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TABLE OF CONTENTS

2 ................ ACADEMIC CALENDAR 50 .............. BASS


4 ................ MISSION STATEMENT Credit Requirements
Course Descriptions
5 ................ ADMISSIONS
Bachelor Degree Programs 55 .............. GUITAR
Associate Degree Programs Credit Requirements
Certificate Programs Course Descriptions
Non-Certificate Programs 62 .............. KEYBOARD
International Student Information Credit Requirements
12 .............. FINANCIAL AID Course Descriptions
17 .............. TUITION AND FEES 66 .............. DRUMS
Credit Requirements
19 .............. POLICIES
Course Descriptions
Academic Policies and Definitions
State of California Tuition Recovery Fund 71 .............. VOICE
Student Conduct Credit Requirements
Student Rights Course Descriptions
Students’ Right to Know 77 .............. ASSOCIATE OF ARTS (COMBINED EMPHASES)
31 .............. STUDENT SERVICES 78 .............. CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Housing 78 .............. PERFORMANCE 1
Student Activities Bass
Academic Tutoring Guitar
Career Services Keyboard Technology
33 .............. FACILITIES Drums
Live Performance Voice
Recording and Production 84 .............. RECORDING AND MUSIC INDUSTRY
Class/Rehearsal Audio Engineering
Counseling/Practice Audio Engineering (Post-Production Emphasis)
Additional Facilities Independent Artist
Administration Music Business
Handicapped Facilities Guitar Craft
36 .............. PROGRAMS Music Video, Film and Television
Programs at a Glance 97 .............. ALTERNATIVE PROGRAMS
38 .............. BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE Encore
Credit Requirements Summer Shot
Course Descriptions 98 .............. GENERAL ELECTIVES
49 .............. ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREES 102 ............ LIVE PLAYING WORKSHOPS
49 .............. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 103 ............ FACULTY BIOS
130............. ADMINISTRATION
132............. CAMPUS HOLLYWOOD
ACADEMIC CALENDAR
2009-10 2010-11
Fall Quarter
2009 2010

Re-Registration August 31-September 11 August 30-September 10


New Student Registration September 21-28 September 20-27
New Student Orientation October 1 September 30
Quarter Begins October 5 October 4
*Thanksgiving Break November 26-27 November 25-26
Final Exams December 14-18 December 13-7
Quarter Break December 19-January 3 December 18 -January 9

Winter Quarter 2010 2011

Re-Registration November 30-December 11 November 29-December 10


2 New Student Registration December 28-30 January 3-6
New Student Orientation December 30 January 6
*New year’s Day January 1 January 1
Quarter Begins January 4 January 10
*Martin Luther King Day January 18 January 17
*Presidents’ Day February 15 February 21
Final Exams March 15-19 March 2-25
Graduation March 20 March 26
Quarter Break March 21-April 4 March 27-April 10

*School closed

ACADEMIC CALENDAR
2010 2011
Spring Quarter 2010 2011

Re-Registration March 1-12 March 7-18


New Student Registration March 22-29 March 28-April 4
New Student Orientation April 1 April 7
Quarter Begins April 5 April 11
*Memorial Day May 31 May 30
Final Exams June 14-18 June 20-24
Quarter Break June 19-July 4 June 25-July 10

Summer Quarter 2010 2011

Re-Registration June 1-June 11 June 6-17


New Student Registration June 21-28 June 27-July 5 3
New Student Orientation July 1 July 7
*Independence Day July 5 (observed) July 4
Quarter Begins July 6 July 11
*Labor Day September 6 September 5
Final Exams September 13-17 September 19-23
Graduation September 19 September 24
Quarter Break September 20-October 3 September 25-October 9

*School closed

MISSION STATEMENT
M usicians Institute provides innovative education that prepares
graduates for creative and professional careers in contemporary music
performance, recording, and related fields. MI is dedicated to providing
comprehensive instruction, facilities and other resources to support and
inspire artistic and professional accomplishment.

Musicians Institute offers the following programs of study:

Baccalaureate
n n Certificate
Bachelor of Music in Performance (Contemporary Styles) Performance (Bass, Guitar, Keyboard Technology, Drums, Voice)
Bass, Guitar, Keyboards, Drums, Voice Audio Engineering
Audio Engineering (Post-Production Audio)
With additional minor studies in: Independent Artist
Audio Production Guitar Craft
Music Industry Studies Music Business
Music Video, Film, and Television Production
Associate
n

4 Associate of Arts in Performance n Non-Certificate Training in Music

Bass, Guitar, Keyboard Technology, Drums, Voice Encore Program


Bass, Guitar, Keyboard, Drums, Voice
Associate of Arts in Performance with emphasis in:
Audio Engineering Summer Shot
Independent Artist Development Bass, Guitar, Keyboards, Drums, Voice
Music Business Audio Production, Music Business
Guitar Craft
Music Video, Film and Television Production


ADMISSIONS
BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE International Applicants
(CONTEMPORARY STYLES) Please send all of the items described above together by mail, PLUS:
Bass, Guitar, Keyboards, Drums, Voice 1. The $100.00 USD application fee must be submitted as an
International Money Order or Postal Money Order for U.S. funds.
2. If a student’s principal language is other than English, he or she must
Eligibility Requirements present verification of English language proficiency through a Test of
1. Satisfactory completion of an accredited secondary school program English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The minimum TOEFL
(high school) or its equivalent. Students are advised to follow a col acceptance scores are 500 (Standard), 173 (Computerized),
lege preparatory curriculum with four years of English, three years of or 61 (Internet-Based Test/IBT).
Social Sciences and as many music courses as are practical. 3. A non-immigrant student F-1 Visa is required for all Degree programs
2. At least three years of study on the primary instrument (see “International Student Information” for details).
(Bass, Guitar, Keyboards, Drums, or Voice).
3. Music reading ability in both treble and bass clef. Admissions Deadlines and Notification
4. Knowledge of and interest in contemporary styles The Admissions Department must receive all required materials by:
5. Working knowledge of keyboard harmony n July 31 to be considered for Fall admission.
n January 31 to be considered for Spring admission.
How to Apply for Admission to the BM Program: Fully completed applications will be reviewed with placement priority given to ap-
The admissions procedure for the BM program consists of three parts: plications received prior to the established due dates. Accepted applicants will be
1. Written application notified by mail and telephone. Applicants who are not accepted will receive notifi-
2. Written entrance test cation by mail only, along with the specific reasons for non-acceptance. 5
3. Video performance test
After your written application is received, reviewed and approved, you will re- Tuition Deposit (Domestic Students Only)
ceive a written BM entrance test by mail to be completed and returned along Upon acceptance to the degree program, students are required to submit a re-
with an unedited video recording of yourself performing specific instrumental fundable deposit in the amount of $300.00US to secure their placement (see
playing requirements (details provided with entrance test). Letter of Acceptance for details). The deposit is applied toward the first quarter’s
tuition and is completely refundable in the event of cancellation of enrollment.
All Applicants
Please send all of the following items together by mail: Registration
1. Completed application Students are expected to arrive two weeks prior to the start of classes for regis-
2. High School diploma, G.E.D. or equivalent, or higher degree tration and orientation. Late registration will be held until Friday of the first week
(A.A., A.S., B.A., B.S. etc.). Please provide an official English of classes. Registration after the first week of classes is by permission of the
translation if the original is not in English. Degree Dean only.
3. $100.00US application fee
Students who need housing/roommate assistance should arrive at least four
4. A 250-word written essay describing why you want to attend
weeks prior to the start of classes. Daily housing meetings and new student
Musicians Institute
tours will take place during registration week.
5. SAT or ACT scores (from within the previous two years); SAT minimum:
500 Critical Reading, 500 Mathematics, 500 Writing; ACT minimum: 21 Placement Evaluation
6. Two letters of recommendation from instructors or professors you have After are accepted by the BM program, you will be given a placement evaluation
studied with for at least one year, including one recommendation in to determine your experience level in several fundamental musical areas. In some
music and one recommendation in academic areas cases, you may receive advanced placement in certain subjects in which you may
7. Transfer credit information from prior college or university (ff applicable). already be proficient. Placement evaluations will take place during registration week
and students will not be scheduled for classes until their evaluations are complete.
ADMISSIONS
Orientation Transfer students who enter Musicians Institute with missing official transcripts or
Attendance at the Orientation Meeting is mandatory for all new students. Unless classes in progress must meet with the Dean during their first quarter to confirm
otherwise stated during registration, Orientation will be held on the Thursday the transfer of those credits. The Admissions Office must receive all transcripts
prior to the start of classes. During this meeting you will learn about school policy before the end of the student’s first quarter of enrollment at Musicians Institute.
and procedures, student services, lab and LPW sign-ups and other school-re-
lated topics. Requirements for MI Associate Degree
Students Applying to the BM Program
General Education Transfer Credits Applicants who complete an Associate of Arts in Performance degree in Bass,
The two main components of the Bachelor of Music Degree are the music Guitar, Drums, Keyboard Technology or Voice at Musicians Institute with a mini-
coursework and the general education requirements. To fulfill the General Edu- mum cumulative GPA of 3.75 (A) and meet all other BM Degree admission re-
cation degree requirements, students must complete 45 quarter units or 30 se- quirements will be admitted to the BM program without submitting the video
mester units in Liberal Arts subjects. For this purpose, Musicians Institute has performance test. Each admitted student will be given a placement test in Music
entered into a partnership with Los Angeles City College (LACC). All required Theory and Ear Training and placed at the appropriate level in those subjects (in
general education courses, including a wide selection of subjects in English, some cases, remedial coursework may be required).
mathematics, natural science, social science and humanities are offered on the
nearby LACC campus. MI students may register for appropriate general edu- Students who complete an AA degree at MI with a GPA lower than 3.75 or stu-
cation classes in consultation with LACC advisors with support and coordina-
dents who complete an AA (combined emphases) will be required to complete
tion from Musicians Institute (LACC is accredited by the Western Association of
the video performance test as part of the BM application process. Acceptance
Schools and Colleges (WASC)). See Bachelor of Music degree requirements in
for admission will be subject to meeting minimum test requirements.
6 this catalog for a summary of required General Education credit distribution.
Transfer Credits from MI Associate to BM Program
Students may also transfer up to the maximum number of required general edu- Applicants who have completed MI’s Associate of Arts in Performance (Bass,
cation units from institutions other than LACC pending review and approval by
Guitar, Keyboard Technology, Drums, or Voice) with a minimum GPA of 3.75 (A)
the Dean. Acceptance of coursework will be based on standards set by the Na-
may transfer the following credits toward their BM completion requirements:
tional Association of Schools of Music and Musicians Institute, as well as com-
parisons to offerings from LACC.
Instrument Study: 12 credits
Music Transfer Credits Reading: 6 credits
The maximum number of transfer credits that may be applied to satisfy music
coursework requirements varies according to the student’s initial placement in Additional credits that may be transferred based on results of BM entrance
the areas of Private Lessons, Ensembles, Theory, Ear Training, and Reading. evaluation include:
In no case may the total number of transfer credits (music and General Educa-
tion combined) exceed the maximum allowed under the Residency Requirement Private Lesson: up to 12 credits
(see “Policies”). Ensembles: up to 6 credits
Electives: up to 9 credits
Applying for Transfer Credit
Provide official transcripts and course catalogs of all college study relevant to Transfer credits for students who are admitted to the BM program after complet-
the desired transfer credits to the attention of: ing the AA Performance Degree with a GPA below 3.75 or students admitted
after completing an AA (Combined Emphases) Degree will be evaluated on a
Musicians Institute Office of Admissions course-by-course basis.
6752 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, California 90028
ADMISSIONS
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE English Language
Bass, Guitar, Keyboard Technology, Drum, Voice TOEFL tests are not required for admission to AA or certificate programs; how-
ever, all classes are taught in English and students must have a basic under-
The Associate of Arts in Performance is a terminal/occupational degree and is not in- standing of the English language in both spoken and written communication.
tended to prepare graduates for transfer to baccalaureate programs. Policies regard-
ing the transfer of occupational degrees or acceptance of transfer course credit vary Application Review and Notification
by institution. MI cannot guarantee the transferability of credit except between its own Class sizes are limited and placement priority is given to applications in the or-
degree programs (see “Transfer Credits from MI Associate to BM Program” above). der accepted. Fully completed applications are reviewed for acceptance on an
ongoing basis. Accepted applicants will be notified by mail. Applicants who are
Eligibility Requirements
not accepted will be notified by mail including the reasons for non-acceptance.
The admissions procedure is selective and based on factors including:
1. An audition tape or written test (where applicable) Tuition Deposit (Domestic Students Only)
2. The written application Upon acceptance to all degree and certificate programs, admitted students are
3. Prior experience required to submit a refundable deposit in the amount of $300.00 USDto secure
4. Desire for career advancement and commitment to an intensive their placement (see Letter of Acceptance for details). The deposit is applied
educational program toward the first quarter’s tuition and is completely refundable in the event of
cancellation of enrollment
Each applicant is individually reviewed, taking into consideration his or her ex-
perience, achievements, aptitude, attitude, and potential for growth. Prospective
Registration
students still enrolled in high school are encouraged to follow a college prepara-
Students are expected to arrive two weeks prior to the start of classes for regis-
tory curriculum and to take as many music and music-related courses as are 7
tration and orientation. Students who fail to register at their assigned registration
practical prior to attending MI.
appointment will be assessed a late registration fee of $100.00 USD. Applicants
How to Apply for Admission to the AA-Performance Program may register after the first week of classes only with permission from the Dean.
Please send all of the following items together by mail (additional items are also
Students who need housing/roommate assistance should arrive at least four
required–check below under the specific program to which you are applying):
weeks prior to the start of classes. Daily housing meetings and new student
1. Completed application form
tours will take place during registration week.
2. $100.00 USD application fee
(International applicants: the application fee must be submitted as an Placement Evaluation
International Money Order or Postal Money Order for U.S. funds) After you are admitted to the Associate Degree program, you will be given a place-
3. High school diploma or proof of GED equivalent from an accredited ment evaluation. The evaluation will measure your current level of knowledge
institution (please provide an official English translation if the original and experience in several fundamental musical areas. Placement evaluations
is not in English) take place during registration week and you will not be scheduled for classes until
4. One letter of recommendation from a music instructor or music your evaluation is complete. In some cases, a student may be recommended for
professional familiar with your personal and musical qualities advanced placement in classes in which he or she may already be proficient.
5. An audio recording of your playing or singing (see application for details)

International Applicants Orientation


In addition to the materials described above: Attendance at the Orientation Meeting is mandatory for all new students. Unless
Student Visas otherwise stated during registration, Orientation will be held on the Thursday prior to
n A non-immigrant student F-1 Visa is required for the Associate the start of classes. During this meeting you will learn about school policy and pro-
Degree program (see “International Student Information” for details). cedures, student services, lab and LPW sign-ups and other school-related topics.
n A non-immigrant student M-1 Visa is required for the Performance
Certificate program (see “International Student Information” for details).
ADMISSIONS
Transfer from an AA Degree Program to an Instrument ENCORE PROGRAM (NON-CERTIFICATE TRAINING IN MUSIC)
Certificate Program Bass, Guitar, Keyboards, Drums, Voice
Students enrolled in an Associate of Arts Degree program in Guitar, Bass, Eligibility
Drums, Keyboards or Voice who wish to transfer to a Certificate program in the There are no specific academic entrance requirements for the Encore Program.
same instrument and are not receiving US financial aid, including International Each applicant is individually reviewed, taking into consideration his or her ex-
students, may transfer no later than the end of the second week of their fourth perience, past achievements, aptitude and potential for growth.
quarter of enrollment in the AA program.
How To Apply to the Encore Program
Students receiving federal financial aid for an AA Instrument program may trans- Please send the following items together by mail:
fer to a Certificate program in the same instrument no later than the end of the 1. Completed application form
second week of their third quarter of enrollment in the AA program. 2. $100.00 USD application fee

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE International Applicants


(Combined emphases) In addition to the materials described above:
Student Visas
Musicians Institute offers Associate degrees combining study of one of the A non-immigrant student M-1 Visa is required (see “International Student
five primary instruments with a non-performance emphasis. Emphasis options Information” for details).
include: English Language
n Audio Engineering TOEFL tests are not required for admission to the Encore program; however, all
8
n Music Business classes are taught in English and students must have a basic understanding of
n Music Video, Film and Television Production the English language in both spoken and written communication.
n Guitar Craft
n Independent Artist Development Application Review and Notification
Class sizes are limited and placement priority is given to applications in the or-
Eligibility and Application der accepted. Fully completed applications are reviewed for acceptance on an
Students applying for admission to an AA (combined emphases) program must ongoing basis. Accepted applicants will be notified by mail. Applicants who are
meet the eligibility requirements of both the instrument study portion (see AA not accepted will be notified by mail including the reasons for non-acceptance.
requirements above) and the additional emphasis portion (see Music Industry
Certificates below). Scheduling/Registration/Orientation
Encore students are expected to arrive two weeks prior to the start of classes for
All other application, registration, placement, and orientation requirements are scheduling, Registration, and Orientation. Students who need housing and/or room-
identical to those described above for the Associate of Arts in Performance. mate assistance should arrive at least four weeks prior to the start of classes.

CERTIFICATE IN PERFORMANCE
Bass, Guitar, Keyboard Technology, Drums, Voice

All eligibility, application, registration, placement and orientation requirements


for the four-quarter/60 credit-unit Certificate in Performance are identical to
those described above for Associate of Arts in Performance.
ADMISSIONS
MUSIC INDUSTRY CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS week and you will not be scheduled for classes until your evaluation is complete.
n Audio Engineering n Audio
Engineering (Post-Production Audio) In some cases, a student may be recommended for advanced placement in
n GuitarCraft n Independent Artist classes in which he or she may already be proficient.
n Music Business n Music Video, Film &TV Production
Audio Engineering (Post-Production Audio)
Eligibility Application:
The admission procedure for each program is selective and based on factors In addition to the items listed above under “All Programs,” you must also:
including:
1. An audition tape or written test (where applicable).
1. Pass a written Scholastic Level Exam (see application form for details).
2. Written application
2. Submit an audio recording of your speaking voice with a short narra
3. Prior experience
4. Applicant’s desire for career advancement and commitment to an tive in English telling us why you want to attend Musicians Institute.
intensive educational program 3. Submit an audio recording demonstrating your current level of ability
in the field of music recording, production, or editing (see application
Each applicant is individually reviewed, taking into consideration his or her ex- or speak to an Admissions representative for details).
perience, achievements, aptitude, attitude, and potential for growth. Prospective
students still attending high school are encouraged to follow a college prepara- Students already enrolled in the Certificate in Audio Engineering program who
tory curriculum and to take as many music and music-related courses as are apply for transfer to the Certificate in Audio Engineering (Post-Production Au-
practical prior to attending MI. dio) program may submit recordings that they have produced during their cur-
rent program in order to meet admission requirement (3) above. The applicant’s
How to Apply for Admission academic progress in the current program will also be considered as a factor in 9
All programs: determining eligibility for transfer.
Send all of the following items together by mail along with any additional items
required by the program to which you are applying (see below): Placement:
1. Completed application form Placement evaluations are the same as those for “Audio Engineering.”
2. $100.00 USD application fee
(International applicants: the application fee must be submitted as an Independent Artist
International Money Order or Postal Money Order for U.S. funds). In addition to the items listed above under “All Programs”, you must also submit
3. High school diploma or proof of G.E.D. equivalent from an accredited an original recording (see application form for details).
institution (please provide an official English translation if the original
is not in English).
Guitar Craft
Program-specific requirements In addition to the items listed above under “All Programs”, you must also:
Audio Engineering 1. Pass a written Scholastic Level Exam (see application form for details).
Application: 2. Submit an audio recording of your speaking voice with a short narra
In addition to the items listed above under “All Programs”, you must also: tive in English telling us why you want to attend Musicians Institute.
1. Pass a written Scholastic Level Exam (see application form for details).
2. Submit an audio recording of your speaking voice with a short narrative Music Business
in English telling us why you want to attend Musicians Institute. In addition to the items listed above under “All Programs”, you must pass a writ-
Placement: ten Scholastic Level Exam (see application form for details).
If you are admitted to the Audio Engineering Certificate program, you will be
given a placement evaluation as part of the registration process. The evalu- Music Video, Film and Television Production
ation will measure your current level of knowledge and experience in several In addition to the items listed above under “All Programs”, you must pass a writ-
fundamental areas. Placement evaluations will take place during registration ten Scholastic Level Exam (see application form for details).
ADMISSIONS
International Applicants students. Musicians Institute follows a policy of equal opportunity in all of its
In addition to the materials described above: educational activities, admissions and employment and does not discriminate
because of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age,
Student Visas physical handicap or marital status.
A non-immigrant student M-1 Visa is required for all programs (see “International
Student Information” for details). MI’s International Student Office assists international students in immigration
and personal matters. A few important regulations applying to all international
English Language students include:
TOEFL tests are not required for admission; however, all classes are taught in
English and students must have a basic understanding of the English language Sufficient Funds: All international students must submit an official letter from
in both spoken and written communication. the student’s, parent’s or sponsor’s bank certifying that there are enough funds
available for payment of tuition and living expenses during the study period. All
Application Review and Notification
funds sent to MI must be in U.S. dollars.
Class sizes are limited and placement priority will be given to approved applica-
tions based on the date of acceptance into the desired program. Fully completed English Documents: All documents must be in English or accompanied by a
applications are reviewed for acceptance on an ongoing basis. Accepted ap- certified English translation of the document.
plicants will be notified by mail. Applicants who are not accepted will receive
notification by mail, along with the specific reasons for non-acceptance. Student Visas: A non-immigrant F-1 student visa (for Bachelor and Associate
Degree programs) or an M-1 student visa (for Certificate and Encore programs)
Tuition Deposit (Domestic Students Only) is required. An I-20 immigration form will be issued to the student upon meeting
10 Upon acceptance to all degree and certificate programs, admitted students are all entrance and financial requirements. The student must take the I-20 form to
required to submit a refundable deposit in the amount of $300.00 USD to secure the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in his or her country of residence to obtain a
their placement (see Letter of Acceptance for details). The deposit is applied student visa in order to enter the United States.
toward the first quarter’s tuition and is completely refundable in the event of
cancellation of enrollment Full-time status: All international students must maintain “full time” status in
order to satisfy student visa requirements.
Registration
Students are expected to arrive two weeks prior to the start of classes for regis- ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
tration and orientation. Students who fail to register at the assigned registration
appointment will be assessed a late registration fee of $100.00 USD Registration Accreditation and Licensure
after the first week of classes is by permission of the Department Head only. Musicians Institute has been an accredited institutional member of the National
Association of Schools of Music since 1981 and is licensed to operate in the State
Students who need housing/roommate assistance should arrive at least four
of California by the Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education.
weeks prior to the start of classes. Daily housing meetings and new student
tours will take place during registration week. Accuracy of Information
All information in this catalog is accurate as of the date of printing. MI reserves
Orientation
the right to revise or cancel the programs, courses, activities, or services de-
Orientation is mandatory for all new students and unless otherwise stated dur-
ing registration, will be held on the Thursday prior to the start of classes. The scribed herein without prior notice. Applicants are advised to confirm their avail-
orientation meeting explains school policy and procedures, student services, lab ability prior to enrollment.
and LPW sign-ups and other school-related topics.
Disclaimer
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT INFORMATION MI offers no guarantee that employment will result from enrolling in, attending,
Musicians Institute is authorized under federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien or completing any MI program.
FINANCIAL AID
Musicians Institute is eligible to offer financial aid under a variety of federal and which means you receive your Student Aid Report sooner. It’s fast, convenient,
state programs. The following pages should answer most of your questions and user-friendly. If you require a paper application, you will need to contact the
and explain the various types of aid that are available. If you are interested in Department of Education at 1-800-4-FED-AID to request one. Upon request
applying for financial aid, please read this section thoroughly. If you need more from the Financial Aid Office, you may need to provide additional documents
information, contact Musicians Institute at 1-800-255-7529 ext. 352 or 1-323- such as student and/or parent tax returns, verification of untaxed income, or
860-4352, or email financialaid@mi.edu. other documents required to determine eligibility. The Financial Aid Office will
mail your award notification approximately 7-10 business days after receipt of
Am I eligible for financial aid? your Student Aid Report (depending on the time of year), and only if you have
Financial aid is available to US citizens and eligible non-citizens. If you qualify, been accepted for admission to MI.
you may be eligible for one or more types of aid. Each type of aid also has other
specific eligibility requirements, and it is important for you to know that financial When do I apply for Financial Aid?
aid usually does not cover all of your tuition costs. It is recommended that you apply for financial aid at least three (3) months be-
fore the start of classes if you plan to use financial aid to help cover your tuition
Your eligibility for need-based financial aid programs is determined by subtract- costs. Please keep in mind that applying for financial aid is a complex process
ing your Effective Family Contribution (or EFC, as determined by your Student that requires your utmost attention to details and deadlines. Once you apply for
Aid Report) from the cost of attendance for your course of study. Cost of at- financial aid, be sure to respond immediately to any mailings you receive from
tendance includes tuition and fees, books and supplies, housing, personal and the financial aid processor or the Financial Aid Office at Musicians Institute.
transportation costs. Charges for tuition and fees can be found in the Tuition
& Fees section of this catalog. Other costs are based on a standard expense How are financial aid funds disbursed? 11
budget as determined by the California Student Aid Commission (current figures In general, financial aid funds are disbursed quarterly, the first disbursement
are also shown in the Tuition & Fees section of this catalog; these costs are coming in the first quarter of attendance, and other disbursements coming in
subject to change). subsequent quarters. However, funds from the various financial aid programs
described below are not all disbursed in the same way or at the same time. Gov-
What are the general requirements for receiving financial aid? ernment financial aid funds are sent to the school via electronic funds transfer.
General requirements for any student receiving federal or state financial aid Students will be notified of disbursements made by federal loans via email or by
include: U.S. postal service.

n High school diploma or equivalent OTHER INFORMATION


n Maintaining satisfactory academic progress while attending MI n Additional information about financial aid at Musicians Institute may
be obtained by contacting a financial aid counselor
If you drop below the minimum standards for satisfactory academic progress, n Federal and State financial aid funds are not available for programs
you will become ineligible for any type of federal or state aid. If you are declared that have not been approved by MI’s accrediting agency.
ineligible for academic reasons, you may appeal the ruling with the Registrar’s
Office. You will also need to request an appeal with the Financial Aid Office in Listed below is a brief summary of the financial aid programs
order to regain eligibility. Requests for appeal will be reviewed on a case-by- offered at Musicians Institute:
case basis by Education and Financial Aid staff.
Federal Pell Grant
How do I apply for financial aid? The Pell Grant program is intended to help provide eligible students with access
The fastest way to apply for financial aid is by logging on to www.fafsa.ed.gov. to the post-secondary institution of their choice. Pell grants do not have to be
By filing your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online, you en- repaid. The Department of Education uses the information provided on the Free
sure its accuracy and the information goes directly to the federal processor, Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), to determine your eligibility.
FINANCIAL AID
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) within 30-60 days from the final disbursement. The amount of the monthly pay-
FSEOG is for undergraduate students with exceptional need and does not have ment will vary with the amount borrowed, but will never be less than $50.00 per
to be repaid. This program is funded by the federal government and adminis- month. Effective July 1, 2008, the interest rate is fixed at 8.5%.
tered by MI’s Financial Aid Office. Please note that these funds are limited and
there is no guarantee that every eligible student will receive this grant. Cal Grants (for California residents only)
The State of California offers Cal Grants to eligible undergraduate students. To
qualify, you must be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen, a California resident
Federal Stafford Loan
and meet the specific requirements of the grant program. Applications are only
This is a low-interest, need-based loan designed to provide students with
accepted between January 1 and March 2 of each year. For more information,
additional funds for college. YOU MUST REPAY THIS LOAN.
you may contact the California Student Aid Commission at (888) CA-GRANT, or
n Dependent students who qualify may borrow up to a maximum of $2,333- log onto their website at www.calgrants.org.
$3,500.00 in a subsidized or unsubsidized loan, depending on the pro
gram, for their first academic year, $4,500 for their 2nd academic year, California Chafee Grant Program
and $5,500 for their 3rd & 4th (for Bachelor students). Effective July 1, The Chafee Grant Program is available to current or former foster youth. This
2008, dependent students are also eligible for an additional unsubsidized program is federally funded and is subject to availability of funds each year. To
loan of up to $2,000. qualify, you must:
n Be eligible, or have been eligible, for foster care between your 16th
n Independent students, or dependent students whose Parent Loan (PLUS) and 18th birthday
is denied, may borrow up to a maximum of $6,334-$9,500.00 in a subsi n Not have reached your 22nd birthday as of July 1 of the award year.
12 dized or unsubsidized loan, depending on the program, for their first
academic year, up to $10,500 for their 2nd academic year, and up to For more information on Chafee Grants, or to download an application, please
$12,500 for their 3rd & 4th (for Bachelor students). At least $4,000- log on to www.chafee.csac.ca.gov. You may also contact the Financial Aid
$7,000.00 of this amount must be in an unsubsidized Stafford Loan. Office for more information.

MI Scholarships
Repayment of a Stafford Loan begins six (6) months after your last date of at-
tendance and the minimum monthly payment is $50.00 per loan. Effective July Musicians Institute offers three types of scholarships designed to provide tuition
1, 2008, the interest rate on the subsidized portion of a Stafford loan is fixed at assistance to students during their enrollment at MI. The information below de-
6% for any disbursements made on or after July 1, 2008 thru June 30, 2009. scribes each scholarship, how to apply, and the deadline for submission. Refer
The interest rate for the unsubsidized portion of a Stafford loan will be fixed at to each scholarship application for specific details; for all additional questions
6.8%. For students who demonstrate a need for a subsidized Stafford Loan, the about scholarships, please contact the Admissions Department.
government will pay the interest on your loan during the time you are in school
and the specified grace period. Students who have a calculated need less than Additional scholarships may also be available! Call the Admissions Department
the maximum on the Stafford Loan may borrow the difference in an Unsubsi- or check www.mi.edu/FinancialAid.aspx for current information about scholar-
dized Stafford Loan and will be responsible for the entire interest on that portion ships sponsored by other companies or individuals.
of the loan.
General Information for All MI Scholarships
Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) Scholarship Amounts and Method of Award
PLUS loans are for qualified parents of dependent students who want to borrow 1. Scholarships are awarded in the form of tuition credit only.
to help pay for their son/daughter’s education. Eligible PLUS borrowers may 2. The minimum award for each scholarship is $1000.00. The total
borrow up to the yearly cost of education less other financial aid awarded to the award amount will be determined after a review of your application.
student. PLUS loans are credit-based and require approval by the lending insti- 3. The total award amount is divided by the number of quarters in your
tution. YOU MUST REPAY THIS LOAN. Repayment on the PLUS loan begins program and credited equally toward each quarter’s tuition.
FINANCIAL AID
Application and Notification Musicianship Scholarship
1. MI Scholarships are available only to newly-enrolling students. Before Musicianship Scholarships are available to new instrument and voice students
you may submit a scholarship application, you must have a Letter of (both US and non-US citizens) enrolling in the Bachelor of Music, Associate
Acceptance from MI’s Admission Department. of Arts, or Certificate in Performance Programs who demonstrate outstanding
2. Scholarship applications are available from the Financial Aid or musicianship. A total of ten Musicianship Scholarships (two per instrument) are
Admissions Department or may be downloaded from awarded for each new program start.
www.mi.edu/FinancialAid.aspx
3. Completed applications submitted by the appropriate deadline will be Requirements
reviewed and applicants will be notified of the results within two To be considered for a Musicianship Scholarship, you must submit a completed
weeks after the deadline. application including:
1. An essay explaining why you should be considered for the scholarship.
Other Information 2. A video recording displaying your performing skills. Video
1. All scholarships are non-transferable and may not be applied to any requirements vary by program; see application for details.
person, program, or start date other than those for which they were
originally awarded. Application Deadlines
2. Scholarship recipients who fail to meet minimum academic require- For programs beginning: Submit your application by:
ments during their enrollment will forfeit any remaining award balance Fall 2009 August 10, 2009
(see scholarship applications for specific requirements). Spring 2010 February 8, 2010

13
Development Scholarship Opportunity Scholarship
Development Scholarships are provided to encourage the educational growth of Opportunity Scholarships are available to middle-income instrument or voice
new students enrolled in a degree or certificate program who have verifiable fi- students enrolling in the Bachelor of Music, Associate of Arts or Certificate in
nancial need (this scholarship is limited to US citizens and permanent residents). Performance programs who have verifiable financial need. A total of ten Oppor-
A minimum of twenty Development Scholarships are awarded each year. tunity Scholarships are awarded for each new program start.

Requirements Requirements
To be considered for a Development Scholarship, you must submit a completed To be considered for an Opportunity Scholarship, you must meet the following
application including: criteria:
1. A 250-word essay explaining why you should be considered for the 1. United States citizen or permanent resident
scholarship and describing the extent of your financial need. 2. Non-dependent student born before January 1, 1986 (if applying for
2. A copy of your official high school or college transcript. the October 2009 or April 2010 start)
3. Verifiable financial need (tax return or other means of income verification). 3. Earned at least $24,000.00 in the 2008 tax year (if applying for the
October 2009 or April 2010 start)
Application Deadlines 4. Minimum High School GPA of 2.5
For programs beginning: Submit application by:
Summer 2009 (Audio Engineering only) May 11, 2009 Application Deadlines
Fall 2009 August 10, 2009 Applications are accepted up to the first day of classes for each new program
Winter 2010 (Audio Engineering only) November 23, 2009 start. Opportunity Scholarships are awarded to qualified applicants on a first-
Spring 2010 February 8, 2010 come, first-served basis up to the maximum number of available awards.
.

FINANCIAL AID
Alternative Loans Before you leave school, you must receive the following
Musicians Institute has information on alternative loans for students who need information about your loan in an exit interview:
additional funding assistance for their education or living expenses. All students, n The amount of your total debt (principal and interest), what your
including students who are not eligible for US government financial assistance, interest rate is and the total interest charges on your loan.
may apply for these loans with an eligible co-signer. These loans are credit- n The average monthly repayment amount you can expect.
based and applications are made directly to the lending institution offering the n The name of the organization that holds your loan, where to send
loan. For further information, please contact the Financial Aid Office (interna- your payments and where to write if you have questions about your loan.
tional students contact the Director of International Student Affairs). n The fees you should expect during the repayment period.
n A description of deferment and cancellation provisions.
Borrower Rights and Responsibilities n A description of repayment options such as prepayment, refinancing
If you take out a student loan, you have certain rights. Some of those rights are and consolidation loans.
listed below: n Debt management advice.
n If you take out a Stafford Loan, you have the right to a grace period n Notification that you must provide your expected permanent address,
before your repayment period begins. The grace period begins when the name and address of your expected employer, the address of
you leave school, or drop below half-time status as defined by the your next-of-kin, and any corrections to the school’s records concerning
school. The exact length of your grace period will be shown on the your name, Social Security Number, references and driver license number.
promissory note provided to you by your lender.
n You must be given a repayment schedule that specifies when your You also have certain responsibilities. Here are a few of them:
first payment is due as well as the number, frequency and amount of n When you sign a promissory note, you are agreeing to repay according
14
all payments. to the terms of the note. This note is a binding legal document. This
n You must be given a list of deferment and cancellation conditions. com mitment to repay means that you will have to pay back the loan,
even if you don’t complete your education, aren’t able to get a job
Before the first loan may be disbursed, you must receive the after you complete the program, or you are dissatisfied with, or do not
following information in an entrance interview: receive the education you paid for. If you do not pay back your loan on
n The full amount of the loan, the interest rate and when you must time, or according to the terms in your promissory note, you may go
begin repayment. into default, which has very serious consequences.
n The effect borrowing will have on your eligibility for other types of n You must make payments on your loan even if you do not receive a
financial aid. bill. Billing statements and coupon books are sent to you as a conve
n A complete list of any charges you must pay (loan fees) and nience, but not receiving them does not relieve you of your obligation
information on how those charges are collected. to make payments.
n The yearly and total amounts you can borrow, and the minimum and n Even though you may have applied for a deferment, you still must
maximum repayment periods. continue to make payments until your deferment is processed. If you
n A current description of loans you owe your school and/or lender, an do not, you may end up in default. You should keep a copy of any
estimate of what your total debt will be and what your monthly deferment request form you may have and you should document all
payments will be. contacts with the organization that holds your loan.
n An explanation of default and its consequences. n You must notify the organization that holds your loan if you graduate,
n An explanation of options for prepaying your loan and for taking withdraw from school, or drop below half-time status, change your
advantage of a consolidation loan. name, address, or Social Security Number, or transfer to anothe school.
n Before you receive your first disbursement, you must attend an
entrance interview. Before you leave school, you must attend an exit
interview (see above).
FINANCIAL AID
Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) The steps for filing an appeal are as follows:
Federal regulations require all institutions that participate in Title IV aid programs
to define and monitor satisfactory academic progress (SAP) for all financial aid 1. Student must complete the Academic Progress Appeal Form and
recipients. The standards must meet all federal requirements and be equal to return it to the Financial Aid Office with all supporting documentation
or more stringent than the SAP standards for non-financial aid recipients. See 2. The appeal will be reviewed by the Director of Financial Aid.
Satisfactory Academic Progress and related topics in the Policy section of this 3. Students will be notified within five (5) working days if their appeal is
catalog for specific information regarding SAP. granted or denied.

Failure to Maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress If the appeal is approved, financial aid suspension will be rescinded and aid will
Failure to meet minimum standards for SAP may result in academic probation, be awarded and/or disbursed to the student’s account.
loss of financial aid, or termination from a program. Students will receive a writ-
ten notice if they do not meet academic progress standards at the end of each If the appeal is denied, financial aid suspension will be continued until the stu-
enrollment period. The notice will provide information on what steps must be dent once again meets the academic requirements outlined above.
taken to reinstate SAP.

For any student failing to maintain satisfactory academic progress, financial aid
is suspended until the student:
Note to Non-U.S. Citizens
Students who are planning to attend Musicians Institute with an M-1 or F-1 Stu-
1. corrects his or her academic status (e.g. has an incorrect grade changed)
dent Visa are ineligible to receive U.S. financial assistance. We recommend 15
2. makes up the deficit (e.g. regains a 2.0 GPA)
that you contact the Department of Student Financial Assistance in your country
3. receives an approval of appeal (see “Appeal Process” below)
for information on financial aid available to you from your own government. U.S.
financial aid programs are only available to U.S. citizens or students who are in
Reinstating satisfactory progress
one of the following categories:
Students receiving financial aid must provide the Financial Aid Office with veri-
n U.S. permanent residents who have an Alien Registration Receipt
fication of a corrected status or that they have reinstated satisfactory progress.
Card (I-151 or I-551).
Reinstatement of financial aid will not occur until the student notifies the Finan-
n Other eligible non-citizen with a Departure Record (I-94) from the U.S.
cial Aid Office that their SAP status has been cleared.
Immigration and Naturalization Service showing specific designations.

Grades of “F”
Note to Veterans
The Financial Aid Office reviews records for all students who receive grades of
Veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces applying to this school must make arrange-
“F” (0 units completed) to verify student status.
ments to pay tuition through means other than Veterans benefits (e.g., cash or
financial aid). If you qualify, Veterans benefits will be paid to you on a monthly
Appeal Process
basis while you are in attendance. All arrangements for Veterans Benefits are
An Academic Progress Appeal Form will be mailed along with the notice of fail-
between the applicant and the Veterans Administration. Musicians Institute will
ure to meet the requirements. Students may appeal the suspension of their aid
assist you, but accepts no responsibility.
due to failure to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress if there are special
circumstances that contribute to their failure to meet the standards. Special cir-
Students who wish to receive Veterans Benefits MUST submit a statement of
cumstances are generally deemed to be something beyond the student’s control
previous training to the school for consideration. After proper evaluation, allow-
such as injury, illness, or a death in the family.
able transfer credits will be recorded on the enrollment record and the length of
the program will be shortened proportionately. In addition, the student and the
Department of Veteran Affairs shall be notified.
FINANCIAL AID
Refund Policy for Financial Aid Students *Scheduled breaks of at least five consecutive days are excluded from the total
Effective on October 7, 2000, changes were added to the Higher Education Act number of calendar days in a payment period (numerator) and the number of
for the treatment of Federal Title IV funds when a student withdraws from school. calendar days completed in that period (denominator). Days in which a student
Musicians Institute is required to comply with these Federal regulations regard- was on an approved leave of absence are also not included in the calendar days
ing Return of Title IV Funds in determining the amount of Title IV Financial Aid from the payment period or period of enrollment.
that must be returned on behalf of a student. The institution must also provide
the student with consumer information regarding the results of a student’s with- Number of days completed = Percentage completed
drawal. Musicians Institute will continue to comply with state and institutional Number of days in period (rounding the third decimal place
refund policies in determining the amount of unearned tuition, as stated in your up if the fourth decimal place is
Enrollment Agreement and in the catalog. 5 or more)

Return of Title IV Provisions


All institutions participating in the Student Financial Aid (SFA) Programs are re- Return of Unearned SFA Program Funds
quired to use a statutory schedule to determine the amount of SFA Program The school must return the lesser of the amount of SFA program funds that
Funds a student has earned when he or she ceases attendance based on the the student does not earn or the amount of institutional cost that the student
payment period the student was in attendance. A payment period at this institu- incurred for the payment period multiplied by the percentage of funds that was
tion is the quarter. not earned.

Return of Title IV Procedures If the institution must return Federal funds received by students who withdraw
16
The Higher Education Amendments of 1998 generally require that if a recipient prior to completing the 60% of a given payment period, the student may owe the
of SFA Program assistance withdraws from school during a payment period in school for the portion of funds returned that the institution is otherwise entitled to
which the recipient began attendance, the school must calculate the amount of based on the school’s approved and applicable refund policy.
SFA Program assistance the student did not earn and those funds must be re-
turned. Up through the 60% point in each payment period, a pro rata schedule Return of Title IV worksheets are available upon request from the Financial Aid Office.
is used to determine how much SFA Program funds the student has earned at
the time of withdrawal. After the 60% point in the payment period, a student has
earned 100% of the SFA Program funds.

The percentage of the payment period completed is the total number of calendar
days* in the payment period for which the assistance is awarded divided into the num-
ber of calendar days* completed in that period as of the day the student withdrew.
TUITION AND FEES
Tuition and fees for all programs are charged on a quarterly basis and are due at the time of registration for each quarter of instruction. Students are not allowed to
enter MI facilities or attend classes until required tuition and fees are paid in full.

PROGRAMS TUITION

Performance (Bass, Guitar, Keyboards, Drums, Voice) per credit per quarter

Bachelor Degree $575 $64691


Associate Degree and Certificate $445 $6675
Non-certificate (Encore) N/A $7000

Recording and Music Industry Certificates



Audio Engineering $560 $8400
Independent Artist $430 $6450
Music Business $380 $5700
Guitar Craft $445 $6675
Music Video, Film and Television $415 $6225
17

1
Bachelor Degree tuition per quarter is based on an average music unit course load of 11.25 credits per quarter (135 total required music credits divided by 12
quarters). Actual tuition per quarter will vary depending on the number and cost per credit of General Education courses. General Education units are offered by
arrangement with Los Angeles City College. GE tuition rates vary according to student residency requirements. Contact MI’s Admissions Department or LACC for
current rates.
TUITION AND FEES
TUITION DEPOSIT Bachelor Degree Program
All programs, refundable, domestic students only $ 300 The quarterly cost of books and supplies is approximately $300 per quarter for
students enrolled in a full-time course of study. Actual costs vary depending on
FEES specific courses and credit loads.
Application fee (all programs, non-refundable) $ 100
COST OF LIVING
Materials fee (per quarter, all programs, non-refundable) $ 100 The cost of living while attending MI varies with each student’s personal needs.
Below are the maximum living expense budgets per quarter (3 months) for the
Equipment and software fees (per program, non-refundable) 2008-2009 Academic Year as prescribed the California Student Aid Commis-
sion. These costs are based on quarterly expenses. To arrive at a total cost
n Certificate in Audio Engineering $ 500* for your program, multiply the quarterly costs by the number of quarters in that
program:
n Artist Certificate (Independent Artist Program)
Equipment (computer and related hardware) $1000-2600** Student living at home with parents (per quarter):
Software $ 450* Tuition varies by program
Books & Supplies $ 546
*Fees may be waived if student already owns the required equipment and/or Food & Housing $1446
current registered versions of required software; contact Admissions Depart- Transportation $ 348
ment or Program Director for current specifications and other information Personal/Miscellaneous $1032
18
**Costs vary according to manufacturer prices and specific features. Total $3372

Student living off campus (per quarter):


Additional Fees Tuition varies by program
n Late Registration Fee $ 100 Books & Supplies $ 546
n Rescheduled Test Fee $ 20 per test Food $1158
n Re-Application or Change of Program Fee $ 50 Housing $2466
n Credit by Examination/Test Out Fee $ 40 per course Transportation $ 390
n Lost or Renewed Student ID Card Fee $ 10 Personal/Miscellaneous $ 942
n Transcript Request Fee $ 10 Total $5502

Course-Related Fees Students are advised that the tuition and fee information contained in this
Some courses require additional fees for supplies and/or equipment. Course- catalog is subject to change. Please contact the Admissions Department or
related fees must be paid at the time of Registration. Courses with related fees refer to catalog addenda to confirm tuition and fee charges in effect at the time
are noted under Course Descriptions. Fees may change without notice; current of enrollment.
information will be provided at the time of registration.

Books and Supplies


Book and supply lists are available during the Registration period in the Regis-
tration Office. Most books and supplies not covered by materials or equipment
fees may be purchased from MI’s Players Supply store located adjacent to Musi-
cians Institute.
POLICIES
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND DEFINITIONS than three consecutive weeks without an approved Leave of Absence will result
in termination from the program.
Academic Calendar
Excused Absences
All degree and certificate programs operate on a year-round quarterly academic
Students are expected to attend every class for which they are registered. All
calendar, with each quarter consisting of ten weeks of classes and one week of
requests for excused absences must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office for
testing followed by two weeks of break.
review by a panel made up of the Registrar and the Director of Education. The
Academic Honesty panel has sole discretion to grant or deny requests based on consistent treat-
All students have an obligation to behave honorably and respect the highest eth- ment of all students. Examples of reasons for excused absences, which must
ical standards in carrying out their academic assignments. Academic dishonesty be documented and are subject to review by the panel, include:
is defined as any form of cheating and/or plagiarism. In cases where academic
dishonesty or falsification of academic information is proven to have occurred, 1. Jury or military duty
students will receive a failing grade in the course and are subject to additional 2. Extenuating circumstances (medical, family emergency etc.)
disciplinary actions up to and including termination from the program.
Excused absence requests must be submitted with accompanying documen-
Academic Probation tation within two (2) school days after returning to classes. The maximum
Satisfactory Academic Progress is reviewed quarterly and students showing a number of excused absences per quarter is five (5).
cumulative GPA of less than 2.0 are placed on Probationary Warning status. A
cumulative GPA of less than 2.0 for two consecutive quarters results in the stu- Audit Status
dent being placed on Official Academic Probation status. A continued cumulative Attendance by students in courses for which they are not registered for credit is 19
GPA of less than 2.0 for three consecutive quarters results in loss of Financial not permitted except under the following circumstances: (1) during the drop-add
Aid funding and termination from the program. period as described under “Auditing”; (2) students enrolled in specific courses
within the Encore Program (non-certificate training in music); or (3) qualified em-
Advanced Placement ployees of Musicians Institute or authorized affiliates (see Employee Handbook
See “Testing Out” for qualifications and restrictions).

Appeals Auditing
A student has the right to appeal any change in status or grades that may af- Auditing (attendance by full or part-time students in classes for which they have
fect his or her ability to graduate. All appeals must be made in writing (Appeal not registered and paid tuition) is permitted only during the first two weeks of
Forms are available in the Registrar’s Office) and submitted to the Education each quarter for the purpose of determining if a student wants to officially regis-
Department for review by the Education Department Committee, consisting of ter. After the second week, auditing is not permitted.
the Director of Education, Registrar, relevant Department Heads and faculty.
Appeals and requests for probation extension will be considered based on the Cancellation of Enrollment
extenuating circumstances of the appeal, past student performance and student Degree and Certificate Programs
commitment and potential. BUYERS RIGHT TO CANCEL: The student has the right to cancel the Student
Enrollment Agreement and receive a full tuition refund, less the application fee,
Attendance Requirements by submitting a written notice of cancellation to Musicians Institute’s Student Re-
Regular attendance is required and recorded in all classes and lessons and is cords Office prior to the first day of instruction. The written notice of cancellation
factored into final grades. Students who show poor classroom or private lesson becomes effective as of the date of the postmark. Written notice of cancellation
attendance will be contacted and counseled by an Academic Advisor. Continued should be sent to: Musicians Institute, Registrar’s Office, 6752 Hollywood Bou-
absence from a class may result in a failing grade for that class (see the course levard, Hollywood, California 90028.
syllabus for specific information on attendance). Absence from school for more
POLICIES
If a student attends the first day of a course of instruction and withdraws, by sub- Course Repetition
mitting a written notice of cancellation to Musicians Institute’s Registrar before A student receiving a final grade below C- (70) in a required course will be al-
midnight of the first day of instruction, he or she will receive a complete tuition lowed to appeal, and upon approval, re-take the final exam one time for a fee
refund within thirty (30) days of cancellation, less the application fee. (see Appeals). If the student successfully raises the course grade to a passing
level, credit will be awarded. All passing grades on retaken tests will be recorded
Encore Program (Non-Certificate) only as C- (70). Students failing the re-test will be required to take the course
An applicant may cancel his or her enrollment in writing any time before the again; full tuition will be charged and normal grading standards will apply. A
commencement of classes. Written notice of cancellation should be sent to: Mu- student who has passed a course and earned credit may not re-take the same
sicians Institute, Registrar’s Office, 6752 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, Cali- course for additional credit unless the catalog course description states “may be
fornia 90028. All money paid to Musicians Institute will be refunded within thirty repeated for credit”. A student may re-take a course for a higher grade without
(30) days of cancellation, less the application fee. Remember, an applicant must receiving additional credit. Full tuition will be charged, only the highest grade will
cancel in writing, not by telephoning or by not coming to class. be factored into the GPA, and the units re-taken will be counted toward the total
number of units attempted in the program.
Challenging Courses
See “Testing Out”
Credit Unit
Changing Programs A unit of measurement indicating the quarterly academic weight given to a par-
Students who wish to change their course of study from one program to an- ticular course (e.g. Harmony & Theory IA = 1.5 credit units). Each quarter-credit
other before completing their current program must: hour represents three hours of work in the subject per week for ten weeks (30
1. Withdraw from their current program at the Registrar’s Office hours total) including a combination of contact hours and independent course-
20 2. Pay a re-application fee work. Credit for a given course is only awarded with the achievement of a pass-
3. Apply to the new program through the Admissions Department ing grade.
4. Audition for the new program (where applicable)
5. If accepted, register for the new program and pay all applicable tuition Dropping or Adding Courses
and fees Students are allowed to drop or add any class without fees or penalties by sub-
Transfer of credits from one program to another will be determined on a case- mitting a Drop-Add form to the Registrar before the third class meeting of the
by-case basis during registration. quarter (or the first class meeting of the third week in the case of classes that
meet twice per week).
Class Standing
Class standing is determined by the number of credits completed toward Drop-Add Period
graduation. Class standing is calculated as follows: The period of time at the beginning of each quarter during which students may
drop or add classes without late registration penalties. The drop-add period for
Freshman 0-45 credits
each course begins on the first day of the quarter and ends before the third class
Sophomore 46-90 credits
meeting (or fifth class meeting, in the case of classes meeting twice per week).
Junior 91-135 credits
Senior 136-180 credits
Tuition and refunds
To complete the BM degree within three calendar years or an AA degree within 1. Credits added to the schedule will be charged at the applicable tuition rate.
18 months, students must successfully complete an average of 15 credit units 2. Full tuition will be refunded for credits dropped during the Drop-Add
per quarter of continuous enrollment (including General Education credits). period. Fifty percent (50%) of tuition will be refunded for classes
dropped after the third-week class meeting but before the fourth
Core Classes week. No tuition will be refunded for classes dropped from the
Courses required for all students attending a given program. All core classes fourth week on.
must be passed in order to meet overall degree or certificate requirements.
POLICIES
Withdrawals and cancellations Less-Than-Half-Time Status
1. Withdrawals after the end of the Drop-Add period but before the n Less than 6 units per quarter
seventh- week class meeting will appear on the student’s transcript as a “W”. n Only available to students requiring less than six (6) units to complete
2. Withdrawals after the seventh-week meeting will be assigned a grade a program.
based on course requirements met up to that point. n Students on Less-Than-Half-Time Status will only have access to
3. Under-enrolled courses are subject to cancellation at any time before facilities during those hours when their scheduled classes are in session.
the third-week class meeting with full tuition refund to enrolled students.
Notification of schedule changes Grading Policies
1. Financial Aid recipients must notify the Financial Aid Office of any The following grading standards will be applied to all credit unit requirements:
schedule changes.
2. International students must notify the International Student Advisor of Grade Score GPA
any schedule changes. A+ 98-100 4.00
A 93-97 3.70
Electives A- 90-92 3.50
Courses other than core requirements chosen by the student from an ap- B+ 87-89 3.30
proved course offering. In programs with elective requirements, students must B 83-86 3.00
complete the total number of required elective credits with a passing grade in B- 80-82 2.70
order to receive the degree or certificate. C+ 77-79 2.30
C 73-76 2.00
Enrollment Status C- 70-72 1.70 (lowest passing grade) 21
Full-Time Status D+ 67-69 1.30
n 12 or more credit units attempted per quarter D 63-66 1.00
n Completion of an average of 15 credits per quarter is required to D- 60-62 0.70
complete programs within the specified time frames F 0-59 0.00
n Students wishing to reduce their course load below 15 units must P Pass
apply in writing to the Registrar. A minimum of 12 credit units is I Incomplete
required to maintain full-time status. W Withdrawal
n Baccalaureate students must maintain full-time status until they have NC No Credit
completed 90 credit units (see “Part-Time Status” below). NR No Record

Three-Quarter and Half-Time Status Grade Point


n Three-quarter-time status: 9-11 credit units attempted per quarter A number used to measure academic achievement in a credit unit course (4.0 =
n Half-time status: 6-8 credit units attempted per quarter A+, 0.0 = F). Grades are calculated based on a combination of factors that may
n Baccalaureate students who are in good academic standing after include attendance, participation, assignments and tests (see each course syl-
completing 90 credit units may be considered for Three-quarter or labus for specific grading standards). All Core and Elective requirements must
Half-time Status be met with a grade of C- or better (1.7). Tuition will be charged for all repeated
n AA and Certificate students may apply for Three-quarter or Half-time courses.
Status only if they need less than twelve (12) units to complete
the program. Grade Point Average (GPA)
n Students who wish to be considered for Three-quarter- or Half-time An average of all grade points awarded for all courses attempted, calculated by
Status must receive approval from the Registrar. dividing the number of grade points by the number of units attempted. Students
enrolled in all programs are required to have earned a cumulative GPA of at
POLICIES
least 2.0 at the end of the third quarter for BM and AA students; at the end of the b. 30 music industry-emphasis credit units (Audio Engineering;
second quarter for Certificate in Performance students; and at the end of the first Guitar Craft; Music Business; Music Video, Film and Television;
quarter for all 30-unit, two-quarter Certificate program students. Students failing or Independent Artist)
to achieve minimum GPA requirements will be placed on probation and must cor- 2. Maintain minimum 2.0 GPA
rect the problem within a specified period of time to avoid possible termination. 3. Pay all tuition and fees

Grading Standards and Reporting Certificate in Performance


The Grade Point Average (GPA) will be used to measure a student’s satisfactory Bass, Guitar, Keyboard Technology, Drums, Voice
academic progress. This is calculated by dividing the number of grade points by 1. Complete 60 required credit units
the number of units attempted. A passing grade of C- (70) or better is required to 2. Maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA
earn credit in all core and elective course work. 3. Payment of all tuition and fees

Graduation Requirements Music Industry Certificates


Bachelor of Music in Performance (Contemporary Styles) Audio Engineering; Guitar Craft; Music Business; Music Video, Film and
Bass, Guitar, Keyboards, Drums, Voice Television; Independent Artist
1. Complete 180 required credit units, including 135 Major Area, 1. Complete 30 required credit units
Supportive Music and Elective credits and 45 General 2. Maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA
Education credits 3. Payment of all tuition and fees
2. Maintain minimum 2.0 GPA
22 Honors and Vocational Honors Status (AA-Guitar only)
3. Pay all tuition and fees
Associate of Arts (Guitar) students may qualify to graduate with Honors if they
Baccalaureate General Education Requirements complete program requirements with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.75. Hon-
Musicians Institute maintains an articulation agreement with Los Angeles City ors candidates must also earn a minimum of 50 live performance credits during
College (LACC) that provides for BM students to complete their General Edu- the last two quarters of the program. AA-Guitar students may also earn Voca-
cation requirements at the nearby LACC campus. MI also accepts accredited, tional Honors by meeting regular honors requirements and passing a special
college-level Liberal Arts credits from other schools that meet equivalent re- Vocational Jury at the end of the graduating quarter. To apply for Vocational
quirements. Students must submit an official academic transcript, which will be Honors, students must submit a “Vocational Honors Jury Petition” (available in
evaluated on a case-by-case basis by the Dean and Registrar. A total of 45 GE the Registrar’s Office) by Friday, Week 9 of the graduating quarter. After review,
quarter units or 30 semester units are required for graduation. Courses that are students who are accepted will be assigned a Jury appointment.
transferred in semester credit units from other institutions will be translated into
quarter units by the Registrar’s Office.
Incomplete (I)
In special and unusual circumstances, a student may request a grade of Incom-
plete, designated by the letter I. Students must petition the relevant instructor
Associate of Arts in Performance
for the grade of Incomplete before the end of the ninth week of the quarter and
Bass, Guitar, Keyboard Technology, Drums, Voice
the instructor must approve the petition before the end of the quarter (Incomplete
1. Complete 90 required credit units
Petition forms are available in the Registrar’s Office). An incomplete will be is-
2. Maintain minimum 2.0 GPA
sued only if the student is making satisfactory progress in the course and due
3. Pay all tuition and fees
to unforeseen, justifiable, and documented reasons including but not limited to
a personal emergency, an illness or a documented family emergency, has not
Associate of Arts in Performance (Combined Emphases)
been able to complete all necessary course work before grades are established.
1. Complete 90 required credit units, including:
All other work must be completed and up to date, with only the final project or
a. 60 instrument-emphasis credit units (Bass, Guitar, Keyboard
examination remaining incomplete. All incomplete course work must be made up
Technology, Drums, or Voice)
before the end of the second week of the following quarter unless an extension is
POLICIES
granted due to verifiable injury or illness. When course work is completed to the LPW Credits
instructor’s satisfaction, a grade will be issued to replace the “I” on the student Written confirmation from an LPW instructor of a performance in a specific LPW
transcript. Failure to complete the course work within the maximum allotted time or performance class. All students enrolled in LPWs for credit must receive at
will result in a grade of “F” replacing the incomplete. An incomplete on a prereq- least ten individual, signed LPW Credits per quarter.
uisite course must be resolved before the student can enroll in a class requiring
that course as a prerequisite. LPW Log
The form for recording LPW Credits. LPW course credit is only earned each
Leaves of Absence (LOA) quarter after turning in a Performance Log to the Registrar’s Office with a mini-
Students who find they have to take a Leave of Absence (LOA) must submit a mum of ten signed LPW Credits.
written request to the Registrar. The request must be mailed or personally deliv-
ered to the Registrar, 6752 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, California, 90028. Maximum Allowable Units
The request should contain the student’s expected date of return. Students who fail to complete a program before reaching the maximum allowable
number of units attempted will be terminated from the program. Units counted as
Mid-quarter Leave of Absence units attempted per evaluation period include units transferred into the program,
Students who expect to be absent from school for more than five consecutive units completed, courses receiving letter grades of D or F, and courses desig-
days of classes during a quarter must file a mid-quarter Leave of Absence. The nated on the transcript as I, W, NC, and NR. The maximum allowable number of
maximum length of a mid-quarter LOA is three weeks. Students must return in units that may be attempted for each program is:
time to complete all coursework and take final exams. Students who must leave
mid-quarter and cannot return within three weeks must withdraw and repeat their Bachelor of Music: 270 units
current quarter from the beginning when they return. Tuition will be charged for Associate of Arts: 135 units 23
the portion of the quarter completed before leaving and for the entire repeated Certificate in Performance: 90 units
quarter upon their return. 30-unit (two-quarter) Certificate Programs: 45 units

End-of-quarter Leave of Absence Minimum Unit Completion Requirements


The maximum length of an end-of-quarter LOA is 180 calendar days. End-of- To maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress, all students must complete ((i.e.
quarter LOA is only granted to students who complete the entire quarter in- pass with a grade of C- or above) a minimum number of units within a certain
cluding final exams and are maintaining satisfactory academic progress before period of time depending on their program and enrollment status. Minimum unit
beginning the LOA. Students may take only one LOA during the length of a completion requirements for each program and status are listed below.
program. Students on Leave of Absence are not qualified to receive Financial
Aid during the Leave. Any student who has received a Federal Stafford Loan Bachelor of Music and Associate of Arts Degrees
and takes a six-month leave of absence will enter the grace period and/or begin The minimum unit completion requirement per academic year (three quarters)
repayment on their loan because the six-month leave exceeds the Federal gov- for each enrollment status is as follows:
ernment’s 120-day maximum for an approved leave of absence. n Full-time (12 or more units per quarter): 30 units
n Three-quarter time (9-11 units per quarter): 23 units
Students receiving Federal financial aid n Half-time (6-8 units per quarter): 15 units
See also “Satisfactory Academic Progress”. n Less than half time (less than 6 units per quarter):: 3 units
n Mixed enrollment: see the Financial Aid office for your
LPW (Live Playing Workshop) minimum unit requirement
Workshops where students from different instrument programs perform stylistic
repertoire or original material in an ensemble setting with instructor supervision.
LPWs are a core requirement in some programs. LPW offerings vary somewhat;
see a current course offering for a list of LPWs offered during a given quarter.
POLICIES
Certificate in Performance ter, the student submits the Log to the Student Records office; a minimum of ten
The minimum unit completion requirements per two-quarter reporting period for separate Open Counseling signatures are required to earn course credit.
each enrollment status is as follows:
n Full-time (12 or more units per quarter): 20 units Pass (P), No Credit (NC)
n Three-quarter time (9-11 units per quarter): 15 units Some course credits are earned by requirements other than grades (see “Test
n Half-time (6-8 units per quarter):
Out”). The status of these courses is designated on your transcript as either P
10 units
(Pass: course requirements met and credit earned) or NC (No Credit: course
n Less than half time (less than 6 units per quarter): 2 units
requirements not met and credit not earned). These designations do not affect
n Mixed enrollment: see the Financial Aid office for your
your GPA, but any required course receiving “No Credit” must be passed in or-
minimum unit requirement der to complete your degree or certificate.
30-unit (two-quarter) Certificate Programs
The minimum unit completion requirement every quarter for each enrollment
Probation
status is as follows:
See “Academic Probation”
n Full-time (12 or more units per quarter): 10 units
n Three-quarter time (9-11 units per quarter): 7 units Registration
n Half-time (6-8 units per quarter): 4 units All students are required to register for classes prior to every quarter of enroll-
n Less than half time (less than 6 units per quarter): 1 unit ment. All registration procedures are coordinated through the Registrar’s Office.
n Mixed enrollment: see the Financial Aid office for your The following rules apply to all students, whether new or returning:
minimum unit requirement 1. No students will be permitted to register after the close of business on
Monday of the third week of classes.
24 No Credit (NC) 2. All tuition and fees are due and payable at registration (see “Tuition
See “Pass/No Credit”
and Fees” for more information about costs and payment options)
No Record (NR) 3. Students will not be permitted to enter MI facilities until required tuition
The letters ‘NR’ on the transcript indicate that there is no record of a final grade on and fees have been paid.
file in the Registrar’s Office. This indication is for administrative purposes only and New Students
is changed to the appropriate letter grade once the issue has been resolved. Permission to register for classes is granted to new students (and continuing
students beginning a new program) only if they have been processed through
Open Counseling
the Admissions Office and have completed placement testing where applicable
Weekly, informal, drop-in sessions during which instructors share their expertise,
(see Academic Calendar for dates). Instructions and materials for registration
expand on ideas presented in class, and jam or otherwise work with individual
will be made available at the times designated for new student registration.
students or small groups. Students may take open counseling as a for-credit
elective or participate on a voluntary basis. Continuing Students
All continuing students are required to register for classes for their next quarter during
Open Counseling Credits
the ninth week of their current quarter. Continuing students who register after the end
Written confirmation (on an Open Counseling Log) from an open counseling in-
of the re-registration period will be assessed a late registration fee (see Tuition & Fees).
structor of a student’s participation in an open counseling session. Open Coun-
Failure to officially confirm attendance for the next quarter will result in courses and les-
seling Credits are only required for students taking Open Counseling as a for-
sons (where applicable) being dropped from those students’ schedules.
credit elective with a minimum attendance of ten sessions per quarter.

Open Counseling Log Rescheduled Testing


The form recording open counseling credits for students taking Open Counsel- Students requesting special testing arrangements outside of the normal testing
ing as an elective. After attending each session, the student obtains the Open period must submit a written request to the Registrar in advance and obtain
Counseling instructor’s signature confirming attendance. At the end of the quar- teacher and Department Head approval, which will be considered on a case-by-
POLICIES
case basis. Following approval, rescheduled testing will be coordinated through Student Forms Deposit
the Registrar’s Office and a fee will be charged for each test given. Secure receptacles are provided in the main MI building (1655 N.McCadden
Place, Hollywood, CA 90028) for the deposit of forms, address cards, perfor-
Rhythm Section Workshop mance logs etc. during non-business hours. During business hours, all student
Instrument-specific ensemble workshop concentrating on the basic elements papers should be brought directly to the Registrar’s Office.
of rhythm section performance in different styles (required for Bass, Guitar and
Percussion AA and Certificate programs only). Student Records
Student records are kept on the premises for five years after graduation. The
Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) files are then transferred to Iron Mountain Record Management Company (1340
All students are required to meet minimum standards for Satisfactory Academic E.Sixth St., Los Angeles, CA 90021. 213.236.2940; fax 213.612.0003) where
Progress as reviewed in the following areas (refer to the respective headings in they are permanently stored and may be accessed within 24 hours. Students
this section of the catalog): may request copies of their academic transcript by submitting a request to Musi-
cians Institute, attention: Registrar, 6752 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA
1. Grade Point Average (GPA) 90028. The request must include the student’s full name (maiden name if ap-
2. Minimum Unit Completion Requirements plicable), Social Security number, program, date of attendance, and a transcript
3. Maximum Allowable Units fee of $10.00 per transcript payable to Musicians Institute (check or money order
Academic progress must be measured at the end of each academic year (three only). See “Students’ Right to Know” below for information regarding privacy of
quarters) or halfway through a program, whichever comes first. For BM and student records.
AA programs, progress is measured after the third quarter; Certificate in Perfor-
Termination from a Program
mance programs after the second quarter; and 30-unit (two-quarter) Certificate
A student may be terminated from a program for reasons including but not
25
Programs after the first quarter.
limited to the following:
Failure to Maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress 1. Violation of student conduct policies
Failure to meet minimum standards for SAP may result in academic probation, 2. Failure to pay tuition or fees
loss of financial aid, or termination from a program. Students will receive a writ- 3. Continuous absence from a program for three consecutive weeks
ten notice if they do not meet academic progress standards at the end of each 4. Three consecutive quarters of non-satisfactory academic progress
enrollment period. The notice will provide information on what steps must be (see “Satisfactory Academic Progress”)
taken to reinstate SAP.
Testing Out
For any student failing to maintain satisfactory academic progress, financial aid Students may receive credit for certain courses through advanced placement or
is suspended until the student: by challenging the requirements of a course for a fee (see Tuition & Fees). Stu-
dents wishing to test out of a course must pass an evaluation of their knowledge
1. corrects his or her academic status (e.g. has an incorrect grade changed) of course material with a minimum grade of A- (90%). Advanced placement tests
2. makes up the deficit (e.g. regains a 2.0 GPA) are allowed only before or during the normal Drop/Add period at the outset of
3. receives an approval of appeal the program for which the student has enrolled. In the case of sequential class-
es, prerequisite courses may not be skipped over via test-out once the original
Sequential Courses
placement has been determined. Students are not allowed to test out of courses
Certain sequential courses with closely related subject matter are labeled as:
previously taken and failed. If a student meets the requirements for testing out
“[course number] a.b.”, with “a” and “b” portions that are each one quarter in
length. Each quarter is treated as a complete course for the purpose of evalua- of a course, a designation of “P” (Pass) is entered on the transcript and course
tion and awarding of credit. Each “a” quarter is the prerequisite for the following credit is granted towards graduation requirements. Credits are counted toward
“b” quarter. Students who fail an “a” quarter may not enroll in the “b” quarter until units completed but are not factored into the GPA.
all “a” quarter course requirements have been met by re-testing or re-taking the
course (see Course Repetition for policies on re-testing and re-taking of courses)
POLICIES
Withdrawal from a Course (W) State of California Student Tuition Recovery Fund
The letter “W” on the transcript indicates that a student was permitted to with- The State of California created the Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF) to
draw from a course after the normal drop-add period, but within the first six relieve or mitigate economic losses suffered by California residents who were
weeks of classes. Withdrawals are not factored into the GPA. Students wishing students attending schools approved by, or registered to offer Short-term Career
to withdraw from a course after the normal drop/add period must apply in writing Training with the Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education
to the Registrar. Withdrawal from a course after the sixth week of classes is not (BPPVE).
permitted; students who stop attending a class after the sixth week will receive a
grade of “F” for that course, which will be factored into their GPA. The Registrar You may be eligible for STRF if you are a California resident, prepaid tuition,
notifies the Financial Aid Office of late withdrawals. paid the STRF fee, and suffered an economic loss as a result of any of the
following:
Withdrawal from a Program 1. The school closed before the course of instruction was completed.
A student who has completed sixty percent (60%) or less of his or her enrollment 2. The school’s failure to pay refunds or charges on behalf of a student
agreement has the right to withdraw from a program and receive a pro-rated to a third party for license fees or any other purpose, or to provide
refund (minus the Registration Fee and any charges for unreturned equipment equipment or materials for which a charge was collected within 180
or textbooks) by providing written notice to the Registrar. days before the closure of school.
1. The last day of refund (completion of 60% of quarterly enrollment) is 3. The school’s failure to pay or reimburse loan proceeds under a
Friday of the sixth week of instruction for that quarter. federally guaranteed student loan program as required by law or to
2. Any money owed to Musicians Institute is due and payable on the pay or reimburse proceeds received by the school prior to closure in
date of the withdrawal. excess of tuition and other costs.
26 3. A withdrawal is effective on the date it is received by the Registrar, 4. The school’s breach or anticipatory breach of the agreement for the
whether personally delivered or postmarked (if mailed). No course of instruction.
withdrawals will be accepted by telephone. 5. There was a decline in the quality of the course of instruction within
4. Any applicable refund will be issued within 30 days after the effective 30 days before the school closed, or if the decline began earlier
date of withdrawal. than 30 days prior to closure, a time period of decline determined by
5. Refunds are pro-rated based upon the last recorded date of atten the Bureau.
dance and calculated based on the length of the completed portion of 6. The school committed fraud during the recruitment or enrollment or
the quarter relative to its total length. No refunds will be issued after program participation of the student.
more than 60% of the quarter has been completed.
You may also be eligible for STRF if you were a student that was unable to
Sample of Refund Calculation: collect a court judgment rendered against the school for violation of the Private
If a student withdraws after Week Two of the Associate of Arts in Performance Postsecondary and Vocational Education Reform Act of 1989.
(Guitar) program, the refund is calculated as shown below: You must pay the state-imposed fee for the Student Tuition Recovery Fund
Total tuition cost $6675 (STRF) if all of the following applies to you:
Application fee $ 100 1. You are a student who is a California resident and prepays all or part
Materials fee $ 100 of your tuition either by cash, guaranteed student loans, or personal
Number of weeks completed 2 loans and
Tuition retained by College $1335 ($667.50 per week) 2. Your total charges are not paid by any third-party payer such as an
Registration fee retained by College $ 100 employer, government program or other payer unless you have a
Materials fee retained by College $ 100 separate agreement to repay the third party.
Total amount retained by College $1535
You are not eligible for protection from the STRF and you are not required to pay
Refund issued to student $5140
the STRF fee if either of the following applies:
1. You are not a California resident,
POLICIES
2. Your total charges are paid by a third party, such as an employer, n Physical abuse of people or property
government program or other payer, and you have no separate n Vandalism
agreement to repay the third party. n Arson
n Sabotage
For further information or instructions, contact: Bureau for Private and Post Secondary n
Carrying weapons of any kind
Vocational Education, 400 R St. Suite 5000, Sacramento, CA 95814; (916) 445-3427 n
Any other act a reasonable person would deem inappropriate
Student Conduct
Any student who receives a threat of violence by a student, teacher and/or mem-
RULES OF STUDENT CONDUCT ber of staff, and any student who hears, observes, reads or otherwise becomes
aware of a threat by any student, teacher and/or staff member on Musicians
Musicians Institute’s primary responsibility to students is to provide a safe and
Institute campus, whether such a threat is direct or implied, should report the
orderly environment in which they may pursue their educational goals. This re-
matter to the VP of Education and/or Director of Human Resources.
quires that students, teachers and staff foster an atmosphere of respect toward
each other and their surroundings. Guns, knives and other dangerous weapons are prohibited on Musicians Insti-
tute’s campus and parking facilities as well as at off-campus Musicians Institute-
Students are expected to abide by ordinary rules of responsible, courteous be-
sponsored events. This restriction supersedes any and all permits obtained
havior. Musicians Institute holds all students, teachers and staff responsible for
from any issuing authority which allows private citizens to possess, carry or
carrying out and monitoring compliance with this commitment. If you become
conceal guns or other weapons.
aware of any violation of an ethical or legal obligation, or any unfair or improper
treatment of a fellow student or teacher or staff member, you should report the All threats of violence are considered serious matters and will be thoroughly
matter immediately to the VP of Education and/or Human Resources so that it investigated. To the greatest extent possible, confidentiality will be maintained. 27
may be investigated and the appropriate action taken. By making it the respon-
sibility of all members of the MI community, including students, to take an active Musicians Institute may, at its discretion, file criminal charges against a violating
role in policing compliance with these ethical standards, we can continue to not student or assist another person in filing charges.
only maintain our creative environment, but our reputation in the community.
2. Alcohol and Illegal Substances
The following conduct is prohibited and will not be tolerated by Musicians Institute. Musicians Institute, in compliance with the Federal Drug-Free Schools and
This list is illustrative only; other types of conduct that threaten security, personal Communities Act Amendment of 1989, prohibits the use, possession, sale or
safety, staff or student welfare, or the School’s operations also may be prohibited: distribution of alcohol, narcotics, dangerous or illegal drugs or other controlled
substances as defined by California statutes on school property. Students may
VIOLATIONS OF POLICY obtain information pertaining to the health risks and effects associated with alco-
hol and narcotics or other dangerous or illegal drugs from the Student Services
Office. The Student Services Office will also assist in referring students to recov-
1. Intimidation, Threats, or Violent Acts
ery and/or treatment programs. Specific school policies prohibit:
Musicians Institute strives to maintain a safe environment free from intimidation, n Use, possession, sale, distribution and/or production of alcoholic

threats or violent acts. Students, teachers and staff are prohibited from engag- beverages, acting as an accessory, liaison, or facilitator for any of the
ing in violent acts or threats of violence of any sort while on Musicians Institute above except at a time, location and circumstance expressly
campus or during Musicians Institute-sponsored events. Any violation of this permitted by MI and government regulations
policy will constitute grounds for disciplinary action, up to and including suspen- n Public intoxication anywhere on MI’s premises or at functions spon
sion, expulsion and/or termination of employment. These acts include but are sored by or participated in by MI.
not limited to: n Illegal substances: Use, possession, sale, distribution, and/or
n Intimidating, threatening or hostile behavior production of narcotics or other controlled substances, including
n Stalking, whether carried out physically, by telephone, mail, electronic related paraphernalia, or acting as an accessory, liaison, or facilitator
mail or any other means or any of the above.
POLICIES
Disciplinary action for a violation of this policy can range from oral and written 6. Harassment
warnings up to and including suspension, expulsion and/or termination of em- Musicians Institute is committed to providing an educational environment free of
ployment, depending on the circumstances. harassment, which includes but is not limited to slurs, jokes, statements, emails,
gestures, pictures, or cartoons based on such factors as race, color, religion, national
Note: Responsibility is not diminished for acts in violation of MI rules and regu- origin, ancestry, age, physical disability, medical condition, marital status, sexual ori-
lations or other laws that are committed under the influence of alcohol or any entation, family care leave status, or veteran status as well as harassment based on
illegal drugs or controlled substances. gender, pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions.

3. Unauthorized Audio/Video Recording Sexual harassment in particular includes all these prohibited actions as well as
Students and visitors may not make any audio or video recording of any class, other unwelcome conduct such as stalking, requests for sexual favors, conver-
lesson, performance or other event on MI premises without the explicit permis- sation containing sexual comments, and unwelcome sexual advances.
sion of instructor(s), student(s) or any other individual whose visual or audio n Musicians Institute will not tolerate harassment of students by
representation is captured by the recording. Any permission granted extends to teachers, staff or other students.
personal use only; authorized audio/video recordings may not under any circum- n Musicians Institute will not tolerate harassment of teachers or staff
stances be distributed by any means, including free-access internet postings, by students.
without the specific written consent of MI management. Under no circumstances n Musicians Institute will also exercise its best efforts to protect
may students make audio/video recordings of visiting artists appearing on MI employees and students from harassment by non-employees while
premises. Violation of any part of this policy may result in disciplinary action up on school property.
to and including expulsion.
28 7. Health and Safety
4. Breach of Peace Conducting oneself in a manner that endangers or threatens the health and
Conduct that is disorderly, disruptive, lewd, or indecent as defined by laws, MI safety of oneself or others within the MI community.
management or its designees; aiding or abetting such behavior by another person
anywhere on MI’s premises or at functions sponsored by or participated in by MI. 8. Keys and Unauthorized Entry
Unauthorized or improper possession or duplication of keys to MI premises,
5. Computer Violations unauthorized or improper entry to or use of MI facilities.
Theft or other abuse of personal or MI computers including but not limited to:
n Unauthorized entry into a file to use, read, or change the contents or 9. Weapons and Explosives
for any other purpose. Possession of any type of firearm, BB or pellet gun, facsimile of a gun, switchblade
n Unauthorized transfer of a file. knives, bows and arrows, explosives, ammunition, dangerous chemicals, martial arts
n Unauthorized use of another individual’s identification or password. weapons, fireworks or any other weapons banned by law or considered dangerous
n Use of computers to interfere with the work of another student, faculty on MI premises or at events sponsored by or participated in by MI.
member, or school official.
n Use of computers, computer lines, or computing facilities to send 10. Property Damage, Vandalism, and Theft
n Destruction, damage, misuse and/or defacing of personal or public property.
obscene or illegal messages.
n Attempted or actual removal of property without the prior permission
n Use of computing facilities to interfere with normal operation of the
computing system (e.g. knowingly transmitting viruses). of the owner
n Unauthorized use of copyrighted material
Note: MI is not responsible for reimbursing or requiring others to reimburse
a student for destruction, damage, misuse, or theft of personal property. It is
5. Telephone Violations
strongly recommended that students obtain private insurance for their personal
Tapping telephone or cable lines, altering another’s phone message, harassing
possessions.
by telephone, unauthorized use of MI telephones or theft of telephone service.
POLICIES
11. Failure to Comply n Information obtained from interviews and investigations will be
Failure to comply with lawful directions of MI officials, including but not limited handled confidentially on a need-to-know basis. However, if information
to security guards, teachers, or administrative personnel acting in performance is learned that requires legal action, disclosure of this information may
of their duties. be required during the process.
n Musicians Institute management or its designees will review the
12. Failure to Provide Identification results of the investigation and determine the appropriate action.
Failure to identify oneself with appropriate identification when requested to do so n Results of the investigation will be handled confidentially on a
or providing false identification. need-to-know basis.
13. Violation of Law
Any violation of federal, state, or local laws on MI property or at events spon- Musicians Institute investigator(s) will make a reasonable effort to ensure that
sored by or participated in by MI. the complainant(s) and/or person(s) providing information are not exposed to
any threats of violence, intimidation or personal risk. If any such situations are
14. Loitering or Squatting
determined to have occurred, Musicians Institute will respond appropriately.
Use of any MI facilities as a domicile to sleep and/or store personal property or
for anything other than educational purposes.
Based on the investigation, the investigative team must determine whether the
15. Other Violations allegation(s) were founded, unfounded or inconclusive. This determination shall
Violation of any other published MI policies, rules, or regulations, including be documented in writing and made part of the investigative report.
those implemented during the academic year.
Where a violation is founded, the accused will be notified of the finding and the
REPORTING PROHIBITED CONDUCT specific or corrective remedial actions to be taken. For employees, the supervi- 29
Students, teachers and other Musicians Institute employees are obligated to sor of the accused will also receive notification as appropriate. No details about
report any incident of prohibited conduct to the Director of Education and/or Hu- the nature or extent of disciplinary or corrective actions will be disclosed to the
man Resources. complainant(s) and/or witness(es) unless there is a compelling reason (e.g.,
personal safety).
Every reported complaint of prohibited conduct or harassment will be investi-
gated thoroughly, promptly, and in a confidential manner. If prohibited conduct Resulting disciplinary action can include the following: verbal warning, written
is confirmed, Musicians Institute will discipline the offender, whether student, warning, temporary loss of specific privileges, permanent loss of specific privi-
teacher or staff. Disciplinary action for a violation of this policy can range from leges, suspension from access to the campus, expulsion and/or termination of
oral and written warnings up to and including suspension, expulsion and/or ter- employment.
mination of employment, depending on the circumstances.
In the event of an incident where Musicians Institute management considers
Musicians Institute prohibits retaliation, including but not limited to making any
there to be a significant safety risk to any students, teachers or staff, Musicians
threatening communication by verbal, written and/or electronic means, against
Institute reserves the right to immediately suspend the involved parties until the
any individual who reports and/or provides any information concerning unlawful
investigation provides reasonable assurances that students, teachers and staff
discrimination, harassment and/or other violations of MI policies, rules and stan-
are not in any danger.
dards of conduct. Any student or employee found engaging in retaliation will be
subject to disciplinary action up to and including suspension and/or termination
Musicians Institute will not refund tuition to students for lost privileges or lost
of employment.
access to MI’s campus and facilities or classes, tests, performances, lessons,
THE INVESTIGATIVE PROCESS appointments, or other activities and events resulting from a disciplinary action
In the event of a reported violation of this policy: except as required by State or Federal policies.

n All involved parties will be interviewed by Musicians Institute management


POLICIES
Student Rights Liability Disclaimer
Musicians Institute is licensed to operate in the State of California through the The Musicians Institute is not responsible for loss of, or damage to, personal
Bureau for Private Post-Secondary Vocational Education. If you have any com- property and/or personal injury that may occur while on the Institute’s premises
plaints, questions, or problems that you cannot resolve directly with the school,
please write or call: Students’ Right to Know
MI is committed to providing current and prospective students as well as the
Bureau for Private Post-Secondary Vocational Education campus community with full disclosure of all consumer information as required
400 R St. Suite 5000 by federal regulations. The laws are intended to allow students the opportunity
Sacramento, CA 95814 to make fully informed choices about the institution they wish to attend. Con-
916.445.3427 sumer information is available in the following locations:

Non-Discrimination Policy Safety on Campus


Musicians Institute is committed to creating and maintaining a community in Campus security information is provided to prospective students via mail in their
which all persons who participate in MI programs and activities can work togeth- acceptance package. Currently enrolled students receive notification in Decem-
er in an atmosphere free of all forms of harassment, discrimination, exploitation ber each year during Winter quarter re-registration. Additional information, in-
or intimidation on the basis of race, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, cluding the Crime Statistics Report, may be obtained by a visit or written request
disability or sex, including sexual harassment. It is the intention of MI to take to the Student Services Office.
whatever action may be needed to prevent, correct and if necessary, discipline
behavior that violates this policy. MI prohibits discrimination against members of Drug Free Schools and Community Act
30 the MI community by any student, staff, faculty or third-party contractors brought Drug and Alcohol abuse prevention information is given to all students at the time
on campus for the purpose of conducting business with MI. Discrimination of any of registration and is also available from the Admissions Department on request.
kind is against MI policy and is prohibited under state and federal laws.
Graduation Rate Information
Any student who believes that he or she has been the victim of sexual harass- Information on graduation and completion rates is sent to prospective students
ment or other discrimination should contact the Title IX Coordinator: via mail along with their acceptance letters. Currently enrolled students may
Director of Human Resources also request a hard copy from the Registrar’s Office.
6752 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, CA 90028 Financial Aid Information
323.860-1146 Information about financial aid that is not already provided in the current Course
Catalog may be obtained from the Financial Aid Office.
Note: a complete statement of the sexual harassment policy and procedure as
well as an Unlawful Sexual Harassment Complaint Form can be obtained in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
Student Services Office, the Registrar’s Office, or the Office of the Director of This act entitles students to specific privacy rights. Directory information (includ-
Human Resources. This form can be turned in to the Title IX Coordinator at the ing name, address, telephone number and certain school-related information)
address above. A student does not have to fill out the form to receive assistance, is publicly accessible unless the student specifically asks that it be blocked.
but can make verbal complaints directly to the Title IX Coordinator or other MI All other student records and information may only be provided to the student,
personnel. Complaints of illegal sexual harassment must be received within one a Musicians Institute employee, or representatives of Federal or State agen-
year of the date of the last alleged incident. Complaints to the Office of Civil cies, accrediting organizations, auditors, or other officials authorized under the
Rights at the Department of Education must be made within six months of the Act. FERPA information is mailed to prospective students with their acceptance
date of the last alleged incident. packages. Currently enrolled students may obtain FERPA information upon re-
quest from the Registrar’s Office.
STUDENT SERVICES
The Student Services Department provides students with resources and sup- Student Activities
port geared toward expanding their academic and personal development and For many students, moving to Los Angeles and committing to full-time study is a
increasing their enjoyment of school life. The Hollywood area offers an array major life decision. Students often travel a long way from home, leaving friends
of resources including museums, libraries, recording studios, film studios, the- and family behind, and the Student Services Department makes every effort to
aters, and clubs that combine to create an exciting social, cultural, educational create a comfortable social environment for them while they’re here. Studies
and professional atmosphere. The Student Services staff helps put students in take a great deal of concentration and effort, but it’s also very important for stu-
touch with these resources as well as providing assistance in areas such as dents to maintain a balanced social and emotional life. For this reason, MI offers
academics, housing, health, and personal issues. Student Services include: a variety of interesting extra-curricular activities including concerts, seminars,
clinics, movies, social events, entertainment discounts and other ways to make
Housing Services life at MI fun as well as productive.
Musicians Institute’s Housing Services department assists students and their
parents in locating safe, comfortable, affordable and accessible off-campus Academic Tutoring and Personal Counseling
housing. MI does not own or operate student housing, but Housing Services MI’s programs are fast-paced and students sometimes may begin to feel over-
manages a vacancy listing service for housing in a variety of locations at dif- whelmed with the challenge of managing their time and priorities. MI is commit-
ferent price levels.* The Student Housing Guide provides information and as- ted to providing maximum support to all students as they progress toward their
sistance regarding apartment rentals, rental agreements, renters’ rights, finding educational, musical and professional goals and the Student Services Office
roommates, budgeting for food, utilities, telephone services, where to shop, and provides tutoring and personal counseling for any student who needs it. For
how to get around the city. For students living in the Hollywood area, MI’s nightly students who are experiencing academic difficulties in any core class, Student
Shuttle Service offers free transportation after a late night of classes, practice or Services assigns students to tutors in either group or private sessions on the
31
rehearsal. More information on all of these services may be obtained by con- recommendation of a core class or private instructor. Any student who feels
tacting Housing Services or an Admissions Representative. that he or she needs tutoring in a core subject may pick up a tutoring request
form in the Student Services office, take it to the class or private instructor for
*Housing information is provided as a courtesy to students and for reference approval, and return it to Student Services for scheduling. Progress is evaluated
only. Musicians Institute has no affiliation with any landlord or property owner. on an individual basis and students may receive additional sessions as needed.
MI does not investigate, endorse or guarantee information provided by third par- If personal issues begin to interfere with a student’s ability to maintain progress
ties. All agreements or contractual arrangements related to housing rental or in school, the Student Services Office can also arrange an appointment with a
leases are strictly between the student or other responsible party and the prop- professional psychologist at no cost to the student.
erty owner or landlord.
STUDENT SERVICES
The mission of the Artist and Career Services Department (ACS) is to keep Hiring Hall
students informed of the many professional opportunities available in the music MI’s weekly audition showcase brings top signed artists seeking talent into
industry, to help prepare them to take advantage of these opportunities, and to school on a weekly basis. Audition opportunities are open to all students and
make the transition from student to working professional as smooth as possible. are advertised to the student body through the Musicians Referral Service. Past
ACS assists in obtaining internships and professional placement for both stu- auditions* have been held by artists as diverse as Korn, Ashlee Simpson, Macy
dents and graduates*. Among other benefits, the office maintains a list of record- Gray, Avril Lavigne, The Smashing Pumpkins, The Offspring, Gwen Stafani,
ing and rehearsal facilities, local clubs, management and promotional agencies, Lauryn Hill, NIN, Rob Thomas, Hilary Duff, Maroon 5, Life House, Hoobastank,
major and independent labels, and other establishments and services that are Missy Elliot, Billy Howerdel, Finch, Rockstar Supernova, Derek Sherinian, and
important to music professionals. Liz Phair.

Musicians Referral Service (MRS) *MI cannot guarantee future auditions for any specific artist, and the outcome
The Musicians Referral Service, MI’s online talent resource, is an exclusive ser- of auditions is entirely beyond MI’s control.
vice for current and former students. MRS receives frequent calls from band-
leaders, managers, potential music students, producers, booking agents, A&R Career Preparation Seminars
representatives, and studio managers who require the services of trained musi- A variety of career-related workshops and seminars are offered by the ACS de-
cians and engineers. When students first enroll at MI they automatically qualify partment throughout the year. Students and alumni are encouraged to participate
to join, and as members can post a player profile including mp3 links, photos in as many programs as possible to enhance their career development process.
and a resume to the MRS online database. Members also gain access to online
job boards, an MRS-exclusive search engine and a community forum. Gig op- Audition Workshops
32
portunities are posted weekly on MRS job boards on the website and in school. Audition workshops are held weekly and cover the fundamental techniques nec-
Listings range from paying gigs to original bands showcasing for record labels essary for students to gain a competitive edge. Typically, students prepare mate-
to signed artists auditioning or replacing band members. For audio engineers, rial for a mock audition and their performance critiqued by the instructor.
opportunities range from intern and runner positions to first engineer jobs in both
audio and post-production facilities. You may also receive referrals for teaching Career Counseling
and other musical opportunities in the LA area and beyond. All students are Private career counseling appointments are available to all MI students. Stu-
highly encouraged to join MRS while enrolled, and the contacts and networking dents meet one-on-one with industry professionals who provide individual ad-
opportunities remain equally important in the years after graduation–many of vice on career options and effective preparation.
MI’s success stories have come about because former students stayed in touch
with each other and MI*. Information about registration is available at www.mrs. Internships
mi.edu. The ACS Internship program allows MI students to gain first-hand experience
within the music industry by interning for a music- related company. Positions
*MI does not guarantee or imply that professional employment will result from vary according to availability but typically include music publishers, manage-
registering with the Musicians Referral Service or from enrolling in, attending, ment companies, record labels, and marketing and promotion firms.
or completing any MI program. MI reserves the right to alter the features of or
to interrupt or cancel operation of the Musicians Referral Service at any time
Job Fairs
without prior notice.
ACS coordinates several career fairs each year to bring together students and em-
ployers within the music industry, giving students a chance to meet face-to-face with
prospective employers and participate in on-campus interviews and auditions.
FACILITIES
Musicians Institute’s central Hollywood campus includes facilities devoted to a visiting artists as well as for student performances and workshops. The Concert
variety of programs and purposes: Hall is also equipped for professional video and audio production with concert
lighting, dual large-screen projectors, Digidesign Icon console, Carvin PA ampli-
Main Complex (Performance, Recording, and Film Classrooms, Lesson/Prac- fiers and speaker enclosures, and a variety of top-of-the-line guitar and bass
tice Rooms and Studios): 1655 N. McCadden Place; one block south of Hol- amplifiers.
lywood Boulevard and one block east of Highland Avenue. The 65,000 square-
foot main complex is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week except holidays. Performance Rooms (140/145/155/160)
Four 1000-square foot performance rooms, each seating up to 50 people, are
Hollywood Passage (Administration, Performance, Recording Lab): 6752 Hol- fully equipped for Live Performance Workshops. Each room contains a complete
lywood Boulevard, ½ block east of Highland Avenue. Carvin PA system and various guitar and bass amplifiers, keyboards and drum
set.
Hawthorn Annex (Administration, Classrooms, Recording Lab): 1621 N. Mc-
Cadden Place; one block south of Hollywood Boulevard and one block east of Passage Performance Center
Highland Avenue (opposite the Main Building entrance) The Passage is a 125-person capacity live performance/classroom facility lo-
cated adjacent to Hollywood Boulevard. Glass doors may be opened to allow
Highland Annex (Classrooms, Lesson/Practice Rooms): 1622 N. Highland Av- listeners to sit either indoors or out. The Passage stage is fully equipped with
enue; one block south of Hollywood Boulevard on the corner of Hawthorn Carvin PA, guitar and bass amplifiers, keyboards and drum kit.
.
Music Business Annex (Classrooms): 1518 N. Highland Avenue, one-half RECORDING AND PRODUCTION FACILITIES
block north of Sunset Boulevard.
33
MI’s extensive recording facilities, ranging from top-of-the-line professional stu-
dios to project studios and recording classrooms, include industry-standard re-
Kodak Annex (Classrooms, Performance): 6801 Hollywood Blvd Suites 219, cording and mixing systems complimented by an extensive array of professional
221, 223 (within the Hollywood & Highland/Kodak Theater complex). microphones and outboard gear.

Guitar Craft Academy (Classrooms, Workshops, CAD/CAM Classroom): 7070 Recording Studios
Santa Monica Blvd at the corner of La Brea. Studio A: “Tommy Tedesco Studio”
Named after the king of LA session musicians, Studio A features a large tracking
Guitar Craft Academy Annex (Classrooms, Workshops): 6920 Santa Monica room for live band recording, an SSL 4000G+ Series 36-channel analog console
Boulevard, 1 ½ blocks west of Highland Avenue. and ProTools HD 2 192 interface, 24 I/O digital audio recording system and Otari
MTR 90 2” analog reel-to-reel recorder.
MI’s Main Complex entrance is located on the alley between Hawthorn Avenue
and Hollywood Boulevard, behind the Hollywood Passage. Parking is available
Studio B
nearby at daily and monthly rates. Metered and street parking are also available.
RIT students learn the art of audio production in this 5.1 Surround Mixing/Editing
Busses and the Metro Red Line subway stop nearby. MI provides students with
Suite outfitted with a Pro Tools HD 2 192 interface, Triton keyboard, MPC 1000,
a free evening shuttle service to nearby apartments.
Avalon 747, Manley Stereo Compressor, Vinyls and Turntable, and a host of
high-end plug-ins.
LIVE PERFORMANCE FACILITIES
Studio C
Main Concert Hall Students track, mix and learn automation on the classic NEVE Vx “Flying Faders”
With a capacity of 500 in fixed theater seating and a stage area of 900 square 36-channel analog console and Protools HD 2 system with three 96 interfaces.
feet plus backstage area, the Concert Hall is used for concerts and seminars by
FACILITIES
Studio D each equipped with Protools Digi002R, Waves Gold Bundles, Reason, Line 6
Features a custom-made “Baby SSL” 4000G+ Series 8-channel analog console Bass and Guitar Pod Pro amp modelers and KORG Triton Keyboards.
and Protools Digi002 digital audio system for tracking and mixing.
Digital Audio Lab (CS202)
Studio E Audio engineering students learn digital recording techniques on Mac worksta-
RIT students are introduced to the world of film and television post-production tions with Protools Mbox-2 A/D interfaces.
in this world-class THX-Certified dubbing stage equipped with a 48-channel
Digidesign ICON D-Control console and Pro Tools HD 3 recording system. Recording Techniques Lab (281)
Audio engineering lab containing Mac workstations equipped with Protools
Independent Artist Program Studios Mbox-2 A/D interfaces, Reason, Oxygen 8 MIDI controllers, Line 6 Bass and
Studio 01 Guitar Pod Pro amp modelers.
Multi-purpose studio with isolated tracking and mix rooms equipped with DW
drum kit, Neumann, Bock and AKG microphones as well as outboard gear from Music Video/Film Editing Lab
Avalon, API, Chandler Ltd. and Apogee. Production and digital editing classroom/lab featuring Mac G5/Final Cut Pro
workstations and Final Cut HD online editing system.
Studio 02
Multi-purpose studio with Neumann and Shure microphones and outboard gear Keyboard Workstation Labs
from Avalon and Universal Audio. Keyboard students have access to three rooms containing multiple Mac G5/
34 Logic Audio-equipped digital audio workstations for class assignments and proj-
Studio 03 ect development.
Production/mixing studio equipped with Neumann and Shure microphones,
Avalon channel strip, Yamaha Motif and Akai MPC Sampler. CLASS/REHEARSAL FACILITIES
MI’s instrument and vocal programs are taught in dual-use facilities that function
Studio 04 as classrooms during the day and student rehearsal rooms during evenings and
Production studio equipped with Dynaudio monitors, Waldorf synthesizer and weekends. Most are equipped with guitar, bass and keyboard amps, drum kits,
88-key weighted midi controller. PAs and audio playback systems. In addition to eight general-use classrooms on
the Main Complex third floor, one on the second floor and three in the Highland
Instrument Program Studios (Bass, Guitar, Keyboards, Drums, Voice) Annex, some classrooms are customized to fit the needs of specific programs:
Each of these dedicated studios is designed to train students in the art and tech-
nique of studio performance. Each studio is equipped with a Mac G5, Protools Voice: Kodak Annex
and/or Logic Audio and related hardware, software and outboard gear. Two classrooms with stage lighting, guitar and bass amps, keyboard and amp,
drum kit, PA system, and a 7’x 20’ mirror for practicing performing techniques.
Audio Labs
Passage Audio Lab Keyboards: CL240, 245
Located in the Hollywood Passage adjacent to Hollywood Boulevard, this digital Keyboard teaching/practice facilities include two main classrooms with 32 stu-
audio lab contains 31 Mac audio workstations, Pro Tools audio software, key- dent keyboard stations, video-assisted instructor stations, and audio systems.
boards and external hardware.
Percussion: CR370, 375, 380
Music Production Lab (102) Percussion-specific class/rehearsal rooms contain customized padded tables
An audio engineering recording/teaching/lab facility featuring Mac workstations, for group drum instruction.
FACILITIES
COUNSELING/PRACTICE FACILITIES The Green Room
Located on Hollywood Boulevard adjacent to the Passage, The Green Room is
Guitar, Bass, Keyboards one of Hollywood’s favorite cafes, offering light meals, discounted coffee, and
35 general-purpose counseling/practice labs are equipped with various combi- other refreshments to MI students as well as the general public.
nations of guitar and bass amplifiers, keyboards and other specialized equip-
ment. All counseling labs are used for private or open counseling instruction Vending Area
during scheduled hours and are otherwise available for student practice. Located on the first floor, the Vending Area houses machines supplying soft
drinks, light snacks and coffee as well as change machine, microwave and pub-
Voice lic telephone.
The 15 vocal labs are each equipped with a computer offering access to hun-
dreds of backing tracks as well as a singing machine, keyboard, and mirror. ADMINISTRATION
Most of MI’s administrative offices are housed in the Hollywood Passage build-
Drums ing, including Student Services, Education, Registration, Admissions, Financial
There are six drum counseling labs, each containing two complete drum kits Aid, Accounting, Human Resources, and Marketing/Promotion. The Artist and
for private and group counseling during the day and individual practice in the Career Services Department is housed in the Hawthorn Annex on Hawthorn
evening. 45 private drum labs are assigned to students for practice. Each lab Avenue across from the main MI building.
contains a drum set (students supply their own pedals, cymbals, and clutch) and
student lockers. SPECIAL FACILITIES AND SERVICES AVAILABLE TO
HANDICAPPED STUDENTS (MAIN BUILDING) 35
ADDITIONAL FACILITIES First Floor:
Library Elevator - one handicapped-equipped elevator providing service to all three
MI’s “virtual library” provides audio, video, print and equipment resources in sup- floors.
port of MI’s educational programs. Over 40 Mac workstations provide access to Lift- A hydraulic lift providing handicapped access between the main entrance
an extensive video library of MI visiting artist concerts and seminars as well as and ground floor (access to upper floors is by elevator)
instructional and concert videos. CDs, CD players, sheet music, electric guitars Restrooms - one handicapped stall in the men’s restroom and one handicapped
and basses are also available for student checkout. stall in the woman’s restroom. The men’s restroom is also provided with one
handicapped urinal. Both are provided with handicapped sinks.
Media Lab Drinking Fountain - two handicapped drinking fountains
45 individual IMac-equipped practice stations running programs including Guitar Public Telephone - one handicapped public telephone station
Rig, Garage Band, Sibelius, and Adobe Creative Suite. An additional 23-station Concert Hall - Handicapped seat stations are provided in the auditorium. Ac-
practice and video viewing lab is equipped with flat-panel viewing screens and cess to the concert hall stage is provided by mechanical/electrical lift.
TASCAM guitar and bass CD trainers.
Second Floor:
Player’s Supply Store Restrooms – one male and one female handicapped restroom
Located on the ground floor adjacent to the main lobby, Player’s Supply is MI’s Public Telephone - one handicapped public telephone station
own music supply store, offering a wide range of accessories (strings, picks,
drumsticks, staff paper, gig bags, tuners etc.), instructional books, CDs and vid- Third Floor:
eos, and MI-logo apparel, all at discounted prices. Restrooms – one male and one female handicapped restroom
Public Telephone - one handicapped public telephone station.
Copy Machine - a coin-operated copy machine is available for student use.
PROGRAMS AT A GLANCE
INSTRUMENT PROGRAMS ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (COMBINED EMPHASES)
Bass, Guitar, Keyboards, Drums, Voice Length: six quarters / 90 credit units
MI offers the following programs in the field of contemporary music instrument Summary: An all-music terminal/vocational degree* that combines 60 units of
performance. Refer to the Admissions section of this catalog for entrance re- instrument study (equivalent to the Certificate in Performance) with 30 units of
quirements and to specific program entries for more detail on program struc- study in a music industry career specialty (equivalent to Audio Engineering, In-
tures and course descriptions. dependent Artist, Music Business, Guitar Craft, or Music Video, Film and Televi-
sion certificate programs described below).
BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE *The AA program does not require General Education coursework. See the
(CONTEMPORARY STYLES) Admissions / Bachelor Program / Transfer of Credit section of this catalog for
Length: twelve quarters / 180 credit units information on transfer of AA credits into MI’s BM program.
Summary: A professional degree in contemporary music performance. The mu-
sic curriculum (135 units) combines intensive instrument training and perfor- CERTIFICATE IN PERFORMANCE
mance with extensive coursework in theory, arranging, conducting, and music Length: four quarters / 60 credit units
technology culminating in challenging student-directed jury performances. Gen- Summary: Provides intensive training in essential instrumental skills, musician-
eral Education requirements (45 units) provide a foundation in critical thinking, ship (harmony, ear training, music reading), and extensive performing expe-
creative problem solving and cultural literacy. rience. Curriculum includes core and elective classes, private lessons, open
counseling sessions, live playing workshops and regular visiting artist clinics
Bachelor Degree Minor Studies options include:
36 ENCORE PROGRAM (Non-Certificate Training in Music)
Audio Production: 30 credits of intensive study in studio technology, audio Length: one quarter / repeatable
engineering and production (degree requires the completion of 196 total credit Summary: A non-certificate* program that allows students to create a personalized
units; see program description for details and credit distribution). ten-week schedule including instrument lessons, classes, workshops, and seminars
within MI’s unique facilities. All styles and levels; classes starting every quarter.
Music Industry Studies: 30 credits of intensive study in record company func- *as a non-certificate program, Encore is not eligible for US or State govern-
tions, artist management, publishing, and other music industry-related career ment financial aid
skills (degree requires the completion of 196 total credit units; see program de-
scription for details and credit distribution). MUSIC INDUSTRY CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE CERTIFICATE IN AUDIO ENGINEERING


Length: six quarters / 90 credit units Length: two quarters / 30 credit units
Summary: An all-music terminal/vocational degree* that develops practical in- Summary: A comprehensive curriculum preparing aspiring audio engineers in
strumental technique, live performing experience and overall musicianship in recording methods and technology oriented toward real-world studio demands.
the field of contemporary popular music performance. Students train on top-of-the-line studio gear as well as industry-standard digital
*The AA program does not require General Education coursework. See the audio workstations.
Admissions / Bachelor Program / Transfer of Credit section of this catalog for
information on transfer of AA credits into MI’s BM program. CERTIFICATE IN AUDIO ENGINEERING (POST-PRODUCTION AUDIO)
Length: three quarters / 45 credit units
Summary: Includes all coursework leading to the Certificate in Audio Engineer-
ing plus an additional 15 units focused on learning to record and mix music,
dialog, and sound effects for film and television.
PROGRAMS AT A GLANCE
ARTIST CERTIFICATE
Length: two quarters / 30 credit units
Summary: Develops the technical, artistic and career skills required to develop
and maintain a career as an independent recording artist. Students write, record
and produce original recordings using personal laptop studios and learn how to
market and promote their music.

CERTIFICATE IN GUITAR CRAFT


Length: two quarters / 30 credit units
Summary: Trains students in electric guitar and bass fabrication, maintenance
and repair in preparation for careers as guitar builders and technicians. As the
culmination of the program, each student designs and builds a personal custom
instrument from scratch.

CERTIFICATE IN MUSIC BUSINESS


Length: two quarters / 30 credit units
Summary: Provides knowledge, skills and experience preparing students for
entry-level employment in the music business. Students learn the essential
functions of record labels, artist management companies, music publishers and 37
other industry career paths as well as how to set up and operate an independent
music business.

CERTIFICATE IN MUSIC VIDEO, FILM AND TELEVISION


Length: two quarters / 30 credit units
Summary: Trains students in the essential skills of directing and producing mu-
sic videos, commercials and film. Students produce and direct their own projects
on film or HD video and learn cinematography as well as non-linear editing and
compositing skills used by industry professionals.
BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE (CONTEMPORARY STYLES)
Performance-based education in contemporary music SUPPORTIVE MUSIC Credits

Musicians Institute’s challenging Bachelor of Music in Performance (Contemporary M121-323 Theory I-VIII 16
Styles) is a unique degree program combining contemporary music performance M131-233 Ear Training I-VI 12
with rigorous education in traditional music disciplines. The intensive program em- S110-120 Styles Survey I-II 2
phasizes the development of stylistic depth, creative maturity and professional M251-352 Music History I-IV 8
competence as part of a comprehensive program preparing students to enter the M331-432 Contemporary Arranging I-V 10
contemporary music industry. Upon completion of all requirements, students are M383 Directing and Conducting 2
eligible to receive the Bachelor of Music in Performance in one of five major instru- M481-482 Studio Recording I-II 3
ments of study: Guitar, Bass, Drums, Keyboard and Voice. M386 Music Industry Studies 3
M483 Multimedia Applications 3
M484 Topics in Contemporary Music Instruction 1
CREDIT DISTRIBUTION K110-310 Keyboard Proficiency3 3
V150 Diction4 1
Supportive General Total Required
Major Area Music Education Electives Credits
Total Supportive Music Credits 60-64

66 credits 60-64 credits 45 credits 5-9 credits 180 credits


GENERAL EDUCATION Credits

38 MAJOR AREA Credits


Various (see Articulation Agreement for required credit distribution)
Total General Education Credits 45

T110-T-430 Private Lesson 24 ELECTIVES Credits


E110-430 Ensembles 12
Various Reading1 6 Various
Various Instrument Study2 12 Total Elective Credits5 5-9
C310-410 Performance 8
F230a.b. Sophomore Jury 2
F430a.b. Senior Jury 2 TOTAL CREDITS: 180

Total Major Area Credits 66


1 Drums: 8 reading credits required
2 Bass: 16 instrument study credits required
Voice:14 instrument study credits required
3 Required for Bass, Guitar, Drums and Voice
4 Required for Voice only
5 Elective requirements vary by instrument as follows:

Bass: 6 credits
Guitar: 6 credits
Keyboard: 9 credits
Percussion: 3 credits
Voice: 3 credits
BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE (CONTEMPORARY STYLES)
BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE (CONTEMPORARY STYLES)
Typical Course Distribution

SOPHOMORE YEAR 4th Quarter 5th Quarter 6th Quarter
FRESHMAN YEAR 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter
course # credits course # credits course # credits
course # credits course # credits course # credits major area
private lesson T210 2 T220 2 T230 2
major area ensembles E210 1 E220 1 E230 1
private lesson T110 2 T120 2 T130 2 1
instrument study various 3
ensembles E110 1 E120 1 E130 1 1
reading various 1.5
instrument study1 various 3 various 3 various 3 sophomore jury F230a 1 F230b 1
reading1 various 1.5 various 1.5 various 1.5
supportive music
supportive music music theory M221 2 M222 2
music theory M121 2 M122 2 M123 2 ear training M231 2 M232 2 M233 2
ear training M131 2 M132 2 M133 2 music history M251 2 M253 2 M252 2
styles survey S110 1 S120 1
general education2 1.5 6 7.5
general education2 3 3 3
TOTAL CREDITS 15 16 15.5
TOTAL CREDITS 15.5 15.5 14.5

JUNIOR YEAR 7th Quarter 8th Quarter 9th Quarter SENIOR YEAR 10th Quarter 11th Quarter 12th Quarter
course # credits course # credits course # credits course # credits course # credits course # credits 39
major area
major area private lesson T410 2 T420 2 T430 2
private lesson T310 2 T320 2 T330 2 ensembles E410 1 E420 1 E430 1
ensembles E310 1 E320 1 E330 1 performance C410 2
performance C310 2 C320 2 C330 2 senior jury F430a 1 F430b 1

supportive music supportive music


music theory M321 2 M322 2 M323 2 contemporary
contemporary arranging M431 2 M432 2
arranging M331 2 M332 2 M333 2 studio recording M481 1.5 M482 1.5
directing/conducting M383 2 music industry
music history M352 2 studies M386 3
multimedia
general education2 3 3 3 applications M483 3
3 various
topics in cont.
electives 1 3 1 music instruction M484 1

TOTAL CREDITS 15 15 15 general education2 3 3 6

electives3 various 2 2
1 Specific courses and credit requirements vary by instrument
TOTAL CREDITS 14.5 15.5 13
2 Distribution of General Education credits is based on recommended average

credit balance per quarter

3Number of required electives varies by instrument



Upon completion of the required 180 credit units, students are eligible to apply for the
Bachelor of Music in Performance.
BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE (CONTEMPORARY STYLES), Minor in Audio Production
The Minor in Audio Production provides an opportunity for Performance Majors General Education Credits
to include concentrated studies in audio recording technology and techniques.
Minor Area studies replace some Supportive Music requirements and addition- Various (see Articulation Agreement for credit distribution requirements)
al credits allow for greater depth in the Minor Area while retaining the compre-
hensive scope of the Performance Degree. Total General Education Credits 45

See the preceding Bachelor of Music in Performance section of this catalog for
Major Area and Supportive Music course descriptions. All Performance Degree Minor Area Credits
requirements apply except for specific Supportive Music coursework replaced
by Minor Area studies. See the Certificate in Audio Engineering section of this R100-200 Console Theory I-II 6
catalog for Minor Area course descriptions. R102-202 Hard Disc Editing I-II 3
R189 Music Studio Etiquette 1
CREDIT DISTRIBUTION R192 Practical Recording 3
R196 Acoustics 1.5
R199 Recording Theory 2
Major Supportive General Minor Total R150 Post-Production 1.5
Area Music Education Area Credits R184 Digital Signal Processing 1
66 credits 55 credits 45 credits 30 credits 196 credits R190 Mixing and Mastering 2
R197 Electronics 1.5
40 Major Area Credits R299 Analog Signal Processing 1.5
(various) Minor-area electives 6
T110-T-430 Private Lesson 24
E110-430 Ensembles 12 Total Minor Area Credits 30
Various Reading 6
Various Instrument Study 12 TOTAL CREDITS: 196
C310-410 Performance 8
F230a.b. Sophomore Jury 2
F430a.b. Senior Jury 2
Total Major Area Credits 66

Supportive Music Credits

M121-323 Theory I-VIII 16


M131-233 Ear Training I-VI 12
S110-120 Styles Survey I-II 2
M251-352 Music History I-IV 8
M331-432 Contemporary Arranging I-V 10
M386 Music Industry Studies 3
M484 Topics/Contemporary Music Instruction 1
K110-310 Keyboard Proficiency 3
Total Supportive Music Credits 55
BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE (CONTEMPORARY STYLES), Minor in Music Industry Studies
The Minor in Music Industry Studies provides an opportunity for Performance Supportive Music Credits
Majors to include concentrated studies in record company management and in-
dependent artist management and promotion. Minor Area studies replace some M121-323 Theory I-VIII 16
Supportive Music requirements and additional credits allow for greater depth M131-233 Ear Training I-VI 12
in the Minor Area while retaining the comprehensive scope of the Performance S110-120 Styles Survey I-II 2
Degree. M251-352 Music History I-IV 8
M331-432 Contemporary Arranging I-V 10
See the preceding Bachelor of Music in Performance section of this catalog for M481-482 Studio Recording I-II 3
Major Area and Supportive Music course descriptions. All Performance Degree M484 Topics/Contemporary Music Instruction 1
requirements apply except for specific Supportive Music coursework replaced K110-310 Keyboard Proficiency 3
by Minor Area studies. See the Certificate in Music Business section of this
catalog for Minor Area course descriptions.
Total Supportive Music Credits 55

Major Supportive General Minor Total
Area Music Education Area Credits General Education Credits
66 credits 55 credits 45 credits 30 credits 196 credits
Various (see Articulation Agreement for credit distribution requirements)

Major Area Credits Total General Education Credits 45


41

T110-T-430 Private Lesson 24


E110-430 Ensembles 12 Minor Area Credits
Various Reading 6
Various Instrument Study 12 MB102-205 The Record Company 4
C310-410 Performance 8 MB110-210 Marketing & Promotion in the Music Industry 4
F230a.b. Sophomore Jury 2 MB104-214 Music Contracts 4
F430a.b. Senior Jury 2 MB091 Business Writing for the Music Industry 2
MB103 Music Publishing 2
Total Major Area Credits 66 MB105 A&R 2
MB106 Personal Management in the Music Industry 2
MB108 Guest Lecture Series 1
MB088 Getting Gigs 1
MB101 Networking in the Music Business 1
MB204 Independent Artist Marketing 2
MB211 Start and Run Your Own Record Label 1
MB325 Music Business Internship 4

Total Minor Area Credits 30

TOTAL CREDITS: 196


BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE (CONTEMPORARY STYLES)
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS F430b Senior Jury (1)
Juried performance demonstrating student’s ability to meet final graduation require-
MAJOR AREA: ALL INSTRUMENTS ments. Focuses on the student as leader and interpreter with emphasis on individu-
All non-keyboard major degree students must demonstrate keyboard proficien- ality, advanced technical skill, stylistic clarity, horn arranging and overall musician-
cy by the end of their Freshman year through examination or a passing grade of ship. Preparation includes weekly meetings with the jury supervisor and Dean to
C- or better in course K310 Keyboard Proficiency III. review arrangements, original compositions, rehearsal progress and related issues
plus monitored rehearsals. Three ensemble hours per week for one quarter.
T110–T430 Private Lesson I–XII (2)
Weekly private lesson with an instructor applying principles learned in instru- SUPPORTIVE MUSIC: ALL INSTRUMENTS
ment study to the major instrument and preparation for juries and final projects.
M121 Theory I (2)
One private lesson hour per week per quarter.
An introduction to fundamental concepts including intervals, triads, major mode
E110–E430 Ensembles I–XII (1) progressions with voice-leading, minor modes and modal scales. Students learn
Weekly live performance workshops providing development of ensemble tech- basic techniques for melodic and harmonic analysis. Introduction to four part
niques, improvisational skills, and repertoire building in various styles as well as writing techniques. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
preparing students for Sophomore and Senior juries. One ensemble hour per
M122 Theory II (2)
week per quarter.
Prerequisite: M121 Theory I. Continuation of four-part writing techniques includ-
C310–C410 Performance I–IV (2) ing first inversion triads, figured bass, melodic function and structure, further
42 An in-depth study of a variety of contemporary and commercial performance- study in melodic analysis, non-harmonic tones and their use. Two lecture hours
related subjects including prototypical characteristics of influential styles, reper- per week for one quarter.
toire, improvisation and interpretation. Dedicated sections for instrumentalists
M123 Theory III (2)
and vocalists. Weekly critiqued performances of selected repertoire. Two en-
Prerequisite: M122 Theory II. Basic harmonization of a melody, formulaic four-
semble hours per week for one quarter.
part writing using second-inversion triads and proper voice leading, cadences
F230a Sophomore Jury Prep (1) and their function in phrases, harmonic rhythm, supporting melodies, indepen-
Individual preparation for score content, format, rehearsals and performance dent bass movement, analysis of excerpts and contemporary song forms. Two
under the supervision of the jury supervisor, Dean and private instructor. Three lecture hours per week for one quarter.
ensemble hours per week for one quarter.
M124 Theory IV (2)
Prerequisite: Theory III. Dominant-seventh voicings and their function, standard
F230b Sophomore Jury (1)
resolutions, secondary dominant function and voice-leading, modulation tech-
Juried performance demonstrating student’s ability to meet lower-division re-
niques, analysis of modulating progressions, harmonic structure of phrases,
quirements. Includes demonstrations of solo work, transcription skills, stylistic
antecedent-consequent structure, analysis of orchestral excerpts and contem-
ensemble repertoire and sightreading. Preparation includes weekly meetings
porary song forms . Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
with the jury supervisor and Dean to review arrangements, rehearsal progress
and related issues plus monitored rehearsals. Three ensemble hours per week M222 Theory V (2)
for one quarter. Prerequisite: M221 Theory IV. Musical textures, irregular resolutions, use of melodic
and harmonic sequences and diminished seventh chords. Focus on four part writ-
F430a Senior Jury Prep (1) ing, figured bass and harmonization. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
Individual preparation for score content, format, rehearsals and performance
under the supervision of the jury supervisor, Dean and private instructor. Three M321 Theory VI (2)
ensemble hours per week for one quarter. Prerequisite: M222 Theory V. Analysis and application of the incomplete major
BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE (CONTEMPORARY STYLES)
ninth chord, seventh chords in non-dominant harmonic function, neighbor-chord har- troduction of multiple parts, four-part homophony, diatonic seventh chords and
mony, ninth, eleventh, thirteenth, and appoggiatura chords. Focus on four part writing, non-chord tones. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter..
figured bass and harmonization. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
M233 Ear Training VI (2)
M322 Theory VII (2) Prerequisite: M232 Ear Training V. Study of Locrian T9 and Altered scales with
Prerequisite: M321 Theory VI. Analysis and application of chromatic altered emphasis on hearing chromaticism, altered chords, and related progressions.
chords including the +II7 and +VI7, Neapolitan chords, augmented sixth chords Continued melodic, rhythmic and harmonic dictation, with applications including
and chords with lowered and raised fifths. Focus on four part writing, figured bass line transcription and lead sheet preparation. Two lecture hours per week
bass and harmonization Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. for one quarter.

M323 Theory VIII (2) M251 Roots of Rock and Roll (2)
Prerequisite: M322 Theory VII. Analysis of late 19th and early 20th century scores. A survey of Rock’s roots, including Rhythm & Blues, Rockabilly, New Orleans,
Discussion includes pandiatonicism, serial writing, polytonality, parallel harmony vocal groups, doo-wop, and early 60’s pop, including an examination of the ma-
and use of symmetrical scales. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. jor artists and regional influences. Weekly discussion, analysis and listening
examples related to each topic. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
M131 Ear Training I (2)
Introduction to the “Movable Do” system including basic solfeggio syllables ap- M253 World Music (2)
plied to single notes, melodic fragments, diatonic triads and intervals in all major A study of music in the context of selected cultures and regions around the
keys. Students learn basic rhythms and four-beat conducting patterns. Dictation of world. The many ways in which music and lyrics function in reflecting these
major-key melodies and basic triads. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. cultures are explored through listening, analysis and transcriptions. Two lecture 43
hours per week for one quarter.
M132 Ear Training II (2)
Prerequisite: M131 Ear Training I. Application of solfeggio to minor keys includ- M252 Western Art Music: Middle Ages to Classical (2)
ing single notes, melodic fragments, diatonic triads and intervals in natural mi- A survey of Western art music from the Middle Ages through the end of the 18th
nor, melodic minor and harmonic minor key centers. Students learn more ad- century. The course will include discussion of major styles and forms in histori-
vanced rhythms and two-, three- and four-beat conducting patterns. Dictation of cal context, supplemented by representative listening and score analysis. Two
minor-key melodies including note groups and patterns and all types of triads. lecture hours per week for one quarter.
Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
M352 Western Art Music: Romantic to 21st Century (2)
M133 Ear Training III (2) Prerequisite: M252 Western Art Music: Middle Ages to Classical. Covers the
Prerequisite: M132 Ear Training II. Dorian and Mixolydian key centers including history of musical styles in the Romantic period through 20th music including
single notes, melodic fragments, diatonic triads and intervals as well as two, cultural contexts and social meaning. Composers and musical developments
three, four, five and six beat conducting patterns. Dictation of more advanced in European and American Art Music, orchestral, choral, band, chamber music
rhythms, Dorian and Mixolydian melodic examples including note groups and and solo repertoire are combined with the influences of music from other world
patterns, and seventh chords. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. cultures. Compositional techniques, style characteristics, and relationships will
be emphasized. In addition to a midterm and final examination, the course
M231 Ear Training IV (2) requires one critical concert report, workbook assignments, and presentation.
Prerequisite: M133 Ear Training III. Phrygian and Lydian key centers including Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
Advanced use of note groups and patterns in melodic dictation, rhythmic phrases,
and all types of seventh chords. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. M331 Contemporary Arranging I (2)
Prerequisite: M222 Theory V. Introduction to instrumentation, arranging tech-
M232 Ear Training V (2) niques, and notation practices for live rhythm section. Emphasis is on score
Prerequisite: M231 Ear Training IV. Locrian and Lydian Dominant scales. In- and parts preparation and notation in selected contemporary styles. As a final
BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE (CONTEMPORARY STYLES)
project, each student completes a studio recording of an arrangement for piano, matas will be covered, as well as basic score reading and application of skills to
guitar, bass and drums. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. Required contemporary music. Students will be videotaped for study. Two lecture hours
lab fee: $200.00. per week for one quarter.

M332 Contemporary Arranging II (2) M386 Music Industry Studies (3)


Prerequisite: M331 Contemporary Arranging I. A continuation of rhythm section An overview of the contemporary music industry with special concentration on
arranging with the addition of brass instruments (trumpet and trombone). Dis- how record companies work, how A&R reps find and sign new talent, copy-
cussion will include transposition, range and idiomatic usage of these instru- righting songs, music publishing and the roles of personal managers, booking
ments in popular styles. The objective is to study the brass family with emphasis agents, business managers and music business attorneys. Current music busi-
ness news is discussed with regard to its effect on the students as independent
on two-part and guide-tone writing. As a final project, each student completes
artists. Three lecture hours per week for one quarter.
a studio recording of an arrangement for trumpet, trombone, piano, bass and
drums. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. Required lab fee: $200.00. M481 Studio Recording I (1.5)
An overall introduction to digital audio techniques using Digidesign Pro Tools with
M333 Contemporary Arranging III (2) primary focus on applications to arranging and composing. Handling of tracks, im-
Prerequisite: M332 Contemporary Arranging II. Arranging techniques for ensem- porting audio, recording of play lists, equalization, and effects will be incorporated
bles including woodwind instruments (saxophone, flute and clarinet). Discus- into the final project. One and one-half lecture hours per week for one quarter.
sion includes transposition, range and idiomatic usage of these instruments in
popular styles. The objective is to study the woodwind family with emphasis on M482 Studio Recording II (1.5)
four-part harmonization. As a final project, each student completes a studio re- Prerequisite: M481 Studio Recording I. A continuation of Pro Tools recording
44 cording of an arrangement for trumpet, alto or clarinet, tenor or flute, trombone, techniques using Virtual Instruments, Midi Recording, Sequencing, Trimming,
guitar, bass and drums. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. Required Fading, Tempo, Meter Maps, Time Stretching, Plug-in automation culminating in
lab fee: $200.00. the mixing of a fully arranged song applying all of the studied techniques. One
and one-half lecture hours per week for one quarter.
M431 Contemporary Arranging IV (2)
Prerequisite: M333 Contemporary Arranging III. Course focuses on string sec- M483 Computer Music Applications (3)
tion writing as it applies to contemporary production, with an emphasis on re- An introductory course in setting up personal business templates using Micro-
harmonization. As a final project, each student completes a studio recording of soft Office; creating songs, demo, and practice tracks using GarageBand; music
an arrangement for string quintet and drums. Two lecture hours per week for one computer notation from lead sheets through three horn charts using Sibelius
quarter. Required lab fee: $200.00 software. Students will create projects using each application. Three lecture
hours per week for one quarter
M432 Contemporary Arranging V (2)
Prerequisite: M431 Contemporary Arranging IV. Course focuses on combined S110 Styles Survey I (1)
rhythm section, woodwind, brass and string writing as it applies to contempo- Provides students with an analytical overview of styles, chart reading and critical
rary productions. As a secondary objective students learn to analyze scores listening as they relate to repertoire requirements. Styles covered include Rock,
of contemporary arrangements that include all instruments. As a final project, Rhythm & Blues, Jazz and Latin. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
each student completes a studio recording of an arrangement for rhythm sec-
tion, woodwinds, brass and strings including overdubs. Two lecture hours per S120 Styles Survey II (1)
week for one quarter. Required lab fee: $200.00 Prerequisite: S110 Styles Survey I. Continues an overview of more advanced
styles as they relate to required repertoire, including Latin, Jazz, Rhythm &
Blues and Rock & Roll. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
M383 Directing and Conducting (2)
Fundamentals of conducting including beat patterns, posture, arm and hand M484 Topics in Contemporary Music Instruction (1)
position, articulations, dynamics, left hand functions, incomplete beats and fer- The skill and art of teaching contemporary music in a variety of settings includ-
BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE (CONTEMPORARY STYLES)
ing rehearsals, coaching, and group and private lessons. One lecture hour per B122a.b. Fretboard Basics IIA-IIB (1.5)
week for one quarter. Expands diatonic harmonic components to a wide range of notes, neck area, fin-
gerings and hand positions. In IIA, simple intervals, diatonic triads and seventh
V150 Diction for Vocalists (1) chords including inversions are explored over the entire length of the neck. In
Degree-specific requirement for Voice majors. Students improve their articula- IIB, fingerings are expanded to cover chromatic harmony. One lecture hour plus
tion and enunciation through the use of drills, exercises, and feedback, and one lab hour per week for two quarters.
learn to apply these skills to the performance of contemporary music. Specific
issues including accent and dialect reduction and enhancement will also be ad- B221a.b. Fretboard Improvisation IA-IB (1.5)
dressed. One lecture hour per week for one quarter. Prerequisite: B122b Fretboard Basics IIB. First quarter concentrates on
the study of modes and modal playing, major II-V-Is, guide tones and building
K110 Keyboard Proficiency I (1) a melodic vocabulary. Second quarter includes a concentrated study of minor
Degree-specific requirement for non-keyboard majors. Covers basic motor skills tonalities, symmetrical scales, modal playing, superimposing scales and contin-
involved in playing the keyboard through diatonic scales, arpeggios, and se- ued development of a melodic vocabulary. One lecture hour plus one lab hour
lected repertoire. One hour per week for one quarter. per week for two quarters.
K210 Keyboard Proficiency II (1) M142Ba.b. Reading IIA-IIB (1.5)
Prerequisite K110 Keyboard Proficiency I. Degree-specific requirement for non-key- Class covers advanced levels of chart reading through the extensive use of de-
board majors. Prerequisite: K110. More advanced application addressing harmonic tailed transcriptions in a wide range of styles including rock, funk, pop and contem-
shapes on the keyboard including chord families, voice leading, and basic keyboard porary instrumental. Concentration is on rhythmic accuracy, pitch recognition and
harmony with selected chord repertoire. One hour per week for one quarter. song form. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters. 45
K310 Keyboard Proficiency III (1) M241Ba.b. Reading IIIA-IIIB (1.5)
Prerequisite: K210 Keyboard Proficiency II. Degree-specific requirement for Prerequisite: M142b Reading IIB. Students learn contemporary chart reading
non-keyboard majors. Emphasizes using the keyboard as an arranging tool, skills through the extensive use of transcriptions. Focus is placed on sight-read-
lead sheet interpretation, basic score reading and outlining an arrangement. ing, pitch and rhythm pattern recognition, position playing and creating a cohe-
One lecture hour per week for one quarter. sive sound. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
INSTRUMENT STUDY GUITAR
BASS G112a.b. Single String Improvisation IIA-IIB (1.5)
Begins with an exploration of “blues tonality”, including the mastery and usage of
B112a.b Playing Techniques IIA-IIB (1.5)
blues, Dorian, and Mixolydian scales over dominant seventh harmonies. Diatonic
Class applies standard bass playing techniques to fundamental styles and
seventh arpeggios and their applications are covered along with alternate major
grooves including straight eighth-note rock, straight and swing sixteenth-note
and minor-tonality scales, culminating in the development of diatonic key-center
funk, shuffles, 3/4 and 4/4-meter swing, and odd meters. One lecture hour plus
improvisation. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
one lab hour per week for two quarters.
G211a.b. Single String Improvisation IIIA-IIIB (1.5)
B211a.b. Playing Techniques IIIA-IIIB (1.5)
Prerequisite: G112b Single String Improvisation IIB. Chromatic variations on key-
Prerequisite: B112b Playing Techniques IIB. Course applies both finger and slap
center improvisation are introduced, including modal interchange and secondary
style electric bass techniques to a variety of contemporary grooves including
dominants. Symmetrical scales, including chromatic, diminished, and whole-tone,
Latin, jazz, odd-meter, funk, swing, shuffles, hip-hop and others. One lecture
are introduced and applied. Other topics include analysis of and improvisation
hour and one lab hour per week for two quarters.
over non-root position chords and the development of the “chord/scale” concept of
improvising. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE (CONTEMPORARY STYLES)
G122a.b. Rhythm Guitar IIA-IIB (1.5) voicings while composing and performing their own progressions. One lecture
Development of chord construction skills based on the five major scale fingering hour and one lab hour per week for two quarters.
patterns, including the theory and application of harmonized major scales. Intro-
duces syncopated eighth-note rhythm figures using different harmonic textures from
K211a.b. Keyboard Improvisation (1.5)
Introduces blues tonality, 7th chord arpeggios, and improvising over all major
full chords to single-note accompaniment. Easy and moderate chord transposition is
and minor tonalities utilizing a key center approach and variations. Students
also covered. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
improvise over simple blues and jazz progressions. One lecture hour and one
G221a.b. Rhythm Guitar IIIA-IIIB (1.5) lab hour per week for two quarters.
Prerequisite: G122b Rhythm Guitar IIB. This course is designed around writing and
performing rhythm guitar parts in a variety of styles. Concepts introduced include M142Ka.b. Reading IIA-IIB (1.5)
voice leading on the fingerboard and the use of sixteenth note and triplet syncopa- Class examines simple left-hand chord voicings, rhythms involving switching from
tion. The ability to improvise and apply appropriate rhythm parts in context will be triplets to duplets and more complex melody lines with exercises drawn from contem-
stressed through classroom performance. Moderate to difficult chord transposition porary styles. Students learn to read two-stave arrangements with complex rhythms
is also covered. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters. and harmony. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for two quarters.

M142Ga.b. Reading IIA-IIB (1.5) M241Ka.b. Advanced Reading (1.5)


Class covers reading on the lower and upper part of the neck. Learn to read and Focuses on reading difficult charts with lead lines and chord symbols. Rhyth-
count “cut time”, 3/4 meter and syncopated rhythmic figures. Continue chromatic mic syncopation and fully extended chords are explored. Students play complex
studies in the fifth position, transposing to concert pitch and chart reading, with charts drawn from contemporary arrangements in a lab/ensemble setting. One
a stronger emphasis on ensemble reading performance. One lecture hour plus lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
46
one lab hour per week for two quarters.
DRUMS
M241Ga.b. Reading IIIA-IIIB (1.5)
Prerequisite: M142Gb Reading IIB. Learn to count and read in odd meters and P112a.b. Playing Techniques IIA-IIB (1.5)
changing meters. Class covers reading up and down string sets, melodies with a Concentrates on effective timekeeping, development of speed and dexterity,
range outside a single position, position shifting, interpretation and developing sight- economy of motion, body balance and eliminating bad habits as well as the ap-
reading techniques. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters. plication of drum set rudiments. IIB emphasizes interpretation and performance of
snare drum solos. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
KEYBOARD
P211a.b. Playing Techniques IIIA-IIIB (1.5)
K112a.b. Keyboard Technique IIA-IIB (1.5) Prerequisite: P112b Playing Techniques IIB. Class focuses on more advanced rudi-
Intermediate-to-advanced techniques and concepts of contemporary keyboard ments and their application to the drum set in a variety of musical styles as well as
playing. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for two quarters. 4-way coordination, odd meter studies, advanced snare drum solos and drum set
solo transcriptions. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
K122a.b. Keyboard Voicings IIA-IIB (1.5)
Covers seventh chord construction and symbols with an emphasis on “rootless” P171a.b. Jazz Drums (1.5)
voicings as well as exercises in diatonic and chromatic chord movement and left This class explores and demonstrates the historical, stylistic and technical evo-
hand accompaniment to melody and improvisation. Stylistic etudes are used to rein- lution of jazz from Dixieland to Bebop and beyond. Techniques include ride pat-
force performance. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for two quarters. terns and left hand comping, basic independence and coordination, brush tech-
nique, and ensemble interaction. In the second half, the focus shifts to group
K221a.b. Keyboard Voicings IIIA-IIIB (1.5)
Prerequisite: K122b Keyboard Voicings IIB. Learn the concepts of chord-scale interaction, jazz soloing on various song forms, up-tempo swing concepts, cym-
harmony and apply them to the construction of voicings and chord progressions. bal turnarounds, 3/4 time, advanced independence and 4-way jazz coordination.
Students explore the techniques of “tension substitution” and use it to create One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE (CONTEMPORARY STYLES)
P122a.b. Ensemble Techniques (1.5) include lyric analysis and interpretation, stage presence, microphone technique,
Prerequisite: P112b Playing Techniques IIB. Course deals with common tech- thought processes before going on stage and communicating with the audience.
niques used by drummers in small and large group performance. The focus Four lab/ensemble hours per week for two quarters.
is on reading and execution of written rhythmic phrases in jazz, rock and Lat-
in styles including section and ensemble figures, chart terminology and form, V241a.b. Artist Showcase Performance IIIA-IIIB (2)
phrasing and stylistic interpretation, soloing concepts and solo fills. One lecture Prerequisite: V142b Vocal Performance IIB. The emphasis in this course is on
hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters. developing polished, professional performing skills culminating in a final juried
performance with a pro rhythm section. During IIIA, each student chooses his
M142Pa.b. Reading IIA-IIB (1.5) or her material, writes charts, rehearses a band, and develops a personal per-
The emphasis is on time signature reading studies, counting and subdivision forming style during a weekly half-hour private session with the instructor and
exercises and applications as well as note value relationships. Also included an accompanist. IIIB includes final music preparation and full rhythm section
is interpretation of rhythms in different styles, independence studies and chart rehearsals leading up to the final jury. Two half-hour private rehearsals per week
reading. Reading IIB moves into compound time signatures, changing meters, for two quarters plus final project/performance.
value indicators and abnormal groupings. One lecture hour and one lab hour per
week for two quarters. V132a.b. Sightsinging/Sightreading IIA-IIB (1.5)
Reading and singing skills expand to include major and minor diatonic melodies
M241Pa.b. Reading IIIA-IIIB (1.5) and harmonies, eighth note and sixteenth note syncopation, and interpretation
Prerequisite: M142b Reading IIB. Class covers interpretation of sixteenth note of standard musical notation. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for
figures, snare drum reading and etudes in changing meters, orchestral snare two quarters.
drum etudes, reading drum set charts with style and meter changes, and multi- 47
tom reading in preparation for studio recording. One lecture hour and one lab V231a.b. Sightsinging/Sightreading IIIA-IIIB (1.5)
hour per week for two quarters. Prerequisite: V132b Sightsinging/Sightreading IIB. Class covers singing in dia-
tonic major and minor keys as well as odd meters and mixed rhythms. One
VOICE lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.

V011a.b. Vocal Technique IA-IB (1) BM-SPECIFIC ELECTIVE CLASSES


An introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the voice. IA covers breathing Baccalaureate elective requirements may be fulfilled through any combination
and how it affects the body, mind and the act of singing as well as effective prac- of the courses listed below as well as General Electives and Instrument-Specific
tice habits and how to protect the voice. IB focuses on understanding the na- electives listed under Associate Degree programs.
ture of voice production as students learn to recognize different vocal functions
through listening and analysis. One lecture hour per week for two quarters. M100 Jazz History (2)
A survey of the chronological development of Jazz with emphasis on socio-
V112a.b. Vocal Technique IIA-IIB (1) economic influences. Includes an examination of the influential players and
Prerequisite: V112b Vocal Technique IB. Class addresses pitch registers, forma- composers through analysis of style and form. Two lecture hours per week for
tion of vowels and consonants, and the application of vocal technique to learning one quarter.
songs as well as specific skills such as vibrato. Students analyze contemporary
artists’ voices and each other to develop their awareness and understanding of M101 Special Topics in Jazz (2)
the vocal instrument. One lecture hour per week for two quarters. Topics vary and may focus on a theme, genre, a historical period, composers or
an influential group. Consult with course instructor or program Dean for informa-
V142a.b. Artist Showcase Performance IIA-IIB (2) tion. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. Repeatable for credit.
Performance-oriented class focusing on the emotional side of singing. Topics
BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE (CONTEMPORARY STYLES)
M170 Independent Study (2) GENERAL STUDIES REQUIREMENTS
Prerequisites: minimum GPA of 3.25 or above in core courses and permission of Bachelor of Music degree requirements include completion of thirty (30) se-
Dean. Provides students with an opportunity to explore a specific subject area in mester units or forty-five (45) quarter units of coursework in General Studies.
depth through independent course work with faculty supervision. A maximum of For general reference, the required distribution of units is shown below along
six credits may be applied toward BM requirements. An additional fee of $100.00 with representative areas of coursework. Please refer to the “Reverse Articu-
applies to each Independent Study undertaken. Weekly hours vary. lation Agreement between Los Angeles City College and Musicians Institute”
for specific course titles and numbers that meet the requirements. Units com-
M195 Professional Reading Ensemble (1) pleted at other institutions will be evaluated to determine their equivalency; see
Prerequisite: M241B, M241G or M241P Reading. A performance class simulat- Admissions>Transfer of Credit for more information.
ing the challenges of professional jobs requiring advanced sightreading skills.
One ensemble hour per week for one quarter. May be repeated for credit. Language and Rationality: minimum of 12 semester units or 18 quarter units in:
1. Written Composition: at least 3 semester units or 4.5 quarter units
2. Communication and Analytical Thinking: at least 9 semester units or
M197 Composition Seminar (2)
13.5 quarter units with no more than one course from each section:
Prerequisite: completion of Sophomore year. A study of composition techniques
a. Speech
through analysis and demonstration with primary focus on clear melodic and
b. Philosophy
harmonic development and definition. Student work is performed in class. Two
c. English
lecture hours per week for one quarter. May be repeated for credit.
d. Mathematics

48 V251 Sightsing Like the Pros (1) Natural Sciences: minimum of 3 semester units or 4.5 quarter units in:
Prerequisite: V231B Sightsinging IIIb. Practical application of sightsinging for 1. Physical Universe ( Astronomy, Chemistry, Earth Science,
the professional singer. Provides experience in reading harmonically challeng- Environmental Science, Geography, Geology, Meteorology,
ing melodies in varying musical styles with piano accompaniment as well as Mineralogy, Oceanography, Physical Science, Physics)
vocal/choral harmonies. One lecture hour per week for one quarter. 2. Life Forms (Anatomy, Anthropology, Biology, Microbiology, Physiology)

M260 Special Topics in Music (2) Humanities: minimum of 6 semester units or 9 quarter units* in:
Prerequisite: M251 Music History: Roots of Rock & Roll. Analysis and compari- 1. The Arts (Architecture, Cinema, Photography, Theater)
son within focused topic areas such as an historical period, a particular artist’s 2. The Humanities (Foreign Language, Humanities, Linguistics, Speech,
work or a world music topic. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. May be Literature, Philosophy)
repeated for credit. *Students with a concentration in Voice are required to complete three semes-
ter hours/4.5 quarter hours of language courses in French, German, or Italian
M358 Formal Analysis (2) as part of minimum Humanities course requirements.
Prerequisite: M323 Theory VIII. Develop skills necessary to recognize traditional
forms as well as score reading and orchestration techniques. Two lecture hours Social and Behavioral Sciences: minimum of 9 semester units or 13.5 quarter
per week for one quarter. units, including:
1. Minimum of 3 semester units or 4.5 quarter units in American
Institutions and Government
2. Minimum of 6 semester units or 9 quarter units in:
a. Social and Behavioral Sciences (Anthropology, Family & Con sumer
Studies, Geography, History, Linguistics, Psychology, Sociology)
b. Economics and Politics (Business, Economics, Journalism, Law,
Political Science)
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE
MI’s Associate of Arts in Performance Degree (six quarters/90 credit units) pro- MUSICIANSHIP (Requirements vary by instrument)
vides technical skills, musical knowledge and performing experience that pre- M021a.b. Harmony and Theory IA-IB (1.5)
pares students for a wide range of professional and creative opportunities as An introduction to Harmony and Theory as it applies to popular music. Includes
performing musicians. This vocationally-oriented* degree is designed for stu- the development of fundamental music notation skills, rhythms, major and minor
dents who wish to develop contemporary music performance skills for: scales, intervals, chords and diatonic harmony. One lecture hour and one lab hour
n Bass n Guitar n Keyboard Technology per week for two quarters.
n Drums n Voice
M122a.b. Harmony and Theory IIA-IIB (1.5)
Students may also earn Associate degrees by combining performance with Prerequisite: M021b Harmony and Theory IB. Begins with diatonic harmony and
music industry emphases including: expands to include chromatic variations typical of popular music, including scale
n Audio Engineering n Independent Artist Development and chord alterations and harmonic analysis of non-diatonic major and minor pro-
n Music Business n Guitar Craft gressions. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for two quarters.
n Music Video, Film and Television Production
M221 Harmony & Theory III (1.5)
*Associate programs are vocational and do not include General Education re- A study of advanced concepts in harmony including altered scales and chords,
quirements or specific preparation for study at the Baccalaureate level. For in- symmetrical scales and chromatic harmony. Students learn to analyze scale/
formation on requirements for students wishing to transfer from an AA program chord relationships and understand non-diatonic progressions from the perspec-
to MI”s Bachelor of Music Degree program, please see Admissions>Transfer of tive of both the player and writer. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for
Credit in this catalog. one quarter. 49
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS M022a.b. Ear Training IA-IB (1.5)
An introduction to Ear Training as it applies to popular music. Covers the ability
Associate of Arts in Performance Degree requirements vary by instrument and
to recognize by ear major and minor scales, intervals, chord qualities, diatonic
include some or all of the following courses. See each emphasis for details on
progressions, and rhythms in the context of examples drawn from contemporary
specific requirements.
popular music. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for two quarters.

All course descriptions include course number, title, number of credit units per
M132a.b. Ear Training IIA-IIB (1.5)
quarter (multiply by number of required quarters for total credit amount), prereq-
Prerequisite: M022b Ear Training IB. Concentrates on the recognition and tran-
uisites (where applicable), description of content, and contact hours per week.
scription of diatonic major and minor melody and harmony and rhythmic figures
PERFORMANCE (All Instruments) including sixteenth notes. Includes specific examples drawn from contemporary
T010a.b., T120a.b., T210a.b. Private Lesson IA-IIIB (2) popular music. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for two quarters.
Weekly instrument lesson with an instructor who guides the student in developing
technique, musicianship and style in support of core curricular goals. The instruc- M231a.b. Ear Training IIIA-IIIB (1.5)
tor and student jointly determine a specific course of study depending on student Prerequisite: M132b Ear Training IIB. Recognition and transcription of non-diaton-
needs, strengths and experience. One private lesson hour per week per quarter. ic melody and harmony, rhythmic figures based on triplets and compound time sig-
natures. Concepts are related directly to their application in contemporary popular
E020a.b., E120a.b., E210a.b.`Live Playing Workshops` IA-IIIB (1) music. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
Students perform regularly throughout the program in a variety of styles and set-
tings (see section on Live Playing Workshops for overview of workshop offerings).
Minimum requirement of ten performances per quarter. One ensemble hour per
week per quarter.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Bass)

Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 Quarter 5 Quarter 6
course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits

major area 54 credits


private lesson T010a 2 T010b 2 T120a 2 T120b 2 T210a 2 T210b 2
live playing workshops E020a 1 E020b 1 E120a 1 E120b 1 E210a 1 E210b 1
playing techniques B011a 1.5 B011b 1.5 B112a 1.5 B112b 1.5 B211a 1.5 B211b 1.5
reading M041Ba 1.5 M041Bb 1.5 M142Ba 1.5 M142Bb 1.5 M241Ba 1.5 M241Bb 1.5
fretboard basics B021a 1.5 B021b 1.5 B122a 1.5 B122b 1.5
rhythm section workshop E01a 1.5 E01b 1.5 E02a 1.5 E02b 1.5
fretboard improvisation B221a 1.5 B221b 1.5
bass studio recording B250a 2 B250b 2
musicianship 15 credits
harmony & theory M021a 1.5 M021b 1.5 M122a 1.5 M122b 1.5
ear training M022a 1.5 M022b 1.5 M132a 1.5 M132b 1.5 M231a 1.5 M231b 1.5
electives 21 credits
(various) 3 3 3 3 4 4
TOTAL 90 CREDITS 15 15 15 15 15 15
50 Upon completion of the above 90 credit units, student is eligible to apply for the Associate of Arts in Performance (Bass)

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Bass)
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS B122a.b. Fretboard Basics IIA-IIB (1.5)
The following course requirements must all be satisfactorily completed in order Prerequisite: B021b Fretboard Basics IB. Course expands diatonic harmonic com-
to qualify for the Associate of Arts in Performance (Bass). ponents to a wider range of notes, neck area, fingerings and hand positions. In
IIA, simple intervals, diatonic triads and seventh chords including inversions are
All course descriptions include course number, title, number of credits per quar- explored over the entire length of the neck. In IIB, fingerings are expanded to cover
ter, prerequisites (where applicable), description of content, and contact hours chromatic harmony. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
per week.
B221a.b. Fretboard Improvisation IA-IB (1.5)
PERFORMANCE Prerequisite: B122b Fretboard Basics IIB. IA concentrates on the study of
T010a.b., T120a.b., T210a.b. Private Lesson IA-IIIB (2) modes and modal playing, major II-V-I’s and building a melodic vocabulary through
Twelve credit units required. See General Requirements for course description. the analysis of solos by Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins and Cannonball Adderly. IB in-
cludes a concentrated study of minor tonality, soloing over static dominant chords
E020a.b., E120a.b., E210a.b. Live Playing Workshops IA-IIIB (1) and continued development of a melodic vocabulary through the analysis of solos.
Six credit units required. See General Requirements for course description. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.

B011a.b. Playing Techniques IA-IB (1.5) M041Ba.b. Reading IA-IB (1.5)


IA covers techniques for finger style bass playing, including correct posture, Introduces the novice reader to the basic elements of music reading in the bass
hand positioning, finger independence, picking, and muting. IB covers tech- clef including rhythmic subdivisions and pitch identification. Students perform
niques for slap-style bass playing including thumb/pluck technique, muting, ar- in solo and ensemble settings. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for 51
ticulation and rhythmic variations and embellishment. All techniques are trained two quarters.
through extensive exercises. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for
two quarters. M142Ba.b. Reading IIA-IIB (1.5)
Prerequisite: M041b Reading IB. Class covers advanced levels of chart reading
B112a.b. Playing Techniques IIA-IIB (1.5) through the extensive use of detailed transcriptions in a wide range of styles
Prerequisite: B011b Playing Techniques IB. Class applies the techniques devel- including rock, funk, pop and contemporary instrumental. Concentration is on
oped in Playing Techniques IA-IB to fundamental styles and grooves including rhythmic accuracy, pitch recognition and song form. One lecture hour plus one
straight eighth-note rock, straight and swing sixteenth-note funk, shuffles, 3/4 lab hour per week for two quarters.
and 4/4-meter swing, and odd meters. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per
week for two quarters. M241Ba.b. Reading IIIA-IIIB (1.5)
Prerequisite: M142b Reading IIB. Students learn contemporary chart reading
B211a.b. Playing Techniques IIIA-IIIB (1.5) skills through the extensive use of transcriptions. Focus is placed on sight-read-
Prerequisite: B112b Playing Techniques IIB. Course applies both finger and slap ing, pitch and rhythm pattern recognition, position playing and creating a cohe-
style electric bass techniques to a variety of contemporary grooves including sive sound. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
Latin, jazz, odd-meter, funk, swing, shuffles, hip-hop and others. One lecture
hour and one lab hour per week for two quarters. E01a.b. Rhythm Section Workshop IA-IB (1.5)
An introduction to ensemble performance with concentration on listening, dy-
B021a.b. Fretboard Basics IA-IB (1.5) namics, awareness of song form, and basic chart reading as well as practi-
Trains students to break the diatonic scale into smaller components (modal pat- cal performing techniques such as giving and following cues, instrument setup,
terns, intervals and triads) and directly relate this information to the electric bass sound, and stage presence. Students perform each week and develop funda-
fretboard. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters. mental technical approaches to a variety of popular styles while gaining live
experience. Two lecture-ensemble hours per week for two quarters.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Bass)
E02a.b. Rhythm Section Workshop IIA-IIB (1.5) B076 Metal Basslines (1)
Prerequisite: E01b RSW IB. Emphasizes the fundamental rhythm section tex- An examination of the history and evolution of heavy metal basslines. Specific
tures of various popular styles and the skills necessary for playing them. Con- techniques and styles are studied through extensive transcriptions and written
centration on handling variations in typical song form, improving chart reading examples. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
skills, and taking a leadership role within the group. Two lecture-ensemble hours
per week for two quarters. B077 Progressive Rock Bass (1)
A detailed study of the Progressive Rock style including techniques, scale pat-
B250a.b. Bass Studio Recording IA-IB (2) terns, time signatures, and basslines. Includes analysis of prog-rock sub-genres
Prerequisite: B112b Playing Techniques IIB. Development of the bassist and bands. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
as a studio musician in the digital recording environment. Students create and
record bass lines for prerecorded curriculum-related tracks under the direction B111 Music Minus One for Bass (1)
of a bass instructor-producer. As a final project, students compile a CD of their A unique performance class based on reading charts and playing along with
recorded performances to use as a demo of their playing abilities. One private professional MIDI sequences in a variety of styles including rock, funk, blues
recording session hour per week for two quarters. and country. One lecture-ensemble hour per week for one quarter. Repeatable
for credit.
MUSICIANSHIP
M021a.b.,M122a.b. Harmony and Theory IA–IIB (1.5) B166 R&B/Funk Bass (1)
Six credit units required. See General Requirements for course description. Class is designed to expose bassists to classic R&B and funk styles through the
52 extensive use of detailed transcriptions including Stax, Motown, Earth, Wind and
M022a.b.,M132a.b.,M231a.b. Ear Training IA–IIIB (1.5) Fire, Tower Of Power and other influential songs, players and styles. One lecture
Nine credit units required. See General Requirements for course description. hour per week for one quarter.

ELECTIVES B167 Walking Basslines (1)


Bass students may fulfill their elective credit requirements by choosing from Designed to help the bassist construct and connect walking bass lines through
program-specific electives, general electives, or entry-level electives offered by various chord changes and forms. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
other programs; see course offerings for options.
B170 Blues Bass (1)
ENTRY-LEVEL ELECTIVES Class focuses on standard blues progressions, rhythmic interpretation and pen-
B074 Melodic Duets for Electric Bass (1) tatonic scale construction. Specific topics include 12-bar and 8-bar form, minor
An in-depth reading class for bassists which focuses on performing melodic blues, straight and swing eighth note interpretation, and application of major and
lines in the context of classical and jazz duets. One lecture/lab hour per week minor pentatonic scales as well as standard blues bass patterns, improvised
for one quarter. basslines and fills. One hour per week for one quarter.

B075 Rhythm Reading Workout (1) B071 20th Century Jazz Bass I (1)
Taught by a drum instructor, this course trains bassists in the same methods of Traces the evolution of the jazz rhythm section, in particular the evolution of
counting and subdividing meter and rhythm used by professional drummers. Top- basslines, from the time of Louis Armstrong through Bill Evans and Brad Mehl-
ics include time signatures, beat subdivision, note value relationships, cut-time dau. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
meter, swing interpretation and more. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
B072 20th Century Jazz Bass II (1)
A continuation of B071 (the courses may be taken in any order). One lecture
hour per week for one quarter.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Bass)
B174 Jaco Pastorius Basslines (1) B175 Afro-Cuban Bass (1)
This elective focuses on the structural, theoretical, technical and harmonic as- Explores different styles of Afro-Cuban music including Bolero, Cha-Cha, Mam-
pects of classic recordings and basslines from one of the most influential bass bo, Songo, Naningo and Merengue. Students apply rhythms to standard Latin
guitarists in the history of contemporary music. The in-depth analysis of Jaco’s tunes during class performances. One hour per week for one quarter.
work will include examples from his original compositions as well as his work
with Weather Report, Joni Mitchell, Pat Metheny and others. One lecture hour B180 Bass Gym (1)
per week for one quarter. Prerequisite: B011a Playing Techniques IA. This is a drill class based on exer-
cises from Playing Techniques I. Exercises will be performed with a metronome;
B176 Les Claypool Basslines (1) the focus is on tone and endurance. One lab hour per week for one quarter.
Class explores the basslines of Les Claypool in the context of Primus repertoire
through transcriptions, analysis and performance. One hour per week for one quarter. B205 Fretless Bass (1)
Concepts such as intonation and vibrato are discussed along with analysis of
B179 Red Hot Chili Peppers Basslines (1) transcriptions of fretless bass masters including Jaco Pastorius, Pino Palladino
Class explores the basslines of Flea in the context of Red Hot Chili Peppers and Mick Karn. One hour per week for one quarter.
repertoire through transcriptions, analysis and performance. One hour per week
for one quarter. B302 Brazilian Bass (1)
Explores different styles of Brazilian music including Bossa Nova, Samba, Parti-
B301 Beatles Basslines (1) do Alto and Baian. Students apply rhythms to standard Latin tunes during class
Class explores the bass lines of Paul McCartney in the context of Beatles rep- performances. One hour per week for one quarter. 53
ertoire through transcriptions, analysis and performance. One hour per week for
one quarter. B377 James Brown Rhythm Section (1)
Performance workshop for bassists and drummers utilizing detailed transcrip-
BASS-SPECIFIC ELECTIVES (available only to bass majors) tions from the book, “The Funkmasters: the Great James Brown Rhythm Sec-
B163 Slap Bass (1) tions 1960-1973”. Students will perform the bass lines and grooves in class with
This hands-on workshop is designed to enhance slap technique and groove. drummers. One hour per week for one quarter.
Songs, exercises and grooves in a variety of musical styles are used to develop
thumb strength, slap syncopation, rhythm, phrasing, ad-lib and funk licks, solo- ADVANCED ELECTIVES (see course descriptions for prerequisites)
ing, and shuffle, swing and funk grooves. Performances are followed by critique
and discussion. One lecture hour per week for one quarter. B177 Modal Improvisation (1)
Prerequisite: B021b Fretboard Basics IB. Students learn to analyze scale choic-
B165 Jazz Bass (1) es for eight standard chord types and play smoothly through various types of
An introduction to the fundamentals of walking basslines including 4/4 and 3/4 chord progressions. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
meter, ballads and variations on standard patterns. One lecture/lab hour per
week for one quarter. B171 Private Upright Lessons (1)
Prerequisite: instructor approval. Weekly private lessons on the upright bass.
B173 Bass and Drum Workshop (1) One half-hour per week for one quarter. Repeatable for credit.
Performance workshop for bassists and drummers that takes an in-depth look at
the musical dependency between the two instruments and the effect that it has
on the groove. Particular attention is given to the intertwining of bass and drum
parts and solidifying the groove. Two hours per week for one quarter; repeatable
for credit.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Bass)
B256 Contemporary Improvisation (1)
Prerequisite: B021b Fretboard Basics IB. An in-depth analysis of diatonic and
chromatic passing notes used to create basslines and solos over standard chord
progressions. Class will learn to create linear basslines and solos utilizing these
concepts over diatonic and non-diatonic chord progressions with applications to
4, 5 and 6-string electric bass. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.

B300 Advanced Bass RSW (1)


Prerequisite: M041Bb Reading IB, B011b Playing Techniques IB. For the ad-
vanced bassist, this workshop uses original compositions to explore the intricate
technical possibilities of the instrument in a group setting with a concentration
on the groove. One hour per week for one quarter. Repeatable for credit.

B310 Advanced Bass RSW II (1)


Prerequisites: M041Bb Music Reading IB, B011b Playing Techniques IB. A con-
tinuation of B300 (the courses may be taken in any order). One lecture hour per
week for one quarter.

54 B304 Motown Bass (1)


Prerequisites: M041b Reading IB. Class studies the work of legendary bass-
ist James Jamerson using transcriptions taken from the book “Standing in the
Shadows of Motown”. Students perform examples in class with play-along
tracks. One hour per week for one quarter.

B305 Motown Bass II (1)


Prerequisite: M041Bb Music Reading IB. A continuation of B304 (the courses
may be taken in any order). One lecture hour per week for one quarter.

B333 Led Zeppelin Basslines (1)


Prerequisite: M041Bb Reading IB. Class explores the bass lines of John Paul
Jones in the context of the Led Zeppelin repertoire. Extensive and detailed tran-
scriptions, performance and analysis. One hour per week for one quarter.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Guitar)

Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 Quarter 5 Quarter 6


course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits
major area 55.5 credits

private lesson T010a 2 T010b 2 T120a 2 T120b 2 T210a 2 T210b 2

live playing workshops E020a 1 E020b 1 E120a 1 E120b 1 E210a 1 E210b 1
single string improvisation G011a 1.5 G011b 1.5 G112a 1.5 G112b 1.5 G211a 1.5 G211b 1.5
rhythm guitar G021a 1.5 G021b 1.5 G122a 1.5 G1122b 1.5 G221a 1.5 G221b 1.5
rhythm section workshop E01a 1.5 E01b 1.5 E02a 1.5 E02b 1.5 E03a 1.5 E03b 1.5
reading M041Ga 1.5 M041Gb 1.5 M142Ga 1.5 M142Gb 1.5 M241Ga 1.5 M241Gb 1.5
guitar studio recording G251 1.5
musicianship 16.5 credits
harmony & theory M021a 1.5 M021b 1.5 M122a 1.5 M122b 1.5 M221 1.5
ear training M022a 1.5 M022b 1.5 M132a 1.5 M132b 1.5 M231a 1.5 M231b 1.5
electives 18 credits
various 3 3 3 3 3 3
TOTAL 90 CREDITS 15 15 15 15 15 15
Upon completion of the above 90 credit units, student is eligible to apply for the Associate of Arts in Performance (Guitar)
55
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Guitar)
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS G021a.b. Rhythm Guitar IA-IB (1.5)
The following course requirements must all be satisfactorily completed in order An introduction to harmony as it is applied to the guitar fingerboard. Students
to qualify for the Associate of Arts in Performance (Guitar). learn to organize the neck into patterns and develop the ability to construct
chords on the spot. Major, minor, and dominant-seventh quality chords are
All course descriptions include course number, title, number of credits per quar- taught in open and movable shapes and applied to everyday rhythms and chord
ter, prerequisites (where applicable), description of content, and contact hours progressions. Rhythm techniques concentrate on developing steady time and
per week. learning typical strumming patterns and other accompaniment textures. One
lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
PERFORMANCE
T010a.b., T120a.b., T210a.b. Private Lesson IA-IIIB (2) G122a.b. Rhythm Guitar IIA-IIB (1.5)
Twelve credit units required. See General Requirements for course description. Prerequisite: G021b Rhythm Guitar IB. Development of chord construction skills
based on the five major scale fingering patterns, including the theory and ap-
E020a.b., E120a.b., E210a.b. Live Playing Workshops IA-IIIB (1) plication of harmonized major scales. Introduces syncopated eighth-note rhythm
Six credit units required. See General Requirements for course description. figures using different harmonic textures from full chords to single-note accom-
paniment. Easy and moderate chord transposition is also covered. One lecture
G011a.b. Single String Improvisation IA-IB (1.5) hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
An introduction to the fundamentals of electric guitar playing including various
picking styles and performance techniques. The development of an organized G221a.b. Rhythm Guitar IIIA-IIIB (1.5)
56 approach to the neck is stressed through the application of major and minor dia- Prerequisite: G122b Rhythm Guitar IIB. This course is designed around writing
tonic and pentatonic scales and triad arpeggios in a variety of keys and patterns. and performing rhythm guitar parts in a variety of styles. Concepts introduced
Improvisation in major and minor tonalities is introduced, including aspects of include voice leading on the fingerboard and the use of sixteenth note and triplet
melodic construction and rhythmic phrasing. One lecture hour plus one lab hour syncopation. The ability to improvise and apply appropriate rhythm parts in con-
per week for two quarters. text will be stressed through classroom performance. Moderate to difficult chord
transposition is also covered. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for
G112a.b. Single String Improvisation IIA-IIB (1.5) two quarters.
Prerequisite: G011b Single String Improvisation IB. Begins with an exploration
of “blues tonality”, including the mastery and usage of blues, Dorian, and Mix- E01a.b. Rhythm Section Workshop IA-IB (1.5)
olydian scales over dominant seventh harmonies. Diatonic seventh arpeggios An introduction to ensemble performance. Concentration is placed on listening,
and their applications are covered along with alternate major and minor-tonality dynamics, awareness of song form, and basic chart reading as well as practi-
scales, culminating in the development of diatonic key-center improvisation. One cal performing techniques such as giving and following cues, instrument setup,
lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters. sound, and stage presence. Students perform each week and develop funda-
mental technical approaches to a variety of popular styles while gaining live
G211a.b. Single String Improvisation IIIA-IIIB (1.5) experience. Two lecture/ensemble hours per week for two quarters.
Prerequisite: G112b Single String Improvisation IIB. Chromatic variations on
key-center improvisation are introduced, including modal interchange and sec- E02a.b. Rhythm Section Workshop IIA-IIB (1.5)
ondary dominants. Symmetrical scales, including chromatic, diminished, and Prerequisite: E01b Rhythm Section Workshop IB. Ensemble performance em-
whole-tone, are introduced and applied. Other topics include analysis of and phasizing the fundamental rhythm section textures of various popular styles and
improvisation over non-root position chords and the development of the “chord/ the skills necessary for playing them. Emphasis is also placed on handling varia-
scale” concept of improvising. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for tions in typical song form, improving chart reading skills, and taking a leadership
two quarters. role within the group. Two lecture/ensemble hours per week for two quarters.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Guitar)
E03a.b. Rhythm Section Workshop IIIA-IIIB (1.5) M022a.b.,M132a.b.,M231a.b. Ear Training IA – IIIB (1.5)
Prerequisite:E02b Rhythm Section Workshop IIB. Ensemble Performance with Nine credit units required. See General Requirements for course description.
an emphasis on popular song styles. Students play pre-composed melodies
over charts including both key center harmonies and chromatic variations. A ELECTIVES
final project culminates in a concert performance. One lecture/ensemble hour Guitar students may fulfill their elective credit requirements by choosing from
per week for two quarters plus final project/performance. program-specific electives, general electives, or entry-level electives offered by
other programs; see course offerings for options.
M041Ga.b. Reading IA-IB (1.5)
Develops the fundamentals of music reading centered around the middle of the ENTRY-LEVEL ELECTIVES
neck. Includes counting and reading basic rhythmic figures and rests, sharp and G155 Jazz Listening (1)
flat key signatures and non-diatonic notes. Also includes fundamentals of chart Course covers a wide range of jazz styles and history. Using video and audio ex-
reading and transposing to concert pitch (reading an octave higher than written). cerpts, the works of Charlie Parker, Wes Montgomery, John Coltrane and many oth-
One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters. er important jazz figures are explored. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.

M142Ga.b. Reading IIA-IIB (1.5) G158 Blues Listening (1)


Prerequisite: M041Gb Reading IB. Class covers reading on the lower and upper Nearly every current electric guitar style has its roots in blues, and this course
part of the neck. Learn to read and count “cut time”, 3/4 meter and syncopated is designed to expose guitarists to the most influential players in the develop-
rhythmic figures. Continue chromatic studies in the fifth position, transposing to ment of modern electric styles and techniques. Recordings by players including
concert pitch and chart reading, with a stronger emphasis on ensemble reading T-Bone Walker and the “Three Kings” (BB, Albert and Freddie) among others 57
performance. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters. will be discussed and analyzed and their influence will be traced through later
generations of players. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
M241Ga.b. Reading IIIA-IIIB (1.5)
Prerequisite: M142Gb Reading IIB. Learn to count and read in odd meters and G165 Classical Guitar (1)
changing meters. Class covers reading up and down string sets, melodies with Learn the fundamental right hand classical guitar techniques for arpeggios,
a range outside a single position, position shifting, interpretation and developing scales, tremolo, harmonics, and rasquedo and apply them to classical guitar
sightreading techniques. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two literature. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
quarters.
G173 Guitar Maintenance and Repair (1)
G251 Guitar Studio Recording (1.5) Learn techniques of guitar setup including truss-rod, action, and intonation ad-
Prerequisites: G112b Single String Improvisation IIB. Course provides individu- justment. Also covered are basic guitar electronics as well as finish maintenance
alized recording session experience in a professional project studio. Students and various other instrument needs. One hour lecture per week for one quarter.
complete a 2-3 song demo CD under the guidance of a guitar instructor-pro-
ducer, creating and recording rhythm patterns, fills and solos over prerecorded GUITAR-SPECIFIC ELECTIVES (available only to guitar majors)
rhythm tracks. One session hour per week for one quarter plus final project. M050 Reading Boot Camp (Slow Lane) (1)
Prerequisite: M041Ga Music Reading IA. Each week will focus on the most im-
MUSICIANSHIP portant aspects of each chapter in the regular Music Reading curriculum. Em-
M021a.b.,M122a.b.,M221 Harmony and Theory IA – III (1.5) phasis will be placed on reading and counting rhythms, learning the notes on the
Seven and one-half credit units required. See General Requirements for course fingerboard and reading melodies in different positions on the fingerboard. One
description. lecture hour per week for one quarter.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Guitar)
M051 Reading Boot Camp (Fast Lane) (1) onstrations. Additional topics include building your own pedal board, guitar synthe-
Prerequisite: M142b Music Reading IIB. Provides in-depth review of reading sizers and using effects loops. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
skills based on Music Reading curriculum. Students that have trouble with the
core reading course will find an outlet to develop reading skills and bring their G160 Acoustic Guitar (1)
individual levels up to (and beyond) the standards of the Guitar Music Reading Class covers the basic techniques of popular acoustic guitar playing from use of
core class. The final quiz will be a mock retest of the actual Music Reading final a flatpick to fingerpicking. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
exam. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
G164 Guitar Heroes of the ‘60s and ‘70s (1.5)
G070 Rumba Workout (1) Analysis of the classic rock solos of Chuck Berry, Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page,
This course focuses on the picking-hand rhythms of the Rumba and other Latin Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, David Gilmore, Carlos Santana, Joe Walsh, Don Felder,
guitar grooves to generate a rhythm guitar-intensive workout experience. One and Billy Gibbons. Objective is to expand your own vocabulary by understanding
lecture hour per week for one quarter. how the great solos were put together and played. One lecture hour per week
plus one lab hour for one quarter.
M072 Guitar/Vocal Accompaniment (1)
Learn to accompany your own vocals on guitar with practical techniques and G168 Acid Jazz Guitar I (1)
rhythm patterns and exercises based on song excerpts common to styles in- Students study the instrumental-funk style of Maceo Parker, Ronny Jordan, Gray
cluding pop, rock, folk, country, and alternative. One lecture hour per week for Boy All Stars etc. Emphasis will be on rhythm guitar playing, rhythmic soloing
one quarter. and chart reading. Some weekly preparation work is required. Two workshop
58 hours per week for one quarter.
G153 Slide Guitar (1)
Learn the fundamentals of slide guitar and its application to various styles. Top- G170 Blues Guitar (1.5)
ics include achieving proper touch and good tone, essential rock and blues vo- Covers the fundamentals of the blues style, including rhythm techniques for
cabulary, open tunings and more. One lecture hour for one quarter. shuffles, slow blues, jump blues and other blues-related rhythms as well as such
soloing concepts as chord/scale relationships and stylistic phrasing. Traditional
G156 Metal Guitar (1.5) techniques include slide guitar and finger style blues. One hour lecture plus one
This class analyzes and examines the role of the guitar in Metal’s heaviest and lab hour per week for one quarter.
most successful bands throughout the 80’s & 90’s, including Metallica, Slayer,
Pantera and Megadeth. The curriculum will break down each riff and solo, laying G171 Twang Guitar (1)
the groundwork for proper Rock/Metal technique while also providing historical Explore classic guitar instrumentals in the “surf/spy” genre. Students learn clas-
perspective. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for one quarter; each sic songs by groups including the Ventures, Duane Eddy and Dick Dale and
student is required to perform in class three times. perform them with a rhythm section. One half-hour lecture and one-and-one-half
hour lab per week for one quarter.
G157 Applied Metal Guitar (1.5)
An examination of Metal bands and guitar styles with an emphasis on harmonic G176 Guitar Workout (1)
analysis and applied Metal techniques. Students learn solos riff-by-riff as they This class offers a one-hour weekly “training session” that exposes guitarists to
develop advanced Rock/Metal techniques. One lecture hour and one lab hour exercises, licks and concepts that can be adapted and added to their personal
per week for one quarter; each student is required to perform (3) times. practice routines. One lecture/workshop hour per week for one quarter.

G159 Guitar EFX (1) G184 Alternative Guitar Heroes (1.5)


An overview of the most popular guitar effect devices. Gain and tone shaping, Analysis and performance of contemporary rock guitar solos, including those of
modulation, delay and reverb are covered through audio examples and live dem- Kurt Cobain, Jerry Cantrell, Tom Morello, Billy Corgan, Kim Thayil, John Frusci-
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Guitar)
ante, Dave Navarro, the Edge, and Lenny Kravitz. One lecture hour and one lab all aspects of their musicianship in the context of rehearsal and performance.
hour per week for one quarter. Some sight reading involved. One ensemble hour per week for one quarter.

G271 Playing Techniques for Guitar (1) G143 Jazz Guitar Ensemble (1)
Students learn ideas and techniques from classical guitar tradition and apply Prerequisite: M041Gb Reading IB. Provides in-depth development of small (4-
them to the electric guitar. One lecture hour per week for one quarter. and 5-part) electric guitar ensemble reading skills utilizing jazz repertoire as
a basis. Students will be provided with the opportunity to refine and enhance
ADVANCED ELECTIVES (see course descriptions for prerequisites) all aspects of their musicianship in the context of rehearsal and performance.
M051 Reading Boot Camp (Fast Lane) (1) Some sight reading involved. One ensemble hour per week for one quarter.
Prerequisite: M142b Music Reading IIB. Reinforces and expands reading skills
presented in the required Music Reading curriculum. Designed for students who G144 Funk Guitar Ensemble (1)
are having difficulty with reading and want additional structured coursework to Prerequisite: M142Gb Reading IIB. Provides in-depth development of small (4-
meet or exceed the required standards. Final quiz is based on actual Music and 5-part) electric guitar ensemble reading skills utilizing funk repertoire as
Reading final exam. One lecture hour per week for one quarter. a basis. Students will be provided with the opportunity to refine and enhance
all aspects of their musicianship in the context of rehearsal and performance.
G133 Jazz Workshop I (1) Some sight reading involved. One ensemble hour per week for one quarter.
Prerequisite: M021b Harmony and Theory IB, G011b Single String Improvisa-
tion IB, G021b Rhythm Guitar IB. Class designed for the guitarist with little or G152 Jimi Hendrix Rhythm Guitar (1)
no jazz experience or the guitarist who would like to fill in the holes in his or Prerequisite: G021b Rhythm Guitar IB. Learn how to improvise rhythm parts in 59
her jazz playing. Topics include playing through chord changes and developing the style of “Little Wing,” “Bold as Love,” and “Castles Made of Sand.” Develop
a vocabulary for standard jazz progressions. Also covers duo accompaniment major and minor pentatonic double-stop vocabulary and learn to adapt Hendrix-
techniques i.e. walking bass lines with chords and bossa-nova bass with chords. style rhythm fills to fit popular progressions or original songs. Techniques include
One lecture hour per week for one quarter. thumb-fretting, the “Hendrix Chord,” and funk-rock rhythms. One lecture hour
per week for one quarter.
G233 Jazz Workshop II (1)
Prerequisite M163 Jazz Workshop I. An in-depth study of the modes of melodic G154 Shred Guitar (1)
minor and their application in jazz improvisation. Emphasis on developing lines Prerequisite: G112b Single String Technique IIB. Class focuses on improvisation
for standard jazz progressions. Also covered are practice techniques for jazz with advanced shred concepts and techniques including speed picking, sweep
development. One lecture hour per week for one quarter. picking, tapping, string skipping, as well as applying three- and four-note-per-
string scale patterns. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
G141 Classical Guitar Ensemble (1)
Prerequisite: M041Gb Reading IB. In-depth development of small (four- and G161 Applied Rock Improvisation (1)
five-part) electric guitar ensemble reading performance skills based on guitar Prerequisite: G112bSingle String Improvisation IIB. Designed to help the student
reading curriculum. Students refine and enhance all aspects of their musician- become a better rock soloist by applying improvising techniques over different
ship in the context of guitar ensemble rehearsal and performance. Some sight rhythm tracks. This is a workshop class where students discuss each other’s so-
reading involved. One lecture-ensemble hour per week for one quarter. los as well as receiving instructor critique. One lecture/ensemble hour per week
for one quarter. May be repeated for credit.
G142 Pop Guitar Ensemble (1)
Prerequisite: M041Gb Reading IB. Provides in-depth development of small (4- G162 Applied Technique (1)
and 5-part) electric guitar ensemble reading skills utilizing pop music repertoire Prerequisite: G011b Single String Improvisation IB. Guitar course designed to
as a basis. Students will be provided with the opportunity to refine and enhance increase playing speed through chord changes over the entire fretboard and
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Guitar)
combine all the techniques learned in Single String Improvisation classes. One al guitarist/instructor, students record in a variety of popular music styles while
lecture hour per week for one quarter. May be repeated for credit learning how to create parts and understand different recording techniques re-
lated to the guitar. One private session hour per week for one quarter.
G163 Chord Melody I (1)
Prerequisite: G122b Rhythm Guitar IIB. An introduction to the art of orchestrat-
G172 Fusion Masters (1.5)
Prerequisites: G112a Single String Improvisation IIA, G122a Rhythm Guitar IIA,
ing melody, chords and bass lines on the guitar neck. Lead sheet interpretation
M142Ga Reading IIA. Class covers intermediate-to-advanced topics in fusion
and jazz improvisation techniques are also covered. One lecture hour per week
performance and their application to the guitar including chord voicings, rehar-
for one quarter.
monization, transcription, and improvising over changes. One lecture hour and
one lab hour per week for one quarter.
G263 Chord Melody II (1)
Prerequisite G163 Chord Melody I. The application of chord melody techniques G174 Guitar Heroes of the ‘80s (1.5)
taught in Chord Melody I. Emphasis is on incorporating techniques and develop- Prerequisite: G011b Single String Improvisation IB. Analyze and perform the so-
ing repertoire. One lecture hour per week for one quarter. los of modern rock players such as Eddie Van Halen, Steve Vai, Randy Rhoads,
Nuno Bettencourt, John Pettrucci, Marty Freidman, and Yngwie Malmsteen as
G166 Eclectic Electric Guitar (1.5) a way of improving rock soloing skills. One lecture hour and one lab hour per
Prerequisite: G170 Blues Guitar, G011b Single String Improvisation IB. Learn to week for one quarter.
play lines and solos in the style of Larry Carlton, Robben Ford, Lee Ritenour and
others. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for one quarter. G175 Melodic Soloing (1)
60 Prerequisite: G011b Single String Improvisation IB. Students solo over basic-to-
G167 Country Guitar (1.5) complex chord progressions with emphasis on the elements of melodic playing,
Prerequisite: G011b Single String Improvisation IB, G021b Rhythm Guitar IB. including chord tones, phrasing, sound and technique. Includes rhythm section
Learn typical progressions involving rhythm guitar and soloing techniques appli- accompaniment and critiqued performances. One lecture/workshop hour per
cable to contemporary country music. Begins with the essentials and moves into week for one quarter.
specialized techniques, including banjo rolls, open-string licks and pedal steel
effects. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for one quarter. G250 Recording Guitar (1)
Prerequisite: G011b Single String Improvisation IB. Combining the art of guitar
G169 Jazz Guitar I (1.5) playing with the skills of engineering, this class is a must for the studio-minded
Prerequisite: G112b Single String Improvisation IIB, G122b Rhythm Guitar IIB. guitar player. Includes topics such as signal flow, microphone selection and
Class covers the vocabulary used in jazz improvisation, including use of scales, placement, EQ, dynamic processing and effects. Learn techniques used to cap-
modes, idioms, and typical bebop phrases One lecture hour and one lab hour ture and define the tone of some of the world’s greatest guitar players. One
per week for one quarter. lecture hour per week for one quarter. Enrollment limited to 10 students.

G269 Jazz Guitar II (1.5) G266 Advanced Electric Guitar Styles (1.5)
Prerequisite: G169 Jazz Guitar I. Class explores inside and outside playing, Prerequisite: G112b Single String Improvisation IIB. This class will show you
symmetrical scales, polychords, and pentatonics as tools for jazz guitar improvi- how to make the leap into becoming a truly professional guitarist. Discussions
sation. One lecture hour and lab one hour per week for one quarter. and demonstrations will explore improvising and composing guitar parts and so-
los in both live and studio situations. Different schools of rhythm guitar, prepar-
G240 Basic Professional Studio Skills (2) ing your instruments for the studio, effects and tone, live playing, and employ-
Prerequisite: G112b Single String Improvisation IIB. This hands-on course will ment strategies will also be covered. Students study actual charts from recent
focus on learning basic studio survival skills applicable to all styles from a ses- TV dates, film scores, and CDs and learn what it takes to “make it” playing in
sion guitarist’s perspective. In one-on-one recording sessions with a profession- arenas and studios. Two lecture/lab hours per week for one quarter.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Guitar)
G268 Acid Jazz Guitar II (1) G302 Funk Guitar (1.5)
Prerequisites: G168 Acid Jazz Guitar I or G011b Single String Improvisation Prerequisite: G021b Rhythm Guitar IB, G011b Single String Improvisation IB.
IB. Continuation of Acid Jazz Guitar I. Some weekly preparation work required. Master the art of the groove! This class covers all the essential techniques of
(Students will be given charts and CD to prepare for the class) Two workshop funk rhythm guitar from the fundamentals to more advanced concepts and pro-
hours per week for one quarter. vides the tools to improve overall rhythm skills. The curriculum is based on tra-
ditional funk, inspired by artists such as James Brown, Earth, Wind & Fire and
G270 Blues Guitar II (1.5) Prince. One lecture plus one lab hour per week for one quarter.
Prerequisites: G112A Single String Improvisation IIA, G170 Blues Guitar. This
course explores expanded jazz-blues harmony, soloing techniques, and the re- G304 Advanced Groove Concepts (1.5)
lationship between blues and other musical styles including jazz, rock and roll Prerequisite: G021b Rhythm Guitar IB, G011b Single String Improvisation IB.
and R&B. Students gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of the blues This course covers both technical and practical approaches to groove-based
tradition and related technical skills. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week styles. Techniques of time discipline, odd-meter studies and playing over shifts
for one quarter. in feel and meter will be explored. Stylistic studies include early R&B, Motown,
Reggae, contemporary African styles and New Orleans grooves. One lecture
G273 Rock Rhythm Guitar (1.5) hour and one lab hour per week for one quarter.
Prerequisite: G021b Rhythm Guitar IB. Learn the application of chord tech-
niques to today’s rock styles. Includes specific contemporary examples. One G306 Developing the Art of Two-Line Improvisation (1)
lecture hour and one lab hour per week for one quarter. Prerequisite: G112B Single String Improvisation IIB. Taught by master guitarist
Jimmy Wyble, this course is a step-by-step introduction and development of 61
G272 Rock Lead Guitar (1) the harmonic awareness, right and left hand techniques and intervallic designs
Prerequisite: G011b Single String Improvisation IB. Class covers the melodic necessary for contrapuntal improvisation. Emphasis is placed on construction of
application of techniques and concepts taught in core classes to rock guitar intervals, chord structures, developing vocabulary and phrases that exemplify
styles. Includes hammer-ons, pull-offs, string bending, two-handed fretting tech- two-line artistry. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
niques and other stylistic nuances of rock soloing. One lecture hour per week
for one quarter.

G275 Afro-Cuban Guitar (1)


Prerequisite: G021b Rhythm Guitar IB. An introduction to the role of the guitar
in the Afro-Cuban rhythm section, including how to create authentic-sounding
parts. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.

G301 Brazilian Guitar (1)


Prerequisite: G021b Rhythm Guitar IB. An introduction to the role of the guitar
in the Brazilian rhythm section, including Bossa Nova and Samba, and how to
create authentic sounding parts. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Keyboard Technology)

Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 Quarter 5 Quarter 6


course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits
major area 65 credits
private lesson T010a 2 T010b 2 T120a 2 T120b 2 T210a 2 T210b 2
live playing workshops E020a 1 E020b 1 E120a 1 E120b 1 E210a 1 E210b 1
keyboard technique K011a 1 K011b 1 K112a 1 K112b 1
keyboard voicings K021a 1 K021b 1 K122a 1 K122b 1 K221a 1 K221b 1
groove K041a 1.5 K041b 1.5 K143a 1 K143b 1 K241a 1.5 K241b 1.5
keyboard improvisation K211a 1.5 K211b 1.5
musical director workshop K245a 2 K245b 2
reading M041Ka 1 M041Kb 1 M142Ka 1 M142Kb 1
digital music K031a 1.5 K031b 1.5 K131a 1.5 K131b 1.5 K231a 2 K231b 2
keyboard programming K042a 1 K042b 1 K164a 1 K164b 1 K263a 2 K263b 2
musicianship 12 credits
harmony & theory M021a 1.5 M021b 1.5 M122a 1.5 M122b 1.5
ear training M022a 1.5 M022b 1.5 M132a 1.5 M132b 1.5
electives 13 credits
62 various 2 2 2.5 2.5 2 2
TOTAL 90 CREDITS 15 15 15 15 15 15
Upon completion of the above 90 credit units, student is eligible to apply for the Associate of Arts in Performance (Keyboard Technology)

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Keyboard Technology)
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS minor tonalities utilizing a key center approach and variations. Students improvise
The following course requirements must all be satisfactorily completed in order over simple blues and jazz progressions. One lecture hour and one lab hour per
to qualify for the Associate of Arts in Performance (Keyboard Technology). week for two quarters.

All course descriptions include course number, title, number of credits per quarter, K041a.b. Groove IA-IB (1.5)
Learn the basic role of the keyboard player in an ensemble with an emphasis on
prerequisites (where applicable), description of content, and contact hours per week.
time, tempo, and rhythmic feel in performance. Drills focus on rhythmic awareness
PERFORMANCE and consistency, playing against a steady pulse, and basic hand independence.
Groove IB concentrates on eighth note syncopation, playing with a drummer,
T010a.b., T120a.b., T210a.b. Private Lesson IA-IIIB (2)
swing and straight feels. Two lecture/ensemble hours per week for two quarters.
Twelve credit units required. See General Requirements for course description.
K143a.b. Groove IIA-IIB (1)
E020a.b., E120a.b., E210a.b. Live Playing Workshops IA-IIIB (1) Prerequisite: K041b Groove IB. Learn basic keyboard groove patterns in diverse
Six credit units required. See General Requirements for course description. styles including rock, pop ballads, blues, country, bossa nova, salsa, reggae,
swing and other popular genres. One lecture hour per week for two quarters.
K011a.b. Keyboard Technique IA-IB (1)
Covers exercises for the development of keyboard facility and precision control over K241a.b. Groove IIIA-IIIB (1.5)
melodic components including scales, patterns, arpeggios, and intervals. Keyboard Prerequisite: K143b Groove IIB. An introduction to sixteenth-note syncopation
Technique IB concentrates on hand independence, melodic phrasing, stamina, and and its application to contemporary musical styles, with emphasis on bass lines,
contemporary keyboard techniques. One lecture hour per week for two quarters. comping and hand-against-hand rhythmic performance. Second half of the course
concentrates on stylistic rhythms, half- and double-time feels and two-keyboard
K112a.b. Keyboard Technique IIA-IIB (1) performance. Also covered are synth bass lines, brass parts and organ & clavinet 63
Prerequisite: K011b Keyboard Technique IB. A continuation of the techniques and con- playing styles. Two lecture/ensemble hours per week for two quarters.
cepts of contemporary keyboard playing. One lecture hour per week for two quarters.
K245a.b. Musical Director Workshop (2)
K021a.b. Keyboard Voicings IA-IB (1) Keyboard players make natural musical directors, a role that calls on a variety of
Fundamentals of chord construction, symbol recognition, and voice leading. skills. This class will prepare students to direct other musicians in a professional
Course covers triads, slash chords, inversions, added-note chords, and diatonic live setting while performing such typical MD tasks as creating intros and endings,
harmony. Weekly sightreading is used to reinforce performance. One lecture hour preparing basic slash charts, directing walk-ons and walk-offs, and vocal accom-
per week for two quarters. paniment. Two lecture hours per week for two quarters.
K122a.b. Keyboard Voicings IIA-IIB (1) M041Ka.b. Reading IA-IB (1)
Prerequisite: K021b Keyboard Voicings IB. Covers seventh chord construction
An introduction to the symbols used for notating melody, rhythm, and harmony.
and symbols with an emphasis on “rootless” voicings as well as exercises in dia-
tonic and chromatic chord movement and left hand accompaniment to melody Class covers clefs, grand staff, ledger lines, song form, and rhythmic syncopation.
and improvisation. Stylistic etudes are used to reinforce performance. One lecture One lecture hour per week for two quarters.
hour per week for two quarters.
M142Ka.b. Reading IIA-IIB (1)
K221a.b. Keyboard Voicings IIIA-IIIB (1) Prerequisite: M041Kb Reading IB. Class examines simple left-hand chord voic-
Prerequisite: K122b Keyboard Voicings IIB. Learn the concepts of chord-scale ings, rhythms involving switching from triplets to duplets and more complex mel-
harmony and apply them to the construction of voicings and chord progressions. ody lines with exercises drawn from contemporary styles. Students learn to read
Students explore the techniques of “tension substitution” and use it to create voic- two-stave arrangements with complex rhythms and harmony. One lecture hour
ings while composing and performing their own progressions. One lecture hour per week for two quarters.
per week for two quarters.
K031a.b. Digital Music IA-IB (1.5)
K211a.b. Keyboard Improvisation (1.5) Students are introduced to the use of digital audio technology as an integral tool
Introduces blues tonality, 7th chord arpeggios, and improvising over all major and in the creation of keyboard-based recordings. Students learn intuitive setup pro-
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Keyboard Technology)
cedures and use of keyboards as digital audio triggers using Logic software. Stu- ENTRY-LEVEL ELECTIVES
dents learn at individual workstations in small groups. One lecture hour and one K006 Keyboard Fundamentals (1)
lab hour per week for two quarters. This class is designed to present “the basics” to self-taught keyboardists in a high-
ly efficient and fun environment. Class covers beginning music notation, chord
K131a.b. Digital Music IIA-IIB (1.5) voicings, note values, time signatures, key signatures and more.
Prerequisite: K031b Digital Music IB. Students learn sequencing as well as the use One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
of sound banks and digital effects using Logic as they complete practical, deadline-
oriented projects. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for two quarters. K002 Digital Music Fundamentals (1)
Learn to manage your music career by harnessing the power of today’s technol-
K231a.b. Digital Music IIIA-IIIB (2) ogy. Classes focus on computer basics, setting up documents and templates in
Prerequisite: K131b Digital Music IIB. Students apply advanced digital record- Word (including creating a bio and resume), learning to manage your business
ing skills culminating in the production of a personal Electronic Press Kit (EPK) with Excel spreadsheets, basic sequencing and recording techniques using Ga-
incorporating original music and video. The EPK is each student’s calling-card for rage Band music production software, and creating professional-looking charts
future professional employment. Two lecture hours per week for two quarters. with Sibelius music notation software. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
K042a.b. Keyboard Programming IA-IB: Basic Synthesis (1) K074 Hip-Hop Keyboards (1)
An introduction to the structure of an analog synthesizer. Includes essential concepts A technical, stylistic and historic look at Hip-Hop from the keyboard perspective.
of subtractive synthesis and synthesized sound production as well as components Students analyze influential artists and styles, learn to compose genre-specific
from wave forms to filters and amplifiers. One lecture hour per week for two quarters. grooves and melodic phrases, and use synthesizers and samplers to create clas-
sic and contemporary sounds. In-depth, hands-on instruction provides students
64 K164a.b. Keyboard Programming IIA-IIB: Intro/Virtual Instruments (1) with a genuine Hip-Hop experience. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
Prerequisite: K042b Keyboard Programming IB. Composing and performing mu-
sic with computer-driven instruments. Using Logic Audio’s vast catalog of virtual K175 Electronic Styles (1)
instruments, students will learn how to trigger and sequence sounds using their Prerequisites: K031a Digital Music 1A or Department Head approval. Learn the
own keyboard and groove skills. Includes advanced sequencing, editing and pro- stylistic embellishments and defining elements of electronic-based music and its
gramming of various instrument combinations in a variety of practical applications. sub-genres such as acid, house, techno, drum and bass, hip hop, chill and more.
One lecture hour per week for two quarters. Concepts are reinforced through assigned projects and hands-on instruction. One
lecture hour per week for one quarter.
K263a.b. Keyboard Programming IIIA-IIIB: Video Scoring (2)
Prerequisite: K164b Keyboard Programming IIB. Students learn to enhance the emotional K162 Funk Keyboards (1)
qualities of video images through the creation of musical background scores. Includes Prerequisite: Department Head approval. Analysis of contemporary funk players
both creative and technical aspects of scoring commercials, TV and film using Apple Logic with an emphasis on understanding the subtle differences in their approach to
Pro digital recording software. Two lecture hours per week for two quarters. groove playing. Teaches the keyboardist two-handed rhythm parts common to
most funk music. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
MUSICIANSHIP
M021a.b.,M122a.b. Harmony and Theory IA – IIB (1.5) K163 R&B/Soul Keyboards (1)
Six credit units required. See General Requirements for course description. Prerequisites: Department Head approval. Develop grooves, rhythms, and har-
monic structure of R&B/Soul keyboard arrangements from the “classic” era of the
M022a.b.,M132a.b. Ear Training IA – IIB (1.5) ‘60s and ‘70s. Also covers chord voicings, techniques, independence drills, and
Six credit units required. See General Requirements for course description. sounds associated with the styles of masters such as Richard Tee, Billy Preston,
Earl Van Dyke etc. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
ELECTIVES
Keyboard students may fulfill their elective credit requirements by choosing from K166 Rock Keyboards (1)
program-specific electives, general electives, or entry-level electives offered by Learn classic and modern rock keyboard techniques as applied to performance
other programs; see course offerings for options. repertoire. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Keyboard Technology)
K165 Blues Keyboards (1) plying the latest technology and receive critiques on performance of assigned rep-
Focuses on technique, groove, scales, and progressions used in authentic blues ertoire. Five lesson hours per quarter for one quarter. May be repeated for credit.
and R&B playing. The class will trace the evolution of the blues through record-
ings and transcribed solos. One lecture hour per week for one quarter. K180 Logic Fastrack (1.5)
Designed for intermediate-to-advanced Logic users, this course focuses on fine-
K172 Accompany Thyself (1) tuning song projects to a professional level. One lecture hour and one lab hour per
Prerequisite: Department Head approval. This class is designed for singer/key- week for one quarter. May be repeated for credit.
board players who want to learn performing skills and keyboard arranging tech-
niques in order to improve the quality of their self-accompaniment. One lecture K252 Keyboard Kontrol (1)
hour per week for one quarter. Learn to add dynamics and style to bass lines, horn parts, synth leads and string ar-
rangements through the use of pitch bends, mod wheels, volume pedals and other
K108 Ableton Live (1) real-time keyboard controller techniques. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
Prerequisite: K031a Digital Music 1A or Department Head approval. Learn the
basic concepts and theory involved in using Ableton Live as a tool for creating, K173 Keyboard Accompaniment Styles (1)
producing and performing music. Students will learn to create a live set, record Prerequisite: K021b Keyboard Voicings IB. Students develop a comprehensive
and manipulate audio, edit and record MIDI, use softsynths and plug-ins, and approach to accompanying singers and instrumentalists in all styles. Topics cov-
how to incorporate it all into spontaneous live performances. One lecture hour per ered include comping rhythms, bass lines, fills, intros and endings, transposition
week for one quarter. tricks, style interpretation, cueing, conducting and more. One lecture hour per
week for one quarter.
K171 Rhythm Programming (1)
Prerequisite: K031a Digital Music 1A or Department Head approval. Learn to cre- ADVANCED ELECTIVES (see course descriptions for prerequisites) 65
ate, record and produce beats using the techniques, concepts and equipment K075 Production Tips & Tricks (1)
used by the pros. Course covers emulative vs. non-emulative programming, real- Prerequisite: K031b Digital Music IB. This course explores production tips and tricks
time and step programming, sampling, “groove-boxes,” and various rhythm pro- that can be applied to demo and live recordings to create professional-sounding
duction techniques. One lecture hour per week for one quarter. results that provide a competitive edge. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.

K185 Keyboard Arranging for Songwriters (1) K070 Composition for Keyboards (1)
Prerequisite: K021b Keyboard Voicings IB or Department Head approval. A compre- Prerequisite: K021b Keyboard Voicings IB. Compose melodies based on simple chord
hensive look at songwriting from a keyboardist’s perspective. Students learn about progressions in a variety of styles. Learn through analysis of Top 40 tunes and widely
song form, intros, endings, breakdowns, comping and rhythm patterns, adding dy- used diatonic chord progressions. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
namics, creating definitive chord progressions and more, with the objective of creating
three new performance-ready songs. One lecture hour per quarter for one quarter. K264 Brazilian Keyboards (1)
Prerequisite: K112B Keyboard Technique IIB. Learn the techniques and repertoire
K107 Contemporary Music Notation, Take-downs and Charts (1) used in Brazilian music with an emphasis on stylistic rhythms and melodic pat-
Prerequisite: M021b Harmony and Theory 1B. This class focuses on the skills terns. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
necessary to create accurate professional music charts by combining ear-training
skills with standardized music notation rules. Concepts covered include road map K265 Afro-Cuban Keyboards (1)
rules, chart layout, indicating drum and rhythm grooves, chord symbol variations Prerequisite: K112B Keyboard Technique IIB. Learn techniques and repertoire
and transcribing rhythms. One lecture hour per week for one quarter. used in Afro-Cuban music with an emphasis on stylistic rhythms and melodic pat-
terns. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
KEYBOARD-SPECIFIC ELECTIVES (available only to keyboard majors)
K010 Keyboard Mastery (1) K270 Chop Shop (1)
Prerequisite: Department Head approval. Advanced keyboard techniques and Prerequisite: K112b Keyboard Technique IIB. An advanced keyboard technique
concepts from world-renowned jazz-fusion artist Russ Ferrante. Students work course focused on improving finger speed and control. One lecture hour per week
closely with Mr. Ferrante on a range of topics from voicings to improvisation to ap- for one quarter. Repeatable for credit.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Drums)
Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 Quarter 5 Quarter 6
course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits
major area 73 credits
private lesson T010a 2 T010b 2 T120a 2 T120b 2 T210a 2 T210b 2
live playing workshops E020a 1 E020b 1 E120a 1 E120b 1 E210a 1 E210b 1
playing techniques P021a 1.5 P021b 1.5 P112a 1.5 P112b 1.5 P211a 1.5 K211b 1.5
rhythm section workshop E01a 2 E01b 2 E2a 2 E2b 2
ensemble techniques P122a 1.5 P122b 1.5
developing your groove P185a 1 P185b 1
contemporary drum concepts P166a 1.5 P166b 1.5
odd meter P250a 1.5 P250b 1.5
music minus one P071a 1 P071b 1
digital drumming P131a 2.5 P131b 2.5
advanced drumming P171a 1.5 P171b 1.5 P169a 1.5 P169b 1.5
studio drumming P240a 2 P240b 2
reading M041Pa 2 M041Pb 2 M142Pa 1.5 M142Pb 1.5 M241Pa 1.5 M241Pb 1.5
musicianship 8 credits
keyboard lab P051a 1 P051b 1
66 harmony & theory M021a 1.5 M021b 1.5
ear training M022a 1.5 M022b 1.5

electives 9 credits
(various) 1 1 1 1 2.5 2.5

TOTAL 90 CREDITS 15 15 15 15 15 15

Upon completion of the above 90 credit units, student is eligible to apply for the Associate of Arts in Performance (Drums)

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Drums)
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS E2a.b. Rhythm Section Workshop IIA-IIB (2)
The following course requirements must all be satisfactorily completed in order Prerequisite: E01b RSW IB. Ensemble performance emphasizing stylistic
to qualify for the Associate of Arts in Performance (Drums). rhythm section textures and applied techniques. Emphasis is also placed on
handling variations in typical song form, improving chart reading skills, and tak-
All course descriptions include course number, title, number of credits per quar- ing a leadership role within the group. Two lecture/ensemble hours per week for
ter, prerequisites (where applicable), description of content, and contact hours two quarters.
per week.
P122a.b. Ensemble Techniques (1.5)
MAJOR AREA Prerequisite: P112b Playing Techniques IIB. Course deals with common tech-
T010a.b., T120a.b., T210a.b. Private Lesson IA-IIIB (2) niques used by drummers in small and large group performance. The focus
Twelve credit units required. See General Requirements for course description. is on reading and execution of written rhythmic phrases in jazz, rock and Lat-
in styles including section and ensemble figures, chart terminology and form,
E020a.b., E120a.b., E210a.b. Live Playing Workshops IA-IIIB (1) phrasing and stylistic interpretation, soloing concepts and solo fills. One lecture
Six credit units required. See General Requirements for course description. hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.

P021a.b. Playing Techniques IA-IB (1.5) P071a.b. Music Minus One Performance (1)
Covers the development of hand technique and essential rudiments for proper drum Drummers play to sequenced tracks of popular songs minus drums. The em-
set performance. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters. phasis is on “locking in” with the track; some chart reading is involved. One
ensemble hour per week for two quarters. 67
P112a.b. Playing Techniques IIA-IIB (1.5)
Prerequisite: P021b Playing Techniques IB. Concentrates on effective timekeep- P131a.b. Digital Drumming (2.5)
ing, development of speed and dexterity, economy of motion, body balance and This comprehensive course is designed to equip drummers to utilize contempo-
eliminating bad habits as well as the application of drum set rudiments. IIB em- rary technology by providing a working knowledge of MIDI sequencing, digital
phasizes interpretation and performance of snare drum solos. One lecture hour audio recording software, drum loop creation and application, custom sample
plus one lab hour per week for two quarters. creation, acoustic drum triggering and designing-creating-wiring an electronic rig
for live use. Students also learn to perform with loops and backing tracks, how to
complement tracks with their playing and how to adjust their time feel in order to
P211a.b. Playing Techniques IIIA-IIIB (1.5)
“lock in”. Two lecture hours and one lab hour per week for two quarters.
Prerequisite: P112b Playing Techniques IIB. Class focuses on more advanced rudi-
ments and their application to the drum set in a variety of musical styles as well as
4-way coordination, odd meter studies, advanced snare drum solos and drum set P171a.b. Advanced Drumming I: Jazz (1.5)
solo transcriptions. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters. Prerequisite: E01b RSW IB. This class explores and demonstrates the historical,
stylistic and technical evolution of jazz from Dixieland to Bebop and beyond. Tech-
niques include ride patterns and left hand comping, basic independence and coor-
E01a.b. Rhythm Section Workshop IA-IB (2)
dination, brush technique, and ensemble interaction. In the second half, the focus
An introduction to ensemble performance. Concentration is placed on listening,
shifts to group interaction, jazz soloing on various song forms, up-tempo swing
dynamics, awareness of song form, and basic chart reading as well as practi-
concepts, cymbal turnarounds, 3/4 time, advanced independence and 4-way jazz
cal performing techniques such as giving and following cues, instrument setup,
coordination. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
sound, and stage presence. Students develop fundamental technical approach-
es to a variety of popular styles through weekly live performance. Two lecture-
ensemble hours per week for two quarters. P169a.b. Advanced Drumming II: Latin (1.5)
Prerequisite: M142Pb Reading IIB, P112b Playing Techniques IIB, E2b Rhythm
Section Workshop IIB. Class develops authentic stylistic hand and foot techniques
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Drums)
through listening, demonstration and classroom practice. The first half focuses M041Pa.b. Reading IA-IB (2)
on popular Brazilian styles including Bossa Nova and Samba. In part two, the Fundamentals of single line and drum set reading. Students learn basic rhyth-
emphasis is on Afro-Cuban styles including Cha Cha, Mambo, Mozambique and mic theory, develop sight reading skills and interpretation of essential rhythmic
others. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters. figures. Two lecture hours per week for two quarters.

P185a.b. Developing Your Groove (1) M142Pa.b. Reading IIA-IIB (1.5)


The goal of this course is to help drummers dramatically improve their time, feel, Prerequisite: M041Pb Reading IB. The emphasis is on time signature reading
independence and sound. Coordination drills that apply to all styles of music are studies, counting and subdivision exercises and applications as well as note
introduced and utilized in class. One lecture/ensemble hour per week for two value relationships. Also included is interpretation of rhythms in different styles,
quarters. independence studies and chart reading. Reading IIB moves into compound
time signatures, changing meters, value indicators and abnormal groupings.
P166a.b. Contemporary Drum Concepts (1.5) One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for two quarters.
Prerequisite: E01b RSW IB. Learn the attitude and technique of rock drumming
through listening examples and transcriptions that expose students to drum- M241Pa.b. Reading IIIA-IIIB (1.5)
mers who have made important contributions to the style. Techniques include Prerequisite: M142b Reading IIB. Class covers interpretation of sixteenth note
warm-ups, motion exercises and single and double bass drum studies. The sec- figures, snare drum reading and etudes in changing meters, orchestral snare
ond half focuses on the continued development of performance skills including drum etudes, reading drum set charts with style and meter changes, and multi-
groove development, soloing concepts, more advanced single and double bass tom reading in preparation for studio recording. One lecture hour and one lab
drum application and sound production. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per hour per week for two quarters.
68
week for two quarters.
MUSICIANSHIP
P250a.b. Odd Meter (1.5) P051a.b. Keyboard Lab (1)
Prerequisite: M142Pb Reading IIB, P112b Playing Techniques IIB, E2b Rhythm Prerequisite: must be currently enrolled PIT student. An introduction to the key-
Section Workshop IIB. Students develop facility with odd-meter rhythmic phras- board especially geared for the drummer. Covers note recognition, scales, inter-
es applied to the drum set and hand drums. Rhythmic phrasing drills utilizing vals and chord construction at the keyboard as a visual and aural aid to required
composite meters and a five-step approach consisting of technique, time, time theory and ear training classes. One hour per week for two quarters.
feel, phrasing, and song form prepare students for applications in all styles of
contemporary drumming. One lecture hour plus one lab per week for two quar- M021a.b. Harmony and Theory IA – IB (1.5)
ters. Three credit units required. See General Requirements for course description.

P240a.b. Studio Drumming (2) M022a.b. Ear Training IA – IB (1.5)


Prerequisites:M142Pb Reading IIB, P112b Playing Techniques IIB, E2b Rhythm Three credit units required. See General Requirements for course description.
Section Workshop IIB, P166b Contemporary Drum Concepts. This “real world”
approach to recording covers all facets of the recording performance experi- ELECTIVES
ence for drummers whether they work in original bands or as independent stu- Drum students may fulfill their elective credit requirements by choosing from
dio musicians. Students perform in a variety of musical situations in a 24-track program-specific electives, general electives, or entry-level electives offered by
Pro Tools studio, developing drum parts, sightreading charts, performing with other programs; see course offerings for options.
backing tracks and live musicians, overdubbing and punching in, and learning
to lock in with loops and tracks. Studio etiquette, sound development and tuning DRUM-SPECIFIC ELECTIVES (available only to Drum majors)
tips are also covered. Each student compiles a CD of their final performances. P080 Timekeeping (1)
Two lecture hours per week for two quarters. Students lean how to develop good timekeeping skills through counting drills,
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Drums)
understanding note duration and spacing, working with metronomes and drum P301 Double Bass Drum Workout (1)
machines, and the importance of upbeats. Students also learn basic set-up fills Class covers use of double bass drum as a means of furthering skills and
and how to play fills in tempo. One lecture hour per week for one quarter. broadening independence. Lectures, demonstrations and exercises emphasize
speed, technique and control. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
P135 How to Practice (1)
Teaches the structure and discipline of efficient, productive practicing on the P306 Inside Studio Drumming (1)
drum set. Students develop individual practice routines and apply them to mate- Rock-influenced drummers like Josh Freese, Kenny Aronoff, Matt Chamberlain,
rial covered in core classes. Also includes performance preparation (prioritizing, Shawn Pelton, Abe Laboriel Jr. and Steve Jordan are part of a new generation of
overcoming anxiety etc.). One lecture hour per week for one quarter. session drummers who have injected fresh versatility and musicality into the role
of studio musician. This class analyzes recordings and takes an in-depth look at
P136 Early Masters of Studio Drumming: 1950s-80s (1) each drummer’s groove, touch, tone, fill vocabulary and time feel. One lecture
Session drummers like Earl Palmer, Hal Blaine, Steve Gadd, Jeff Porcaro, Car- hour per week for one quarter.
los Vega, John “J.R.” Robinson and Vinnie Colaiuta have inspired many young
drummers to replace rock star aspirations for the life of a session musician. Their ADVANCED ELECTIVES (see course descriptions for prerequisites)
drumming brought a fresh approach to rock and pop music as they defined the P132 Drum Transcription and Rhythmic Eartraining (1)
session drumming profession. This class analyzes their recordings for an in- Prerequisites: M041Pb Reading IB; E01b RSW IB. Many of today’s drummers
depth look at each drummer’s groove, touch, tone, fill vocabulary and time feel. can learn and play any piece of written music that is put in front of them, but not
One lecture hour per week for one quarter. many can listen to a recording and transcribe what another drummer is playing
note-for-note. This course trains this skill through the study of exciting transcrip-
P175 Basic Caribbean Drumset (1) tions from the likes of Dennis Chambers, Steve Gadd, Billy Martin, Buddy Rich, 69
Students learn how to perform basic Afro-Cuban and Brazilian styles on the
Max Roach, Art Blakey and others. Solos, grooves and musical forms are ana-
drumset. Emphasis is on gaining the ability to effectively handle any Latin per-
lyzed and transcribed. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
forming situation. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
P137 Chop Busters I (1)
P180 Fill Fest (1) Prerequisite: P021b Playing Techniques IB. This class uncovers weaknesses in
Course shows how to develop a vocabulary of fills on the drum set. Each week, basic hand technique and takes players beyond what they learn in fundamen-
the student is introduced to a new fill concept that can be applied to a variety of tal technique classes. Explores technique exercises and warm-up patterns that
musical situations. Class includes written and audio examples of top contem- develop finger, wrist, and forearm coordination, sticking accuracy, dynamics and
porary rock drummers. Students write out and demonstrate their own fills and rhythmic recognition. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
concepts throughout the class. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
P139 Chop Busters II (1)
P267 Latin Percussion - Brazilian (1) Prerequisite: P137 Chop Busters I. Continues the exploration of technique ex-
Develops basic hand techniques enabling students to perform Brazilian styles ercises and warm-up patterns to develop finger coordination, wrist and forearm
more authentically. Listening, demonstration and classroom practice focus on motion, sticking accuracy, dynamics, rhythmic recognition and confidence in
popular Brazilian rhythms including Bossa Nova and Samba as well as applica- performance. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
tions to other forms of popular music. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
P172 Funk Drums - Classic (1)
P269 Latin Percussion - Afro-Cuban (1) Prerequisites: M041B Percussion Reading IB, P021B Playing Tech IB, E01B
Develops basic hand techniques enabling students to perform Afro-Cuban styles RSW IB. Studies the evolution of funk drumming from James Brown to the early
including Cha Cha, Mambo, Mozambique and others. Listening, demonstration 1980’s through listening and analysis of each groove supported by transcrip-
and classroom practice focus on authenticity as well as applications to other tions. Includes discussion of how to practice the techniques covered. One lec-
forms of popular music. One lecture/ensemble hour per week for one quarter. ture hour per week for one quarter.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Drums)
P173 Funk Drums - Modern (1) P303 Latin/Funk Connection (1)
Prerequisites: M041B Percussion Reading IB, P021B Playing Tech IB, E01B Prerequisites: M041Pb Reading IB, E020b Live Playing Workshop IB and E01b
RSW IB. Studies the evolution of funk drumming from early 1980’s to the present Rhythm Section Workshop IB. This class concentrates on the relationship be-
day. Includes R&B and jazz influence on funk music and explores the relation- tween rhythms in Funk and Afro-Caribbean music and examines how mixing
ship between acid jazz, hip-hop, R&B and earlier funk music. One lecture hour them can provide musicians with soulful and musical grooves. Concentration is
per week for one quarter. on performance and listening. One hour per week for one quarter.

P184 Analysis of Great Grooves (1) P320 Advanced Drum Concepts I (1)
Prerequisites: M041Pb Reading IB, E01b RSW IB, P021b Playing Techniques Prerequisites: M142Pb Reading IIB, P112b Playing Techniques IIB, E02b RSW
IB. Through analysis of influential recordings, this class examines the techniques IIB. This class offers a more advanced and very specific look at hand technique
used by innovative drummers including John Bonham, Vinnie Colaiuta, Danny and execution as applied to the practice pad and the drum set. The class ex-
Carey, David Garibaldi and others to create interesting and eclectic grooves. plores alternate approaches to playing technique that greatly enhance the stu-
One lecture hour per week for one quarter. dent’s ability to get around the drum set quickly and comfortably. One hour per
week for one quarter.
P190 Duets (1)
Prerequisites: M041Pb Reading IB, P021b Playing Techniques IB, E01b Rhythm P321 Advanced Drum Concepts II (1)
Section Workshop IB. This class focuses on duet material that will help students Prerequisite: P320 Advanced Drum Concepts I. This class goes beyond tech-
develop ensemble ability, challenge their reading and technical abilities and de- nique into the world of groupings and advanced exploration of the drum set.
70 velop a degree of healthy performance competition. Progressive duets will be Concepts taught include hand technique, drum set movement, developing sound
analyzed and performed weekly with an emphasis on sensitive phrasing, shad- through technique and advanced fill concepts. A must for drummers who want to
ings, clear articulation, tone production, and touch. Students will be encouraged learn to play blowing licks on the kit. One hour per week for one quarter.
to experiment with various drums to obtain an assortment of timbres. Includes
solo, multi-student and all-class performances. One lecture hour per week for P338 Bebop and Beyond (1)
one quarter. Prerequisites: M142Pb Reading IIB, P112b Playing Technique IIB, E02b Rhythm
Section Workshop IIB. Class focuses on a modern approach to playing jazz with
P270 Drum Solo Analysis, Concepts and Performance (1) a strong emphasis on bebop vocabulary and developing a musical flow of ideas.
Prerequisites: E01b RSW IB, M141Pb Reading IB, P021b Playing Techniques Topics discussed include advanced comping and ride cymbal approach, advanced
IB. This class analyzes famous drum solos past and present from such pioneers hi-hat techniques, development of motifs over standard song forms, polyrhythmic
as Max Roach and Art Blakey to the innovations of Steve Gadd, Tony Williams overlap and metric modulation. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
and Terry Bozzio, topped off with the grooving showmanship and technical tal-
ents of John Blackwell and others. Each week, students analyze and perform
specific concepts and techniques and add them to their own soloing efforts. One
lecture hour per week for one quarter.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Voice)


Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 Quarter 5 Quarter 6
course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits

major area 44 credits


private lesson T010a 2 T010b 2 T120a 2 T120b 2 T210a 2 T210b 2
live playing workshops E020a 1 E020b 1 E120a 1 E120b 1
artist showcase performance E02a 2 E02b 2 V142a 2 V142b 2 V241a 2 V241b 2
art of preparation V040a 1.5 V040b 1.5
vocal technique V011a 1 V011b 1 V112a 1 V112b 1
artist recording sessions V212a 1.5 V212b 1.5
sightreading/sightsinging M041Va 1.5 M041Vb 1.5 V132a 1.5 V132b 1.5

musicianship 24 credits
harmony & theory M021a 1.5 M021b 1.5 M122a 1.5 M122b 1.5
ear training M022a 1.5 M022b 1.5 M132a 1.5 M132b 1.5
keyboard accompaniment EV01a 1.5 EV01b 1.5 M141Va 1.5 M141Vb 1.5 M241a 1.5 M241b 1.5
arranging for singers V183a 1.5 V183b 1.5
71

electives 22 credits
(various) 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 8 8

TOTAL 90 CREDITS 15 15 15 15 15 15

Upon completion of the above 90 credit units, student is eligible to apply for the Associate of Arts in Performance (Voice)

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Voice)
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS V241a.b. Artist Showcase Performance IIIA-IIIB (2)
The following course requirements must all be satisfactorily completed in order Prerequisite: V142b Vocal Performance IIB. The emphasis in this course is on
to qualify for the Associate of Arts in Performance (Voice). developing polished, professional performing skills culminating in a final juried
performance with a pro rhythm section. During IIIA, each student chooses his
All course descriptions include course number, title, number of credits per quar- or her material, writes charts, and develops a personal performing style during
ter, prerequisites (where applicable), description of content, and contact hours twice-weekly half-hour private sessions with the instructor and an accompanist.
per week. IIIB includes final music preparation with an accompanist plus full rhythm section
rehearsals leading up to the final showcase. Two half-hour private rehearsals per
PERFORMANCE week for two quarters plus final project/performance.
T010a.b., T120a.b., T210a.b. Private Lesson IA-IIIB (2)
Twelve credit units required. See General Requirements for course description. V212a.b. Artist Recording Sessions (1.5)
Learn the basics of recording and the recording studio as they apply to vocalists.
Class covers microphones, compressors, reverb, delays and other equipment found
E020a.b., E120a.b., E210a.b. Live Playing Workshops IA-IIB (1)
in most studios. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
Six credit units required. See General Requirements for course description.
V221a.b. Acting for Singers (1)
V011a.b. Vocal Technique IA-IB (1) Focuses on communication and performance using acting skills to draw out the
An introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the voice. IA covers breathing best performance of the lyric and melodic content. Topics include beginning
and how it affects the body, mind and the act of singing as well as effective prac- improvisation, memorization skills and artist/performer communication. Two lab
72 tice habits and how to protect the voice. IB focuses on understanding the nature of hours per week for two quarters.
voice production as students learn to recognize different vocal functions through
listening and analysis. One lecture hour per week for two quarters. V040a Art of Preparation I (1.5)
Based on the book The Unconscious Actor: Out of Control, in Full Command by
V112a.b. Vocal Technique IIA-IIB (1) Darryl Hickman, this course provides step-by-step techniques and exercises that
Prerequisite: V112b Vocal Technique IB. Class addresses pitch registers, forma- prepare singers mentally and physically for skillful and artistic live performances.
tion of vowels and consonants, and the application of vocal technique to learning One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for one quarter.
songs as well as specific skills such as vibrato. Students analyze contemporary
artists’ voices and each other to develop their awareness and understanding of V040b Art of Preparation II (1.5)
the vocal instrument. One lecture hour per week for two quarters. Prerequisite: V040a Art of Preparation I. Expands on Darryl Hickman’s “Flow” ex-
ercise, introduces “Form” and the first step of “The Process.” One lecture hour and
E02a.b. Artist Showcase Performance IA-IB (2) one lab hour per week for one quarter.
An introduction to live performance skills including lyric interpretation, microphone
techniques, stage presence, and overall presentation designed to help students V041a.b. Sightsinging/Sightreading IA-IB (1.5)
develop a sense of self-awareness and professionalism while performing. Four Introduction to reading and singing diatonic melodies with quarter, eighth and six-
lab-ensemble hours per week for two quarters. teenth note rhythmic patterns from the musical staff. One lecture hour plus one lab
hour per week for two quarters.
V142a.b. Artist Showcase Performance IIA-IIB (2)
Prerequisite: V112b Vocal Performance IB. Performance-oriented class focusing on V132a.b. Sightsinging/Sightreading IIA-IIB (1.5)
the emotional side of singing. Topics include lyric analysis and interpretation, stage Prerequisite: M132Vb Sightsinging/Sightreading IB. Reading and singing skills
presence, microphone technique, thought processes before going on stage and com- expand to include major and minor diatonic melodies and harmonies, eighth note
municating with the audience. Four lab/ensemble hours per week for two quarters. and sixteenth note syncopation, and interpretation of standard musical notation.
One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for two quarters.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Voice)
MUSICIANSHIP ELECTIVES
M021a.b.,M122a.b. Harmony and Theory IA – IIB (1.5) Voice students may fulfill their elective credit requirements by choosing from pro-
Six credit units required. See General Requirements for course description. gram-specific electives, general electives, or entry-level electives offered by other
programs; see course offerings for options.
M022a.b.,M132a.b. Ear Training IA – IIB (1.5)
Six credit units required. See General Requirements for course description. ENTRY-LEVEL ELECTIVES
L017 Stagecraft (1)
EV01a.b. Keyboard Accompaniment IA-IB (1.5) A performance-oriented workshop designed to help students become comfortable
An introduction to the keyboard for the vocalist. Note recognition, scales, intervals on stage and improve their artistic presentation. Students work on original projects
and chord construction using the keyboard as a visual and aural aid and as sup- or impromptu improvisations and are coached on stage presence, believability,
port for musicianship studies. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week per audience communication, and stage etiquette. One workshop hour per week for
quarter for two quarters. one quarter. May be repeated for credit.

M141a.b. Keyboard Accompaniment IIA-IIB (1.5) V031 Contemporary Vocal Styles (2)
Prerequisite: EV01b Keyboard Accompaniment IB. An introduction to practical An overview of the history of various vocal styles concentrating on the pioneers
keyboard performance skills for the vocalist. Students learn basic keyboard tech- of each style, how they influenced and contributed to pop culture, society, and the
niques and fingerings for scales and chords with the goal of using the keyboard music industry, and the legacy they have left behind. In the second quarter, stu-
as a tool for learning songs, transposition, self-accompaniment and lead sheet dents apply vocal techniques as they perform in styles of their own choosing with
interpretation. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week per quarter for two instructor direction and critique. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. 73
quarters.
V080 Gospel Vocals (1)
M241a.b. Keyboard Accompaniment IIIA-IIIB (1.5) An opportunity for vocalists to be challenged, uplifted and inspired. Students per-
Prerequisite: M141Vb Keyboard Accompaniment IIB. A further study of keyboard form one or two songs per week ranging from traditional to contemporary Gospel.
voicings for the vocalist, including seventh chords and extensions, voice leading Students sign up to perform lead vocals with the entire class performing choir/
techniques and creative approaches to accompaniment. One lecture hour and background vocal parts. Techniques include constructing lead vocals, learning
one lab hour per week for two quarters. and arranging harmonies by ear, group vocal blend and dynamics. The class con-
ducts a live performance at the end of the quarter accompanied by a full band.
V183a Arranging for Singers I (1.5) Two ensemble hours per week for one quarter. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: M021b Harmony and Theory IB, M022b Ear Training IIB Students
learn to write lead sheets by hand as well as with the Finale digital notation pro- V081 Introduction to Studio Singing (1)
gram. Specific skills include writing chord charts from takedowns, melodic and Prerequisite: instructor approval. A must for the serious singer! Learn basic studio
lyric notation, adapting commercial sheet music, road-map symbols, and digital technique as well as how to handle different styles by singing lead vocals to pre-
transposition. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for one quarter. recorded tracks. Strengthen pitch, control, and learn to project emotion vocally.
One ensemble hour per week plus four recorded performances per quarter. May
V183b Arranging for Singers II (1.5) be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: V183a Arranging for Singers I. Introduction to computer recording
and arranging using Apple GarageBand. Students learn how instruments work to- V082 Studio Background Vocals I (1.5)
gether in a band, how to create recordings combining loops, live instruments and Put a keyboard player out of work! Learn harmony and vocal texturing in the
vocals, and basic editing and mixing techniques. Knowledge and skills learned studio and how to create a wall of sound with just your voice. This is an excellent
provide the foundation for using other popular applications such as Protools, Log- addendum to Studio for Singers and a MUST for songwriters. One ensemble hour
ic and Cubase. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for one quarter. and one workshop hour per week. May be repeated for credit.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Voice)
V084 Accent Reduction (1) V165 Extreme Vocals (1)
This course enables non-native English speaking students to develop an Ameri- Prerequisite: Instructor approval. Unorthodox singers who maintain long careers do
can English accent. Students will learn to break words into their phonetic so because they apply effective vocal technique. Techniques taught include “The
parts and identify and individually concentrate on problem sounds. One hour per Gravel” (James Hetfield/Metallica), “The Bobcat” (Phil Anselmo/Pantera), “The Drill
week for one quarter. May be repeated for credit. Sergeant” (Slayer, Godsmack) and “The White Scream” (Roger Daltrey/The Who).
Two ensemble hours per week for one quarter. May be repeated for credit.
V085 Voiceover Workshop (1)
Prerequisite: instructor approval. Learn essential performing and professional V166 Rock Vocals (1)
techniques for the lucrative voiceover industry. Topics include how to communi- Prerequisite: instructor approval. Students learn the singing styles of influential
cate with the voice alone, handling auditions, developing characters, vocal com- classic and modern rock vocalists through listening, analysis, demonstrations of
mand and consistency in reading, learning to change tone, volume, pitch, type, techniques, and class discussion. One hour per week for one quarter. May be
tempo, and emphasis. Leave your inhibitions at the door! One lecture hour per repeated for credit.
week for one quarter.
V167 Song Success (1)
This course will focus on LYRICS ONLY (no singing!) and the singer’s need to
V090 Live Performance Makeup (1.5) represent them to their fullest. Students choose and interpret song lyrics as prose
Taught by a professional makeup artist, students learn live performance makeup design and develop interpretations based on their personal connection to the lyric content.
and techniques, including tools & cosmetics, color theory, eye designs and full makeup One lecture/workshop hour per week for ten weeks. May be repeated for credit.
designs from natural to outrageous. As a final project, students create their own full
74 makeup design. One lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for one quarter. V169a Stage Movement I (1)
Introduction to effective body movement in live performance. Techniques include
V140 Songwriting I (1.5) small, full, and stadium stage movement, mime, and mirror imaging. One ensem-
Introduction to the techniques of popular songwriting, including melodic and lyric ble hour per week for one quarter.
development, scansion and meter, and common chord progressions and form.
One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for one quarter. V170 The Art of Success (1)
More people quit the music industry due to a lack of follow-through than a lack of
V150 Hip-Hop Dance (1) talent. This course offers real-world advice about how to define success for yourself,
An introduction to Hip-Hop dance style for singers or instrumentalists. The class how to realistically define the next step in your evolution as a performer, and how to
consists of warm-ups, stretching, Hip-Hop dance combinations and groove move- keep moving up the ladder. Two workshop hours per week for one quarter.
ments. One and one-half hour workshop per week for ten weeks.
V178 Vocal Interpretation I (1)
Develop a personal vocal style and approach through exercises designed to un-
V160 Blues Vocals (1) leash the music and mind, including vocal improvisation, applying different grooves
Prerequisite: instructor approval. A study of blues vocalists and their music de- to familiar songs, adding emotion to your singing, and finding your musical voice.
signed to give singers insight into blues phrasing and emotional delivery leading There is life in a song that only you can breathe into it – find out how. Two perfor-
to more authentic and convincing blues performance. One hour per week for one mance hours per week for one quarter.
quarter.
V182 Image Development I (1.5)
V164 Jazz Vocals (1) Successful performing artists project a visual image that supports their sound and
Prerequisite: instructor approval. Learn to communicate with a band and work in a message. Learn to create a strong stage persona including visual image, song
jazz ensemble with an emphasis on learning the standard repertoire and develop- choice, audience communication and overall performance. Each class is video-
ing stylistic interpretation. One hour per week for one quarter. May be repeated recorded for review and critique. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for
for credit. one quarter.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Voice)
V226 No Musicians Needed (1) V152 Hip-Hop Dance Performance (1)
Prerequisite: instructor audition. Develop and enhance improvisational styles and Prerequisite: V151 Hip-Hop Dance II or permission of instructor. During the course,
expand vocal capabilities during this weekly acapella vocal jam session. One hour students learn specific choreographed routines to be showcased in a final class
per week for one quarter. May be repeated for credit. performance. One and one-half ensemble hours per week for one quarter.

V280 Background Vocals (1) V169b Stage Movement II (1)


Ensemble class designed to teach beginning vocal students how to harmonize Prerequisite: V169a Stage Movement I. Focuses on developing stage movement
and hold their parts in a large or small group setting or as individuals with empha- techniques for various tempos and styles including R&B, Rock, Jazz and more.
sis on blending during live performance. Two ensemble hours per week for one for One ensemble hour per week for one quarter.
quarter. May be repeated for credit.

ADVANCED ELECTIVES (see course descriptions for prerequisites) V172 Advanced Acapella Ensemble (1)
Prerequisite: instructor audition. A five-part acapella group performing arrange-
V087 Advanced Songwriters Circle (1)
ments of contemporary material with a dynamic, contemporary R&B/Pop sound.
Prerequisite: M021B Harmony & Theory IB. Audition required. Singer-songwriters
Two workshop hours per week for ten weeks. May be repeated for credit.
prepare a song each week, bring in typed lyrics and perform for each other. Some
weeks are themed with writing exercises and assigned challenges. The group of-
fers feedback on lyrics, melody and performance. Students prepare their two best V187 Songwriters in the Round I (1.5)
songs for a final showcase before industry representatives. Two workshop hours Prerequisite: V440 Songwriting IV. Students refine songwriting and performance
per week for one quarter. May be repeated for credit. skills with a focus on melody, lyrics, song structure and style. Students are given
writing assignments leading up to a final self-accompanied performance. One lec- 75
V092 Studio Background Vocals II (1.5) ture hour and one lab hour per week for one quarter.
Prerequisite: V082 Studio Background Vocals I and instructor approval. This class
is an advanced approach to vocal production in the studio. Learn how to add emo- V287 Songwriters in the Round II (1.5)
tional textures to your original music with your voice as well as vocal production Prerequisite: V187 Songwriters in the Round I. Focuses on defining the artistic
skills using Protools. Students record actual background vocal arrangements for signature and style as well as self-accompanied performance. Each week, stu-
the Demo Production class as well as original projects in a real-world vocal ses- dents are given songwriting assignments and perform for the class with group
sion environment. One lab and one ensemble hour per week for one quarter. May critique. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for one quarter.
be repeated for credit.
V240 Songwriting II (1.5)
V141a Art of Preparation III (1.5) Prerequisite: V140 Songwriting I. Application of skills taught in Songwriting I with
Prerequisite: V040b Art of Preparation II. Focuses on Step Three of Darryl Hick- an emphasis on regular writing assignments. One lecture hour and one lab hour
man’s rehearsal process, including “Beats and Blocking”. One lecture hour and per week for one quarter.
one lab hour per week for one quarter.
V265 Extreme Vocals II (1)
V141b Art of Preparation IV (1.5) Prerequisite: V165 Extreme Vocals I or permission of instructor. The first hour of
Prerequisite: V141a Art of Preparation III. The culmination of the “Art of Preparation” each session includes a review of various extreme vocal styles followed by vo-
sequence, focusing solely on using the Darryl Hickman process to create a polished cal exercises. The second hour consists of graded student performances. Each
final performance. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for one quarter. student is required to prepare five different performances, including a final perfor-
mance, for critique by both the class and the instructor. Two ensemble hours per
V151 Hip Hop Dance II (1) week for one quarter.
Prerequisite: V150 Hip Hop Dance I or permission of instructor. A continuation of
Hip-Hop Dance. Two workshop hours per week for one quarter.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (Voice)
V231a Sightsinging/Sightreading IIIA (1.5) V383 Arranging for Your Band II (1.5)
Prerequisite: V132b Sightsinging/Sightreading IIB. Class covers singing in dia- Prerequisite: V283 Arranging for Your Band I. Continuation of V283; culminates in
tonic major and minor keys as well as odd meters and mixed rhythms. One lecture a final arrangement performance with rhythm section and horns. One lecture hour
hour plus one lab hour per week for one quarter. and one lab hour per week for one quarter.

V231b Sightsinging/Sightreading IIIB (1.5) V201 Vocal Teacher Training (1)


Prerequisite: V231a Sightsinging/Sightreading IIIA. A continuation of 231a. One Prerequisite: V112b Vocal Technique IIB. Prepares vocalists in the fundamental
lecture hour plus one lab hour per week for one quarter. skills of training the voice. Topics include how to evaluate the throat and estab-
lish the student’s starting point, correct interferences, increase range, apply scale
V270 The Art of Success II (1) exercises and communicate the science of vocal technique. One lecture hour per
Prerequisite: V170 Art of Success. Students expand their perception of the world, week for one quarter.
the entertainment business and their definitions of happiness, then engage in ac-
tivities to hone the skills needed to be professional musicians, artists and partici- V202 Vocal Teacher Training II (1)
pants in the entertainment world and beyond. Success = Happiness. Two work- Prerequisite: V201 Vocal Teacher Training I. Continued development of voice train-
shop hours per week for one quarter. ing techniques, including how to recover from vocal abuse, how to bridge and
strengthen the middle register, vocal effects, and how to break down and practice
V281 Basic Demo Production for the Singer/Songwriter (2) songs. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
Prerequisites: M184 Intro to Songwriting, V183b Arranging for Singers II, V092 Stu-
76 dio Background Vocals II or instructor approval. Learn the fundamental steps to V440 Songwriting IV (1.5)
making cost-effective demos using drum loops and live musicians. One lecture hour Prerequisite: V340 Songwriting III. Students learn the skill of writing on commis-
and one lab hour per week plus project for one quarter. May be repeated for credit. sion, including writing for television, film, and commercials. Topics include tech-
niques for writing quickly to meet special conditions. One lecture hour and one lab
V282 Image Development II (1.5) hour per week for one quarter.
Prerequisite: V182 Image Development I. Focuses on preparing artists for live TV
and concert appearances, including live interview techniques, what to wear on
camera, how to perform for the camera, and how to integrate all elements taught
in the course into a complete image. Each class is video-recorded for review and
critique. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for one quarter.

V283 Arranging for Your Band I (1.5)


Prerequisite: M122b Harmony & Theory IIB. Students learn the techniques of
rhythm section and background vocal arranging. Topics include fundamentals of
arranging and writing rhythm parts, lines and voicings. Students apply ideas and
techniques to contemporary songs and original material. One lecture hour and
one lab hour per week for one quarter.

V340 Songwriting III (1.5)


Prerequisite: V240 Songwriting II. Students learn to write in a variety of genres by
studying the development of contemporary songwriting from the 1950s through
the present day. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for one quarter.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN PERFORMANCE (COMBINED EMPHASES)
MI’s six-quarter, 90-credit-unit Associate of Arts in Performance (Combined Em-
phasis) programs are vocational1 degrees combining instrument performance
with specialized studies in music industry career skills.

The degree includes 60 units of study in performance (equivalent to the Certifi-


cate in Performance on one of five major instruments (Bass, Guitar, Keyboard
Technology, Drums, or Voice)2 and 30 units of study in one of the following areas
of emphasis (equivalent to the respective certificate program):

Audio Engineering
Professional audio recording and music production

Independent Artist
Original songwriting, recording, production, and career development

Music Business
Music industry business career preparation

Guitar Craft 77
Electric guitar and bass design, fabrication, and maintenance

Music Video, Film and Television Production


Music-driven film and video creation

For specific information about courses and credit requirements, refer to the sec-
tion of this catalog describing the appropriate Certificate in Performance (Bass,
Guitar, Keyboard Technology, Drums, Voice) as well as the section describing
Certificate requirements for the appropriate music industry emphasis (e.g. Cer-
tificate in Audio Engineering).

1
Associate programs are vocational and do not include General Education re-
quirements or direct preparation for study at the Baccalaureate level. For infor-
mation on transfer requirements from an Associate Degree to MI”s Bachelor of
Music Degree, please refer to page 6 of this course catalog.

2
Guitar Craft emphasis is only available in combination with major instrument
study in Guitar or Bass.
CERTIFICATE IN PERFORMANCE
MI’s 60-credit-unit, four-quarter Certificate in Performance program provides
students with a broad foundation of musical knowledge, technique and prac-
tical experience that prepares them to perform virtually any style of contem-
porary popular music. Core and elective classes, private lessons, live playing
workshops, open counseling sessions, and regular visiting artist concerts and
seminars combine to create an intensive educational environment designed to
encourage rapid development of performance skills in:

n Bass n Guitar n Keyboard Technology n Drums n Voice

Certificate in Performance courses and requirements are equivalent to the first


four quarters of Associate of Arts in Performance program for each instrument.
Program requirements are listed on the following pages in outline form; for full
course descriptions, refer to the Associate of Arts Degree requirements for each
instrument.

78
CERTIFICATE IN PERFORMANCE (Bass)
CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS
The following course requirements must be satisfactorily completed in order to qualify for the Certificate in Performance (Bass). Certificate requirements are listed
here in outline form. Certificate courses and requirements match the first four quarters of the Associate of Arts in Performance (Bass); for full course descriptions of
core classes and electives, refer to that section of the catalog.

Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4


course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits
major area 36 credits
private lesson T010a 2 T010b 2 T120a 2 T120b 2
live playing workshops E020a 1 E020b 1 E120a 1 E120b 1
playing techniques B011a 1.5 B011b 1.5 B112a 1.5 B112b 1.5
fretboard basics B021a 1.5 B021b 1.5 B122a 1.5 B122b 1.5
rhythm section workshop E01a 1.5 E01b 1.5 E2a 1.5 E2b 1.5
reading M041Ba 1.5 M041Bb 1.5 M142Ba 1.5 M142Bb 1.5

musicianship 12 credits
harmony & theory M021a 1.5 M021b 1.5 M122a 1.5 M122b 1.5
ear training M022a 1.5 M022b 1.5 M132a 1.5 M132b 1.5
79
electives 12 credits
(various) 3 3 3 3

TOTAL 60 CREDITS 15 15 15 15

Upon completion of the above 60 credit units, student is eligible to apply for the Certificate in Performance (Bass)

CERTIFICATE IN PERFORMANCE (Guitar)
Certificate Requirements
The following course requirements must be satisfactorily completed in order to qualify for the Certificate in Performance (Guitar). Certificate requirements are listed
here in outline form. Certificate courses and requirements match the first four quarters of the Associate of Arts in Performance (Guitar); for full course descriptions of
core classes and electives, refer to that section of the catalog.

Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4


course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits
major area 36 credits
private lesson T010a 2 T010b 2 T120a 2 T120b 2
live playing workshops E020a 1 E020b 1 E120a 1 E120b 1
single string improvisation G011a 1.5 G011b 1.5 G112a 1.5 G112b 1.5
rhythm guitar G021a 1.5 G021b 1.5 G122a 1.5 G1122b 1.5
rhythm section workshop E01a 1.5 E01b 1.5 E02a 1.5 E02b 1.5
reading M041Ga 1.5 M041Gb 1.5 M142Ga 1.5 M142Gb 1.5

musicianship 12 credits
harmony & theory M021a 1.5 M021b 1.5 M122a 1.5 M122b 1.5
ear training M022a 1.5 M022b 1.5 M132a 1.5 M132b 1.5
80
electives 12 credits
(various) 3 3 3 3

TOTAL 60 CREDITS 15 15 15 15

Upon completion of the above 60 credit units, student is eligible to apply for the Certificate in Performance (Guitar)

CERTIFICATE IN PERFORMANCE (Keyboard Technology)
CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS
The following course requirements must be satisfactorily completed in order to qualify for the Certificate in Performance (Keyboard Technology). Certificate require-
ments are listed here in outline form. Certificate courses and requirements match the first four quarters of the Associate of Arts in Performance (Keyboard Technol-
ogy); for full course descriptions of core classes and electives, refer to that section of the catalog.

Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4


course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits
major area 39 credits
private lesson T010a 2 T010b 2 T120a 2 T120b 2
live playing workshops E020a 1 E020b 1 E120a 1 E120b 1
keyboard technique K011a 1 K011b 1 K112a 1 K112b 1
keyboard voicings K021a 1 K021b 1 K122a 1 K122b 1
groove K041a 1.5 K041b 1.5 K143a 1 K143b 1
reading M041Ka 1 M041Kb 1 M142Ka 1 M142Kb 1
digital music K031a 1.5 K031b 1.5 K131a 1.5 K131b 1.5
keyboard programming K042a 1 K042b 1 K164a 1 K164b 1

musicianship 12 credits
harmony & theory M021a 1.5 M021b 1.5 M122a 1.5 M122b 1.5 81
ear training M022a 1.5 M022b 1.5 M132a 1.5 M132b 1.5

electives 9 credits
(various) 2 2 2.5 2.5

TOTAL 60 CREDITS 15 15 15 15

Upon completion of the above 60 credit units, student is eligible to apply for the Certificate in Performance (Keyboard Technology)

CERTIFICATE IN PERFORMANCE (Drums)
CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS
The following course requirements must be satisfactorily completed in order to qualify for the Certificate in Performance (Drums). Certificate requirements are listed
here in outline form. Certificate courses and requirements match the first four quarters of the Associate of Arts in Performance (Drums); for full course descriptions
of core classes and electives, refer to that section of the catalog.

Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4


course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits
major area 48 credits
private lesson T010a 2 T010b 2 T120a 2 T120b 2
live playing workshops E020a 1 E020b 1 E120a 1 E120b 1
playing techniques P021a 1.5 P021b 1.5 P112a 1.5 P112b 1.5
rhythm section workshop E01a 2 E01b 2 E2a 2 E2b 2
developing your groove P185a 1 P185b 1
contemporary drum concepts P166a 1.5 P166b 1.5
music minus one P071a 1 P071b 1
digital drumming P131a 2.5 P131b 2.5
advanced drumming P171a 1.5 P171b 1.5
reading M041Pa 2 M041Pb 2 M142Pa 1.5 M142Pb 1.5
82
musicianship 8 credits
keyboard lab P051a 1 P051b 1
harmony & theory M021a 1.5 M021b 1.5
ear training M022a 1.5 M022b 1.5

electives 4 credits
(various) 1 1 1 1

TOTAL 60 CREDITS 15 15 15 15

Upon completion of the above 60 credit units, student is eligible to apply for the Certificate in Performance (Drums)

CERTIFICATE IN PERFORMANCE (Voice)
CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS
The following course requirements must be satisfactorily completed in order to qualify for the Certificate in Performance (Voice). Certificate requirements are listed
here in outline form. Certificate courses and requirements match the first four quarters of the Associate of Arts in Performance (Voice); for full course descriptions of
core classes and electives, refer to that section of the catalog.

Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4


course/credits course/credits course/credits course/credits
major area 33 credits
private lesson T010a 2 T010b 2 T120a 2 T120b 2
live playing workshops E020a 1 E020b 1 E120a 1 E120b 1
artist showcase performance E02a 2 E02b 2 V142a 2 V142b 2
art of preparation V040a 1.5 V040b 1.5
vocal technique V011a 1 V011b 1 V112a 1 V112b 1
sightreading/sightsinging M041Va 1.5 M041Vb 1.5 V132a 1.5 V132b 1.5

musicianship 21 credits
harmony & theory M021a 1.5 M021b 1.5 M122a 1.5 M122b 1.5
ear training M022a 1.5 M022b 1.5 M132a 1.5 M132b 1.5
keyboard accompaniment EV01a 1.5 EV01b 1.5 M141Va 1.5 M141Vb 1.5 83
arranging for singers V183a 1.5 V183b 1.5

electives 6 credits
(various) 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5

TOTAL 60 CREDITS 15 15 15 15

Upon completion of the above 60 credit units, student is eligible to apply for the Certificate in Performance (Voice)

CERTIFICATE IN AUDIO ENGINEERING
The two-quarter, 30 credit-unit certificate program in Audio Engineering provides COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
an intensive, hands-on curriculum designed to prepare aspiring engineers for All course descriptions include course number, title, number of credit units per
the demands of the professional recording studio. Completion of all program quarter (multiply by number of required quarters for total credit amount), prereq-
requirements qualifies students to earn the Certificate in Audio Engineering. uisites (where applicable), description of content, and contact hours per week.

Quarter 1 Quarter 2
REQUIRED CLASSES
course/credits course/credits R100 Console Operation I: SSL© (3)
Students learn signal flow as it applies directly to high-end professional SSL
major area 27 credits consoles, including how to route signals for tracking, overdubbing, and mixing.
console operation I/II R100 2 R200 2 One 90-minute lecture and one 90-minute workshop per week for one quarter.
pro tools I/II R102 3 R202 2
R200 Console Operation II: Neve© (2)
music pre-production R130 2
Prerequisite: R100 Console Operation I: SSL. Students learn signal flow as it
musicianship R188 1.5
applies directly to the high-end professional Neve consoles, including how to
music studio etiquette R189 1.5
route signals for tracking, overdubbing, and mixing. One 90-minute lecture and
practical recording R192 2
one 90-minute workshop per week for one quarter.
acoustics R196 1.5
recording theory R199 1.5 R102 Pro Tools© I (3)
post-production R150 1.5 Learn the basic concepts and theory involved in using a digital audio worksta-
84 digital signal processing R184 1.5 tion. Students will learn how to set up a Pro Tools session for recording, import
mixing and mastering R190 2 audio, edit and record MIDI, back up data, work with firewire drives, etc. Com-
electronics R197 1.5 pletion of the course prepares students to take Digidesign-sanctioned Pro Tools
analog signal processing R299 1.5 101 and 110 exams. One 3-hour lecture per week for one quarter.

electives 3 credits R202 Pro Tools© II (2)


various* 3 Prerequisite: R102 Pro Tools I. This class explores powerful Pro Tools editing
and processing functions including plug-ins, automation, synchronization, quan-
TOTAL 30 CREDITS 15 15 tization, mastering and more. One 90-minute class per week for one quarter.

*elective requirement must be met from RIT-specific electives R130 Music Pre-Production (2)
Working with project-studio equipment, this class helps form basic production
Upon completion of the above 30 units, student is eligible to apply for the skills. As an introduction to recording, students record right away and begin to
Certificate in Audio Engineering understand how demos are made and why they are so crucial to having a great
session. One 90-minute lecture per week for one quarter.

R188 Musicianship (1.5)


Note: successful completion of this course or equivalency exam is a prerequi-
site for all electives. This class provides a basic understanding of terms used
by musicians, engineers and producers as well as the information necessary to
bridge the gap separating these three different roles. Learn how to contribute
to the songwriting process in a studio environment. One 90 minute lecture per
week for one quarter.
CERTIFICATE IN AUDIO ENGINEERING
R189 Music Studio Etiquette (1.5) R197 Electronics (1.5)
A comprehensive look at what goes on before, during and after sessions. Learn Builds a firm understanding of soldering techniques, DC and AC circuits, and
the do’s and don’ts of how to work in a professional recording studio environ- various technical components used in studios. One 90-minute lecture per week
ment. One 90-minute lecture per week for one quarter. for one quarter.

R192 Practical Recording (2) R299 Analog Signal Processing (1.5)


Class focuses on recording drums, bass, different types of guitars, vocals, pi- Learn how to operate professional outboard gear including traditional in-line pro-
ano etc. Learn how to overdub single instruments and build a complete, multi- cessors (compressor, gate, EQ) as well as effects processors (reverb, delay,
track arrangement and production using the SSL studio and ProTools HD. One chorus, pitch shift, etc). One 90-minute lecture per week for one quarter.
90-minute lecture and one 90-minute workshop per week for one quarter.

R196 Acoustics (1.5) ELECTIVES


Fundamentals of musical phenomena and perception. Learn to recognize fre- Note: Audio Engineering students must complete their elective requirements
quencies by ear and how different microphone techniques affect the recording from the following program-specific electives only.
of sound waves, critical elements in creating a professional recording and mix.
Also introduces the student to soundproofing and acoustic treatments of studios. Entry-Level Electives
One 90-minute lecture per week for one quarter. Note: successful completion of R188 Musicianship or equivalency exam is a
prerequisite for all electives.
R199 Recording Theory (1.5)
Fundamentals of analog recording theory and practice, including an overview of R180 Music Production (1.5) 85
studio components, EQ and filters, dynamic processors, microphones, auxiliary Students learn the “ins and outs” of both the business and creative sides of
routing and effects processors. One 90-minute lecture per week for one quarter. album production. Classes are hands-on, intensive and real-world, covering
concepts such as budgeting, choosing studios and musicians, working with en-
R150 Intro to Post-Production (1.5) gineers and management, and finessing the best performance out of artists.
Fundamentals of audio post-production concepts and techniques, includ- One 90-minute lecture per week for one quarter.
ing sound effects editing, dialogue editing, Foley, and 5.1 Surround mixing for
film and television. Weekly hands-on projects culminate in a final project. One R195 Live Sound (1.5)
90-minute lecture per week for one quarter. Class focuses on live sound engineering. Students participate in “front of house”
mixing, monitor mixing and set-up/tear down procedures in a working, 500-seat
R184 Digital Signal Processing (1.5) concert hall environment. World-class musicians in a variety of styles provide
This class focuses on plug-ins used with Pro Tools, the difference between TDM the music. One three-hour lecture per week for one quarter.
and LE systems, and advanced Pro Tools features and third party plug-in manu-
facturers. One 90-minute class per week for one quarter. Upper-level Electives (see course descriptions for pre-requisites)

R190 Mixing and Mastering (2) R182 Track Programming (1.5)


Learn professional mixing and mastering techniques including fader balance Prerequisite: R192 Practical Recording. This course introduces students to the
and automation, lifting instruments with EQ and corrective EQ blueprints, edit- art of sequencing tracks using MIDI, samplers, loops, and the latest computer
ing and gating techniques, compressor and limiter settings, imaging, and time- software. This elective is ideal for students interested in producing beats for
based processors. During a weekly Project Advisor meeting, students discuss popular music styles such as Hip Hop, R & B, pop/rock, dance, electronica, etc.
progress and receive advice and critique on their mandatory Final Recording One 90-minute lecture per week for one quarter.
Project. One 90-minute lecture and one 90-minute group Project Advisor meet-
ing per week for one quarter.
CERTIFICATE IN AUDIO ENGINEERING
R201 Studio Design (1.5)
Prerequisite: R196 Acoustics. This course is designed to focus on creating an
acoustically viable space in the home or project studio environment. Students
will learn the various methods of controlling sound in a less than ideal space.
Devices for sound proofing and sound controlling will be studied and used in
the creation of an actual studio. You will get your hands dirty in this one. One
90-minute lecture/workshop per week for one quarter.

R209 Electronics Workshop (1.5)


Prerequisite: R196 Acoustics. Students who are interested in becoming studio
technicians or learning how to do repairs on their own studio gear gain practical
hands-on experience in studio maintenance and repair. Three workshop hours
per week for one quarter.

R250 Intro to Logic (3)


Prerequisite: R102 Pro Tools I. This course introduces songwriters, composers,
audio producers and sound engineers to the primary features and basic user
interface of Logic Pro. Students learn the process of creating an actual song,
86 from recording, editing, and arranging MIDI sequences to digital effects process-
ing, mixing, automation and scoring to picture using Logic Pro’s comprehensive
array of software instruments, Apple Loops and DSP effects. The course covers
the requirements needed to become an Apple Certified Pro – Level One in Logic
Pro 8. One three-hour lecture per week for one quarter.

R325 Audio Internship (1.5)


Prerequisites: R199 Analog Recording Theory, 3.5 minimum GPA. See RIT
Administrator for additional requirements. Students gain practical professional
experience in working recording studios as engineering assistants. Hours and
schedules vary according to the specific position obtained; minimum of five
hours per week for one quarter.
CERTIFICATE IN AUDIO ENGINEERING (POST-PRODUCTION AUDIO)
The Certificate in Audio Engineering with an emphasis in Post-Production Audio COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
prepares graduates for a wide range of creative and professional opportuni- All course descriptions include course number, title, number of credits, prerequi-
ties in the fields of music, film and television audio. Through hands-on courses sites (where applicable), description of content, and contact hours per week.
taught on industry-standard equipment by experienced professionals, students
learn to manage the entire audio production process from pre-production and
AUDIO ENGINEERING COURSE REQUIREMENTS
tracking through editing, mixing, conforming and mastering. Concepts and tech-
nical skills are presented from a practical perspective with an emphasis on musi- All audio engineering course requirements for the 45-unit Certificate in Audio
cal and creative applications. Engineering (Post-Production Audio) are identical to those for the 30-unit Certifi-
cate in Audio Engineering; see that program description in this catalog for details.
Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Courses specific to the Post-Production Audio emphasis are described below.
course/credits course/credits course/credits
EMPHASIS IN POST-PRODUCTION AUDIO: REQUIRED COURSES
major area 27 credits
NOTE: successful completion of R190 Mixing and Mastering is a pre-requisite for
console operation I/II R100 2 R200 2
pro tools I/II R102 3 R202 2 all courses in the Post-Production Audio emphasis.
music pre-production R130 2
musicianship R188 1.5 R326 Location Sound Recording and Mixing (1.5)
music studio etiquette R189 1.5 Students learn theory and practical use of microphones, field recorders and mix-
practical recording R192 2 ers in order to capture audio in outdoor and TV/Movie set environments. This
acoustics R196 1.5 course also focuses on the organization and editing of field recorder media inside
recording theory R199 1.5 Pro Tools. One 90-minute lecture per week for one quarter.
intro to post-production R150 1.5
87
digital signal processing R184 1.5
mixing and mastering R190 2
R328 Post-Production Essentials (3)
electronics R197 1.5 Students receive a comprehensive overview of all the essential concepts, equip-
analog signal processing R299 1.5 ment, formats, workflow and scheduling of a Post-Production facility and project.
audio One three-hour lecture per week for one quarter.
engineering
electives 3 credits 3 R330 Music Editing (1.5)
various* Music is an essential element in visual storytelling and emotional development.
emphasis 15 credits This course introduces students to concepts of music aesthetics, music resourc-
location sound es, editing techniques and elements of film scoring. One 90-minute lecture per
recording/mixing R326 1.5
week for one quarter.
post-production essentials R328 3
music editing R330 1.5
background/ R331 Background and Sound Effects Editing (3)
sound effects editing R331 3 Using professional sound libraries and movie scene analysis, students learn how
foley recording and editing R332 1.5 to edit and synchronize background and sound effects. This class also empha-
ADR and dialog editing R333 1.5 sizes the delivery requirements for the dubbing stage. One three-hour lecture per
mixing and conforming R340 3 week for one quarter.
TOTAL 45 CREDITS 15 15 15
R332 Foley Recording and Editing (1.5)
*elective requirement must be met from program-specific electives This class demonstrates the recording and editing techniques for footsteps and
Upon completion of the above 45 units, student is eligible to apply for the Cer- props. Students will learn how to spot and configure the editing environment in
tificate in Audio Engineering (Post-Production Audio) preparation for a Foley session. One 90-minute lecture per week for one quarter.
CERTIFICATE IN AUDIO ENGINEERING (POST-PRODUCTION AUDIO)
R333 ADR and Dialogue Editing (1.5)
Students are introduced to a comprehensive set of tools and techniques for re-
cording, replacing, and editing dialogue. The emphasis is on maintaining consis-
tent synchronization and audio quality while using different dialogue sources. One
90-minute lecture per week for one quarter.

R340 Mixing and Conforming (3)


Using the Digidesign Icon system in MI’s THX certified stage, students learn the
complex and creative process of mixing sound and music in surround sound. This
class introduces critical elements of dubbing session preparation, organization
and conforming to reflect changes in the picture editing process. One three-hour
lecture per week for one quarter.

88
INDEPENDENT ARTIST PROGRAM (ARTIST CERTIFICATE)
MI’s two-quarter, 30 credit-unit Independent Artist Program (IAP), leading to the ect Advisor provide guidance in topics such as songwriting, music production,
Artist Certificate, is designed to equip creative musicians with the skills they sound recording and career development. One one-hour private Project Advisor
need to write, record and market their original music. As the centerpiece of the meeting per week plus assigned studio time for two quarters.
program, each student applies skills learned in core classes to produce record-
ings of their original songs, create a website, develop a marketing and career
RD04a Recording Techniques I (2)
Learn to produce professional recordings in a project-studio environment. The first
plan, and design promotional media.
portion of this course focuses on recording fundamentals and the tracking/overdub-
bing process. Students learn how to record their original songs using IAP’s studios
as well as their own home setups. Specific topics include project-studio terminology
and setup, microphones and microphone placement, EQ, compression and vocal
production techniques. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.

Quarter 1 Quarter 2
RD04b Recording Techniques II (2)
Prerequisite: RD04a Recording Techniques I. Building on the foundation of Re-
course/credits course/credits
cording Techniques I, this course focuses on the mixing and mastering process.
Students learn how to turn basic tracks into dynamic and professional finished
major area 22 credits products. Topics include effects, mixing, mastering, buying equipment and
independent artist project I/II RD01a 3 RD01b 3 home-studio setup. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
recording techniques I/II RD04a 2 RD04b 2
apple logic I/II RD05a 2 RD05b 2 RD05a Apple Logic© I (2)
visual media I/II RD06a 2 RD06b 2 Apple’s Logic Studio is a powerful music production package designed for music
creators and producers. This Apple-Certified course, when combined with Apple
89
the business RD10 2
your career plan RD20 2 Logic II, is equivalent to Apple’s own Logic 101 course. Topics covered include
working with midi and audio, virtual instruments, effects, drum programming, time
stretching and working with loops. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
electives 8 credits
various * 4 4 RD05b Apple Logic© II (2)
Prerequisite: RD05a Apple Logic I. The second level of this Apple-Certified
TOTAL 30 CREDITS 15 15 course focuses on using Logic as a mixing and mastering tool. Topics include
effects, automation, scoring to picture, third-party plugins, and mastering us-
*a minimum of 6 credits must be selected from program-specific electives ing Logic’s companion program, Waveburner. Upon successful completion, stu-
Upon completion of the above 30 units, student is eligible to apply for the Artist dents are eligible to take Apple’s Logic Pro Certification Exam. Two lecture hours
Certificate per week for one quarter.

Course Descriptions RD10 The Business (2)


All course descriptions include course number, title, number of credit units per The music business is in a rapid state of change. This course explains how the
quarter (multiply by number of required quarters for total credit amount), prereq- business has traditionally been structured and discusses where it may be head-
uisites (where applicable), description of content, and contact hours per week. ed. Topics include the roles and relationships of attorneys and managers, music
publishing, copyrights, and how to write effective press releases and artist bio’s.
RD01a.b. Independent Artist Project I-II (3) Each student will be professionally photographed for their press kit and website
The Independent Artist Project is the cornerstone of both the program and your (part of RD01: The Project). Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
career as an artist. Combining all of the knowledge and skills developed during
the program, you’ll write and produce several original songs; create CD artwork, RD20 Your Career Plan (2)
Independent musicians now have more opportunities to control their own ca-
biography, and a press photo; and develop a marketing and career plan includ-
reers than at any time in the history of the business. To be both self-sufficient
ing content for an internet marketing campaign. Weekly meetings with a Proj- and successful, artists must be highly motivated and organized in their business
INDEPENDENT ARTIST PROGRAM (ARTIST CERTIFICATE)
approach. This course shows how to develop a brand identity, release and mar- AR21 Songwriting Techniques II (2)
ket your music, promote yourself on the internet and find ways of making money Prerequisite: AR11 Songwriting Techniques I. Students learn advanced song-
in the music business. All students are required to develop and submit a de- writing skills for developing a personal artistic vision as well as commercial writ-
tailed marketing & career plan. Three lecture hours per week for one quarter. ing strategies. Class time will be split between instructor presentation of weekly
subject matter and student presentation of original songs for feedback and dis-
RD06a Visual Media I (2) cussion. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
Learn to design CD artwork, flyers, posters, promotional merchandise, and in-
ternet banners using Adobe Photoshop. Emphasis is on creating exciting and M500 Artist Development: The Songs (2)
expressive designs that directly support music marketing campaigns. Detailed Prerequisite: M184 Intro to Songwriting or AR11 Songwriting Techniques I, or
topics covered include Photoshop basics, image manipulation, color theory, permission of Artist Development Coordinator. During intensive one-on-one ses-
photo retouching, filters and elements of effective design in promotional materi- sions, instructor and student work on developing original songs from ideas to fin-
als and packaging. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. ished arrangements. One private lesson-rehearsal hour per week for ten weeks
plus final presentation. May be repeated for credit.
RD06b Visual Media II (2)
M501 Artist Development: The Show (2)
Prerequisite: RD06a Visual Media I. The internet has opened up an enormous op-
Prerequisite: M500 Artist Development: The Songs and permission of Artist
portunity for musicians to promote themselves directly to music fans. This class fo-
Development Coordinator. Instructor and student develop live performances
cuses on the technical skills needed to promote music online. Topics include creat- of original material written during M500 with concentration on stage presence,
ing banner ads, building a website using Apple iWeb, electronic press kits, creating movement, audience rapport, image, song sequence and entertainment value.
and spreading playlists, podcasting, blogging, video editing basics and customizing At the conclusion, students present their best live material for evaluation and
social networking sites. Two lecture hours per week for two quarters. screening by a jury of guest experts. Selected students qualify for an additional
90
video-recorded Industry showcase. One private lesson-rehearsal hour per week
ELECTIVES for ten weeks plus jury. May be repeated for credit.
Note: Independent Artist Program students must complete at least six (6) of
their eight (8) required elective units from the following list: M325 Music Internship (1)
Prerequisite: completion of one quarter of study in residence. Gain first-hand
T101 Elective Private Lesson (2) experience within the music industry by interning for a music-related company.
Weekly one-hour private instrument lesson on bass, drums, guitar, keyboards, or Positions vary according to availability, but typically include music publishing,
voice. One private lesson hour per week for one quarter; repeatable for credit. management, record label, promotion, or marketing. Specific responsibilities and
working hours vary by position; minimum of ten weeks/three hours per week.
RD12 Song Analysis (2)
Course enrollment is contingent on placement in a position. The MI Internship
Analysis, discussion and critique of original songs. Students learn to analyze
Coordinator will assist in placing students but cannot guarantee placement dur-
songs for effectiveness in terms of melody, lyrics, structure, rhythm, production
ing a given quarter. May be repeated for credit.
and intangible elements. Examples used in class include student’s songs as
well as selections ranging from classic rock to modern pop and hip-hop. Two RD03a Synthesis and Sampling I (1)
lecture hours per week for one quarter. This course covers the history of synthesizers, fundamentals of subtractive syn-
thesis, sampling techniques and their application using Apple Logic software.
AR11 Songwriting Techniques I (2)
One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
An introduction to songwriting through the study of the elements of contempo-
rary song structure. Students develop their songwriting skills by presenting and RD03b Synthesis and Sampling II (1)
evaluating original song ideas. Class time will be split between instructor pre- Prerequisite: RD03a Synthesis and Sampling I. More advanced elements of
sentation of weekly subject matter and student presentation of original songs for subtractive synthesis as well as an introduction to FM and granular synthesis.
feedback and discussion. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. Students also learn to work with hardware synths and samplers such as the
Waldorf Q and Akai MPC. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
CERTIFICATE IN MUSIC BUSINESS
The Certificate in Music Business (two quarters/30 credits) provides intensive, Course Descriptions
hands-on preparation for a business career in the recording industry. Students All course descriptions include course number, title, number of credit units per
gain direct practical experience through guaranteed industry internships and quarter (multiply by number of required quarters for total credit amount), prereq-
workshop-style classes and projects, including forming and managing a record uisites (where applicable), description of content, and contact hours per week.
company that selects and promotes independent artist CDs. MI’s location in the
heart of Hollywood provides the ideal setting in which to study all aspects of the MB102 The Record Company I (2)
contemporary music industry. A thorough look at the music industry from the inside. Analysis of the various
departments within a record company and how they interact with each other and
with management to build an artist’s career (principles will be applied to setting
up a student-run virtual record company in MB205: The Record Company II).
Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
Quarter 1 Quarter 2
course/credits course/credits MB205 The Record Company II (2)
Prerequisite: MB102 The Record Company I. Students apply principles learned
major area the record company MB102 2 MB205 2 in MB102 to form a virtual record company. Groups are assigned to carry out
music contracts MB104 2 MB214 2 A&R, press, marketing, radio promotion and booking functions on behalf of ac-
internet marketing MB110 2 tual independent artists. Course culminates in a record release showcase event
business writing for with invited guests from record labels, management and booking agencies. Two
the music industry MB291 2 lecture-workshop hours per week for one quarter. 91
music publishing MB103 2
A&R MB105 2 MB104 Music Contracts I (2)
personal management MB106 2 A music business attorney guides students through standard music business
guest lecture series MB108 1 contracts (recording contracts, producer agreements, etc.) and discusses es-
getting gigs MB086 1 sential legal terminology, deal-breaking issues, bargaining power and negotiat-
networking in ing options. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
the music business MB101 1
MB214 Music Contracts II (2)
independent artist
Prerequisite: MB104 Music Contracts I. Learn to analyze, understand and define
marketing MB204 2
artist agreements including distribution, deal memos, and name and likeness.
start and run your
Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
own record label MB211 1
radio promotion MB288 1 MB110 Internet Marketing (2)
music business news MB207 1 Students learn how record company Media Relations departments create artist
music business internship MB325 4 EPKs (electronic press kits). Discussions center on Street Teams, the Internet
and self-promotion of CDs and live performances. Two lecture hours per week
TOTAL 30 CREDITS 15 15 for one quarter.

Upon completion of the above 30 units, the student is eligible to apply for the MB291 Business Writing for the Music Industry (2)
Certificate in Music Business Learn how to use words as a productive business tool to establish a professional
image. This course prepares students to communicate clearly and efficiently
in written communication, including business letters, email, press releases and
website content. Two lecture/workshop hours per week for one quarter.
CERTIFICATE IN MUSIC BUSINESS
MB103 Music Publishing (2) study and practice social techniques and presentation skills important to making
Publishing remains one of the most lucrative segments of the music industry. personal contact with all strata of the music business. All levels of communica-
Topics covered include how to copyright songs and recorded works (PA/SR tion are discussed as the students begin to create an invincible support network
Copyrights), licenses, how songs make money, how royalties are paid to writers for the future. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
and publishers, and the functions and responsibilities of the Performing Rights
Organizations—ASCAP, BMI and SESAC. Two lecture hours per week for one MB204 Independent Artist Marketing (2)
quarter. Learn do-it-yourself grass-roots marketing strategies designed for limited bud-
gets. Topics include defining an image, brand, position and format and identify-
M105 A&R (2) ing the target audience. Students create practical plans for booking live shows
An examination of the role of the Artist and Repertoire department in the pro- and gaining access to radio, internet, press, video, advertising, sponsorships,
cess of signing new artists. Included are discussions about the A&R hierarchy sales & distribution, and film & TV licensing. Mailing press kits, follow-up, and
at labels, day-to-day A&R responsibilities, what “talent ingredients” they look for tracking of results are also discussed. At the completion of the course, students
in new artists, how they manage the recording process and how to establish perform marketing presentations before the class for review and analysis. This
a relationship with the A&R community. Class project includes the selection of is the real thing! Two lecture hours per week for one quarter.
actual independent artist CDs for MB 205: The Record Company II. Two lecture
hours per week for one quarter. MB288 Radio Promotion (1)
Getting airplay is the key to increasing sales for your independent CD. This
MB106 Personal Management (2) course shows students how to approach and secure airplay from college and
An overview of the responsibilities of personal managers and the nature of the commercial radio music and program directors. One lecture hour per week for
92
relationships they maintain with their artists. Topics include contractual agree- one quarter.
ments between the artist and manager, the avenues a manager takes to fulfill
those obligations, and management responsibilities with regard to negotiating MB211 Start and Run Your Own Record Label (1)
and concluding recording and publishing contracts. Two lecture hours per week This course details what is needed to start your own label from both creative
for one quarter. and business perspectives. Topics discussed include choosing a name, obtain-
ing trademarks, signing artists and choosing a distributor. One lecture hour per
MB108 Guest Lecture Series (1) week for one quarter.
In an informal classroom setting, contemporary music industry executives and
artists discuss their careers and professional experiences and answer ques- MB207 Music Business News (1)
tions from students. One lecture hour per week for one quarter. Students and instructor review and discuss all of the latest music business news
as reported in Billboard, trade websites and newspapers and general media.
MB086 Getting Gigs (1) Discussions center on how the news impacts the industry and students’ own
Learn the most efficient ways for artists and bands to book live shows and tours. careers. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
Subjects include where to play, checking out the venue, personal appearance
contracts, getting paid, and putting together your own tours. Guest speakers (as M325 Music Business Internship (4)
available) include club owners, promoters, booking agents and touring artists. Students gain first-hand experience within the music industry by serving as in-
One lecture hour per week for one quarter. terns for music-related companies. Positions vary according to availability. Spe-
cific hours and duties vary; average of twelve hours per week for one quarter.
MB101 Networking in the Music Business (1)
Success in a changing music industry is determined by the strength and longev-
ity of personal contacts: who you know, what you know, and most importantly,
who knows you. In this practical, application-oriented course, students analyze,
CERTIFICATE IN GUITAR CRAFT
MI’s two-quarter, 30 credit-unit certificate program in guitar design, fabrication COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
and maintenance, offered by the Guitar Craft Academy (GCA), provides com- All course descriptions include course number, title, number of credits, prereq-
prehensive training for the instrument manufacturing and repair professions. uisites (where applicable), description of content, and contact hours per week.
The program is held within GCA’s custom-designed facility containing all of the Lab hours shown are approximate. Total hours vary from week to week during
tools, fixtures and accessories required to build high-quality instruments. During each quarter. All courses include required projects and/or research.
the program, every student designs and builds a custom electric guitar or bass
for their personal use. Each student also receives weekly private instruction in GC06a Instrument Design I (2)
stylistic instrument performance techniques. Completion of all program require- Every detail of an instrument’s design affects its musicality and playability. This
ments qualifies the student to earn the Certificate in Guitar Craft. course covers principles of neck, headstock, and body design including the
weight and musical properties of various types of tone woods as well as pick-
guard and control cover fabrication and design, selecting instrument hardware,
Quarter 1 Quarter 2 musical qualities of hardware materials, overview of instrument fabrication his-
course/credits course/credits tory and template design. Eight lecture hours and 14 supervised lab hours plus
independent research assignments and design projects for one quarter.
major area
instrument design GC06a 2 GC06b 1 GC06b Instrument Design II (1)
instrument fabrication GC09a 6 GC09b 6 Prerequisite: GC06a Instrument Design I. Continuation of GC06a; students de-
fretwork & setup GC03a 2 GC03b 2 sign a tilt-back neck and body and research the design and fabrication of clas-
electronics GC04a 1 GC04b 1 sic instrument designs including the Fender Stratocaster and Gibson Les Paul.
finish work GC07 3
93
Four lecture hours and six supervised lab hours plus independent research as-
instrument repair GC01 2 signments and design projects for one quarter.
instrument performance T232a 2 T232b 2
GC09a Instrument Fabrication I (6)
TOTAL 30 CREDITS 15 15 Building outstanding instruments starts with understanding the tonal properties
of wood and shaping it to produce the most musical results. This course is an
on completion of the above 30 units, student is eligible to apply for the Certifi- introduction to the use of woodworking tools and techniques including routing,
cate in Guitar Craft jointing, milling, and shaping along with the use of large industrial and hand-held
tools. Six lecture hours and 33 supervised lab hours plus independent fabrica-
tion projects for one quarter.

GC09b Instrument Fabrication II (6)


The ultimate proof of a luthier’s knowledge and skill is in the instrument itself. As
the centerpiece of the program, each student designs and fabricates a personal
electric guitar or bass from raw materials, including instrument bodies, necks
and pickups as well as painting and buffing. Four lecture hours and 35 super-
vised lab hours plus independent fabrication project for one quarter.
CERTIFICATE IN GUITAR CRAFT
GC03a Fretwork & Setup I (2) GC01 Instrument Repair (2)
Learn essential guitar maintenance techniques used by professional technicians. Course covers the methodology and organization of materials and procedures
String height and truss rod adjustment, intonation, fret dressing, fret replacement for basic guitar repair and modification. Includes building the relationship be-
and intonation are covered along with effective methods for trouble-shooting re- tween musician-client and technician and communicating in musical and techni-
lated problems. Students learn principles of temperament and harmonics as well cal language. Twelve lecture hours plus projects for one quarter.
as how to adjust the instrument for proper musical “feel”. Eight lecture hours and
24 supervised lab hours plus projects for one quarter. T232a Instrument Performance I (2)
Private instrument instruction on guitar or bass with a focus on understanding
GC03b Fretwork & Setup II (2) the relationship between musical style, technique, sound and instrument design.
Prerequisite: GC03a Fretwork & Setup I. Continuation of GC03a with emphasis One private lesson hour per week for one quarter.
on final preparation for demands of professional setup. Four lecture hours and
30 supervised lab hours plus projects for one quarter. T232b Instrument Performance II (2)
A continuation of T230a. Private instrument instruction on guitar or bass with
GC04a Electronics I (1) a focus on understanding the relationship between musical style, sound and
An introduction to guitar and bass electronics. Topics include understanding instrument design. One private lesson hour per week for one quarter.
magnetic, piezo, and active pickups; proper shielding techniques; switching op-
tions; and proper soldering technique as well as trouble-shooting and repair.
Students will also learn how to make their own magnetic pickups, balancing
94 output and tone to arrive at optimal tonal properties for different instruments and
stylistic applications. Students are required to research a wide range of after-
market electronics. Ten lecture hours and ten supervised lab hours plus projects
for one quarter.

GC04b Electronics II (1)


Prerequisite: GC04a Electronics I. A continuation of GC04a; students learn elec-
tronic troubleshooting and wiring modifications, coil taps, phase switching and
other more advanced electronics applications. Ten lecture hours and twelve su-
pervised lab hours plus projects for one quarter.

GCO7 Finish Work (3)


An instrument’s finish is not only cosmetic, but can have a profound effect on
its musical properties. Class covers procedures and techniques for finishing
and repairing musical instruments, including preparation, painting and buffing.
Twelve lecture hours and 24 supervised lab hours plus projects for one quarter.
CERTIFICATE IN MUSIC VIDEO, FILM AND TELEVISION PRODUCTION
MI’s two-quarter/30 credit-unit Music Video, Film and Television program, COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
offered by the Film Institute of Technology (FilmIT) is an all-inclusive course All course descriptions include course number, title, number of credits per quar-
in the aesthetic and technical skills of creating music-based short films and ter, description of content, and contact hours per week. Successful completion
videos. The program culminates in a final project in which each student directly of all core classes is required in order to be eligible for the Certificate in Music
applies the skills of music selection and analysis, directing, producing, cinema- Video, Film and Television Production.
tography, editing, and compositing in creating a professional-level short film,
commercial or video incorporating music as a primary element. Successful F108 Music and Sound for Visual Media I (2
completion of all program requirements leads to a Certificate in Music Video, Essential elements of song form, meter and rhythm; the relationship between
Film and Television. musical structures, emotion and imagery; music editing and processing as fun-
damental skills in the production of music-based film and video. One and one-
half lecture hours per week for one quarter.
Quarter 1 Quarter 2
course/credits course/credits F208 Music and Sound for Visual Media II (2)
Prerequisite: F108 Music and Sound for Visual Media I. Sound design and
program core music and sound soundscape creation; music and location recording; mixing and synchronization
for visual media F108 2 F208 2 of music and image. One and one-half lecture hours per week for one quarter.
directing F101 3 F201 1
producing F102 3 F202 1 F101 Directing I (3)
editing F103 3 F203 2 An introduction to the art of music selection, script writing and directing, including 95
cinematography F104 3 F204 2 how to write and pitch music-based scripts and treatments, create shot lists and
compositing and storyboards, and develop communication techniques necessary for productive
motion graphics F105 1 F205 1 creative relationships with composers, arrangers and artists, producers, direc-
industry career strategies F206 1 tors of photography and art directors. One and one-half lecture hours per week
final project F207 5 plus class projects for one quarter.

TOTAL 30 CREDITS 15 15 F201 Directing II (1)


Prerequisite: F101 Directing I. Students compose or supervise music scores,
on completion of the above 30 units, student is eligible to apply for the decide on visual elements and direct actors. The class also focuses on the busi-
Certificate in Music Video, Film and Television Production ness side of directing, including getting an agent, working with composers, musi-
cal artists and production companies, and dealing with advertising agencies and
record labels. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.

F102 Producing I (3)
An introduction to the music video/film production process from pre-production
through production and post-production. Topics include understanding the key de-
partments and specialized roles of a production team, selecting and renting equip-
ment, creating budgets, specification sheets, contracts, riders, and obtaining per-
mits. One and one-half lecture hours per week plus class projects for one quarter.
CERTIFICATE IN MUSIC VIDEO, FILM AND TELEVISION PRODUCTION
F202 Producing II (1) F205 Compositing and Motion Graphics II (1)
Prerequisite: F102 Producing I. Learn the more complex aspects of produc- More advanced techniques including photorealistic compositing and CGI, ani-
tion including managing location and sound-stage productions, dealing with film mating to music with motion math, matting & rotoscoping, motion tracking, and
commissions, international productions, and managing the post-production pro- working with programs including Magic Bullet and Ultimatte AdvantEdge. One
cess. One lecture hour per week plus class projects for one quarter. lecture hour per week plus lab for one quarter.

F103 Editing I (3) F206 Industry Career Strategies (1)


An introduction to the short-form, music-driven editing process. Technique and Essential skills for building and maintaining a career in the music video-film-
concepts include compression and mastering formats, time code, file manage- television industry. Topics include building and presenting show reels, develop-
ment, working with transitions and effects using industry-standard editing pro- ing a career timeline, setting up your own production company, and bidding for
grams Final Cut 6.0 and Soundtrack. Students carry out exercises in montage, music videos and commercials. One lecture hour per week plus class projects
synchronization and story development. Two lecture hours per week plus lab for for one quarter.
one quarter.
F207 Final Project (5)
F203 Editing II (2) Students write, plan, produce, shoot and edit a complete music-driven video,
Prerequisite: F103 Editing I. An exploration of advanced editing techniques in- short film, or commercial. Applied skills include selecting, composing or super-
cluding multi-cam, color correction, format conversions, post-production sound vising the development of musical elements, developing a script or a treatment,
mixing, ADR and mastering of various HD formats. One lecture hour per week storyboarding, planning a budget, assembling a crew, securing location permits
96 plus lab for one quarter. and insurance, directing, shooting, editing, compositing and mastering. Final
projects are shown in class for review, critique and grade. Two lecture hours per
F104 Cinematography I (3) week plus lab and independent study for one quarter.
The fundamentals of cinematography, including aspect ratios; film stock; digital
compression; essential lighting skills for people, objects, and sets; film and HD
camera operation; exposing film, maintaining synchronization with sound and
music . Students complete class projects and exercises plus field trips. Two
lecture hours per week plus lab for one quarter.

F204 Cinematography II (2)


Prerequisite: F104 Cinematography I. Explore more advanced aspects of cin-
ematography including beauty, mood and effect lighting and filtering, camera
support, location sound recording and music playback. Field trips to Panavision
and Riot color. One lecture hour per week plus lab for one quarter.

F105 Compositing and Motion Graphics I (1)


Introduction to compositing using After Effects, including title manipulation, lay-
ering and third-party plugins. Introduction to DVD Studio Pro. One lecture hour
per week plus lab for one quarter.
ALTERNATIVE PROGRAMS
ENCORE Availability of Classes
The Encore Program offers non-certificate training in music for Performance All courses are not offered every quarter. Courses specific to Baccalaureate
students. With guidance from the Encore Coordinator, Encore students create a and non-Performance Certificate programs (as well as certain other courses
personalized ten-week schedule including lessons, classes, performance work- offered by Performance Certificate and AA programs) are not available for
shops and other activities. There are no required courses; all courses under- Encore enrollment. Before enrolling, consult with the Encore Coordinator to
taken will be graded, but no credit will be awarded. All instruments, styles and confirm the availability of specific courses.
levels are available and students may enroll at the beginning of any quarter.
Materials
The Encore Program includes: Encore students are entitled to the curriculum, materials and other resources
applicable to the courses included in their enrollment schedule only.
Private Lesson
Fees
A weekly, one-hour private lesson on the student’s primary instrument. Instructor
Encore students are responsible for all applicable fees; see “Tuition and Fees”
and student jointly develop a lesson plan that supports the student’s particular in-
for specific information.
terests and provides general guidance throughout the program (requests for pri-
vate lessons with a particular MI instructor are subject to instructor availability).
Course Credit
Courses taken during an Encore session do not earn course credit. Attendance
Personalized Schedule
or completion of any course does not guarantee subsequent advanced place-
Encore students may enroll in any combination of courses normally available to
ment in a Certificate or Degree program.
students at their level of knowledge and performing skill (as determined by the 97
Encore Coordinator and relevant program directors), equal to a full-time credit
load of fifteen units.
SUMMER SHOT
MI’s annual summer program is an intensive, one-week contemporary popular
Access
music education experience for students age 14 and up. Summer Shot offers
Encore enrollment includes 24-hour access to MI’s facilities for practice and
two non-certificate program options:
rehearsal, use of the library, admission to special clinics and seminars, and par-
ticipation in open counseling and live performance workshops.
Performance (Guitar, Bass, Drums, Keyboards, Voice)
The schedule includes classes in instrument technique and general musi-
Please Note:
cianship, group performance workshops, private and group lessons, visiting
instructor seminars, visiting artist concert, and live student performances on
Financial Aid
the professional concert stage.
State and Federal financial aid are not available to students enrolled in non-
Certificate programs.
Recording
Students learn basic computer-based recording and music production tech-
January and July enrollments
niques and participate in recording sessions in MI’s state-of-the-art studios.
Most core classes available to entering Encore students during January and
Each student produces an original recording applying techniques taught during
July quarters are at an intermediate-to-advanced level. January or July enroll-
the program.
ment is not advisable for beginning-level Encore students.

Program dates, specific course offerings, and other information are provided
on MI’s website (www.mi.edu) and updated regularly.
GENERAL ELECTIVES
Except where students are required to choose electives from a program-specific M164 Lifemanship (1)
list, students may also fulfill their elective requirements with the General Elec- Students learn techniques that develop their ability to be confident in front of an
tives listed here. See program descriptions for specific elective credit require- audience including stage presence and communication skills. One hour per week
ments and program-specific elective offerings. for one quarter. Course may be repeated for credit.

NOTE: Most electives are not offered every quarter and electives may be added
CREATIVE DEVELOPMENT
or cancelled without prior notice. Refer to the current course offering for specific
courses available at time of registration.
M500 Artist Development: The Songs (2)
Prerequisite: M184 Intro to Songwriting or AR11 Songwriting Techniques I, or per-
GENERAL INTEREST mission of Artist Development Coordinator. During intensive one-on-one sessions,
M112 Open Counseling (1) instructor and student work on developing original songs from ideas to finished ar-
Instructors in various programs offer informal coaching, critique and insight into rangements. One private lesson-rehearsal hour per week for ten weeks plus final
technique, musicianship and style during weekly scheduled sessions. Student presentation. May be repeated for credit.
must attend a minimum of ten one-hour sessions per quarter; may be repeated
for credit.
M501 Artist Development: The Show (2)
Prerequisite: M500 Artist Development: The Songs and permission of Artist Devel-
E020 Live Playing Workshops (1) opment Coordinator. Instructor and student develop live performances of original
(NOTE: LPWs are required for all AA and Certificate in Performance programs; material written during M500 with concentration on stage presence, movement,
LPWs are offered for elective credit to eligible students from other programs). audience rapport, image, song sequence and entertainment value. At the conclu-
98 Students gain performing experience in a wide range of contemporary styles. See sion, students present their best live material for evaluation and screening by a
catalog section on Live Playing Workshops for general descriptions; refer to cur- jury of guest experts. Selected students qualify for an additional video-recorded
rent course offering for specific LPWs available at time of registration. Minimum of Industry showcase. One private lesson-rehearsal hour per week for ten weeks
ten performances per quarter, repeatable for credit plus jury. May be repeated for credit.

M069 Latin Listening (1) M303 Creativity Workshop (1)


Students gain an understanding of Latin styles through intense listening and dis- Based on the book The Artist’s Way, this workshop is intended to help students tap
cussion. One lecture hour per week for one quarter. into a deeper sense of creativity in both music and life. The goal is to create more
dialogue among students, developing a community of artists who learn to open up
M155 Audition Workshop (1) and relate to each other while exchanging ideas about the creative process. Two
Prerequisite: E01b Rhythm Section Workshop IB (Guitar, Bass, Drums); K041b workshop hours per week for one quarter. May be repeated for credit.
Groove IB (Keyboards), or E02b Vocal Performance IB. Learn what it takes to
build and sustain a career as a working musician, including practical advice and SONGWRITING
proven steps for getting and passing auditions, preparing and promoting yourself
and obtaining work from clubs and casuals to sessions and tours. Students ex-
M075 Original Song Pre-Production (2)
perience mock sessions and auditions under the direction of a professional talent
Grammy-nominated record producer Richie Zito (Cher, Poison, Janet Jackson,
coordinator. Two workshop hours per week for one quarter.
Cheap Trick, The Cult) works with students on getting their original songs ready
for recording. Song arrangements and key studio production tips are discussed.
M160 Accelerated Learning (1) Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. May be repeated for credit.
Build speed learning and recall skills to make the most efficient use of practice and
study hours through visualization, time frame practice and isolation of material.
One hour per week for one quarter. Course may be repeated for credit.
GENERAL ELECTIVES
M085 Writing TV Themes (2) M321 Original Song Workshop (1.5)
Prerequisite: M021b Harmony and Theory IB, M184 Intro to Songwriting. Some- Prerequisite: M184 Intro to Songwriting. Students develop songwriting skills by
times it’s the TV theme song that hooks us into watching the show. Who can presenting and evaluating their original songs through critiques of lyrics, melo-
forget the themes to Gilligan’s Island, The Flintstones, or Friends? Students learn dies, grooves and chord progressions. Weekly writing assignments culminate in
how to write memorable TV themes to cartoon shows, crime shows, or shows a complete, professionally presented song. One lecture hour and one workshop
about super heroes. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. hour per week for one quarter.

M114 Fundamentals of Lyric Writing (2) MUSIC BUSINESS


Lyrics are the language of music, and often have as much or more to do with
the success of a song than the music. This class focuses on developing a basic M008 Evolution of Pop 1960-1980 (1)
knowledge of lyric writing, including discussion and analysis of the form, structure Study the musical styles that influenced the modern pop era, exploring music
and content of popular hit songs. Two lecture hours a week for one quarter. ranging from Hendrix, Zeppelin and Pink Floyd to the Eagles, Bee Gees, Sex Pis-
tols, Ramones, David Bowie and Alice Cooper, among others. Students analyze
M184 Intro to Songwriting (1.5) recordings and videos. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
Prerequisite: M021a Harmony & Theory IA. This class develops the basic tech-
niques and skills used by effective songwriters. Topics include song form, hooks, M009 Evolution of Pop 1980-Present (1)
melody, lyrics, rhyme and harmony. One lecture hour and one workshop hour per Students listen to recordings and view videos of performances by artists including
week for one quarter. Madonna, Nirvana, Alice in Chains, Alanis Morissette, Eminem, Dre, Coldplay,
Blink-182 and others across the spectrum of popular music. One lecture hour per 99
M185 Professional Songwriting (2) week for one quarter.
Prerequisite: M184 Intro to Songwriting. The popular music industry is built first
and foremost on songs, and thousands of musicians earn the bulk of their musi- M065 Business of the Beatles (1)
cal income from songwriting. This course is a hands-on writing course teaching A nuts & bolts overview of the Beatles’ business career. Topics include their failed
students how to create songs on demand in various popular music styles. Stu- audition for Decca Records, how Capitol almost lost the band, Brian Epstein’s poor
dents develop their craft by learning the structural and stylistic elements of various merchandising deal, songs they gave away, John Lennon’s copyright infringement
genres including pop, rock, country and adult contemporary with assignments that case and more. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
include creating verses, choruses and bridges in each style. Two lecture hours per
week for one quarter. M074 The Songwriters (1)
Seminar series featuring a different successful guest songwriter each week play-
M308 Songwriters Lab (1) ing demos of songs recorded by major artists as well as discussing how to break
Class designed to foster open discussion, idea sharing, performance, and rela- into the business of songwriting and maintain a career. Each class includes a Q&A
tionship-building for songwriters. Student songwriters perform their songs and session with students. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. Repeatable
share the writing process followed by open discussion of alternative writing tech- for credit.
niques and the creative process. Two workshop hours per week for one quarter.
May be repeated for credit. M076 Do-It-Yourself Promotion (1)
Learn to put together a promotion and publicity campaign to market and sell origi-
M309 Lyric Writing for Original Songs (2) nal music. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
Prerequisite: M114 Fundamentals of Lyric Writing. Application of lyric writing fun-
damentals to students’ original work, including extensive writing assignments and
evaluation of material with a focus on lyrical content. Two lecture/workshop hours
per week for one quarter.
GENERAL ELECTIVES
M078 The Business of Working Musicians (1) M101 Making Money in New Music Markets (1)
Learn to manage a career as a working musician. Topics include managing life Students explore ways of making money in new and different music markets, in-
on the road, negotiating an employment contract, calculating per diems, key-man cluding getting endorsements, applying for showcases, grants, festival gigs, col-
clauses, equipment endorsements, working with unions (AFM and AFTRA), band lege shows and sponsorships. One lecture hour per week for one quarter.
membership agreements and more. One lecture hour per week for one quarter..
M325 Music Internship (1)
M079 Music Business Basics (1) Prerequisite: completion of one quarter of study in residence. Gain first-hand ex-
A survey of essential elements of the music business as they pertain to musicians perience within the music industry by interning for a music-related company. Posi-
and songwriters. Topics include publishing, copyrights, management, A&R and tions vary according to availability, but typically include music publishing, manage-
getting gigs. One lecture hour per week for one quarter. ment, record label, promotion, or marketing. Specific responsibilities and working
hours vary by position; minimum of ten weeks/three hours per week. Course en-
M080 The Touring Musician (1) rollment is contingent on placement in a position. The MI Internship Coordina-
An introduction to what to expect as a touring musician. Includes finding and ne- tor will assist in placing students but cannot guarantee placement during a given
gotiating live gigs, negotiating performance contracts, planning a budget, and cov- quarter. May be repeated for credit.
ering the ‘real’ costs of traveling. Students learn to make and follow through on an
actual tour plan from first phone call to final costs. One lecture hour per week for ADVANCED MUSICIANSHIP
one quarter.
E20 Fusion Ensemble (1)
100 M083 From the Streets to Success (1) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Advanced ensemble performs complex
This class reveals how to deal effectively with obstacles encountered by artists jazz/fusion arrangements during weekly rehearsals. The emphasis is on ensem-
as they move to a professional career status. Topics include rehearsal tips, press ble playing, listening and improvisation. One ensemble hour per week for one
packages, dealing with the press, getting gigs and creating a buzz. One lecture quarter. May be repeated for credit.
hour per week for one quarter.
M290 Advanced Ensemble Skills (1)
M087 Doing Business as a Band (1) Prerequisite: B112B, P112B, G112B, or K112B (depending on major instrument).
An in-depth discussion of the creative and business aspects of operating a band. How to function as a professional-level rhythm section. Instructor acts as a musi-
Topics include: auditioning band members, protecting your band’s name, delegat- cal director for a Funk, Fusion, Jazz-Rock-oriented rehearsal band. Emphasis is
ing responsibility, partnership papers, rehearsal tips, putting together a killer live placed on groove, timing, and feel. Bass, drum and keyboard chairs will be open
set, and promoting your band’s image and music. One lecture hour per week for to a maximum of three students; the guitar chair a maximum of four. Improvisation,
one quarter. lead sheet, and notation skills will be required. Two ensemble hours per week for
one quarter.
M092 The Record Producers (1)
Each week, a different guest producer brings demo and final master recordings of art- NON-INSTRUMENTAL SKILLS
ists’ songs for analysis and comparison, critiques students’ original song productions,
and discusses record producers’ career preparation, development and responsibili- M107 Computer Notation (2)
ties. Two lecture hours per week for one quarter. May be repeated for credit. An important, practical and contemporary survey of computer notational tech-
niques using Sibelius notation software. Recommended for all students, this
course has wide application for theory, arranging, songwriting and other assign-
ments requiring notation. Two hours per week for one quarter.
GENERAL ELECTIVES
M109 Introduction to Final Cut Pro© (2) M167 Hand Percussion (1)
This hands-on course introduces students to the interface and primary feature set An introduction to percussion techniques including hand coordination and rhythm
of Final Cut Pro, the powerful industry-standard film-video editing program. Topics as they relate to various types of Latin hand percussion instruments with applica-
include navigating the interface, basic editing techniques, adjusting and custom- tion to Latin and pop music. One hour per week for one quarter.
izing settings, capturing HD video and audio, trimming, audio editing, finishing,
and final output to various formats and compressions. One lecture hour and two M305 Introduction to Bass (1)
lab hours per week for one quarter. For non-bass majors interested in learning how to play appropriate basslines us-
ing correct playing techniques and understanding the role of the bassist in a band.
M187 Computers in Music (1.5) Covers all essentials of the bass for the non-bassist. One hour per week for one
Students become familiar with music-oriented software applications ranging from quarter.
ear training, practice and songwriting aids, sequencing and digital editing. Each
program is covered in an introductory fashion geared toward combining computer M306 Introduction to Keyboards (1)
and musical understanding. One lecture hour and one lab hour per week for one Covers basic chord voicings, scales and fingerings for non-keyboard majors. The
quarter. keyboard is the basic reference instrument for the study of every style of music
and the basic tool of songwriters. All musicians can benefit from knowledge of
M330 Composing/Scoring for Film and TV (2) basic keyboard technique. One hour per week for one quarter.
An overview of the TV & Film industries as lucrative outlets for original music.
Class covers the creative process of seeing a video and creating an audio track
from scratch, including such factors as the equipment needed to get started, how 101
to create tension and emotion in your music, considerations of time and space in a
visual medium, and time code & sync tracks. Also covers the business side of how
to create industry interest in your music, developing your reel, royalties, contracts,
points, credits, and dealing with music supervisors. Two lecture hours per week
for one quarter.

NON-MAJOR INSTRUMENT STUDY


See instrument program course offerings for additional entry-level instrument
electives.

M110 Introduction to Voice (1)


For non-vocal majors. Students learn to develop techniques for proper breathing,
pitch accuracy, and improving range while protecting their vocal instrument with
application to popular styles in both lead and backup vocal roles. One lecture hour
per week for one quarter.

M111 Introduction to Guitar (1)


For non-guitar majors. Covers simple note reading, fingerings and accompaniment
patterns. Great tool for singer-songwriters. One hour per week for one quarter.
LIVE PLAYING WORKSHOPS
Live Playing Workshops (LPWs) and Ensembles provide students with a wide MUSICIANSHIP ENSEMBLES
range of opportunities to gain valuable performing experience and fulfill their In these ensembles, students confront musical and professional challenges that
performance requirements by concentrating in one area or sampling a variety expand their stylistic range while teaching them to think on their feet. Musician-
of styles and settings according to their needs. Live performance courses are ship ensembles include Real World (playing contemporary styles while chart-
offered in three general categories: reading and following a musical director), Schroeder Ensemble (developing sty-
listic range and improvisational skills under the guidance of popular MI instructor
STYLE & REPERTOIRE Carl Schroeder) and Traditional Jazz.
Staffed by experienced instructor-performers, these LPWs use a “tune of the
week” format. Students prepare parts in advance, perform on stage with other ARTIST DEVELOPMENT
students, and receive coaching and critique on their musical and performing Designed to help students form original bands, showcase original material and
skills. These LPWs are also a great way for students to meet each other, learn gain experience as performing artists in solo or group settings, these perfor-
about different styles, and develop their repertoire. Regularly scheduled* Style mance workshops emphasize creativity, stagecraft and professionalism. Artist
& Repertoire LPWs include: Development LPWs include Coffeehouse (solo performance) and Pro Perfor-
mance (original groups).
Blues Classic Rock
Country Rock Modern Rock
Hard Rock Metal
Classic R&B Contemporary R&B
Fusion Funk
102
Reggae Latin
Traditional Jazz Ensemble Student Choice (styles vary)
Digital

* LPW offerings vary by quarter; check current course schedule for availability.
FACULTY BIOS
Akimoto, Takeshi (Guitar) mentator on TV and radio shows, and worked on CD reissue projects for Elton
Guitarist Takeshi Akimoto maintains a very busy schedule between live tours John and Nilsson. At MI, Michael teaches Music Business News, Business His-
with such artists as Ziggy Marley, The Marley Brothers, and Raya Yarbrough and tory of the Beatles and Public Relations.
sessions including soundtracks for the recent motion pictures 50 First Dates and
Christmas With The Kranks, as well as ABC-TV’s Jimmy Kimmel Live. At GIT, Anderson, Michael (Multi-Program)
Takeshi teaches private lessons and open counseling. Michael Anderson is a songwriter, artist, producer, and author who has written
songs for John Fogerty, Juice Newton, Pam Tillis, Phil Seymour, Rebecca St.
Akutsu, Keita (Drums) James, and others in rock, pop, country, and CCM. He has been a staff writer for
Keita Akutsu is a native of Yokohama, Japan, and is an honors graduate of PIT, EMI and BMG Publishing in Nashville, as well as MCA /Universal and Criterion
where he earned the Most Improved Student of the Year Award. Keita also Music in Los Angeles. He wrote the #1 country single, “Maybe It Was Memphis”,
graduated from the California Institute of the Arts with BFA in music where he several #1 CCM singles, and won a Dove Award for “Hard Rock Song of the
studied under the guidance of Joe LaBarbera. He regularly performs at various Year.” As a solo artist he has released six albums, including two on A&M Re-
major venues in the LA area including Catalina Bar & Grill. He has performed cords, two on EMI / Forefront, and two independent releases. Michael is also an
with such artists as Larry Koonse, Bob Shepard, Nate Morgan and Darek Oles author of screenplays and books including Michael Anderson’s Little Black Book
among others. At MI, Keita teaches private lessons and Traditional Jazz LPW. of Songwriting and works as a music business career and song consultant. At
MI, he teaches Professional Songwriting and Artist Development.
Allen, Brian (Bass)
Since graduating in 1999 from the Bachelors Program at Musicians Institute Aponte, Bryan (Audio Engineering)
with the BIT Outstanding Student Award, Brian has maintained a busy schedule Bryan Aponte received his Bachelor of Arts degree cum laude from Long Island
103
of live performances and sessions in Los Angeles, performing on both electric University’s School of Broadcasting and graduated from New York’s Institute of
and upright bass in styles ranging from jazz to heavy alternative. Currently, he Audio Research. After completing his studies in audio engineering, he turned
is playing with Greg Adams, the legendary trumpeter/ arranger for Tower Of professionally to post-production for television and film, first at BET and sub-
Power, and works as a clinician for Zon basses, SWR amps and Lightwave sequently as an engineer/mixer for ABC, CBS, E! Network, Fox TV, Mad TV
optical pickups. At BIT, Brian teaches private lessons, open counseling, and the and more, receiving two Emmy Award nominations for his work in sound. For
Hip-Hop LPW. MI’s Audio Engineering/Post-Production Audio program, Bryan teaches ADR/
Dialogue Editing and Foley Recording and Editing.
Alonzo, Lance (Guitar Craft)
Lance Alonzo graduated from the Guitar Craft Academy program in March 2001 Avery, Justin (Keyboards)
and soon joined the staff as a teaching assistant by then-Program Director John Justin Avery is a versatile performer whose original arrangements have been
Carruthers. His teaching assignments expanded over the next few years and performed from his hometown of Traverse City, Michigan all the way to South
from 2005-08 he served as the program’s Department Head before returning to Africa. He grew up in a musical family, performing at his father’s nightclub before
teaching full-time. Aside from his teaching duties, Lance also repairs and builds entering Western Michigan University as a Jazz Studies major. His arrange-
custom guitars and basses for local musicians. ments and original compositions were featured in the school’s Gold Company
performances around the world. Justin won a 2004 Downbeat Student Music
Amicone, Michael (Music Business) Award for best Blues, Pop, Rock Band as well as best Blues, Pop, Rock soloist
Michael Amicone has been a respected music journalist and editor for over two with his all-original Justin Avery Band. He has also created Icons, a multi-media
decades. He has served as managing editor of the award-winning daily music showcase performance of his original music that can be viewed at www.justinav-
news source Billboard Bulletin, editor-in-chief of the innovative Universal Music erymusic.com. As a performer, Justin works as a keyboardist with the Emotions
Group TV show/website Farmclub and senior editor of Music Connection maga- and as lead vocalist for his original rock band, Population Game, named in Music
zine. He has also interviewed scores of top artists and executives, including Connection Magazine’s 15th Annual “Hot 100 Unsigned Artists”. For MI, Justin
David Bowie, Quincy Jones, Tony Bennett and Ringo Starr, been a guest com- conducts ensembles and teaches arranging as well as keyboard private lessons.
FACULTY BIOS
Avveduti, Peter (Independent Artist) 1200 published articles in a variety of publications and general entertainment
Peter has worked for Howard Benson, Robi Draco Rosa, and Leslie Van Treese websites, he is currently Review Editor, A&R Reporter and Features Writer for
performing jobs from guitar & bass tech to Pro Tools engineer. He later went on to Music Connection Magazine. With over twenty years in entertainment and mu-
become the head engineer at Mad Heaven Studios where he produced numerous sic, Bernard has worked with superstars and emerging artists as a Director of
artists in genres ranging from acoustic to rock to electronic. He currently works as Marketing and Promotions, Director of Business Affairs, PR consultant, Media
an independent producer, engineer, mixer, and as a session guitar player while Liaison and A&R executive. At Warner Bros. Entertainment, he handled market-
also focusing on his own music, including his band Illium which has released its
ing and copywriting for all WB products, including music, television programs,
first album, All Our Hope Is... For the Independent Artist Program, Peter engi-
films and DVDs. As a partner in BGO Entertainment Network, he consults for
neers drum sessions, maintains the studios, and teaches private lessons.
record labels, entertainment firms (music, TV, and internet) and Minarik Guitars.
Banks, Tio (Independent Artist) Bernard has appeared in documentaries, VH1, MTV and CNN specials and is a
After a four-year honorable tour of duty in the United States Marine Corps at frequent participant in music conferences and workshops across the US. At MI,
Quantico, Tionno Banks moved to Los Angeles to study piano, synthesizers and he teaches Music Business Basics and Start & Run Your Own Record Label.
voice at the Dick Grove School of Music. Upon completion, Tio went on tour
as the assistant keyboardist for legendary keyboardist Billy Preston, followed Berestovoy, Marcelo (Guitar)
by recording, writing and more touring with various artists including Don Was, GIT graduate (‘86) Marcelo Berestovoy’s recording credits include Ricky Martin,
Khaleb, John Taylor (Duran Duran) and Mandy Moore. Tio’s current musical Jessica Simpson, and Selena, as well as movies (with Tom Coster and Tom
projects include the completion of his debut solo CD entitled Tiopiah, producing
Coster Jr.) and TV spots. As a player, he’s truly versatile, covering all of the gui-
Eminem artist Cashus, and touring with the funk-rock-blues band The Bone-
tars for the live production of “Holiday on Ice”. Recent songwriter credits include
shakers. When he’s in LA, Tio teaches private keyboard lessons for the Inde-
a cut on Natalia Oreiro’s Latin Grammy-nominated Tu Veneno (BMG Argentina).
104 pendent Artist Program.
Stylistic preferences: anything with guitar in it! At GIT, Marcelo conducts Rumba
Basick, Shawna Voice) Workout classes, and teaches Single String Improvisation, Rhythm Guitar, RSW,
Shawna Basick has been performing most of her life, with experiences ranging open counseling and private instruction.
from sports events to musical theater. Recently, Shawna has been touring the
UK with Leslie Paula & the Latin Soul Band as well as performing at a variety of Berry, Kris (Drums)
venues in LA. A VIT grad noted for her stylistic versatility, Shawna specializes in Kris Berry works professionally in a variety of styles including jazz, Latin, rock,
voice technique and placement for different styles of music. At VIT, she teaches funk, R&B, soul and classical. Artists he has worked with include Clare Fischer
Sightsinging and private lessons. (Latin/Jazz quartet & vocal ensemble), Otmaro Ruiz (Alex Acuna, Sheila E), Stu
Goldberg (John McLaughlin, Pat Martino), Smokey Robinson, Doc Severenson,
Bates, Jonathan (Independent Artist) Tim Bogert (Jeff Beck, Rod Stewart), Keith Jones (Santana, Andy Narell, Airto
Jonathan is the singer and founding member of the Columbia recording group & Flora Purim) and musicians from the LA Philharmonic Orchestra. At MI, Kris
Mellowdrone. Music from his current LP Box has been licensed by the likes of specializes in mallet percussion and private instruction.
Six Feet Under, Nissan, Project Runway, Bravo, Disney, MTV, and several video
game titles. A by-product of years of solid touring has lent to a lot of DIY know-how Blue, Jeff (Music Business)
and experience with business matter such as contract law. He has shared the Jeff Blue’s extensive music industry resume includes positions as Senior Vice
stage with Paul Weller, The Fire Theft, Johnny Marr, The Killers, and She Wants President of A&R and Staff Producer for Interscope Records, Vice President of
Revenge. In the studio, he was worked and collaborated with Eric Valentine, Bob A&R for Warner Bros. and Jive/RCA Records, writer for Warner Chappell Music
Ezrin, Tony Berg, and Sean Beaven. Visit www.mellowdrone.com or myspace. and music business attorney. He has worked with artists who have sold in ex-
com/mellowdrone for more info. Jonathan is currently a Project Advisor for IAP. cess of 130 million records, including Linkin Park, Limp Bizkit, Korn, Hoobastank,
Macy Gray and Better Than Ezra, among others. He is currently an A&R consul-
Baur, Bernard (Music Business)
tant for Jive Records and writer with Universal Music Publishing. For MI’s Music
Bernard Baur is an artist crusader and award-winning journalist. For many art-
Business program, Jeff teaches A&R and Music Contracts.
ists he’s the connection between the streets and the suites. Credited with over
FACULTY BIOS
Bolton, Ross (Guitar) Brewer, Henry “Soleh” (Keyboards)
Currently on tour with jazz vocal legend Al Jarreau, Ross Bolton has also re- Henry Brewer received his musical education at Webster College Music Conser-
corded or performed with Rick Braun, David Benoit, Warren Hill, English funk- vatory in St. Louis, MO. After relocating to L.A. in 1983, Henry remained active
sters Down to the Bone, Jeffrey Osborne and many others, as well as providing in writing, performance and recording. Some of his professional credits include
guitar work for soundtracks including the The Gary Shandling Show (HBO) and B.B. King, Lou Rawls, Gladys Knight, and The O’Jays, and most recently, The
movies such as Switch, Into the West, and Friday. Ross has also recorded with Emotions, members of Earth, Wind, & Fire and legendary guitarist Paul Jackson
The Beach Boys and played on the theme song of the long running radio show Jr. Recording credits include soundtracks for the films Nemesis, Police Acade-
Rockline. Ross has an instructional video entitled Funk Rhythm Guitar. Special- my II, Bob Roberts and Fast Getaway II, as well as his Warner Bros instructional
ties: funk, R&B, contemporary improvising video Blues Keyboard. He is the author of two instructional books, R&B Soul
Keyboards and Pop Rock Keyboards (with David Garfield) and also records for
Bonhomme, Al (Guitar) and endorses Ensoniq Corporation. Specialties: Blues, voicings, and groove.
Al has performed for many years as a freelance working guitar player covering
all styles of music from country and blues to rock and roll, R&B, finger picking Broderick, Chris (Guitar)
and everything in between. Al has worked with country star Dwight Yoakum, gui- As guitarist for legendary metal pioneers Megadeth, Chris has toured the world
tarist/producer Pete Anderson, the Bull Durham Band and Disney Entertainment and earned critical praise for his virtuosic guitar style. After receiving his degree
as well as performing at the Grand Old Opry, on CNN’s Crook and Chase show in Classical Guitar Performance from the University of Denver and studying at
and with country artists Mark Collie and Tracy Lawrence. In 1988, he was voted the Lamont School of Music, he went on to release five albums with his band
“Guitarist of the Year” by the California Country Music Association. Specialties: Jag Panzer (Century Media Records) and is currently endorsed by companies
country, “roots” music and finger picking including Ibanez, Bareknuckle Pickups, ENGL amps, and DR strings (for more
information about Chris, check out www.chrisbroderick.com). At GIT, Chris 105
Borg, Bobby (Music Business, Independent Artist) teaches private lessons and open counseling.
Bobby Borg is an international recording and touring musician with over 25
years experience in the music business. He has worked with a variety of artists Brown, Dean (Guitar)
including the multi-platinum group Warrant as well as Beggars & Thieves and his For more than twenty years, Dean Brown has been one of the most sought-after
own band, Left For Dead. As a consultant to both artists and independent labels, “A-list” guitar players for both recording and tours, with a credit list of over 100
he is a familiar guest speaker at music industry events, a regular contributor to major artist recordings (including four Grammy Award winners) and tours with
music business publications and on-line sites, and a music screener for the in- the Brecker Brothers, Marcus Miller, David Sanborn, Kirk Whalum, Bob James,
dependent A&R company, TAXI. A graduate of Berklee College of Music, Bobby George Duke, and Billy Cobham, among others. At GIT, Dean teaches electives
is also the author of the highly endorsed Billboard publication The Musician’s in Advanced Electric Guitar Styles and Advanced Ensemble Skills as well as
Handbook: A Practical Guide To Understanding The Music Business. At MI, Bob- weekly Open Counseling sessions.
by teaches Inside the Recording Industry and the Independent CD Project.
Buckingham, Bruce (Guitar)
Bruce is an experienced teacher at MI and author of several courses, including
Bowders, Jeff (Drums) Rhythm Guitar, Chord Melody, and Latin Guitar Styles, as well as three books
Jeff Bowders began playing professionally at age 14 and graduated from PIT
for MI Press and one video for Hal Leonard Publishing. He has played and/or
as “Outstanding Student of the Year”. After relocating to Nashville, he record-
recorded with musicians as diverse as Helen Reddy, John Pattitucci and Michael
ed and toured internationally with various artist including Rebecca St. James,
Ginny Owens, Fusebox, Chuck Yamek, and the Paul Colman Trio. In 2003, Hal Jackson’s live production of Sisterella. Bruce’s classes at MI include rhythm gui-
Leonard Publishing/MI Press released Jeff’s book, Double Bass Drumming-The tar, chord melody, Latin guitar, single string technique, theory and ear training.
Mirrored Groove System. Jeff currently keeps a busy schedule touring and re- Specialties: jazz and Latin styles.
cording with bands and artists from the LA area; check out www.jeffbowders.
com for more info. At MI, Jeff teaches Rock Drums, Rhythm Section Workshop Burn, Roger (Keyboards)
and private lessons. Roger’s national and international tours and television appearances include Lou
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Bega, Vanessa Williams (Arsenio Hall, Grammy Awards), Brian Setzer Orches- Campbell, Mike (Voice)
tra (Jon Stewart Show, VH-1 Duets, Tonight Show), and Lionel Richie (Tonight Aside from his duties as VIT department head, Mike Campbell has maintained
Show, Today Show, Oprah Winfrey). He also played piano on Brian Setzer’s a busy career as a vocalist, including seven solo recordings as well as appear-
Guitar Slinger. Roger has also played for Pepsi, Acura, Dodge and Cadillac ances with artists as diverse as Sarah Vaughn, Count Basie, Ella Fitzgerald,
jingles, and has recorded soundtracks for feature films The Mask and McHale’s
Henry Mancini, Nancy Wilson, Roger Miller, Bobby Darin, Petula Clark, The Su-
Navy. In addition to keyboards, Roger plays vibraphone, marimba, and drumset.
premes, the Mamas and the Papas, Quincy Jones, Joe Williams, Tuck & Patti,
At MI, Roger introduces students to the realities of the working musician through
Benny Carter and the North Carolina Symphony. He has recorded with Nancy
the Real World LPW.
Wilson, Donald Byrd, and Brazilian composer Moacir Santos, with whom he
Calzatti, Alan (Music Video-Film) co-wrote the title track for Carnival of the Spirits. He has contributed his vocal
FilmIT director/instructor Alan Calzatti was destined to be behind the camera— talents to numerous jingles, TV and movie soundtracks, and has performed on
his grandfather was a film director and his father a director of photography. over forty television shows, including Ed Sullivan, Jerry Lewis, Red Skelton and
Alan’s first taste of the film world was as a child on location as his father shot Roger Miller. He has served on the Board of Governors of NARAS and is a
documentaries throughout the war-torn Middle East. After moving with his fam- member of AFof M, SAG., and AFTRA. As an educator, before coming to VIT
ily from Russia to Jerusalem to Hollywood, by 1984 Alan was ready to begin Mike was chairman of the vocal department at the renowned Grove School of
his own career, honing his craft by directing & producing numerous industrial Music for ten years and has presented vocal clinics worldwide. He has done
films and home video titles. After he was approached to direct a music video
two vocal instructional videos for Warner Bros. and written Sight Singing: The
for Compton’s Most Wanted, he never looked back. With partner Jeff Clark, he
Complete Method for Singers (MI Press/Hal Leonard) and Harmony Vocals (with
formed Calzatti/Clark Productions (later Sputnik Films) and during the next 18
years completed over 250 commercials and music videos for the domestic and Tracee Lewis). Mike appears in the 2005 Who’s Who Among American Teachers
and was named one of the “The 500 Greatest Jazz Singers of All Time” in Scott
106 international markets, working with Atlantic, Sony, A&M, Jive, Hollywood Re-
Yanow’s book of the same title. Specialties: Jazz vocals and interpretation
cords, WEA International, & BMG/RCA, to name a few. In 1996 Alan received
the MTV Viewer’s Choice—Video of the Year Award for the Backstreet Boys’
“Get Down”, which launched the band into first place in Europe and changed the Campos, Carlos (Keyboards)
way “Boy Bands” were marketed. A year later, Alan repeated that success with Carlos Campos completed his undergraduate studies at the National Conserva-
N’ Sync’s climbing to a number-one position on the European charts. Still very tory of Lima, received his B.M. in Composition from the Berkley College of Music
active in the industry, Alan most recently shot the critically acclaimed rockumen- and completed his Masters Degree at the New England Conservatory. Carlos
tary “Heima” for the Icelandic group Sigur Ros. At FilmIT, Alan trains students is the author of Salsa and Afro Cuban Montunos for Piano and has recorded
in multiple areas including directing, shooting, editing and creating CGI/visual over twenty albums for international artists. He is also the head writer for Indi-
effects. www.alancalzatti.com ant Productions in Los Angeles and maintains an active recording schedule in
broadcast television and radio. Carlos currently teaches keyboard proficiency,
Campbell, Kathryn (Baccalaureate) theory, and ear training for MI’s Degree Program.
Katie Campbell, a Los Angeles native, completed her Bachelor of Music Degree
in Jazz Studies at Western Michigan University. While at WMU, she performed Carruthers, John (Guitar Craft)
throughout Europe and South Africa with the award-winning ensembles, “Gold
Well-known LA guitar builder, instrument repairman and Guitar Craft Program
Company” and “University Chorale.” In the US, Katie has performed from New
Director John Carruthers wrote the guitar repair column in Guitar Player maga-
York to Los Angeles in venues including Alice Tully Hall (Lincoln Center), Bird-
land, and The Jazz Bakery. She has also performed with Bobby McFerrin, Janis zine for ten years. He has also worked with Fender, Ibanez, Yamaha and EMG
Siegel, and Darmon Meader. Katie was named “Best Collegiate Jazz Vocalist” in and helped create such signature series guitars as the Robben Ford, Joe Pass,
the 2004 Downbeat Awards. Katie was the stand-by for both female roles in the and Lee Ritenour models, as well as the EMG pick-up. His shop, Carruthers
off-Broadway production “Toxic Audio” and performed with the show in Mexico Guitar Repair, has been in business in LA since 1977.
and the Caribbean. Back in Los Angeles, Katie is the lead vocalist for the Matt
Roberts Group, studies acting and dance, and is a certified yoga instructor. At Carson, Rob (Drums)
MI, Katie teaches Harmony & Theory, Ear Training, and Intro to Keyboards at Rob Carson is recognized as one of today’s finest rudimental performers. His
Musician’s Institute. http://www.myspace.com/singinkate snare drum talents have won him more than 30 competition awards, including
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three World Snare Drum Championships. He is a highly regarded educator, per- California State University Long Beach as well as the Dick Grove School of
former and clinician, and through his disciplined and aesthetic approach to music Music with an emphasis on music synthesis and technology. Kevin has per-
he has perfected many new and enlightening rudimental techniques. Carson is formed and/or recorded with The Clue, Hotboxx, Gone Wilde, Bent, 11th Hour,
also the co-inventor of Remo’s Power Stroke and Falam Drum Head and designer Funk Rage N Soul, Bare Bones and Christine Russell, and also worked as a
of the DC10 ProMark Drumstick. At MI, Rob teaches Playing Techniques. live-performance consultant for many LA based bands and performers. In 1996
Kevin began producing live shows and events for corporate clients including the
Christie, Jerry (Audio Engineering) NFL, Capcom Entertainment, Xtrasports LA Radio, Nickelodeon Television En-
Born in Seattle to a family of engineers and musicians, Jerry started playing tertainment, Jet Blue, Boeing, Warner Brothers, Six Flags Magic Mountain, Taco
guitar at the age of eight, spurred by his parents’ love of American blues and big Bell among others. Kevin also serves as musical director for several LA-based
band jazz, and soon began rebuilding and modifying guitar amps in order to im- sketch comedy groups, including writing and recording the theme song for “The
prove their tone and output. By his late teens, he was working in studios and as Instigators.” He also plays guitar and percussion and is a member of the Music
a touring live sound engineer. After relocating to Los Angeles in 1983, he began Teachers Association of California and the National Association of Music Educa-
working in studios full time with many gold and platinum records to his credit. In tion. In 2008, he joined MI as Director of the Keyboard Department.
1997, he became a training instructor on SONY’s large-format digital consoles
and taught at Los Angeles Recording Workshop. He joined the RIT staff in 2003 Contreras, Joshua (Guitar Craft)
teaching NEVE and SSL consoles, Pro Tools and Studio Etiquette while also Joshua Contreras graduated from the Musician Institute’s Guitar Craft Academy in
instructing on the SSL 9000K console at Los Angles Recording School. In his 2005 and was soon hired by G&L Guitars while simultaneously working at GCA as a
spare time, Jerry builds guitar amps, microphones and high-end audio equip- Teaching Assistant. At G&L, Joshua supervised the Final Assembly department and
ment, writes books on audio and is completing his Digidesign certification for Pro also worked in the Custom Creations department developing artist models, custom
Tools. He is currently teaching Acoustics and Automation for RIT 107
runs and prototypes. In 2008, he was promoted to Assistant Director of GCA.
Cohen, Barbara (Multi-Program)
Barbara Cohen is a gifted singer songwriter, composer and multi-instrumen- Corne, Eric (Independent Artist)
talist. Her intricate body of work embraces a variety of musical genres from Eric is a Canadian producer/engineer and singer-songwriter currently based in
folk, roots rock, trip-hop, electronica and world music. A former Virgin Records Los Angeles. In the late 1990s, he formed the Toronto space-pop group, Myste-
recording artist, her credits include co-founding the trip-hop band Brother Sun, rio. Since 2004, Corne has worked primarily out of Dusty Wakeman’s Mad Dog
Sister Moon; collaborating with England’s rave luminaries Orbital on their big Studios in Burbank, CA where he has amassed a diverse list of credits spanning
beat-techno classic Middle of Nowhere; featured vocals for France’s experi- many different genres including Lucinda Williams, Michelle Shocked, Walter
mental duo Air; and several critically-acclaimed solo albums. Cohen’s diversity Trout (Canned Heat, John Lee Hooker), John Mayall, Glen Campbell, Airto Mor-
can be heard in her scores, ranging from the klezmer influence in the Academy eira (Miles Davis, Joni Mitchell), PF Sloan, Anne McCue, Nancy Wilson (Heart),
Award-winning short The Confession to the whimsical horn and Mellotron ar- Louie Bellson (Duke Ellington), John Doe (X, The Knitters) and Tsar. Corne also
rangements for the film American Shopper to the ambient, Andean guitar and recorded and mixed a track for the Instant Karma charity project for Darfur with
charango music for the PBS documentary The Judge and the General. Her Ghanaian reggae/afro-beat artist Rocky Dawuni and he has written, produced
songs have appeared in film and television including the Fox production Broke and or recorded music for film and television projects such as Underworld 2, Blu
Down Palace, Director Michael Radford’s film Dancing at the Blue Iguana and Ray and Sony animation.
NBC’s Lipstick Jungle and Third Watch. Cohen’s awards include the 2008 BMI
Conducting Workshop, The 2005 Sundance Film Composer Lab Fellowship and Cross, Mark (Audio Engineering)
The Minnesota State Arts Board Fellowship Grant for Artistry and Composition. Mark Cross has engineered and mixed numerous albums, film scores and tele-
At MI, Barbara teaches Songwriting and Artist Development. vision soundtracks from the Grammy-winning I Am Shelby Lynne and Randy
Newman’s Oscar-nominated and Grammy-winning CARS to the Meet the Par-
Comstock, Kevin (Keyboards) ents score and soundtrack and hundreds of episodes of ER. As a producer and
Native Southern Californian Kevin Comstock received his music education at composer, Mark has created the musical themes for Nickelodeon’s Wow Wow
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Wubbzy and the Seinfeld Season 8 DVD as well as producing and performing and Digidesign Certified Pro Tools Instructor. He has taught at the Academy
with Grammy-winner John Legend on HBO’s CurbYour Enthusiasm. Mark has of Entertainment Arts and Professions at Milan’s Teatro alla Scala, Soho Edi-
been a NARAS member since 2000 and served in the 2007 NARAS P&E Wing tors (AATC - London, UK), Espero (AATC - Milan, IT), University of California
as well as on the 2008 NARAS Board of Governors. Los Angeles (UCLA Extension), and Moviola (Hollywood, CA). He writes articles
on music data processing and audio-pro solutions for Macworld magazine and
Derrico, Justin (Guitar) Macworld Online. At MI, Otto teaches Pro Tools 1 Classes. Learn more about
Justin Derrico resumed teaching at GIT in 2008 following two years of touring Otto at his website, http://www.superotto.net
the world with pop vocalist Pink. GIT grad Derrico has also toured with The Call-
ing and records as a solo artist. At GIT, you’ll find Justin teaching Open Coun- Dinkins, Fred (Drums)
seling and Private Lessons. To learn more about Justin and his music, check One of PIT’s most popular instructors, Fred Dinkins has performed with the
out www.myspace.com/justinderricomusic. likes of Tramaine Hawkins, Andre Crouch, David Peaston, Wilton Felder, Ndugu
Chancellor, Norman Brown, and many others. Fred is also busy with numerous
Desai, Pathik (Guitar) club dates, clinics, and session work in the L.A. area and touring as musical
Pathik completed his undergraduate studies at University of Texas at Arlington director with the R&B vocal group The Emotions. At MI, Fred teaches Playing
before receiving a scholarship to attend the Berklee College of Music in Boston. Technique, Sightreading, and private lessons.
Since moving to Los Angeles and joining the GIT staff in 1996, he has been
busy with recording sessions, touring and teaching, including writing for Guitar Doolittle, Andrew (Guitar)
Player magazine and online lesson provider Truefire.com. Pathik’s recording Los Angeles-based guitarist Andrew Doolittle has performed and recorded with
experience includes major motion pictures (such as the 2000 hit Finding For- a broad palette of artists representing a wide variety of styles, including Geffen
108
rester), television shows (Cedric the Entertainer, American Idol) and countless Artist Rich Price, French rock band Stripped Polaris, songwriters Bird York, Cor-
jingles (Doritios, Mercedes Benz, Dirt Devil, Yamaha Motorcycles). In 2003, he rinne May and Joe Deveau, legendary entertainer Patti Page, and the Tulsa Phil-
played on Kelly Clarkson’s first single “A Moment Like This” which went to #1 harmonic. Andrew has a B.M. from the Oberlin Conservatory of Music, where he
on the Billboard Charts and was the best-selling single of the year. Pathik has studied with Bob Ferrazza, and a Master of Music Degree from the New England
toured with a wide range of artists including Kelly Clarkson, Westlife, Anastacia, Conservatory, where he studied with Gene Bertoncini and John Abercrombie. At
Nick Lachey, Aaron Carter, Deborah Cox, Patti Austin, Kelly Price, Javier, Taylor GIT, Andrew specializes in Reading, private instruction and open counseling.
Dayne and A.J. McLean (Backstreet Boys) just to name a few. He has also
appeared on the Tonight Show with Jay Leno, David Letterman, Today, Good Echizen, Kenny (Guitar)
Morning America, the CBS Early Show, Rosanne, Ellen, Jimmy Kimmel, TRL Born and raised in Torrance, California, Kenny Echizen graduated from GIT in
Live (MTV), Regis and Kelly, and Craig Ferguson. At MI, Pathik teaches Single 2006 with the Outstanding Stylist award. Kenny has since recorded for ABC-TV
String, Rhythm Guitar, RSW, Reading and private lessons while specializing in (One Life to Live), Daytime Emmy Nominee Rie Sinclair, and Steve Hopkins. At
funk, R&B and contemporary pop styles. GIT, Kenny can be found teaching Private Lessons.

De Togni, Maurizio (Audio Engineering) Edwards, Robert “Masta” (Voice)


Maurizio (better known as Otto) has been a music-maker and independent mu- Masta began singing in his early teens in Suffolk, Virginia, and then moved to
sic producer since 1990. His background includes wide experience as a musi- New York City to further develop his skills. His performance credits include Ste-
cian, composer, arranger and programmer for Italian and international artists in vie Wonder, Wilson Pickett, Norman Brown, Don Covay, Millie Jackson, Thelma
the classical, pop, rock, and dance fields as well as international commercials Houston and Carol King. Masta recently released a series of instructional vid-
and TV award programs with major Italian networks. His Logic and Pro Tools eos through Warner Bros., and has been performing on the set of the televi-
credentials include Apple Logic Pro Studio Certified Master, Apple Distinguished sion series, Almost Perfect. Masta teaches Stagecraft, the R&B LPW and open
Audio Professional, and Digidesign Certified Pro Tools Expert Music/Post Op- counseling.
erator along with qualifications as an Apple Logic Studio Certified Master Trainer
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Elliott, Joe (Guitar) Feinberg, Jason (Music Business)
Joe Elliott started playing at 13 and was performing gigs by the age of 15. He Jason Feinberg is the President and founder of On Target Media Group, an
studied with Nashville guitarist Jimmy Bird and toured the U.S. and Canada entertainment industry Internet-based marketing and promotion company. Ja-
non-stop from 1980-1985 with his own band. Joe moved to L.A. in 1985 to at- son is responsible for business development, formulation and management of
tend GIT, where he was voted Outstanding Student. He has appeared in many online marketing campaigns, and media relations with over 1,000 websites and
network and local T.V. productions along with numerous recording sessions and
media outlets. The company has served clients including Warner Bros. Records,
club dates in the L.A. area. In 1999, Joe released his first solo CD entitled Joe’s
Universal Music Enterprises, Concord Music Group, Rockingale Records and
Place. He has performed clinics around the U.S. and is currently working with
others with an artist roster that includes Carole King, JJ Cale/Eric Clapton, Neil
his own original instrumental group. Specialties: jazz, fusion, R&B, funk.
Young, Primus, George Benson/Al Jarreau, Poncho Sanchez and many more.
Jason started his career in college radio as Music Director of KUNV, a multiple
Emmons, Tim (Bass)
Gavin station-of-the-year award winner. He has also worked for record labels
Tim is an active freelance musician and a veteran of more than one hundred
such as Nitro Records and Favored Nations, at the National Association of Re-
film and television scores including The Simpsons, Family Guy, Mission Impos-
cording Arts and Sciences, and is a founder and lead editor at Rapid Jackalope,
sible III, The Incredibles The Day After Tomorrow, Something’s Gotta Give, and
The Wedding Planner and for dozens of major theatrical productions including a video editing and DVD authoring company with clients such as Steve Vai and
Candide, Swan Lake, Swing, and Ragtime. He is known as a performer on both Rendevous Records. Jason teaches Internet Marketing and Independent Artist
contrabass (Stevie Wonder, Beyonce, Josh Groban, Justin Timberlake, Ken- Marketing for the Music Business Program.
ny G, Andrea Boccelli, Brandy, John Tesh, Toni Braxton) and bass (Joe Pass,
Richard Greene, Bo Diddley, Art Pepper, Lionel Hampton, Liza Minelli, Donna Ferrante, Russ (Keyboards)
Summer, Carol Channing, Rod Stewart, Cab Calloway). In 2000 he joined the Russell began studying piano at age 9, performing first in church and then with
109
seminal Classical-Jazz-Fusion ensemble Freeflight, and in 2001 arranged, con- various R&B and jazz groups in the San Francisco Bay area. His professional
ducted and performed on the soundtrack of HBO’s F. Scott Fitzgerald bio-pic career began in 1973 when he and guitarist Robben Ford toured the US and Eu-
Last Call and Peter Bogdanovich’s The Cat’s Meow. Tim also directs actor Jeff rope with legendary blues singer Jimmy Witherspoon. In 1977, Russell moved to
Goldblum’s “Mildred Snitzer Jazz Orchestra”. As an educator, he teaches bass LA and within a short time was recording and touring with a variety of musicians
and directs the Jazz Ensemble at Occidental College and is a bass instructor at including Joe Farrell, Tom Scott, and Joni Mitchell. In 1980 he co-founded the
Cal State Los Angeles, Azusa Pacific University, the University of Redlands, the Yellowjackets jazz-fusion group with Ford and Jimmy Haslip and began working
University of California at Riverside, and Musicians Institute. as a freelance writer, arranger and producer for artists including Bobby McFerrin,
Michael Franks, Al Jarreau, Take Six and many others. Currently, Russell contin-
Fanelli, Lynn (Voice) ues to perform worldwide with the Yellowjackets, who have recorded seventeen
Born in New York and raised in Los Angeles, Lynn spent many of her forma- albums, received thirteen Grammy nominations and won two. He teaches and
tive years in Hollywood, learning the ins and outs of the music business from conducts clinics at colleges and private music schools throughout the United
her father, a skilled singer and saxophone/keyboard player. Her versatility has States, Japan and Europe, including Musicians Institute, Berklee School of Mu-
netted her a career rich in varied music opportunities with such diverse acts as sic (which offers a course in the Yellowjackets’ music) and USC, where he is an
Delaney Bramlett, Wild Cherry, Peter Reckell, Les Brown, Connie Stevens, Pat adjunct professor. At MI, you’ll find Russell in Fusion LPW, Keyboard Mastery
Boone, Heatwave and Gene Chandler, to name a few. Lynn has recorded with and Open Counseling.
some of the nation’s top music producers, including Giorgio Moroder (Blondie,
Donna Summer), David Briggs (Neil Young), Jim Steinman (Meatloaf, Bonnie
Findlay, Jamie (Guitar)
Tyler), Ray Ruff (Van Morrison, Tanya Tucker, Merle Haggard) and Jonathan
Originally from Seattle, Washington, 1978 GIT grad Jamie Findlay is one of the
Wolff (Seinfeld, Will & Grace). She has also been heard on numerous jingles
including Nickelodeon, Michelob and Wella and currently maintains a busy free- masters of contemporary acoustic guitar. He has released two CDs under his
lance career as a singer and vocal arranger. At VIT, Lynn specializes in Contem- own name, Amigos del Corazon and Wings of Light, featuring Alex Acuña, Gary
porary Vocal Styles, private lessons and open counseling. She will be the first to Willis, and Russell Ferrante, and has performed with Robben Ford, Don Mock,
tell you she’s ready to rock. Frank Sinatra Jr. and the Tony Guererro Band. Jamie has also toured extensively
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throughout Europe, Asia, Central America, and the United States. His author Garbatini, Gary (Drums)
credits include four books for Hal Leonard, featuring his own techniques and Gary Garbatini, a PIT graduate, is an in-demand drummer who has had private
compositions plus arrangements of jazz standards, plus two Star Licks videos, instruction with such noted artists as Ed Soph and Nick Forte. His proficiency
Acoustic Soloing and Acoustic Fingerstyle Guitar. Specialties: solo jazz guitar, in various styles such as rock, pop, jazz, reggae, and funk make him versatile
fingerstyle acoustic. enough to play in almost any situation. Currently, Gary keeps a busy schedule do-
ing studio and session work as well as teaching RSW and private lessons for MI.
Finn, Ed (Guitar)
Born in Rock Island, Illinois, Ed has studied music at Blackhawk College, Florida Gilbert, Daniel (Guitar)
Atlantic University, and GIT. A professional guitarist since 1966 and an MI staff One of GIT’s most popular instructors, Daniel Gilbert has played guitar profes-
instructor since 1985, Ed does freelance live and studio gigs around L.A., and sionally in the Northeast since age 16. He has studied music at Queensborough
can be heard on the theme to the HBO series Dream On. Touring credits include Community College, Brooklyn Conservatory of Music and GIT. Private teachers
singer Nell Carter and pianist Roger Williams. Specialties: musicianship and have included Pat Martino, Howard Morgan and Ronnie Lee. He has kept busy
technique classes, commercial styles. teaching, doing sessions, and producing his own fusion band Mr. Invisible (YT
Records), plus performing with Cone of Silence and Terri and the T-Bones. Dan
Fletcher, Chris (Multi-Program) is also the co-author of Guitar Soloing for MI Press (Hal Leonard Publications).
Chris Fletcher owns & operates her own company, Coast-to-Coast Music Specialties: Single String Improvisation, Applied Technique, Guitar Workout, Fu-
Promotion & Consulting, where for the past fifteen years she has directed en- sion LPW and Eclectic Electric Guitar and Guitar EFX.
tertainment careers ranging from bands (The Ravyns, BB Chung King) and
songwriters (Platinum award-winning Harold Payne) to solo artists (Grammy- Gold, Jude (Guitar)
110 nominated Peter Alsop) and a variety of others. Chris has also produced, direct- GIT Director Jude Gold served as Associate Editor of Guitar Player magazine
ed and edited music performance videos, consults regularly on music business since 2003 and prior to that was a staff editor from 2001-2003. He has written
touring, publicity and promotion, and continues to book engagements and man- features on countless guitar greats including everyone from Slash, Joe Perry,
age tours. Her teaching experience also includes music business workshops at Zakk Wylde, and Alexi Laiho to John Mayer, Pat Metheny, Brad Paisley, and Larry
California State Universities at Long Beach, Northridge and Fullerton as well as Carlton. As a guitarist, Jude has toured, performed, and/or recorded with JGB (for-
UCLA. At MI, Chris teaches Getting Gigs and The Touring Musician. merly the Jerry Garcia Band), the Oakland Symphony, 2 Live Crew, DJ/Producer
Miguel Migs, DJ Spooky,Spinal Tap’s David St. Hubbins (actor Michael McKean),
Flores, Chuck (Drums) BX3, (the band featuring electric bass ninjas Stu Hamm, Jeff Berlin, and Billy
Chuck Flores is MI’s jazz drumming specialist. His extensive background in- Sheehan) and the Van Halen tribute band Hot For Teacher. In addition to his duties
cludes gigs with Woody Herman, Stan Kenton, Bud Shank, and the Toshiko as Director of the Guitar Program, Jude also teaches Private Lessons and Open
Akiyoshi Big Band. Chuck’s authentic interest in students’ education makes him Counseling.
a perennially popular teacher.
Grasamke, Chas (Guitar)
Galane, Bernard (Drums) Guitarist-arranger Chas Grasamke majored in music at the University of Wiscon-
Bernard Galane was born in Vienna, Austria, the classical music capitol of the sin and studied with greats Howard Roberts, Ted Greene, Johnny Smith, Jimmy
world. He started playing drums at age 4 and later joined a band called “Kits on
Wyble and Lenny Breau. In his many years as a performer he has opened con-
The Drums” at age 12. This band was very successful in Europe, had songs in
certs for major recording acts, toured extensively, and is an active force in music
the charts, and opened for major acts like Brian Adams. Around this time Ber-
education. Chas is also an accomplished Travis picker and Beatles enthusiast.
nard got also very interested in more complex, jazz oriented music. At the age
Specialties: Coffeehouse LPW, Harmony and Theory, Eartraining, Reading.
of 15, he was accepted by the University for Music and Performing Arts, Vienna.
He continued playing and recording in and around Vienna and graduated from
the Conservatory with outstanding results. After graduation, he moved to Los Gruendler, Donny (Drums)
Angeles to expand his musical career and joined the MI staff, where he teaches Donny Gruendler was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan. In 1996, at age
private lessons. Visit www.BernieGalane.com for more info. twenty, Gruendler graduated Cum-Laude with a Bachelor of Music Degree from
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Berklee College of Music in Boston, followed by a Master of Music Degree from Harnell, Jason (Drums)
Wayne State University in Detroit. While living in Detroit, Gruendler freelanced Jason Harnell started playing the drums at the ripe old age of six when long-time
in a wide variety of musical styles, touring internationally and recording behind family friend Louie Bellson gave him his first real drum set. Jason attended the
such artists as Kenny Burrell, John Medeski, Alberta Adams, Denny Freeman University of South Florida as a jazz performance major and moved to L.A. in
and W.C. Handy award winner Johnny Jones. Since moving to LA, Gruendler 1990. Soon after, Jason joined Maynard Ferguson’s Big Bop Noveau Band. He
has been working in a wide variety of styles including traditional drum set as well toured the world with Maynard and recorded These Cats Can Swing (Concord
as beats, loops and samples, notably while touring with genre-stretching roots Jazz). He has also toured extensively with contemporary jazz keyboardist Keiko
artist Rick Holmstrom. At MI, Donny specializes in private instruction. Matsui. Recently, Jason has performed and/or recorded with such prestigious
jazz artists as Kei Akagi, Bob Sheppard, Steve Tavaglione, Darek Oles, David
Grierson, Don (Music Business) Goldblatt and on sessions for Nissan and Verizon. Currently, Jason is leading
As Vice President of A&R for Epic, Capitol and EMI Records, Don signed Celine his own trio featuring Larry Koonse and Joe Bagg as well as being a member
Dion, Heart, Iron Maiden, Sheena Easton, Joe Cocker, George Clinton, J.Geils of the bass-less trio “Joe-less Shoe” with Matt Otto and Jamie Rosenn. Jason
Band and Kate Bush. He has also worked with Gloria Estefan, The Jacksons, teaches private lessons at University California Irvine as well as MI. www.jason-
Duran Duran, Queen, Tina Turner, Indigo Girls, Alice Cooper and many others. harnell.com.
At MI, Don teaches Music Business News.
Harrison, Greg (Guitar)
Greenberg, Ted (Audio Engineering) Originally from Wilmington Ohio, Greg Harrison graduated from GIT as Out-
Ted Greenberg is a producer, recording engineer, writer, and performer who standing Stylist in late 2004. While attending the school he founded Shredzilla,
has won two Grammy Awards and two TEC Awards for his work on Standing in an all-instrumental shred band, and briefly studied with Paul Gilbert. Greg has
111
the Shadows of Motown. Mr. Greenberg has written and placed songs in recent been performing live for years in various bands with styles ranging from jazz,
feature films (Feast of Love) and network TV shows (Friday Night Lights) and country and classic rock to metal, death metal, and shred. His specialties in-
has recorded with such artists as G Love, Cypress Hill, Stuttering John, Howard clude advanced shred techniques, improvisation, and overall stylistic diversity.
Stern, Cyndi Lauper, Philosopher Kings, Taj Mahal, The Roots, Teddy Pender- At GIT he teaches Single String Improvisation, Rhythm Guitar, RSW, private
grass, Rita Coolidge, Joan Osbourne, Chaka Khan, Ben Harper, Pink, The Wall- lessons and open counseling.
flowers, and The Cult. At MI, he teaches Recording Theory and Acoustics.
Harriton, Lisa (Keyboards)
Gullu-Badat, Kether (Independent Artist) Born into a professional music family, by age eight Harriton was working as
Kether has worked in the music and new media industries for over fifteen years, a studio singer on dates for Disney, Integrity Media and Word Records, and
currently as co-owner and co-president of Latchkey Recordings, an indie label later on preproduction tracks for Rod Stewart’s Great American Songbook. She
with North American distribution via Koch Entertainment. The Latchkey artist graduated with distinction from the Royal Schools of Music London with a de-
roster includes an eclectic handful of artists including Rev Run’s teenage son gree in classical piano followed by a degree in Jazz Piano from USC, where she
JoJo and his group Team Blackout (from MTV’s Run’s House), Kool G Rap studied privately with prominent jazz pianist Alan Pasqua. For several years Har-
and Luscious Jackson co-founder Gabby Glaser. Kether has worn many hats riton played the Los Angeles jazz club scene, building a growing following with
through the years such as A&R Director for SouthBeat Records/ADA; Music eclectic sets interspersing jazz with original songs influenced by artists such as
producer for companies such as MTV, Eidos Games, Ichiban Records, Damon Maria Schneider and the Yellowjackets, and she played and recorded with veteran
Dash Films, Diplomat Records and more. He’s worked as a music journalist, jazz musicians including Ernie Watts, Joe LaBarbara, Darek Oles, Ingrid Jensen
having written for various publications and websites such as Scratch Magazine, and Larry Koonse. In 2007, Lisa was unveiled as touring keyboardist and backing
WaxPoetics, URB and MTV.com and he also spent time as an Internet designer/ vocalist for the reformed Smashing Pumpkins, appearing in videos for “Tarantula”
developer, creating sites for companies such as Hermes, Shop NBC, Barclays and “That’s the Way (My Love Is)”. Featured in the April 2008 issue of Keyboard
Bank and many more. Magazine, Lisa plays Yamaha Acoustic pianos and is also sponsored by Roland
and Moog. At MI, Lisa teaches Private Lessons and Open Counseling.
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Hassine, Mehdi (Audio Engineering) Hess, Gary (Drums)
Medhi comes to RIT from Paris, where he received a Master’s Degree in Elec- Gary Hess began his professional music career in 1971, playing clubs through-
tro-Optical Engineering from Paris University followed by extensive working ex- out the United States and Canada. In September of 1980 he became the first
perience with computers. A 2000 graduate of RIT, he is an active sound engineer enrollee at the Percussion Institute of Technology (PIT). Upon graduating in
with international album credits (Dave Weckl, Dennis Chambers, Gary Willis, September of 1981 he was offered a position with the school as a staff instruc-
Scott Henderson etc.) and a parallel career as a performing bass player. At MI, tor, and served as Department Head of PIT from 1995-2000. Besides having
Mehdi is head engineer for MI’s Degree projects and teaches Hard Disk Editing, years of extensive hands-on teaching experience, he is also the author of The
Recording Theory, Acoustics, Electronics, and Automation. Encyclopedia of Reading Rhythms (MI Press/Hal Leonard), used as the basis
of PIT’s drum reading program. His expertise in a wide variety of styles and
Hauser, Dominik (Bass) techniques has made him an invaluable part of the MI staff. Gary has conducted
Dominik Hauser was born and raised in Switzerland, where he attended the drum clinics in Japan and the U.S. and continues to maintain a full schedule of
Jazz School and received his Masters Degree in music. As a composer, ar-
free-lance work and teaching. Specialties: R&B, blues, funk, country, reading
ranger and bassist for the jazz-funk group “The Ruleless” he was awarded the
and interpretation.
prestigious “Prix Walo” and performed at the Montreux Jazz Festival. After mov-
ing to Los Angeles in 1996, Dominik studied film scoring at UCLA and began
composing for independent films, which led to his selection for the 2000 AS- Hewitt, David (Audio Engineering)
CAP Film Scoring Workshop. At BIT, Dominik teaches Fretboard Improvisation, David Hewitt is an accomplished pianist – composer – arranger – producer –
Private Lessons and Open Counseling, and he continues to play and record engineer. He began his musical career as a classical pianist, and his talent and
around Los Angeles. determination garnered many awards and local acclaim. David later learned the
guitar and subsequently spent many years traveling the US and Europe as the
112 Helmerich, T.J. (Audio Engineering) guitar player and engineer with an internationally known folk group. He began
RIT instructor TJ Helmerich has worked with some of the biggest names in the his engineering endeavors as a live sound and venue engineer, mixing and re-
business as both a recording engineer and musician. Behind the console, he’s cording sound for theater, concerts and outdoor events. This path led eventually
worked with world-class musicians including Stanley Clarke, Scott Henderson, to studio recording, and today engineers and produces for a wide variety of art-
Dennis Chambers, Gary Willis and many others. His brand of 8-finger guitar play- ists in LA including international pop/rock artist Hector King, jazz/contemporary
ing, showcased on two albums with Brett Garsed Quid Pro Quo and Exempt), singer Constance Jensen and many other local and national acts. For RIT, Da-
has brought him international acclaim. T.J. is also an exceptional vocalist and has vid teaches Music Studio Etiquette, SSL Signal Flow, and Open Counseling.
featured his playing and singing skills on tour with fellow GIT alumnus Paul Gilbert
(Mr. Big). At RIT, TJ specializes in Automation and Session Engineering.
Hill, Dave (Guitar)
Dave Hill graduated from Musicians Institute in March of 1983 and has toured
Henderson, Scott (Guitar) extensively throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe, where he per-
Scott studied arranging and composition at Florida Atlantic University. After formed at the Montreux Jazz Festival. Dave has also played with Frank Gam-
graduating from GIT, he toured and recorded with bassist Jeff Berlin, Jean-
bale, Jimmy Earl, Three Dog Night, The Coasters, and Al Wilson, and is a staff
Luc Ponty, Chick Corea, and Weather Report’s Joe Zawinul. Scott joined up
transcriber for REH Instructional Videos. Currently, Dave is working with the
with bassist Gary Willis in 1985 and together they have released eight albums
with the critically acclaimed fusion group Tribal Tech. In 1991, Henderson was Dave Hill Group and Cone of Silence. Specialties: fusion, jazz improvisation,
named by Guitar World as the #1 Jazz Guitarist, and in January 1992 he was sightreading, ear training, rhythm guitar, and live performance.
named #1 in Guitar Player’s Annual Readers Poll. Scott has released three solo
albums, Well to the Bone, Tore Down House, and Dog Party (Guitar Player’s Hinds, Allen (Guitar)
“Best Blues Album of 1994”). Scott has also released two instructional videos, Allen attended Berklee School of Music in 1978 and GIT in 1985, where he was
Jazz Fusion Improvisation and Melodic Phrasing. Two books containing Scott’s the winner of the Larry Carlton Scholarship. Allen has recorded many TV and
compositions are also available through Hal Leonard publishing. Scott’s open radio jingles as well as recording and/or touring with Natalie Cole, the Crusaders,
counseling sessions are some of GIT’s most popular. Roberta Flack, Eric Marienthal, BeBe and CeCe Winan, Hiroshima, Randy Craw-
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ford, Boney James and many more. Recent credits include TV scores for Lucky Mitch has worked with composers including John Williams, Dave Grusin, Clint
(EFX) and JAG (CBS), touring with London funk/jazz all-stars Down To The Bone, Eastwood, Alan Silvestri, Lalo Schifrin, Michel Legrand, Johnny Mandel, Mark
and work with Marc Antoine, Jeff Kashiwa, and Rayford Griffin. At GIT, Allen’s spe- Shaimen, John Barry, Tom Scott, David Newman, Hans Zimmer, and Herbie
cialties include jazz improvisational techniques, contemporary rock and R&B. Hancock. He has been an adjunct professor at USC, conducted numerous mas-
ter classes and workshops, and recently authored “The Jazz Guitar Stylings of
Hoffmeyer, Frank (Guitar) Howard Roberts” (Mel Bay), an analysis of the playing of MI’s founder. At GIT,
Frank Hoffmeyer received his formal music training at the University of Muenster Mitch can be found teaching Private lessons and Open Counseling. To learn
in his native Germany before moving to Los Angeles to study at the University of more about Mitch and his extraordinary career, visit www.mitchholder.com.
Southern California, where he earned his Master’s Degree. Since graduation, he
has maintained a busy schedule in the Los Angeles club and recording scene, Homeyer, Ernst (Guitar)
earning credits on a wide variety of film soundtracks, commercial jingles, and Ernst traveled to LA from his native Argentina to earn his Bachelor’s degree from
theater productions. Frank’s specialties as a player include Classical guitar and MI. Ever since, he has been brandishing his monster rock and fusion chops as
fingerpicking techniques, and at GIT he concentrates on private instruction. a session player, live performer and recording artist with a CD entitled EGH I. At
GIT, Ernst specializes in rock guitar and fusion styles and teaches Single String
Holden, Mark (Multi-Program) Improvisation, Rhythm Guitar, RSW and private instruction.
Originally from Houston, Mark Holden attended the High School for the Per-
forming & Visual Arts, the University of Houston and the Berklee College of Hsu, Talun (Music Video/Film)
Music. As founder of Musicomm, Inc., Holden composes themes and scores Born in Taipei, Taiwan, Talun spent his formative years in Vienna, Austria before
for TV programming including feature films, interactive features and series. His finally relocating to Southern California. After graduating from UCLA, Talun Hsu
113
advertising and corporate clients include General Motors, NBC, Fox, The Los toiled for six months in the camera department for legendary producer Roger
Angeles Times, Continental Airlines, Zales Jewelers, Texas Rangers Baseball Corman before moving on to directing three feature films, Witchcraft V, Body
and Compaq. Mr. Holden has received numerous Addy and Telly awards for Count, and Fatal Blade with stars like: Robert Davi, Steven Bauer, Sonny Chiba,
his music in addition to two Emmy nominations in regional categories and an Gary Daniels, Eric Lutes, and Seiko Matsuda. Shortly after Talun directed his
Emmy award for his score to Good Luck, Mr. Robinson. Holden is a member of third film, he wrote his first screenplay, Snake Heads, an epic gangster saga
The American Federation of Musicians (AFM), has served as Seminar Chair for about the rise and fall of Chinese immigrants set in New York. Talun also gained
The Society of Composers & Lyricists (SCL) as well as Acting Secretary of the experience as a line producer and producer on feature films including Lethal
American Alliance of Composer Organizations (AACO) in Los Angeles. He also Eviction, Finding Madison and The Tailor. For FilmIT, Talun teaches Directing
writes a column on performing rights for Film Music Magazine and teaches Film and Producing.
& Television Scoring at MI.
Hume, Peter (Baccalaureate)
Holder, Mitch (Guitar) Born in Washington DC, Peter Hume took up the guitar at age twelve and began
Mitch Holder has been a first-call session guitarist on the LA studio and jazz his professional career while still in his teens. In 1978, he graduated Summa
scene for nearly forty years, with a wide range of professional credits that reflect Cum Laude from Berklee College of Music in Boston. Peter taught at Berklee
his mastery of every style of music. Highlights of his career to date (to name from 1978 until 1982. For many years he has been the musical director for
very few) include records with Barbra Streisand, Frank Sinatra, Joe Cocker, vocalist Melissa Manchester, appearing in concerts all over the world, includ-
Diana Ross, and Brian Wilson; film soundtracks for Little Children, Kicking & ing a 2004 appearance at the White House. Peter has conducted the Toronto
Screaming, Something’s Gotta Give, Catch Me If You Can, Saturday Night Fe- Symphony, Hollywood Bowl Orchestra, Atlanta Pops Orchestra and Dallas Sym-
ver, E.T., Indiana Jones & The Temple of Doom, and Terms of Endearment; phony, to name just a few. Over the years he has also played for Paul Williams,
and TV work for the Tonight Show With Johnny Carson, The Simpsons, King Michael McDonald, Natalie Cole and Johnny Mathis. Peter is active in commer-
Of The Hill, Family Guy, The Academy Awards, Grammy Awards, Country Mu- cial, film and TV music, contributing arrangements, orchestrations, source cues,
sic Awards, American Music Awards, and the Emmy Awards. In the process, MIDI production and guitar to a variety of projects. His movie and TV credits
FACULTY BIOS
include The Colt, Major Payne, Money For Nothing, Pearl, Evening At Pops Jean, Stewart (Drums)
& The Tonight Show, and commercial credits include Albertson’s, Del Monte, Originally from New Jersey, Stewart studied at the University of Miami and re-
Disneyland, Levi’s, MTV, Sprite & Toyota. For MI’s Bachelor Degree program, ceived a Bachelor of Music in Studio Music and Jazz, including studies with
Peter teaches Single String Improvisation, Rhythm Guitar, Reading, Ear Train- Steve Rucker and Steve Bagby. Stewart’s performing credits include Raul Mi-
ing, Reading Ensemble, Conducting, and Private Lessons. don, Jimmy Buffett, Mike Utley, Bo Diddley, Ben Vereen, Lucky Peterson, Pres-
ton Smith, Ellis Hall, Sam Moore, and Betty Wright, to name a few. He has
Humphrey, John (Bass) recorded for various artists on the Sony and Columbia labels and can be heard
John Humphrey graduated from BIT and took private instruction with such noted on the soundtrack for the film Contact. An inspiring educator who is well versed
artists as Jeff Berlin and Bob Magnusson. His proficiency in styles from rock in all aspects of music, Stewart teaches a variety of classes including Theory,
and pop to jazz and funk have made him versatile enough to play in almost any Ear Training, Keyboard Lab, Drum Solos and private lessons.
setting and kept him in demand for studio and session work. At BIT, he teaches
private lessons and assists Carl Schroeder in his Jazz Live Playing Workshop.
Jong, Greg (Independent Artist)
Hutchison, Tita (Voice) Greg was a founding member of progressive rock outfit Pure Reason Revolu-
Tita Hutchison’s strength lies in her extraordinary versatility. Her recording and tion on Sony/BMG, which formed while he was completing a BA in Commercial
performing credits extend from work with industry legends Rick Rubin, Herbie Music at the University of Westminster in London. He has also worked in New
Hancock and Keith Forsey and soundtrack sessions for commercials, TV and Media Licensing for the Association of Independent Music (AIM) in London and
film (Baywatch the Movie), live radio performance (KCRW’s landmark original toured as a session drummer for EMI-Sparrow artists Tim Hughes & Matt Red-
music showcase, Morning Becomes Eclectic) and tours (Shooter Jennings) as man. More recently, he was a member of The Procession on Nude/V2 Records
in the UK and is currently working on his own solo artist project. At MI, Greg is
114 well as fronting her own band, Bullet Proof Soul. At VIT, Tita’s diverse schedule
includes the Rock, Modern Rock and Country LPWs as well as Artist Develop- an Independent Artist Project Advisor.
ment, Private Lessons and Open Counseling.
Juergensen, Chris (Guitar)
Iadarola, Matthew (Audio Engineering) Veteran studio musician and session guitarist Chris Juergensen is in constant
Matthew Iadarola attended UCLA film school where he received a B.A. in Film demand as a sideman, front man, and clinician. Chris’ latest CD, Big Bad Sun
and Television. Over the course of his career he has recorded location sound, (Abiku Records) as well as his instructional book The Infinite Guitar are both
sound effects, Foley and ADR as well as editing, mixing and mastering with popular international sellers. For his efforts in promoting international music edu-
most current audio formats and technologies including Pro Tools and the Digide- cation, Chris was made an honorary citizen of New Orleans by the Mayor of the
sign Icon console. Matthew has mixed the soundtracks of over 150 feature films city and more recently asked to perform on behalf of Japan at the Japanese em-
while working with such directors as Robert Altman, Sam Raimi, Spike Jonze bassy in Seoul, Korea. At GIT, Chris can be found teaching private lessons, the
and Carl Franklin and he is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts Guitar Effects elective, and open counseling. More info on Chris can be found
and Sciences. on his website, www.chrisjuergensen.com

Jacobs, Sid (Guitar) Keif, Dave (Bass)


Sid was born in Miami, Florida and raised in Cuba, returning to the US after the David Keif is a freelance bassist and has performed and recorded with Mark
revolution to continue his education. By age 18, he was the youngest instructor on Lindsay, Rita Coolidge, Etta James, Freida Payne, Carla Olson, Darlene Love
the faculty of the University of Las Vegas. Sid has performed with a multitude of and the Platters and on TV shows and movies including Smallville, the Horse
entertainers such as Steve Lawrence and Eyde Gorme, Diahanne Carroll, Ike and Whisperer and Trekkies, As an author, Dave’s titles range from Arpeggios For
Tina Turner, Luciano Pavarotti, and Frank Sinatra Jr. Sid has been receiving rave Bass and Grooves For Electric Bass to Classic Rock Bass and Latin Bass (w/
reviews for recent performances and his first album on Delmark Records. As an George Lopez), all for Hal Leonard Publishing. At BIT, Dave specializes in Mo-
author, Sid has written The Complete Book of Jazz Guitar Lines and Phrases and town Bass, RSW, Recording Performance and private lessons.
Jazz Guitar I and II. At GIT, Sid’s specialty is jazz guitar and Reading.
FACULTY BIOS
Keller, John (Multi-Program) and composer he has recorded and performed live with artists such as Vinnie
John Keller is the co-writer of the multi-format Number-One hit “Love Is”, record- Colaiuta, Peter Erskine, Dave Weckl, Randy Brecker and Toots Thielemans. At
ed by Vanessa Williams and Brian McKnight. His songs have been recorded BIT, J.K. teaches Sightreading, Private Lessons and also holds Open Counsel-
by Rickie Lee Jones, Al Green, Aaron Neville, and Wynonna. He also co-wrote ing sessions with an emphasis on technique and soloing.
“Get Over Yourself”, a Top-Ten single by Eden’s Crush as well as “I’ve Gotta See
You Smile”, performed by Leigh Nash (of Sixpence None The Richer) for the Klikovits, Christian (Keyboards)
movie Because Of Winn Dixie. Currently signed to Sony Music, John has col- Originally from Vienna, Austria, Christian received classical training from age
laborated with top writers including Tonio K, Will Jennings, Bonnie Hayes, Shelly 11, eventually studying jazz piano at the Vienna Conservatory. Since moving to
Piken, David Baerwald, Danny Wilde, Beth Neilson Chapman, and Leigh Nash. California he has remained active as a freelance keyboardist as well as compos-
At MI, he teaches Artist Development. ing and producing music for films and commercials. Specialties are sight reading
and vocal accompaniment.
Kerner, Kenny (Music Business)
Director of the Music Business Program Kenny Kerner comes to MI as a thirty- Kohring, Jörg (Guitar)
year music industry veteran. He has produced records for Kiss, Gladys Knight, Originally from Germany, Jörg Kohring studied at the “Hochschule für Musik und
Jose Feliciano, and Badfinger. He has also worked in personal management Darstellende Kunst” and earned his Master’s Degree in jazz guitar. During that
and is a former record company A&R executive, public relations expert, and time he toured with the “LJJO” Big Band in Indonesia, Spain and France and
music journalist. Specialties: Music business and promotion. worked as an instructor at the prestigious Music Station in Hamburg. After moving
to the US in 1995, Jörg graduated from MI with Vocational Honors and resumed
Kim, Hyun (Joyce) (Keyboards) recording and touring, with TV appearances in both Europe and the States (Pop
Hyun Kim completed her Bachelors Degree in Music Composition in Korea, Of The Tops, Live And Kicking and Olympics broadcasts among others) and per- 115
where she also performed with Abraham Laboriel and Gary Garbatini. After mov- formances with multi-platinum selling artists “Lifehouse”, as well as his own band,
ing to Los Angeles to attend KIT, she received the Outstanding Student Award “Blend”. At GIT, Jörg’s specialties include rock, pop, blues and guitar technique.
two years in a row. Since graduation, Hyun has been directing music for church,
arranging, and performing live in the LA area. For KIT, she teaches private les- Kolb, Tom (Guitar)
sons and directs keyboards for the Fusion LPW. Tom Kolb graduated from Musicians Institute in 1989 as an honors graduate
as well as Student of the Year. A veteran of over 4,000 gigs, Tom has worked
Kimpel, Dan (Music Business) in nearly every musical situation imaginable, from tours to sessions to his own
Acknowledged as a foremost authority on popular music, Dan Kimpel contrib- funk/rock band, the Gurus. He has been a featured artist and musical director
utes to a dizzying variety of print and electronic media including books, interac- for Star Licks Videos and a regular contributor and columnist for Guitar One
tive CD’s, magazines, web sites, and videos. He is the author of the best-seller magazine, as well writing Classic Rock Workshop (MI Press/Hal Leonard). Spe-
Networking in the Music Business as well as Networking Strategies for the New cialties: rock improvisation, melodic soloing, rhythm guitar.
Music Business and most recently, How They Made It: True Stories of How
Music’s Biggest Stars Went from Start to Stardom (Hal Leonard Publishing). For Kotikoski, Antti (Guitar)
five years, Dan conducted weeklong master seminars at Sir Paul McCartney’s Antti Kotikoski began playing guitar at age nine, and after being introduced to the
Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts (LIPA) in the UK. Stateside, he lectures rudiments of electric guitar at the Pop/Jazz Conservatory in Helsinki, Finland, it
at colleges, universities and conferences across the U.S. and Canada, and at was time to move to Los Angeles to attend GIT. By the time he graduated in
MI he teaches a course in Music Business Networking and conducts personal 1994, he had completed his first album in MI’s own Tommy Tedesco Studio with
career counseling. To learn more, visit www.dankimpel.com. fellow Dutch GIT student Richard Hallebeek. The album, Richie & Antti: Genera-
tor also features such guitar greats as Scott Henderson, Dan Gilbert, and Frank
Kleutgens, J.K. (Bass) Gambale as well as keyboardist Scott Kinsey. As a guitarist and composer, Antti
J.K. was born in Germany and has lived in Los Angeles for 10 years. In 1987, has recorded and performed with artists including Vinnie Colaiuta, Steve Tava-
he studied at BIT with Jim Lacefield, Gary Willis and Steve Bailey. As a bassist glione, JK Kleutgens, Marco Minnemann, Virgil Donati, Gary Novak and Andre
FACULTY BIOS
Manga. At MI, Antti teaches private lessons and holds open counseling sessions with Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Indesign, and Dreamweaver. David works in
with an emphasis on rock/jazz improvisation, technique and composition. To the Independent Artist Program as a project advisor. His portfolio can be viewed
learn more, visit www.kotikoski.com at: www.dmlworx.com

LaFleur, Bill (Guitar) Lopez, George (Bass)


Originally from Rochester, New York, guitarist Bill LaFleur relocated to Los An- At age 14, George began his professional music career, quickly developing a
geles where he studied composition and film scoring at UCLA. He has worked local reputation as a formidable talent. In 1981, George moved to L.A., where
as a freelance music transcriber with dozens of published works for most major he graduated from MI, then established himself as one of the area’s finest Latin
publishing companies including music portfolios from such diverse artists as bass players. He has performed with Tito Puente, Celia Cruz, Azteca, El Chi-
Sheryl Crow, Dream Theater, Dwight Yoakam and many others. He is also a cano, Dave Valentine, Poncho Sanchez, Norman Brown, and many other local
demonstrator for Yamaha Guitars. At GIT, Bill’s busy schedule includes Single musicians. At BIT, George teaches Latin Bass, the Latin LPW, Bass RSW and
String Improvisation, Rhythm Guitar, RSW, Theory, Ear Training, private instruc- private lessons.
tion and open counseling.
Lula, Jami (Voice)
Jami Lula is a soulful singer and songwriter/performer/recording artist. As the
Lander, Tony (Keyboards) leader of the band “LULA” he released two albums, Waiting and Live Groove
Music has been a part of Tony’s life since he was a young boy growing up out- (Circle Up Records) and early in 2009 brought out a new solo CD, There’s a
side of Washington D.C. In 1988, Tony formed an original band and performed Healin’ Goin On. Jami was twice nominated as Best Vocalist of the Year by the
throughout the New York-New Jersey area before relocating to Las Vegas in L.A. Music Awards and took home the award in 1997. His work has earned rave
1996, where he joined Planet Groove, a classic funk-R&B-blues ensemble. In-
116 reviews from the LA Times, The Album Network, and Whole Life Times, which
spired to further his music career, he moved once again to Los Angeles to study remarked “As Jami Lula sings you will be aware that he becomes the music, the
music on a full-time basis at MI and upon graduation began teaching and work- sound, the energy and spreads a powerful message of Love and positive inten-
ing as a professional keyboard player and singer in the LA area. At MI you’ll find tion.” He has recently been performing in Spiritual Fellowships Theaters and
Tony teaching Rock Keyboards, Keyboard Reading, Live Playing Workshops house concerts. At MI, Jami’s specialties include Coffeehouse LPW as well as
and Private Lessons Artist Development, Voice and Songwriting.

Lauretta, Troy (Independent Artist) Lynn, Jessica (Voice)


Troy Lauretta is a singer, songwriter and performer with the R&B/Neo-soul duet With her versatility and flavor, Jessica Lynn is one of the most sought-after danc-
A2C (myspace.com/a2csoul). A classically trained pianist, he has been studying ers in Los Angeles. She has danced for artists including Blu Cantrell, Nelly
music his entire life. Troy’s songs have been featured on TV shows around the Furtado, and Fantasia Barrino as well as the Reggaeton artist Adassa. Other
world, including MTV Asia, ABS-CBN and local shows in Hawaii and the Phil- film, television, music video and live credits range from Alias and the hit sketch
ippines. His performing experience includes work with American Idol finalists, show MadTV to the feature films Grind, Wes Craven’s Zombie Prom, and the
MTV, John Legend, and Stevie Wonder to name a few. After completing MI’s Bette Midler Workshop. Jessica’s choreography credits include TV (FOX pilot
Audio Engineering and Independent Artist programs and winning Outstanding Hype Dat Track), tours (Jon.B promo tour), and commercials (Century 21) as
Project awards in both, Troy joined the Independent Artist staff as a project advi- well as numerous videos and stage performances for new artists. She is also an
sor. established teacher and has taught master classes throughout the US and Italy.
At MI, Jessica teaches the beginning and intermediate level Hip-Hop Dance
Littlefield, David (Independent Artist) electives.
David Littlefield is a web designer, graphic artist, and illustrator whose recent
projects include designing the social networking component for the Adam Car- Machacek, Alex (Guitar)
olla Radio Show website, MacArtFilms.com, and Print Ads for Monte Nido & Af- Alex Machacek’s musical journey has taken him from his native Austria (where
filiates. David graduated from the School of Visual Arts in New York and is fluent he holds a degree from the prestigious Conservatory in Vienna) to LA where he
FACULTY BIOS
now resides; performing and recording his own original projects (including Alex’s Leonard/MI Press. While working her way up the musical food chain, Beth has
trio featuring Terry Bozzio) and now as a member of the GIT faculty. With two performed with a wide range of artists including Harold Land, Brownie McGee,
CD releases under his own name, Alex has garnered praise from many notable Helen Reddy and Louis Bellson. She’s composed more than a dozen indepen-
music critics and fellow musicians alike, including John Mclaughlin who stated, dent film scores and maintains an active schedule as a freelance guitarist. She’s
“Alex Machacek’s music starts where other music ends. He is playing some served on the Steering Committee and as a panel moderator for the 2004 World
amazing guitar on (his CD) SIC. He is going where other people stop. He has Guitar Congress, and was a judge for 2007 North American Rock Guitar Competi-
done some very deep excavation in the mind of music.” At GIT, you’ll find Alex tion. Beth has been a GIT Instructor since 1987, teaching all levels and courses
teaching private lessons and open counseling. To learn more about Alex and his in the GIT core curriculum and specializing in jazz and funk.
music visit him at www.alexmachacek.com.
Marshall, Jeff (Guitar)
Jeff Marshall is a graduate of GIT (‘89) and has since toured and recorded
Maddux, David (Guitar Craft)
with Nashville artist Rick Monroe and opened for the likes of Montgomery Gen-
David Maddux began repairing and modifying guitars in 1966. In 1977, he went to
try, Dwight Yoakum, Patty Loveless, and Kenny Wayne Shephard, to name a
work for Fender where his first assignment was in the paint department. In 1998,
few. He has done sessions with(AC40 Female Vocalist of the Year Debbie Hen-
after having learned the various aspects of guitar production, he became the su-
nessey, solo artist Gene Owens, Petru Luna and countless demo sessions for
pervisor of the Fender Custom Shop. Dave currently oversees the production of
various artists. Jeff stays ever-busy doing gigs and sessions in the LA area,
Factory Special Run guitars, which are limited-edition instruments for special cus-
covering almost any style of popular music from rock to country, jazz or blues.
tomers. At GCA, he teaches Woodworking, Hardware Selection and Installation,
At GIT, Jeff can be found teaching Single String Improvisation, Rhythm Guitar,
Design Theory, Template Fabrication, and History of Guitar Fabrication.
RSW, private lessons and open counseling.
117
Maloney, Christopher (Bass)
McIntyre, Tim (Drums)
Syracuse, NY native Christopher Maloney graduated with a BA in music from
Tim McIntyre is a 1987 Vocational honors graduate of PIT, receiving the Out-
Oswego State University and graduated from BIT in 1994, winning the award for
standing Student of the Year Award. Tim also graduated in 1981 with a B.M.
Outstanding Student of the Year. Recent recording projects include work with
Degree from the University of Calgary, Alberta. Tim maintains a busy club, con-
Dweezil Zappa, Lisa Loeb, Lao Tizer, and members of Journey, Earth, Wind and
cert, and recording schedule in the L.A. area while also teaching Styles Primer,
Fire and INXS. He has recorded two vocal CDs with the Sunset Records la-
Jazz LPW and private lessons at MI.
bel, Control and The Terrors Of Intimacy (see www.christophermaloney.com for
more information). Christopher is also a two-time ASCAP Plus award winner for
songwriting, and his compositions have been featured on television programs
Megna, Andy (Drums)
Andy is an honors graduate of PIT and was awarded the Rock/Funk Stylist of
throughout the United States and Europe. As a touring musician, Christopher
the Year award. He specializes in rock, funk and fusion music with an emphasis
has worked in North, Central and South America, Europe, Japan and the Ca-
on hand technique and rudiments. Andy is currently recording for Lueken In-
ribbean, and he maintains a regular schedule of sessions and club dates in
novations (Pocket Percussion, Rock University) and playing with various artists
Los Angeles. Endorsements include Linc Luthier basses, SWR amps and Dean
in the LA area, including Dakota Moon. He endorses Spaun drums and Truline
Markley strings. At MI, Christopher’s varied teaching interests include creative
drumsticks.
basslines, slap-style, fretless bass, songwriting, and music theory.

Marlis, Beth (Guitar) Meza, Aaron (Music Business)


VP of Education Beth Marlis was GIT Director 2000-2009 and a Vocational Hon- Aaron Meza is an ASCAP writer and publisher, NARAS musician and vocal-
ors graduate of the program in 1986. She holds a BA in Music from UC Santa Cruz ist, SAG and AFTRA-member voice actor, and has served on the Los Angeles
and a Master’s in Music from USC in Studio/Jazz Guitar Performance. Beth has Board of the Recording Academy. His narration talents have been recognized
co-authored (with Daniel Gilbert) two instructional books for Hal Leonard/MI Press with Telly and Golden Aurora awards. Based on his many years of experience
(Guitar Soloing and Advanced Guitar Soloing) as well as a video release for Hal as the West Coast Director for The Songwriters Guild of America, Aaron wrote
FACULTY BIOS
the audiobook, You’ve Written A Song, So Now What? He holds a music degree and has been a circus performer and fire-eater. At MI, Alicia teaches voice,
from UCLA and certificates from USC Law Center and UCLA Extension, and keyboards, Arranging For Singers, and Demo Production.
has taught at UCLA Extension, Cal State Dominquez Hills, Los Angeles City
College and El Camino College. At MI, Aaron teaches Music Publishing and Morgan, Burgundy (Music Business)
Music Licensing. Burgundy Morgan is a graduate of Pepperdine University School of Law and is
a member of the State Bar of California, the United States District Court for the
Mikkelsen, Ronny (Independent Artist) Central District of California and the United States District Court of Michigan,
Ronny Mikkelsen is a freelance audio engineer based in Los Angeles; originally Western Division. A former professional musician, Ms. Morgan holds two under-
from Odense, Denmark. He is currently the Technical Director for two nation- graduate degrees in Music from William Paterson University and Raritan Valley
ally syndicated radio programs, Sounds Eclectic, hosted by Nic Harcourt (Host College, with applied music in Classical Guitar and Jazz Piano, respectively. Ms.
of Morning Becomes Eclectic and Music Director of KCRW 89.9 - FM, Santa Morgan’s law practice focuses on entertainment transactions and litigation, in-
Monica), and The Axis of Justice Radio Network featuring hosts Tom Morello cluding copyright infringement lawsuits, drafting and negotiating music contracts
(Audioslave, Rage Against the Machine) and Serj Tankian (System of a Down). and licenses, and application of new technology relating to music, including on-
Ronny graduated from the GIT program in 1999 and was nominated for the Stu- line music distribution and Digital Millennium Copyright Act issues. Ms. Morgan
dent of the Year and Outstanding Stylist awards. For MI, he is an Independent is a member of the National Association of Recording Industry Professionals, the
Artist Project Advisor. California Copyright Conference and California Lawyers for the Arts. Presently,
Ms. Morgan teaches Music Contracts and Owning and Operating A Music Busi-
Mina, Maurilio (Bass) ness as part of Musicians Institute’s MBP program.
Maurilio hails from Ticino, Switzerland. After studying and playing in various
118
bands there, he moved to LA to study at MI. Upon graduation (where he re- Morgan, James (Audio Engineering)
ceived the award for Outstanding Student) he was asked to stay and teach. Cur- RIT instructor-engineer-producer-studio technician-songwriter Jim Morgan has
rently, Maurilio is a working bassist in Los Angeles doing casuals, jingles, and been engineering in Los Angeles recording studios for over twenty years. He
sessions. At MI, he teaches Live Playing Workshops in Classic Rock, Reggae, has held chief engineer positions at RFH Records, A&R Studios/Hollywood and
Country and ‘80s Pop. currently Silent Sounds Recording Studios (which he also designed and built
with owner Steve Jacobson). Jim’s extensive client list includes Kool Keith, Raz
Morgan, Alicia (Voice) Kaz, George Clinton (P-Funk), Laurence Tollhurst (The Cure), Bootsy Collins,
Keyboardist/vocalist Alicia McCracken Morgan is a New York-born, Florida- Killah Priest, Cannabis, Sunshine Anderson, Kurupt, Joe Walsh, Nancy Wilson,
raised singer-songwriter-musician. Noted for her raspy blues style, Alicia’s cred- Don Henley, Mark Latham, Guitar Jack, Mike City, Billy Gibbons, Billy Preston,
its include recording and/or performing with a wide range of artists including Neil Capitol Records, Interscope and Warner Bros., to name a few, and his efforts
Young, Oasis, Al Wilson, Bobby Womack, Sally Kellerman, Kevin Murphy (of to further the art of audio engineering have earned him a collection of Gold and
Rufus), Don & Dewey, Billy Vera & The Beaters, The Nelsons, Tata Vega, King Platinum records. Jim is also an accomplished technician, so when he’s not
Ernest, Peter Tork, Chuck Negron, Klymaxx. Her TV experience includes Rose- actually operating a world-class recording console he can often be found in the
anne, The Jeff Foxworthy Show, The Naked Truth, Almost Perfect, Phenom, and wee hours of the morning taking one apart, just because he can. For RIT, Jim
Sibs. She has had original songs in the feature films Beyond Desire and Tom teaches Electronics and Mixing & Mastering.
Arnold’s Barhopping, and was the singing voice for Caroline Rhea in the Dis-
ney movie Mom’s Got a Date With A Vampire. As a keyboard player, Alicia has Nathan, Robert (Music Business)
worked with MI alum smooth-jazz artist Norman Brown, LA soul/blues favorites Robert Nathan began his protean career as a performer in television and on stage,
The Scarletts and Some Like It Hot, producer Richard Perry on the cast album transitioning to producer and writer, and later to management and law. With over
for the musical Baby, It’s You and Rod Stewart. She produces and records in fifty years in the entertainment industry, including over twenty years in Business
her own studio and has received an Addy advertising award for vocals and en- Affairs and Legal Affairs for record labels and stage, television, and film production
gineering. A mother of four, she collects vintage keyboards, builds computers, companies, Mr. Nathan is the author of The Business Affairs Glossary, heads a
FACULTY BIOS
specialized legal consulting firm in Beverly Hills, and is regularly engaged in ne- Panciera, Greg (Independent Artist)
gotiating and packaging entertainment projects. At MI, he applies his expertise to Greg Panciera received his Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Engineering from the
teaching courses in Music Contracts, Legal Issues, and Music Business. University of Michigan and later graduated from GIT. As a sound engineer, Greg
has worked as an assistant to engineer/producers Sylvia Massey (Tool, System
Nikou, Ali (Independent Artist) of a Down), Dusty Wakeman (Dwight Yoakam, Me’shell Ndege’ocello), David Bi-
Ali has been working as a multi-tasking musician in Los Angeles for the last anco (Rage Against the Machine, The Black Crowes, Tom Petty) and MI’s own TJ
nine years in roles including touring guitarist, musical director/band leader for Helmerich (Uncle Moe’s Space Ranch, Scott Henderson). As a guitarist, he has
theatrical productions, songwriter, producer, and original artist. Collaborators performed with Warner Bros recording artist Bonnie Mckee. He is currently focus-
and project affiliations include producer Jim Wirt (Incubus), Dave Carlock (The ing on his original project Veiled (www.veiledmusic.com ). At MI, Greg directs the
Transplants), and Chris Julien (De La Soul). At MI, Ali teaches private guitar les- Independent Artist Program (IAP) and teaches Recording Techniques classes.
sons and works as a project advisor in the Independent Artist Program.
Paris, Anika (Voice)
Nonisa, Mark (Audio Engineering) Anika Paris is a singer/songwriter and recipient of ASCAP’s Abe Oleman Schol-
Mark Nonisa has been a working professional in the music industry for nearly arship at the Songwriters Hall of Fame, Nashville’s City Song Festival, and AS-
three decades. In 1990, he graduated with honors from MI and began teaching CAP’s Pop Plus Award for the past six years. A published writer with Universal
for the Recording program in 1999. Some of his professional credits include Polygram and Warner Bros, her songs are featured in major motions pictures
work as an actor and musical performer in the feature film A Mighty Wind, vocal- starring Gwyneth Paltrow, Ben Affleck, Mariah Carey, Mira Sorvino, John Tuturro,
ist on Scott Henderson’s Tore Down House, and guitarist on Babyface’s sound- to name a few, and on soundtracks alongside Carly Simon, Dido, and Six Pence
track for the film Have Plenty on the YabYum label. He is currently performing None the Richer. She has released three solo CD’s (EAR/Sony, Warner Brothers
with his group The Basix and working on a new musical project with guitarist/ London, Abbeylane Records). Anika is the only female composer for Telepictures 119
producer TJ Helmerich, bassist Ric Fierabracci and drummer Bernie Galane. At Television shows (Ellen, Extra, The Tyra Banks Show, TMZ), and has songs on
RIT, Mark teaches Musicianship and SSL Console Workshop. Lifetime, Hallmark, MTV, Oprah, HBO’s Sex in the City and the CW. As a per-
former, she has been a musical guest on TV’s Late Night with Craig Kilborn, Latin
Oakes, David (Guitar) Explosion (with Christina Aguilera and Ricky Martin), Celebrity Justice, and even
David Oakes graduated in 1978 with a B.M. from North Carolina School of the performed for the Royal Princess of Thailand. She had the honor of sharing the
Arts and studied Classical guitar with Jesus Silva, Pepe Romero, and Andres stage with legendary Stevie Wonder, John Legend and John Mayer in a ben-
Segovia, flamenco with Juan Serrano and harmony with Ted Greene. Before efit concert with Musicians Institute and Hollywood Pop Academy. Most recently,
moving to California, David taught at Appalachian State University, Greensboro Anika composed the score and songs for the Off-Broadway musical The Judas
College, and Winston Salem State University. As a classical guitar soloist, he Tree, by Mary Fengar, which premiered in New York City. She is a published poet
has done studio work for NBC and Paramount. David is an expert with music with Kansas City Star, Helicon Nine Editions, Gival Press, Soft Blow Poetry and
notation and computer generated music notation programs and is the author of has completed a book of poetry Life in Check. At MI, Anika teaches Artist Devel-
Music Reading for Guitar (MI Press/Hal Leonard). Specialties: Reading, Playing opment, Songwriting & Performance, Voice and Image Development.
Techniques, classical guitar.
Parker, Scott (Guitar)
Ozaki, Jinshi (Guitar) A native Floridian, Scott toured the Latin circuit out of Miami for years and is
Jinshi Ozaki is a specialist in funk, R&B and contemporary jazz styles. He has an alumni of both the Florida State School of Classical Guitar and University of
toured with Kirk Whalum, Paul Taylor, Keiko Matsui and Jody Watley and is also Miami Jazz and Music Business School. Scott moved to Los Angeles in 1993
a busy recording session veteran. At GIT, he specializes in Acid Jazz, Funk and and has maintained a busy schedule as a studio musician/producer. Currently,
private instruction. Scott works as a session guitarist for Sabour Entertainment and Fox Television
and performs around town with Mr. Nice Guy. Specialties: Versatility as both a
musician and a producer.
FACULTY BIOS
Pedersen, Tim (Drums) Randall, Robin (Keyboards, Voice)
Tim Pedersen has been performing and recording for over 30 years. Some of Robin Randall’s specialty is songwriting, with classes covering such topics as
his credits include Spencer Davis, Fabian, Little Anthony, Johnny Nash, Ron song form, melodic development, chord progressions, lyric analysis, writing
Wood, Peter Noone, Jeff Pilson, and Mackenzie Phillips. Tim graduated from in different styles, music business for the songwriter and more. No slouch in
the Grove School of Music in 1981, and studied privately with Terry Bozzio, Tom the songwriting biz herself, her credits include the platinum hit Starship single
Brechtlein, David Garibaldi, Mark Craney, and Les DeMerle before coming to “Hoopla,” and the 1991 number one hit “Roxus.” Along with her partner and
PIT as an instructor. Tim is featured on the best-selling instructional videos Be- mother Judithe Randall, she had the honor of being the only songwriter as-
ginning Drums Vol. 1 & 2 (Hal Leonard) and is the co-founder of the free drum signed to compose hit songs for the world’s most- watched television show,
lesson/interview site www.learn2drum.com In 2000, Tim took over duties as the Baywatch. In 1994 Robin and singer/songwriter Diana DeWitt released their
Department Head while maintaining a teaching schedule that includes RSW, debut CD in Europe and Japan.
Rock Drums and the Classic Rock and Hard Rock LPWs.
Rappoport, Doug (Guitar)
Petco, Peter (Music Business) Doug Rappoport has played guitar professionally since age 15 and is currently
From 2000-2004 Peter Petco was a staff writer for the industry-leading Radio playing lead guitar, touring and recording with the Edgar Winter group. The band
and Records newspaper, covering AAA and Smooth Jazz formats and editing has performed for hundreds of thousands of people throughout Europe, the UK,
their R&R Retail product. In 2004, he joined Bryan Farrish Radio Promotion as a Japan, Canada and the USA. Doug has also composed for television and acted
staff promoter for college and commercial radio, later segueing to campaign di- as Music Director and composer for LA TV favorite “The John Kerwin Show”. At
rector/client relations for BFRP’s indie promotions, which cover all radio formats GIT, Doug can be found teaching Private lessons and Open Counseling. Check
as well as press, touring, product placement and imaging services. He also out his website at www.dougrappoport.com
120 helps music supervisors source music (signed and unsigned) for TV, film, new
media and video games. At MI, Peter teaches Radio Promotion.
Rashid, Orlando (Audio Engineering)
Rabhan, Jeff (Music Business) Orlando Rashid is an experienced audio engineer and producer whose credits
Jeff Rabhan has an extensive resume in the music industry, including positions include local and international bands. A musician/songwriter as well, he brings
as a Partner in Three Rings Projects, personal manager representing artists both technical and creative skill to the classroom. Orlando’s specialties at RIT
including American Idol finalist Elliott Yamin, Lil’ Kim, Everlast and Jermaine include both Recording Theory and ProTools.
Dupri, five years as a partner in The Firm, and soundtrack executive for Atlantic
and Elektra Records. At MI, Jeff teaches Personal Management in the Music Razze, Ralph (Drums)
Business program. Ralph Razze studied with Jim Chalpin and Charlie Perry in New York, performed
with the Buddy Rich Band, the Nelson Riddle Orchestra, and has recorded with
Rabuchin, Brad (Guitar) the L.A.-based Steve Speigel Band. His TV credits include Trapper John M.D.,
LA native Brad Rabuchin studied music formally at Pierce Junior College, but Matlock, Highway to Heaven, and The Fall Guy, as well as the TV specials War
his true musical identity was formed by self-study and several excellent private and Remembrance and Perry Mason. His most recent film credits are Cocoon,
teachers including Derol Coraco, Ted Greene and Joe Pass. Brad’s eclectic per- Beaches, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Ralph works extensively as a
forming career began as a sideman playing Balkan Gypsy, Flamenco, Indian, well-rounded studio and big band drummer in L.A. besides teaching Three Horn
Punk, Atonal/Free, Persian, Turkish, Brazilian and African music. Some of the Band, Ensemble Technique and Percussion Ensemble at MI.
his professional credits include Bonnie Raitt, Al Kooper, Steve Wonder, Buddy
Miles, Lean-to, Diane Shurr, David “Fathead” Newman, Ta Ta Vega, Willie Nel- Reeves, Tommy (Keyboards)
son and even Mr. Tom Jones. Brad also toured six continents as Ray Charles’ Tommy is a producer, arranger, pianist, singer and songwriter who has worked
guitarist during the final years of his career (you can learn more about Brad at with Smokey Robinson, Melissa Ethridge, James Ingram, Burt Bacharach, Betty
www.bradrabuchin.com). At GIT, you’ll find Brad teaching private lessons and Buckley, Brian McNight and the hit songwriting team of Billy Steinberg and Tom
open counseling. Kelly. Tommy has played and arranged for Dick Clark Productions and on ani-
FACULTY BIOS
mated features for NBC Television. Tommy is also a co-founder of Catalina Island music-directed numerous shows including her own rock opera, Jerusalem A.D.. In
Music, for which he recently released his own CD entitled Another Lap Around The 2008, she released a CD of original inspirational rock tunes with her band, Breath-
Sun. At KIT, Tommy teaches Keyboard Voicings, Reading, and private lessons. ing Room. As an educator, she spent nine years on the keyboard faculty at Grove
School of Music and currently divides her time between performing, recording
Richman, Jeff (Guitar) projects and teaching. At MI, Jan teaches private lessons and open counseling.
Jeff Richman is a 1976 graduate of Berklee College of Music. His performance
credits include Blood, Sweat and Tears, John Klemmer, Ronnie Laws, Doc Sev- Roscetti, Ed (Drums)
erinson, Don Grusin, and Alphonse Mouzon. Jeff has also recorded six solo Ed Roscetti, an accomplished composer, producer and performer, has worked
albums and teaches seminars and clinics around the world. Currently, Jeff is
with such notables as Joe Sample, The Crusaders, Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil,
busy doing studio work for albums and TV shows. At GIT, Jeff conducts the Fu-
Tommy Tedesco, Gary Wright, and Clair Marlo. He is currently producing and
sion Ensemble, and teaches private lessons and open counseling.
composing music for both records and television. Ed specializes in drum high
Roberts, Paul (Guitar) tech and is a key live performance instructor at Musicians Institute.
Paul Roberts is a Los Angeles native and graduate of MI’s Guitar Craft program.
His first professional experience was gained while working for GCA instructor Rosenberg, John (Keyboards)
and master luthier John Carruthers at his custom guitar and repair shop. Paul’s John Rosenberg has played and taught piano from Philadelphia and Boston to
duties included performing all types of repairs and modifications on a wide va- San Francisco and Los Angeles, working with artists from Cab Calloway, Carlos
riety of stringed instruments while also working as a guitar tech for local bands. Santana and Bonnie Raitt to Phil Collins, Huey Lewis and Bobby Blue Bland.
Currently, Paul works at the custom shop of noted LA guitar designer James John’s recording credits include Jerry Garcia, Maria Muldaur and Dan Hicks;
Tyler, where he wires, assembles, and sets up guitars. At MI, Paul teaches the
and he has written songs for television and film, most notably for the Jim Henson
Guitar Repair and Maintenance class.
Production Animal Jam and Disney’s Air Bud and MVP series. His songs have 121
Rogers, Carol (Voice) been recorded by Mandy Patinkin and Bernadette Peters for a new children’s
“Mama O” is a 30-year veteran of the recording and performing industries. Her book/CD entitled Dewey Doo-it Helps Owlie Fly Again based on the life and
numerous vocal recording credits include a “Best World Recording” Grammy work of Christopher Reeve. As an educator, John developed Improvisational
winner, Brasileiro (Sergio Mendes), and her voice has also been featured in Music courses for Harvard University’s Adult Education program and has taught
major motion pictures (Antitrust w/Leonardo DiCaprio and Bossa Nova w/ Cognitive Therapy workshops at the Sufi Institute in Istanbul. He was also Artist-
Amy Irving), network TV (2001 Teen Choice Awards) and educational software
(Walla’s World). As a live performer, Carol has toured the world with her musi- in-Residence aboard the University of Pittsburgh’s Semester At Sea voyage-
cal inspiration and mentor, Sergio Mendes, and appears regularly with her own around-the-world in the spring of 2000. At MI, John teaches Private Lessons,
group, “Mama O”. During ten years of teaching vocal technique at VIT, Carol’s Open Counseling, Groove and the Country LPW.
multilingual stretching and strengthening techniques for the voice have trained
students from all over the US as well as Sweden, Japan, Mexico, and Brazil,
where she is the vocal coach for teenage duo sensation Sandy & Junior. Her
Rosenn, Jamie (Guitar)
stylistic teaching technique has been captured on the Warner Brothers instruc- Jamie holds a Bachelors Degree in Music from the New England Conserva-
tional video, Blues Vocals. Carol’s personal credo is “Learn, laugh, and master tory of Music and a Masters Degree in Music from CalArts. He has studied with
your craft!” At VIT, her specialties include “everything you can do in the studio” such jazz greats as Jimmy Giuffre, Ran Blake, Mick Goodrick, Cecil McBee,
plus Blues Vocals and the Blues LPW. Bob Moses, Charlie Haden, Leo Smith, Larry Koonse and Joe LaBarbera, and
his teaching resume includes positions at UCLA, Saddleback College, and the
Roper, Jan (Keyboards) Los Angeles Music Academy. In 1996, Jamie was chosen by the United States
With more than 25 years of experience as a professional keyboard player, Information Agency to be an artistic ambassador, an assignment that took his
singer, arranger, composer and music director, Jan brings exceptional depth duo on a seven week tour of the Middle East and South Asia. Currently, Jamie
to her roles as teacher and private coach. She has performed hundreds of gigs co-leads an original group, is working on a new CD, and is a very active member
as singer and/or keyboard player at top venues including the Kodak Theater, of the Los Angeles jazz scene (see www.jamierosenn.com for current info). At
Hollywood Bowl and Greek Theater and since 2000 has been a featured singer
GIT, Jamie teaches private lessons and open counseling.
at Governor’s Balls for the Oscars and Emmys. As a keyboard player, Jan has
FACULTY BIOS
Rosser, Ken (Guitar) He is a certified Digidesign pro tools instructor, a member of the Editors Guild,
Ken Rosser’s lengthy performance resume ranges from John Cage, Billy Hig- board member of the M.P.S.E. and is also on the roster of the prestigious music
gins, Bennie Wallace and Vinny Golia to the Elvis Schoenberg Orchestra Sur- editing group MAD 4 MUSIC (http://www.mad4music.biz).
real, with appearances at prestigious festivals including the Monterey Jazz Fes-
tival, The Frankurt Jazz Festival and the International Reggae Festival in New Sandoval, Jaime (Guitar Craft)
Orleans. He is also actively involved in the World Music scene, studying tradi- Jaime A. Sandoval attended Los Angeles Trade Technical College, where he
tional Chinese, African and Brazilian music and performing with several South- learned basic machining skills, before he completed MI’s Guitar Craft program
ern California-based Chinese orchestras. Currently, Ken is performing with the in 2004. Shortly after graduation he was hired as a teacher’s assistant and now
Grandmothers (featuring Frank Zappa alumni playing Zappa’s music), West Af- teaches a wide range of classes for GCA while also holding a full-time position
rican kora virtuoso Prince Diabate, free-jazz luminary Bobby Bradford, the David at the Matchless Amplifier company.
Pritchard Guitar Quartet, jazz pianist Steve Lockwood, vocalist Angela Carole
Brown, the Steve Weisberg Big Band, world music/jazz group Quarteto Nuevo Saucier, Michael (Bass)
and others. Ken’s recording experience includes work for Warner Brothers and Born in California and raised in Omaha, Nebraska, Michael began his musical
Nine Winds records, the films American Beauty and Runaway Jury, TV shows development with the saxophone before switching to electric and acoustic bass.
and commercials. His Delta blues-inspired score for the play Turning Points won While in Omaha, he played rock, R&B and with a 7-piece jazz band directed by
an L.A. Theatre Award. At GIT, Ken teaches Single String Improvisation, Rhythm saxophonist Stemsy Hunter (formerly with the Electric Flag and Buddy Miles
Guitar, RSW, Reading, private lessons and open counseling. Band). In 1978 Michael relocated to LA where he recording two albums with
a jazz group as well as performing and recording with Alligator Records artist
122 Salinas, David (Drums) Guitar Shorty. Additional credits include performances with Johnny Hammond
David Salinas received his music education at the Leeds College of Music in Smith, Earl Palmer, Gene Harris, and David Whitfield, as well as work for the hit
England and at PIT before joining the teaching staff in 1995. He has performed TV series Seinfeld and The Single Guy. At BIT, Michael teaches private lessons,
and/or recorded with artists such as Josh Kelley, Melissa Etheridge, Black Lab, ensembles, and the Blues and R&B Live Playing Workshops.
Rita Coolidge, Mick Taylor, Chuck Berry, Donny Osmond, Adam Cohen, Box-
ing Ghandis, Billy Vera & the Beaters and others. At MI. he specializes in Funk Saunders, Daniel (Guitar)
Drums and the Bass & Drum Groove Workshop. Daniel studied at Berklee College of Music and is an MI graduate. He has
performed countless live shows in a diverse array of musical styles alongside
Saltzman, Steven (Audio Engineering) national recording artists including Candiria and Drowning Pool and has several
Music Editor & Composer Steven Saltzman received his Bachelor degree in years of experience as a studio musician. As a player, Daniel specializes in
Composition and Film Scoring from Berklee College of Music. While in Boston, classic rock, hard rock, heavy metal and blues; at GIT he can be found teaching
he also studied composition with Boston Conservatory composer John Hess private lessons.
and composed music for television, animated films, commercials, and theater.
After moving to Hollywood, he continued studying and composing scores for Schroeder, Carl (Keyboards)
independent films, commercials and TV before turning his focus to music editing Pianist Carl Schroeder is from New York, where he started his career playing
for film and television. His editing credits include Dragon Ball, War Inc, The King with blues legends Jimmy Reed and John Lee Hooker, subsequently switching
of California, Strange Wilderness, Bewitched, The House Of D, Santa’s Slay, gears and recording with jazz greats Art Blakey and Roy Haynes. His work with
A Guy Thing, HeartBreakers, The Outsider, How To Kill Your Neighbor’s Dog, the illustrious jazz vocalist Sarah Vaughan enabled him to perform around the
Dead And Breakfast, This Space Between Us, and the WB series Hyperion Bay, world and be heard on two Grammy-nominated recordings. In addition to ap-
with credits for additional editing on Deck The Halls, Ghost Rider, Desperate pearing several times at the White House for Presidents of the United States, he
Housewives, and The Perfect Score. In 2005, Steven received a Golden Reel is featured in the Smithsonian Collection of Classic Jazz. Carl teaches impro-
Award for music editing, and he has worked with composers including Dave visation and composition, and the Schroeder LPW has introduced hundreds of
Robbins, Mark Mothersbaugh, J.A.C. Redford, Larry Groupé, and Ernest Troost. students on all instruments to the mysteries of chord changes.
FACULTY BIOS
Sezaki, Katsuya (Voice) Silva, Rick (Audio Engineering)
Kats Sezaki was born in Brazil and raised in Japan. After completing high school Rick Silva has accumulated a wide variety of experience in his dual roles as
in Tennessee, he graduated from Hiwassee College in 2004 with an award for guitarist and engineer. Years of teaching and studio work as a player have coin-
“Outstanding Choral Member.” Turning his focus to music, he went on to receive cided with an impressive list of credits in the recording field, including work as a
his Bachelor Degree in Voice from Musician’s Institute in 2008. As a studio digital editor for hip-hop artists Pharcyde (Chapter One Records) and mixer for
vocalist, Kats has recorded the original song “Bright Shine” for Fervor Records reggae/rock artists Pysde Car (Stellar Records) as well as tracking, mixing and
and Matt Hirt. He has also been directing and arranging for choirs and bands live engineering numerous projects for such labels as Legato, Shrapnel, Inside
for several churches in Los Angeles. His musical strengths also include percus- Out and Tone Center. Recently, Rick opened his own production studio in LA
sion, harmony and theory, composition and chart transcription. At MI, he can be (Mixed Emotions Productions). At RIT, Rick’s specialties include Musicianship,
found teaching private lessons and open counseling. Hard Disk Editing, Recording Workshop and Recording Theory.

Sheehan, Coreen (Voice) Silverman, Chuck (Drums)


A five-time nominee and three-time winner of LA’s Best Rock Vocalist Award, World renowned as a drummer, percussionist, educator and writer for many of
Baltimore, Maryland native Coreen Sheehan has toured and recorded with art- the world’s drumming magazines, Chuck’s unique brand of rhythmic communi-
ists including Whole Lotta Rosies, Richie Kotzen, Richie Zito, Japan’s Tyed Dyed cation has touched musicians worldwide. His works include the Drumset Artists
Junkies and Bricks Dance Company in Paris, including shows alongside such of Cuba educational video, Afro-Caribbean Practical Playalongs book and CD
acts as David Lee Roth and The Foo Fighters. She can be seen and heard in TV set, The Funkmasters book and CD set for drums, bass, and guitar, Practical Ap-
commercials in the U.S., Germany, Japan (MTV) and South Korea, and served plications Parts 1,2, and 3 book and CD packages, Practical Applications edu-
as Music Consultant for the series You Rock (VH1) where she prepared vocal- cational video , and Power Grooves by Chuck Silverman and Dave Lombardo.
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ists for performances with Rod Stewart, The Bare Naked Ladies and others. Her At MI, Chuck teaches the Latin Drums and Latin LPWs, Latin-Funk Connection,
education credits include writing the popular Vocal Technique curriculum for MI Latin Percussion and private lessons.
Japan, where she taught from 1994-99 before returning to MI Hollywood. Voted
MI’s Instructor of the Year in 2008, she maintains a full class schedule with Vocal Simper, Jay (Bass)
Technique, Rock Vocal Workshops, Pro Performance Showcase, Vocal Perfor- Jay Simper has been a professional bass player for seventeen years, with the
mance, Teacher Training, Vocal English Workshop, Contemporary Vocal Styles, past ten spent in the Los Angeles area. Jay graduated with honors from Musi-
Accent Reduction, Private Lessons and Open Counseling. cian’s Institute in 1992 and has been a member of the BIT staff since 1996.
Professionally, he is currently recording and performing as a freelance bassist
Shotts, Blair (Independent Artist) with various artists in a variety of styles. At BIT, Jay is the bass instructor for the
Blair Shotts’ extensive performing resume includes work with Tone Loc, El Hefe Classic Rock and Real World LPWs.
of NOFX, Hollywood Records recording artist Jesse McCartney, and The Zodiac
Sklarevski, Alexis (Bass)
Show with Macy Gray. Recently, Blair has been recording with engineers Ben
A BIT “Outstanding Achievement” graduate, Alexis has worked with Crosby, Stills
Grosse (Marylin Mason, Depeche Mode, Disturbed) and Brian Carlstrom (Alice In
& Nash, Manhattan Transfer, Jackson Browne, Dweezil & Ahmet Zappa, Albert
Chains, Offspring) and working as musical director for Everyman For Himself; a
Lee, Carole King, Rita Coolidge, Johnny Rivers, Jamie Walters, Daniela Romo,
play directed by Ameenah Kaplan of STOMP. He has shared the stage with artists
Martha Reeves and Chuck Berry. He has performed on The Tonight Show with
including Kid Rock, Fishbone, Cypress Hill, The Wailers, David Crosby, Beenie
Jay Leno, The Late Show with David Letterman and numerous film, TV and
Man, Buckethead, Mix Master Mike of The Beastie Boys, and many more. Cur-
jingle sessions. Alexis is the author of the critically acclaimed instructional video
rently, Blair is playing with actor/singer Eric Balfour in Fredalba, Rachel Sierra, and
The Slap Bass Program and also co produced Fingerstyle Funk, the instruc-
LA melodic gloom masters Veiled. Aside from drumming, Blair writes experimen-
tional video by legendary Tower Of Power bassist Francis Rocco Prestia. In ad-
tal, ambient, exotic hip-hop and soundtrack music (you can hear some his work on
dition to having written the Bottom-Line Bass column in Bass Player magazine
the Stone Brothers’ films 12 O’clock and Urban Street Bike Warriors. At MI, Blair
for seven years, Alexis is the author of Bass Playing Techniques -The Complete
works as the Independent Artist Program session drummer.
Guide (Hal Leonard/MI Press) and has done bass clinics throughout Japan and
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Europe. Currently, he continues recording and performing with many artists in Sobel, Glen (Drums)
the US and around the world. In addition to his duties as BIT Department Head, Glen Sobel is a Los Angeles-based drummer who has toured and recorded with
Alexis teaches Playing Techniques, Blues Bass, Beatles Bass, Fusion LPW and a diverse list of national and international acts including Beautiful Creatures,
private lessons. Brooks Buford, Tony Macalpine, Gary Hoey, Impellitteri, Jennifer Batten, mem-
bers of Cypress Hill, Everlast, Saga and many more. In addition to a busy ses-
Smalios, Tony (Audio Engineering) sion schedule including numerous TV appearances and major label CD credits,
Tony Smalios has worked for over twenty-five years as a composer, engineer, Glen has been active in music education, conducting clinics, master classes
and producer in both the music and television industries. He is the recipient of and lessons. For more info, visit his website at www.glensobel.com. At MI, Glen
multiple Grammy awards as well as dozens of Gold and Platinum albums and specializes in private instruction.
has worked with such notable clients as Arista, BMG, CBS, Columbia, Chrysalis,
Electra, BMG, Epic, Geffen, Interscope, Islan, Jive, Maverick, Motown, MTV, Solt, Gary (Baccalaureate)
VHI, Sony (France, Greece, Japan, UK, US), Universal, Warner Brothers, NBC, Gary’s professional credits include session guitar work for Star Trek: The Next
and Virgin. At MI, Tony teaches Analog Signal Processing. Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager, Enterprise, Becker, Knots Landing and
other television shows. His guitar playing has been featured on many Jay Chat-
Smart, Delbi (Voice) taway scores including Masters of Horror (Showtime). He has toured North
Delbi Smart is an all-around music professional with extensive credits as a sing- America and Japan as a featured guitarist with The Percy Faith Orchestra,
er, songwriter, producer, vocal arranger and recording artist. Her first solo CD, Don Rader, Leslie Uggams, Shirley Bassey, The Bruce Paulson LA All-Star Big
World Of Emotions, won the Vocalist and Song of the Year awards from the Band, and many others. Gary serves as a performing artist and clinician for the
CCMA. As a studio vocalist she has worked with extraordinary producers in- Northern Arizona Jazz Festival, directed by former Tonight Show bassist, Joel
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cluding David Foster, Mark Shaman, Dennis McCarthy , Jonathan Wolff (Who’s DiBartolo. He has played in the pit at the Pasadena Playhouse for the world
The Boss, Will and Grace, Seinfeld) and Tommy Banks. She has performed premieres of Broadway musicals Sister Act, Mask, Vanities, Stormy Weather
with and/or recorded guide vocals for artists as diverse as Celine Dion, Bar- and many others. He has performed with Gordon Goodwin, Natalie Cole, Josh
bra Streisand, Luciano Pavarotti, Frank Sinatra, Neil Diamond, Rick Springfield, Groban, David Foster, Frank Sinatra, The Boston Pops, and numerous others.
Anita Baker, Melissa Manchester, Alan Thicke, Tony Renis, Pat Boone, Johnnie He is a former faculty member at the Berklee College of Music in Boston and
Carl (Crystal Cathedral), Carol Bayer Sager, Carole King, Barry Manilow, Reba performed for the Boston Pops with John Williams conducting. At MI, aside from
McEntire, Steve Allen, Randy Travis, John Berry and Grace Jones, just to name his duties as Associate Dean of the Baccalaureate program, he is an instructor
a few, and directed the MI Choir in performance with Stevie Wonder. At MI, in Music Theory, Degree Ensemble, Performance, History of Rock, and various
Delbi teaches Artist Recording Sessions, Basic Demo Production, Background computers-in-music classes.
Vocals, Studio For Singers, Voiceover, Advanced Acapella, Country LPW and
private lessons. Learn more at www.myspace.com/delbismartvocals. Squire, Barry (Music Business)
Barry spent fifteen years as a professional drummer before starting a career
Smith, Putter (Patrick) (Bass) as a record company A&R executive, including fourteen years at Warner Bros.,
Upright specialist Putter Smith has worked with music legends ranging from Geffen and Columbia records. He currently works as an independent A&R
Thelonious Monk and Art Blakey to Phil Spector, the Beach Boys, John May- consultant and operates an exclusive musician referral service for professional
all, Marlene Dietrich and Burt Bacharach. In addition to playing concerts with musicians and recording artists. His client list includes over 400 recording art-
his own band, “Left Coast”, Putter is a very active figure on the Los Angeles ists such as John Mayer, Weezer, Guns and Roses, Kelly Clarkson, Smashing
jazz scene, performing and recording with numerous other artists including Alan Pumpkins, Hoobastank, Perfect Circle and Justin Timberlake. Barry’s resume
Broadbent, Mose Allison, Karin Alyson, Natalie Cole, Sam Most, Walter Nor- also includes work at Musicians Union Local 47 as a rock music representative,
ris, Larry Koonse, Dave Koonse and Gary Foster. His schedule at BIT includes two consulting positions at music business web sites and twelve years of music
Sightreading and Walking Basslines as well as private lessons on upright bass. business instruction at UCLA extension. Since joining the MI staff in 2001, his
emphasis has been on helping students transition from their school experience
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to a future in the music world. He teaches A&R, coordinates Industry Semi- and first engineer at Silverlake Recording Studios, literally living at the studio
nars, and oversees MI’s weekly “Hiring Hall” that offers exclusive auditions at the while conducting round-the-clock sessions and learning the Trident Series 80B
school for tours and recording artists. Learn more at www.Barrysquire.com. console. After a break to earn his bachelor’s degree from UCLA, Darryl returned
to engineering full time at Straight Arrow Studios in Van Nuys, where he wrote,
Steele, Mark (Audio Engineering) produced, and engineered his first major label release with Motown group Pretty
Mark Steele is an award-winning sound editor with 32 years of editing experi- in Pink before his own group, Cultural Revolution, signed with Sony/Epic/New
ence and 20 years of sound mixing experience. He has won seven Primetime Deal Records and released the single “Nite & Day” on the soundtrack to the
Emmys, three Golden Reels, and has received thirty-two other nominations. At John Singleton-directed film Poetic Justice. In 1997, Darryl began writing and
producing with Macy Gray, resulting in the multi-platinum album Macy Gray on
MI, he teaches the Background and Sound Effects Editing class for the Post-
How Life Is as well as her follow-up, The Id. His other recent projects include
Production Audio program.
developing a music-related video game for Sony Playstation 3 and Microsoft X-
Steiger, Ken (Guitar) Box 360. At MI, he teaches Music Production and Track Programming.
A GIT honors graduate in 1992. Ken gathered wide-ranging film score, radio
and TV experience before returning to GIT, where he offers new explorations in Tagliarino, Barrett (Guitar)
rock/metal guitar and intense lessons on the latest techniques of modal shred Barrett’s extensive performing experience includes tours of Asia and Europe,
guitar improvisation. Ken’s current activities include his “Instra-Metal” shred gui- where he served as Rock Department Head at Hohner Musikchule in Vienna.
tar project Project Steiger , available in May of 2002, featuring special guests He has recorded projects for ARCO, Sony, MTV, The Food Network, and his
Derek Sherinian (Dream Theater, KISS) on keyboards, Virgil Donati (Steve Vai) own CD, Moe’s Art. Barrett’s education-oriented projects include Classic Rock
on drums and Tony Franklin (Whitesnake, Jimmy Page) on bass. Ken is also Soloing (Starlicks/Hal Leonard DVD) and Guitar Fretboard Workbook (Hal Leon-
known as a “guitar coach for the stars”, most recently on the Warner Brothers ard) as well as columns for Guitar One and Guitar Player magazines. He also 125
movie, Rock Star. At GIT, Ken currently teaches the Metal LPW, Metal Guitar created and maintains a guitar-oriented website, www.monsterguitars.com. At
and private lessons specializing in speed picking, arpeggios studies, string skip- GIT, Barrett’s specialties include rock, blues, jazz and composition.
ping, advanced modal improvisation and advanced rock rhythm guitar. Check
out Ken on the web at www.Steiger.RockGuitar.net Taylor, Joel (Drums)
Born in Worland, Wyoming, in 1959, Joel started playing drums and trumpet
Steinman, Roger (Baccalaureate) at an early age, performing at Carnegie Hall with the McDonald’s All American
Roger Steinman was educated at Performing Arts High School, Youngstown High School Band when still only 16. From 1979-82 he studied at Berklee Col-
State University (BM, Magna Cum Laude), and California Institute of the Arts lege of Music with a focus on recording engineering and drums, including private
(MFA). Additional composition studies were undertaken at Juilliard and Dart-
instruction with Alan Dawson and Gary Chaffee. Since moving to Los Angeles in
mouth with Vincent Persichetti, Carlos Chavez, Mel Powell, and George Trem-
1985, Joel Taylor has been in demand as one of the most versatile drummers on
blay. He has taught at the Grove School of Music, California State University,
Fullerton, and Musicians Institute, where he oversees the Degree program. For the LA studio and touring scene. He has performed and recorded with artists that
network television, Roger has scored Best of the West, George Burns Comedy span the whole stylistic spectrum of the music world including Stanley Clarke,
Week, Family Man, and Major Dad. As a keyboardist, he has performed at CBS Allan Holdsworth, Al Dimeola, Frank Gambale, Andy Summers, Mickey Thomas
Television, A&M Records, Los Angeles Music Center (Phantom of the Opera), (Starship), Bobby Kimball (Toto), Edgar Winter, Vesta Williams, Phil Perry, Bob-
Shubert Theatre (Evita, Cats, Les Miserables, Sunset Boulevard, Beauty and by Caldwell, Joe Sample, Jeff Lorber, Herb Alpert, Yanni and Freeflight. Joel has
the Beast, Ragtime) and Pantages Theater (Lion King, Wicked). In addition to worked with legendary producers David Foster and Peter Wolf and numerous
his duties as Dean of the Degree Program at MI, Roger also teaches theory, ear other film, TV, and jingle composers. At MI, Joel teaches open counseling.
training and advises the Sophomore and Senior juries.
Tibbs, Ernest (Bass)
Swann, Darryl (Audio Engineering)
Darryl’s first session as second engineer took place in 1986 with famed produc- Ernest Tibbs graduated from BIT in 1989 and received the Bass Student of the
tion team LA and Babyface as they produced the hit song “Rock Steady” for Year Award. Since then, he’s gone on to develop an impressive list of credits,
R & B vocal group The Whispers. Within a month, he became night manager including work with Melba Moore, Natalie Cole, Gladys Knight (musical Madam
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Lilly), Eloise Laws, Debra Laws, Miki Howard with the Kevin Toney Band, Carl the LA club scene, sharing the stage with artists such as Marty Friedman (Mega-
Anderson, and James Ingram. Ernest has also toured and/or performed with deth), Steven Adler (Guns ‘n Roses) and Mike Hartman (David Lee Roth).
Allan Holdsworth, Thom Rotella, David Benoit, David Garfield, Phil Upchurch, Although fluent in many musical styles, Menno specializes in Hard Rock and
Dan Segal, Tom Scott, Eric Marienthal, Brian Auger, Ronnie Laws, Jeff Lorber, Heavy Metal, with a ‘heavy’ emphasis on ‘shred’ style bass and two-handed
Pat Kelley, John Pisano, and Norman Brown, as well as symphony orchestras tapping. At MI, Menno teaches private lessons and the Metal LPW. Check out
in San Francisco, Atlanta, and Los Angeles. His TV appearances include The Menno at www.nihilistworkshop.com or www.thecauterized.com.
Tonight Show with Jay Leno, the Rosie O’Donnell Show, and the 2002 Ameri-
can Idol finale. His recording credits are equally impressive: David Garfield, Verloop, Maurice (Bass)
Pat Kelley, Kevin Toney, Reggie C, Mijares, Phil Upchurch & the Phil-Harmonic A native of the Washington D.C. area, Maurice is a BIT honors graduate and recipient
Orchestra, Vernell Brown, and David Benoit At BIT, Ernest teaches private les- of the Outstanding Student award. Maurice’s busy LA performing schedule includes
sons and LPWs. work with Carl Anderson, Zakk Wylld, Nick Menza and Virgil Donati as well as various
original projects. At MI, Maurice teaches BIT private lessons and workshops.
Turner, Dale (Guitar)
As West Coast Editor of Guitar One magazine, Dale Turner has interviewed up- Watson, Sammy J. (Drums)
wards of 100 world-renowned players (from Al Di Meola to Zakk Wylde) and con- Sammy has toured and recorded with multiple artists, including most recently
ducted exclusive lesson features with the A-List of “instrumental guitar”greats The Apex Theory. After graduating with honors from PIT in 1995, he toured with
(from Scott Henderson and Mike Stern to Yngwie Malmsteen and John Petruc- Ricky Lee Jones on the H.O.R.D.E. Festival and a variety of other artists. With
ci). An author, transcriber, and multi-stylist, Dale received his Bachelor’s degree The Apex Theory, Sammy has performed at the Ozz Festival, Warped Tour, Snow
in Studio Guitar Performance from USC in 1991. Performance highlights include Core and many others, both in the US and internationally. Sammy’s teaching
126
appearances with Billy Cobham (Mahavishnu Orchestra/Miles Davis), Larry Klein specialties include rock, jazz, drum-n-bass, jungle, fusion, reggae, metal, pop
(Joni Mitchell/Shawn Colvin), and Eric “Bobo” Correa (Cypress Hill), among oth- and funk influences with heavy emphasis on odd meter groove and stylistic feel.
ers. Recent releases include David Pritchard’s Acoustic Guitar Quartet CD, Un- Sammy’s outlook towards the drums is passionate and honest, summed up by
assigned Territory (Zebra Acoustic). At GIT, Dale teaches private lessons, open the statement, “We were born students and will die students.”
counseling (focus: guitar for the vocalist), music theory and ear training.
Way, Jason (Jay) (Audio Engineering)
Verheyen, Carl (Guitar) Jay Way has been a musician for over 15 years. His experiences in the studio
Guitar Magazine calls him “one of the top 10 best guitar players in the world.” as a musician along with his desire to become more self-sufficient led him into
For the past two decades, Carl Verheyen has been one of LA’s first call session the field of recording. In addition to his skills as an engineer, Jay continues to
players as well as a member of Supertramp and leader of his own successful perform with his group The Gravity Guild (www.thegravityguild.com). After at-
band. Carl has played on hundreds of recordings, movie soundtracks and TV tending MI in 2001, Jay returned as an instructor and currently teaches SSL
shows, and 1996 won the Guitar Player Magazine Reader’s Poll for Best Studio Console Theory, Pre-Production, and Applied Hard Disk Editing.
Guitarist. In addition to his work as for others, Carl has released several solo
CDs, written for all of the major guitar periodicals, conducted seminars, and Waymire, Charlie (Drums)
produced instructional videos and software (see Carl’s website, Charlie studied music at the McNally Smith College of Music in St. Paul, MN and
www.carlverheyen.com , for updates and details). At GIT, Carl teaches Advanced Musicians Institute in Hollywood, CA where he graduated with “Rock Drummer
Electric Guitar Styles. of The Year” honors. Following graduation, he was signed to Universal Records
with the hard rock act, Speak No Evil and toured extensively throughout the
Verbaten, Menno (Bass) United States. He has since toured Europe with his band JKB and has achieved
Born and raised in The Netherlands, Menno relocated to Los Angeles to attend critical acclaim through his work with his Rock-Fusion trio, EGH, with the CD re-
Musicians Institute, studying with the likes of Steve Bailey, Billy Sheehan and leases Live at MI and a studio recording both due in 2007 along with his first solo
Stuart Hamm. He graduated in 1998 as Outstanding Student and started playing electronica record. Charlie endorses Trueline Drumsticks, which has created
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his signature stick known as “The Basher”. Besides Charlie’s drumming work Witt, Tom (Bass)
he also stays busy writing, producing and mixing for his production company Tom Witt graduated from Berklee College of Music in ’93 and has assembled an
Abrasive Productions and various TV shows including Malcolm in the Middle impressive array of credits in his musical journey since then. He has toured exten-
(Fox Television) at his studio in Hollywood, CA. For MI, Charlie teaches private sively with artists including Javier, Missing Persons, and American Idol Live! and
lessons, Live Playing Workshops, Rock Drums & Rhythm Section Workshop. worked with such artists as Enrique Iglesias, Andrae Crouch, Fantasia, Jennifer
For more bashing mayhem check out www.thebasher.com! Hudson, Impromp2, Lemar, Pepe Aguilar, Martha Reeves, Isyss, Don Omar, and
many more. His television appearances include 2005 Latin Grammy Awards, The
Weinstein, Paul (Independent Artist) Ryan Seacrest Show, The Ellen DeGeneres Show, BET’s 106 & Park, and Soul
Paul began playing music at an early age while growing up in New Hyde Park, Train. Tom’s recording career includes #1 singles, film soundtracks, and com-
NY. After graduating with a Bachelor’s of Arts in Music from SUNY Oneonta mercial jingles. He has also had the privilege of tracking sessions with drummers
he honed his skills working as a writer and studio musician for various Pop, Steve Smith, Vinnie Colaiuta, Carmine Appice, Abe Laboriel, Jr., and Joey Here-
Hip-Hop, and R&B producers in New York City. Paul has collaborated on count- dia. Currently, he works as a LA-based sideman and session player. For BIT, Tom
less sessions with multi-platinum mega-producer Timbaland, working on record- teaches the Slap Bass 101 course and the Funk LPW.
ings for artists including Justin Timberlake, Bubba Sparxxx, Petey Pablo, Ms.
Jade, Shady Sheist, and many more. His recent sessions and original music Wood, Doug (Voice)
placements include TV (MTV Making the Band IV, VH-1), independent feature As a singer, Douglas Wood has toured nationally with the award-winning rock
films (Downtown, The Angry Trainer), commercials (“Steve Irwin Action Figure”), a cappella group, Chicago Voice Exchange, and performed as lead vocalist
and indie artists (Cassanova Jones). For the Independent Artist Program, Paul in the Chicago area with the Stanley Paul Orchestra while also unleashing his
works as a Project Advisor. original fusion of pop, rock and soul. Other notable performances include ap- 127
pearances on the Today Show, at the Illinois Governor’s Inauguration Ball, for
Widegren, Lenny (Guitar) the White Sox and Halsted St. Market Days, and live performances on WGN-TV,
MI Bachelor’s Degree graduate (‘98) Lenny Widegren was born and raised in
WJYS-TV and WCBR radio. He (and his songs) can be heard in the indie films
Sweden. After playing the local scene, he recorded two albums with Boulevard
Angels Don¹t Live Here, Finders Keepers and The Promise. Doug was nominat-
(1987) and The Ungrateful (1993). Lenny plays Blues, Hard Rock, Metal, and
ed for a 2001 JPF pop songwriting award and has composed songs for twelve
slide guitar with equal passion and performs internationally with his band, El-
original stage plays and musicals in addition to earning a BFA in Musical Theatre
egantly Wasted. At MI, he currently teaches Alternative Guitar Heroes, Hard
from Millikin University. At VIT, Doug handles Vocal Review, Vocal Interpretation,
Rock LPW, Single String Improvisation, Rhythm Guitar, RSW, open counseling
Acting for Singers, private lessons and open counseling.
and private lessons.

Williams, Brian (Voice) Wright, Ross (Bass)


Hacksaw has been entertaining audiences since shortly after the creation of the Ross Wright (AKA Elvis Schoenberg) is a composer, conductor and bassist
wheel. In the summer of 1985, he thrilled his parents by moving to Los Angeles whose educational background includes a Masters Degree in Music from Cali-
with his high school rock band instead of attending the Ivy League school to fornia State University, Los Angeles; a Bachelor Degree from California State
which he had been accepted. Since that fateful decision, Hacksaw has recorded University, Northridge; a diploma from the UCLA Film Scoring Program, and cer-
and performed with numerous aggressive ensembles in LA and across North tificates from the Dick Grove School Of Music and Musicians Institute. Trained
America. He has also supplemented his income as a comedy writer, received a in classical and jazz bass, Ross has worked as composer or orchestrator on
B.A. in Political Science from UCLA and generally avoided substantial jail time. over 20 feature films and composed four concerti, two symphonies and dozens
In his free time, he likes to knit Velcro jumpsuits for his two cats: Daisy Mae & of chamber pieces that have been performed internationally. As a bassist, he
Sugar Bear. Hacksaw’s latest musical project is Damn Hippie Freaks. At MI, has performed and toured internationally with artists from Ray Charles to Middle
Hacksaw teaches the Hard Rock Live Performance Workshop, The Art of Suc- East superstar Darioush and served as music director and bassist for the Frank
cess 1 & 2, Extreme Vocals 1 & 2 and Vocal Private Lessons. Zappa musical, “Joe’s Garage.” His alter-ego, Elvis Schoenberg, is the writer,
conductor, and producer of the Orchestre Surréal, a 25-piece group that mixes
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classical, rock, jazz, and hip-hop into an unclassifiable musical hybrid that has Yoon, Rachel Jiyoung (Baccalaureate)
won him honors for Best Orchestral Arranger and Best Rock Opera at the Los Rachel Jiyoung Yoon graduated from Seoul National University (BA and MA in
Angeles Music Awards. The group, which performs regularly at theaters, festi- Composition) and UCLA (PhD in Composition). Professionally, Rachel consults
vals, and clubs throughout Southern California, has recorded albums including with jazz groups (including the Yellowjackets) and film composers on orchestra-
Air Surreal, It’s Alive, and Manic Voodoo Lady, an orchestral tribute to Jimi Hen- tion and music preparation in the Finale format in addition to playing sessions for
drix. At MI, Ross teaches private lessons and courses including Harmony and noted R&B producer Wah-Wah Watson. As a teacher, her classical background
Theory, Playing Techniques, and Melodic Bass Duets. combines with her contemporary commercial music experience to provide a
unique educational approach. At MI, she teaches Western Music History, World
Wyatt, Keith (Guitar) Music History, Theory, Composition, and Keyboard Proficiency as well as private
A graduate of MI’s second GIT class, Keith helped design MI’s curriculum and lessons.
later served as department head of GIT before becoming Director of Programs.
As a guitar education specialist, he has created over a dozen best-selling in- Yoon Seung, Cho (Keyboards)
structional videos for Warner Brothers (including Rockin’ the Blues and Guitar Cho Yoon Seung was born 1973 in Seoul, Korea and at 14 moved to Buenos
Basics), books for MI Press/Hal Leonard (Harmony and Theory: a Comprehen- Aires, Argentina where he studied classical music at C.L.B Nacional Conser-
sive Guide), award-winning CD-ROMs for Play Music (Play Blues Guitar and vatory. While attending Berklee College of Music in Boston from 1996-2000,
Play Rock Guitar), DVDs for Hal Leonard/Fender (the award-winning Getting he studied with Paul Schmeling and Hal Crook as well as with Jerry Bergonzi
Started on Guitar) and has written columns and articles for all of the major guitar and John Lockwood at the New England Conservatory. From 2001-03, after
magazines. As a performer, Keith is currently touring with the Blasters, and has being selected by Herbie Hancock he attended the exclusive Thelonious Monk
performed and recorded in the US, Europe and Asia. Specialties: blues and Institute at USC and studied with Dave Holland, Lewis Nash, Kenny Barron,
128
American “roots” music. John Scorfield and Terence Blanchard. Currently, Cho works with the Ron King
Quartet and Big Band, participating in world festivals including the Umbria Jazz
Wyble, Jimmy (Guitar) Festival, Java Jazz Festival and Tri-C Jazz Festival and has released his own
Jimmy Wyble’s discography and touring credits span the gamut of Western CDs for the Sound Sketch and Woong-Jin Media labels in Korea. At MI, Cho
Swing and Jazz from Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys to Benny Goodman, teaches Open Counseling and Private Lessons.
Red Norvo, Frank Sinatra, Barney Kessel and Tony Rizzi’s Five Guitars. At GIT,
Jimmy can be found teaching the course “Developing the Art of Two Line Impro- Zargaran, Mahsa (Independent Artist)
visation” and weekly Open Counseling sessions. Mahsa is an Iranian-born singer, songwriter and classically trained pianist cur-
rently based in Los Angeles. Her credits include piano/synth programming ses-
Yares, Spencer (Independent Artist) sions for producer Dave Ogilvie (Nine Inch Nails, David Bowie, Marilyn Manson),
Spencer Yaras is a songwriter, producer, and composer with a passion for digital studio vocal sessions at Dream Sequences for producer Dan Chase (Cheryl
music production. He has a degree in Computer Science from University of Cali- Crow, Celine Dion, Pink), and co-writing the score for the short film A Season To
fornia at San Diego and currently teaches Computer Recording and Synthesis Whither for The Director’s Guild of Canada. Mahsa is currently focusing on her
and Sampling for the Recording Artist program. He has written and produced solo project, performing with the electronic/rock band The Sweet Kill and teach-
music for television shows such as Star Search, Dance Fever, The Road to Star- ing keyboard lessons in the Independent Artist Program at MI. Learn more at
dom with Missy Elliot, and Close To Home and has scored many independent www.myspace.com/mahsa and www.myspace.com/thesweetkill
films. Along with his Los Angeles-based production team, District 78, he has
worked with artists such as Volume 10, Blaque, and Turtleman. His most recent Ziff, Stuart (Guitar)
CD release contains material from Sen Dog, Kottonmouth Kings, and Insane Native New Yorker Stuart Ziff has crafted a career as professional guitarist,
Clown Posse. To learn more, visit www.district 78.com songwriter, and popular music historian. Ziff’s expertise lies in Rock & Roll, R&
B, Funk, Blues and all points in between. A veteran sideman of 25 years, he
has supported legends including Wilson Pickett and Charles Brown and backed
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contemporary artists, emerging singer-songwriters as well as Broadway shows. Biographies not available:
In 1994, Ziff co-wrote the #1 single “Thinkin’ Problem” with country artist David
Ball (Warner Bros.). He has numerous recording credits as a writer, guitarist, Bertelli, Valente (Keyboards)
producer, and vocalist in NYC, Nashville and Los Angeles, and tours as guitar- Cho, Yoon-Seung (Keyboards)
ist for the legendary Funk-R&B-Latin group War. At GIT, Stuart teaches Blues
Howard, Charissa (Voice)
Guitar, Slide, private lessons and Open Counseling.
McPherson, Shawn (Voice)
King, Kevin (Keyboards)
Zilbershtein, Vadim (Guitar)
Miller, Luke (Keyboards)
Vadim’s resume as a guitarist includes Earth Wind and Fire (2003-08) as well
as performances and recordings with such industry luminaries as Marcus Miller, Park, Adrian (Voice)
Chaka Khan, Chick Corea, Lenny Kravitz, James Brown, and Mary J Blige, to Pfeifer, Daren (Drums)
name a few, with numerous TV appearances including the Grammy and Emmy Schoenhals, Tim (Keyboards)
award shows. At GIT, Vadim can be found teaching the Earth, Wind, and Fire Wittenberg, Scott (Drums)
LPW, Open Counseling and private lessons.

Zito, Richie (Multi-program)


Richie Zito was a sought-after session guitarist throughout the 1970s, recording
with artists including Neil Sedaka, Rick James, Barbara Streisand, the Beach
Boys, Donna Summer, Tina Turner, Lionel Richie and the soundtracks for Flash-
129
dance, Top Gun and Scarface before joining Elton John’s band in 1980.
During the next two decades Zito produced 38 singles that reached Billboard’s
Hot 100, including two number-one records, “The Flame” (Cheap Trick) and
“When I See You Smile” (Bad English). Other successes included Eddie Mon-
ey’s “Take Me Home Tonight”, Sam Kinison’s “Wild Thing”, Joe Cocker’s “You
Can Leave Your Hat On”, and Heart’s multi-platinum “Brigade”. In1990, Zito won
recognition as Billboard’s “Producer of the Year” and the following year formed
Zito/RCA Records. Additional credits included Cher’s double-platinum Greatest
Hits, Poison’s platinum Greatest Hits and his role as Music Supervisor for the
feature film Wise Girls. 2006 saw Zito’s first solo CD release, Avalon, and the
launch of a new label, Your Music America, with Larry Lee and Zito at the helm
backed by WMC Mortgage CEO Amy Brandt. For MI, Richie teaches Original
Song Pre-Production.

Zunigar, Rick (Guitar)


Jazz guitarist Rick Zunigar has been on the professional scene since he was
sixteen years old. He has accumulated an extensive list of studio credits includ-
ing work with Stevie Wonder, Freddie Hubbard, Cal Tjader, Ray Charles, Willie
Bobo, Roberta Flack, Smokey Robinson, and the Crusaders. At GIT, you’ll find
Rick teaching private lessons and Open Counseling.
ADMINISTRATION
EXECUTIVE OFFICERS Program Directors
President Hisatake Shibuya Dean, Baccalaureate Program Roger Steinman
General Manager Takeshi Sakimoto Associate Dean Gary Solt
Vice President of Programs Keith Wyatt Bass Alexis Skljarevski
Vice President of Education Beth Marlis Guitar Jude Gold
Keyboards Kevin Comstock
Percussion Tim Pedersen
Accounting
Voice Mike Campbell
Controller Kengo Kido
Audio Engineering Monica Mancillas
Accounting Manager Benedict Bacon
Guitar Craft John Carruthers
Payroll Coordinator Robyn Hansen
Music Business Kenny Kerner
Staff Accountant Peter Spyropoulos
Music Video/Film/TV Alan Calzatti
Accounts Payable Claudia Melgar
Independent Artist Greg Panciera
Student Billing Coordinators Darlene Carillo
Alternative Programs Daniel Gilbert
Yaritza Santana
Education Coordinators
Admissions Encore Program Chris Maloney
Director Steve Lunn Live Playing Workshops Tita Hutchison
130
Director Jonathan Wilder Musicianship Bill LaFleur
Assistant Director Paul Weinstein
Assistant Director Elicia Hernandez Course Scheduler Angel Ricciardi
Admissions Coordinator Marcos Ochoa Scheduling Assistant Kristina Fox
Administrative Assistant Angelo Aguiluz
Financial Aid
Receptionist Rossana Brassea
Director Melissa
Admissions Representatives Brooke Archilla
Cuesta-Booker
Jennifer Cazares
Financial Aid Officers Barbara Corzo
Michael Coleman
Kymberlee Nelson
Cullen Dickson
Isabel Cano
Phillip Dippold
Ty West
Geffrey Fafenrodt
Lori Johns
Marshall McQuown Human Resources
Valerie Smith Director Jeff Spencer
Roy Walker Generalist Mari Yoshida
Michael Winn
Gary Younger Marketing
Education Director Coko Johnson
Director of Education Tom Engfer Outreach Coordinator Travis Johnson
Designer Jim Felix
ADMINISTRATION
Operations Assistant Evan Parker
Director Michael Phifer Assistant James Rhee
Drum Services Anthony Taddeo Assistant Michael Schoemer
Electronics Technician Dale Scott Assistant Jon Robaina
Facilities Technician Juan Hernandez Assistant Nick Lindholm
Facilities Technician Victor Ortiz
Student Records
Facilities Technician Ismael Martinez
Registrar Jim McMains
Librarian Josh Moorman
Assistant Registrar Shaun Vieten
Circulation Supervisor Ermila Carlin
Assistant Registrar/Collection Michelle Leadon
Curriculum and Printing Coordinator Mark Thomas
Assistant Mario Hernandez
Mail Room Dave Leggett
Academic Advisor/Retention Christina Page
Security Manager Raymond Daniels
Assistant Security Manager Anthony Williams Student Services
Security Guard Bernard Brooks (including Housing and Events)
Security Guard Adrian Williams Manager Gabriel Hernandez
Security Guard Nick Douglas Assistant Hilde Klain
Security Guard Mike Delaney 131
Director of International Student Affairs Dan Diaz
Information Technology Artist and Career Services
Director Iyob Araia Manager Todd Berhorst
Network Administrator Ramil Gavia Job Outreach Coordinator Michael Bishop
Database Administrator Rajesh Anamanal Internships Chris Fletcher
System Administrator Tim Metz Assistant Gina Galardo
Mac Technician Joaquin Pacheco
Musicians Institute Contact Information:
Players Supply
Manager Scott Munday
Telephone: 800-255-7529 (US and Canada)
Assistant Manager Steven Barbola
323-462-1384 (Local/International)
Assistant Robert Smith
Fax: 323-462-6978
Assistant Miguel Vega
Mail: 6752 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, CA 90028
Production Services
E-mail: admissions@mi.edu
Production Manager Joe Fiorello
Website: www.mi.edu
Production Assistant Yolen Farias
Employment: jobs@mi.edu
Video Director Michael Ellenshaw

Lighting Director Lenny Douglas

CAMPUS HOLLYWOOD
CAMPUS HOLLYWOOD

Musicians Institute is part of Campus Hollywood, a group of entertain-


ment-related schools and companies dedicated to the development of
the contemporary arts, performance, and education. Campus Hollywood
includes:

ESP Guitars www.espguitars.com United Television Broadcasting www.utbhollywood.com


Leading manufacturer of electric guitars and basses including ESP, LTD, Southern California’s premier provider of Japanese-cultural television
and X-Tone. programming.

Schecter Guitars www.schecterguitars.com Theater of Arts www.toahollywood.com


Manufacturer of unique, high-quality guitars and basses for the contem- Innovative education in the theatrical arts.
porary music market.
International Dance Academy www.idahollywood.com
MI Japan www.mijapan.com.jp Training in all styles of contemporary dance, from novice to professional.
132 Providing Musicians Institute’s world-renowned contemporary music
education to students throughout Japan. Elegance International www.ei.edu
Comprehensive, innovative education in professional and special-ef-
Los Angeles Music Academy www.lamusicacademy.com fects makeup.
A boutique contemporary music school training well-rounded musicians
for professional performing careers. The Green Room Cafe www.thegreenroom-hollywood.com
A full-service restaurant and cafe located in the heart of downtown
Hollywood.