AUG 2011 SEP 2011 – AUG 2012 SEP 2012 – AUG 2013 SEP 2013 – AUG 2014

JR ENROLLMENT/YR 8 12 14 17
TOTAL GROWTH/YR 8 20 34 51

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PROPOSAL | MINORITY MENTORING PILOT PROGRAM

MENTOR BENCHMARKS

STAGE 1 | BUILD PILOT 2 | LAUNCH PILOT 3 | IMPLEMENT PROGRAM 4 | EXPAND PROGRAM


TIME JAN 2011 – AUG 2011 SEP 2011 – AUG 2012 SEP 2012 – AUG 2013 SEP 2013 – AUG 2014

DTMA Bots Competition (Oct) DTMA Bots Competition (Oct) DTMA Bots Competition (Oct) DTMA Bots Competition (Oct)
TASKS

Focus Group: 100% participate Mentor Role Mentor Role Mentor Role
Student Eligibility Conduct monthly activities Conduct monthly activities Conduct monthly activities
Collaborate to define criteria Participate in quarterly debrief Participate in quarterly debrief Participate in quarterly debrief
Evaluate Bots participants to sessions sessions sessions
identify pilot participants Assist in identifying additional Assist in identifying additional
Mentor Eligibility mentors mentors
Complete DPS Volunteer New mentors complete eligibility New mentors complete eligibility
Orientation & training requirements & training requirements
Pass background check
Complete Mentor Training &
Orientation
Participate in quarterly debriefs

Mentor Program Mentor Program Mentor Program Mentor Program


DELIVERABLES

Recommend relevant activities & Provide relevant information & Provide relevant information & Provide relevant information &
experiences updates updates updates
Assist in designing mentor Coordinate with teacher Coordinate with teacher Coordinate with teacher
activities Participate in program Participate in program Participate in program
Assist in defining mentor role & evaluation evaluation evaluation
success criteria Recommend program Recommend program Recommend program
Assist in establishing mentor-to- refinements refinements refinements
student ratios (e.g., 1:3 or 1:5)

TEACHER BENCHMARKS

DTMA Bots Competition (Oct) DTMA Bots Competition (Oct) DTMA Bots Competition (Oct) DTMA Bots Competition (Oct)
TASKS

Focus Group: 100% participate Participate in mentor activities as Participate in mentor activities as Participate in mentor activities as
Student Eligibility appropriate appropriate appropriate
Collaborate to define criteria Participate in quarterly debrief Participate in quarterly debrief Participate in quarterly debrief
Evaluate Bots participants to sessions sessions sessions
identify pilot participants Convey program expectations to Convey program expectations to Convey program expectations to
Mentor Eligibility parents & students parents & students parents & students
Contribute to Mentor Training & Assist in program expansion Assist in program expansion Assist in program expansion
Orientation preparations preparations preparations
Participate in quarterly debriefs
Convey program expectations to
parents & students

Mentor Program Mentor Program Mentor Program Mentor Program


DELIVERABLES

Recommend relevant concepts, Provide relevant reports Provide relevant reports Provide relevant reports
activities & experiences Coordinate with mentors Coordinate with mentors Coordinate with mentors
Assist in designing mentor Participate in program Participate in program Participate in program
activities evaluation evaluation evaluation
Assist in defining mentor role & Recommend program Recommend program Recommend program
success criteria refinements refinements refinements

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PROPOSAL | MINORITY MENTORING PILOT PROGRAM

COORDINATOR BENCHMARKS

This position is pivotal to initial success and long-term sustainability. The Coordinator shoulders day-to-day
responsibility for planning and reporting, coordination and collaboration among program participants, and developing,
documenting and implementing core program components (recommended mentor activities, training and orientation
materials, etc.).

STAGE 1 | BUILD PILOT 2 | LAUNCH PILOT 3 | IMPLEMENT PROGRAM 4 | EXPAND PROGRAM


TIME JAN 2011 – AUG 2011 SEP 2011 – AUG 2012 SEP 2012 – AUG 2013 SEP 2013 – AUG 2014

Focus Groups: Elicit input from Implement Launch Plan Implement Full Program Implement Expansion Plan
TASKS

students, mentors & teacher Orientation & Training Orientation & Training Orientation & Training
Student Eligibility Conduct Student Orientation Conduct Student Orientation Conduct Student Orientation
Collaborate to define criteria Conduct Mentor Training & Conduct Mentor Training & Conduct Mentor Training &
Evaluate Bots participants to Orientation Orientation Orientation
identify pilot participants
Provide ongoing mentor support Provide ongoing mentor support Provide ongoing mentor support
Conduct Student Orientation
Conduct quarterly debriefs Conduct quarterly debriefs Conduct quarterly debriefs
Mentor Eligibility
Work with DTMA to add mentor Work with DTMA to add mentor Work with DTMA to add mentor
Define & document criteria companies companies companies
Conduct Mentor Training &
Link with other community Link with other community Add additional pathway(s)
Orientation
mentoring initiatives mentoring initiatives Link with other community
Work with school personnel to
mentoring initiatives
incorporate student portfolios &
assessments (Kuder, MEtaMorph)
into plan
Conduct quarterly debriefs
Link with other community
mentoring initiatives

Student Components Evaluate Stage 2 Evaluate Stage 3 Evaluate Stage 4


DELIVERABLES

Document eligibility criteria Compile relevant input Compile relevant input Compile relevant input
Create Student Orientation Collaborate with mentors & Collaborate with mentors & Collaborate with mentors &
program teacher teacher teachers
Mentor Program Lead program evaluation Lead program evaluation Lead program evaluation
Define mentor criteria Solicit program refinements Solicit program refinements Solicit program refinements
Develop calendar of Collect performance data Collect performance data Collect performance data
recommended activities Prepare evaluation report Prepare evaluation report Prepare evaluation report
Define mentor role & success Identify program refinements Identify program refinements Identify program refinements
criteria
Incorporate evaluation data into Build capacity to expand mentor Summarize Program Results
Define mentor-to-student ratios Full Program plan program Prepare a Master Plan for
(e.g., 1:3 or 1:5)
Work with writing consultant to Create Expansion Plan Transfer & Sustainability
Develop Mentor Training & develop Mentor Training & Adapt model to additional Report to Partnership
Orientation Operations Manual pathway(s)
Create a detailed Launch Plan Report to Partnership Identify target pathway(s)
Report to Partnership Identify relevant DTMA-like
partner(s)
Identify initial mentor pool
Report to Partnership

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PROPOSAL | MINORITY MENTORING PILOT PROGRAM

Investment & ROI

The Minority Mentoring Pilot Program consists of four stages spanning 44 months, from start up
(January 2011) through full implementation and expansion (August 2014). To execute the program and
achieve the results detailed in this proposal, we’re requesting $100,000 payable in predetermined
increments and amounts. DTMA will serve as the fiscal agent and will manage the program and budget
in partnership with Dayton Public Schools and Sinclair Community College.

Proposed Budget

The proposed budget details the funding required to accomplish the identified objectives. In 2014, the
funding will transition to federal and state dollars managed through the DPS Office of Career-Technical
and Adult Education.

PROGRAM ELEMENTS JAN-DEC 2011 JAN-DEC 2012 JAN-DEC 2013 SUBTOTAL

COORDINATOR
Compensation $28,000 $28,000 $28,000 $84,000

OPERATIONS
Marketing, Training & Recruitment $1,500 $1,000 $1,000 $3,500
Materials & Supplies, Background
Screening Fees, etc.

ACTIVITIES
Purchased Services, Event Support, $1,500 $1,500 $1,500 $4,500
Fees, etc.

MENTOR TRAINING & OPERATIONS MANUAL


External Consultant-Writer $5,000 $5,000
Graphic Layout & Printing $3,000 $3,000

TOTAL FUNDING REQUEST $31,000 $38,500 $30,500 $100,000

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PROPOSAL | MINORITY MENTORING PILOT PROGRAM

Return on Investment

The Minority Mentoring Pilot Program is not intended to be a high-volume, quick-fix effort. The
objective is to build a sustainable program and provide quality work-related experiences in order to
systematically increase the number of minority students positioned for success in non-traditional
sectors like manufacturing.

Over the course of 3.7 years, the initial investment will result in up to eight program graduates
employed in manufacturing. It will also create a pipeline of nearly 100 IES students to begin developing
a continuous supply of top-performing, job-ready manufacturing candidates. (The Ponitz CTC
enrollment projections are included as an attachment.)

Bottom Line

The Minority Mentoring Pilot Program offers direct and indirect benefits at every level.

Students benefit from the opportunity to place learning in context and gain guided hands-on
experiences focused on high school, college and career success. Schools benefit from the development
and implementation of a unique work-based career program that is adaptable, expandable, sustainable
and replicable, with the potential to become a national model. Manufacturers benefit, because they
gain access to a pool of qualified candidates who are technically and personally prepared for and
excited by the prospect of manufacturing careers.

The Dayton region benefits, as well. The advanced materials and manufacturing sector has been
identified as a targeted growth industry by the Dayton Development Coalition, but the challenge is to
keep the pipeline filled with skilled, job-ready workers. If manufacturers can’t find workers with the
right skill sets, these employers and job opportunities will leave the area.

Capable workers, strong schools and thriving manufacturers boost productivity and prosperity and
create the conditions that attract new industry and fresh opportunities. By building a diverse workforce
skilled in advanced manufacturing trades, the Minority Mentoring Pilot Program has the potential to
play a pivotal role in closing an identified opportunity gap and grow the region’s economy. #

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