Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 68

International Congress & Convention Association

The Global Telecoms Industry 
45 th  ICCA Congress & Exhibition 
Monday 30 October 2006 

www.iccaworld.com 
The Global Telecoms Industry

What are the big growth sectors? Who are the biggest players? 

Which parts of the world will see increased activity that can 
stimulate meetings? 

Malcolm Ross, Principal, Merlin Consulting Ltd. 
PO Box 153, 75 Old Bakery Street, CMR 01, Valletta, Malta  Tel: +49+177­625 2656 Fax: +49­177­99­625 2656 
Skype: callmalcolm  eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com  Web: www.consultmerlin.com 

The Global Telecommunications Industry, 11:00 – 12:30 
2006 ICCA, Rhodes, Greece 30 th  October 2006 
Summary
Telecoms is the biggest share of GDP, but relative to its size 
produces only a tenth the congresses & meetings of Health­Care 
n  Telecoms is a €1,000 B industry, growing twice as fast as GDP
n  Telecom is a major source of Congresses and Meetings
àITU Telecom World every four years, is a mega­event: 2006 (Hong 
Kong): 42k – 57k visitors, of which 2,600 in the Congress
à3GSM Barcelona: 50,000 visitors, of which over 5,000 in the 
Congress; plus regional events in Asia, Africa, etc.
àGlobalComm (Chicago) 20000 visitors; PTC (Hawaii) 1000 delegate
àOperators and vendors hold many training and promotional events
àCorporate and end­user congresses such as INTAUG etc.
n  Positive correlation of travel with telecoms (cause & effect?)
n  But is only fourth largest source of mega­congresses: 8% (2005) – 
10% (2004) of International Congresses in Vienna
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  3 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
Summary

However, the Telecom industry is half­way through 10 years of crisis 
fed by 6 paradigm shifts
n  Stock­market value of network operators (Vodafone, Deutsche 
Telekom, Verizon etc.) and sales of equipment (Nokia, Siemens, 
Ericsson etc.) halved since 2000; mergers of Siemens/Nokia 
Networks, Alcatel/Lucent; bankruptcy of MCI; Benq Germany;

n  It is assailed simultaneously by many powerful internal and 
external drivers and paradigm shifts

àFrom the stable monopolies on the 1980, every country now has 
many operators, fiercely competing

àMarkets, technology, players and rules of the game changing at least 
as fast as the computer industry.

àNew paradigm shifts continue to change the industry and generate 
an increasingly dense fog of uncertainty 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  4 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
Summary

Will this crisis change where Telecoms congresses and meetings will 
be held, their number and size and what they will be about? Can we 
multiply them by ten (to match relative size of Health­Care)? 

Chinese character for „Crisis“ 

Wei = „Dangerous“  Ji = „Opportunity“ 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  5 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
Summary

We suggest 32 clues and hints ICCA Members look for now in these 6 
shifts, to seek out over the next 3 ­ 5 years the new telecom­related 
congress & meeting business, and to manage the increased dangers 
1.  The shift of buying power, manufacturing capacity and innovation 
to Asia is accelerating – 6 clues and hints 
2.  Technology change is at least as fast and broad as in IT – 8 clues 
and hints 
3.  Even the big directions for the telecoms industry are foggy – 7 
clues and hints 
4.  The financial industry has a strong, growing influence – 4 clues 
and hints 
5.  Power is shifting from operators to equipment, device and service 
vendors – 3 clues and hints 
6.  Other industry sectors are shifting by embedding telecoms – 3 
clues and hints  th 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30  October, 2006  6 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
1. The shift of buying power, manufacturing capacity and innovation to Asia 
is accelerating
Possible impact of the shift to Asia in the Telecom sector on the 
Conference and Congress industry 
1.  Higher demand in attractive Asian cities for congress center and 
meeting capacity of all sizes for telecom­related meetings 

2.  Higher demand in “safe” African & Middle­East cites for capacity 
for telecom­related meetings 
3.  Fewer and smaller mega­conferences in telecom in Europe and US 
4.  More “satellite” conferences regionally to augment global mega­ 
events, and some of these will grow bigger than the parents 
5.  More demand for translation services in events and back­offices 
(e.g. Mandarin into English) 
6.  US­ and European­based Congress Bureaus and Congress 
Centers sales staff have to travel, as traditional event organisers 
and association/organisation leaders more often in Asia 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  7 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
1. The shift of buying power, manufacturing capacity and innovation to Asia 
is accelerating
Telecom‘s center of gravity has shifted to Asia, so that Asia will soon 
become the dominant force driving telecoms
n  Telecom is growing faster than GDP everywhere, is growing 
fastest where penetration is low, with the biggest markets being 
China and India
n  China Telecom (220 M fixed­line and 27 M broadband customers) 
is the world’s biggest fixed operator. China Mobile with 280 Million 
users rivals Vodafone as biggest mobile operator.
n  Developing markets are leaping directly into the latest platforms
n  Asian buying power means new products are being launched there 
first and are influenced more by Asian customer needs
n  Telecom manufacturing has already shifted to Asia, and there are 
signs that innovation and standards­setting will follow
n  Bangalore is the world capital of call­center outsourcing 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  8 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
1. The shift of buying power, manufacturing capacity and innovation to Asia 
is accelerating
Telecom is growing faster than GDP everywhere, is growing fastest 
where penetration is low, with the biggest markets being “Chindia”
n  The total number of mobile telecom users will rise from 2B to 3B 
by 2010 (43% of world population). 1.5B fixed phones. Goal 6.5B!
n  China and India will make up 30% (370M) of that growth
n  Middle­East and Africa will add 200M by 2010
n  Over 50% of telecom infrastructure and mobile handsets sales are 
to mainland China, so Asia dominates markets
n  India commits to the two largest ever network procurements
à  Oct 2006 BSNL receives bids for 60 million GSM lines ($4.8B)
à  Adding 1.6M users in July 2006 Bharti buys $1B network expansion
n  Europe may be 100% penetrated with mobile, but total spend still 
is rising faster than GDP; broadband still growing fast 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  9 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
1. The shift of buying power, manufacturing capacity and innovation to Asia 
is accelerating
Western European telecomm market growth is declining 

139% 
140% 

97% 
100% 

51% 
50%  37% 

25% 
30% 
17% 
9% 
Broadband a 
10%  7% 
5%  5%  4% 
2% 
Mobile 
Voice & Data b 
0% 
0%  ­1%  ­2%  ­2%  ­3%  ­3%  Fixed Voice c 

­10%  2002  2003  2004  2005E  2006E 2007E 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  10 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
1. The shift of buying power, manufacturing capacity and innovation to Asia 
is accelerating
Developing markets are leaping directly into the latest platforms

n  The vast majority of new users in markets with low telecom 
penetration go for personal mobile rather shared fixed phones

n  Operators in emerging markets have little investment in legacy 
(previous generation) equipment, so move straight to next 
generation (Internet Protocol), so are best equipped to offer 
advanced services, best quality and low cost to build and run
n  Korea has the highest broadband penetration in the world
n  Japan has high broadband penetration and the fastest widely­ 
available broadband anywhere
n  Several Taiwanese, Singaporean and Hong Kong operators are 
building ultra­high capacity fiber­cable to every work place and 
every urban household nationwide, and Taipei­wide next 
generation wireless broadband 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  11 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
1. The shift of buying power, manufacturing capacity and innovation to Asia 
is accelerating
Asian buying power means new products are being launched there 
first and are influenced more by Asian customer needs
n  Local script languages need larger displays, touch­screens, stylus 
write­pads and voice response

n  Mainland China instigating a project to provide all students with an 
electronic writing­pad based distance­learning computer
n  Local content is taking off (e.g. Japanese and Chinese music and 
video, ring­tones)
n  i­Mode (Japanese mobile Internet) is often cited as the model for 
the West to copy (although its success is based on different 
cultural environment that doesn’t exist elsewhere) 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  12 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
1. The shift of buying power, manufacturing capacity and innovation to Asia 
is accelerating
Telecom manufacturing has already shifted to Asia, and there are 
signs that innovation and standards­setting will follow
n  The European GSM standard is used in 80% of all mobile phones 
and produces the biggest Telecom Congress (3GSM), but Asia buy 
more than 50% and is producing the next standards!
n  The U.S. graduates 70,000 engineers a year vs. 350,000 from India 
and 600,000 from China (there is dispute over definitions)
n  Taiwan (including mainland factories), Korea and Japan dominate 
supply of IT and telecom components: displays, disk­drives, 
displays, mother boards, WLAN modules
n  Taiwan (and now China) are not just copying, they are innovators 
for example monopoly suppliers of all next generation wireless 
and are putting it into digital cameras, game consoles, hi­fi etc.
n  Strong in device software (although still weak in application 
software) 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  13 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
1. The shift of buying power, manufacturing capacity and innovation to Asia 
is accelerating
Summary: Possible impact of the shift to Aisa in the Telecom sector 
on the Conference and Congress industry 
1.  Higher demand in attractive Asian cities for congress center and 
meeting capacity of all sizes for telecom­related meetings 

2.  Higher demand in “safe” African & Middle­East cites for capacity 
for telecom­related meetings 
3.  Fewer and smaller mega­conferences in telecom in Europe and US 
4.  More “satellite” conferences regionally to augment global mega­ 
events, and some of these will grow bigger than the parents 
5.  More demand for translation services in events and back­offices 
(e.g. Mandarin into English) 
6.  US­ and European­based Congress Bureaus and Congress 
Centers sales staff have to travel, as traditional event organisers 
and association/organisation leaders more often in Asia 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  14 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
2. Technology change is at least as fast and broad as in IT

Possible impact of fast technological change in the Telecom sector 
on the Conference and Congress industry 
7.  Events have to be more often for delegates to keep up with 
changes 

8.  Mega­events fragment into more parallel sessions 
9.  More events, each more specialised and smaller 
10.  Peer­networking at events and between events is key 
11.  More demanding and expensive state­of­the­art support facilities 
are key to selecting Congress location/facilities 
12.  Telecom and IT services to delegates become a major source of 
revenue to Congress centers 
13.  Many more corporate and internal training events 
14.  Telecom will be a key theme in Congresses in many other sectors 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  15 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
2. Technology change is at least as fast and broad as in IT
What is possible will be limited more by our imagination rather than 
by computer and telecom technology
n  Performance, cost and pervasiveness of IT/telecom devices and 
bandwidth are highly predictable, even if specific products are not
n  Moore’s law: computer power/price doubles every 18 – 24 months
n  We cannot predict success for specific products, but Moore’s law 
means ubiquitous and affordable communications devices by 2010
n  Advances in price performance of IT/Telecom can provide 
powerful tools previously limited to very specialised purposes
n  Software developments are more difficult to quantify, but some 
trends are at least qualitatively predictable
n  Optical fibre cables offer unlimited bandwidth, eliminating distance 
and giving advantage to the first­to­market
n  In most urban environments, along roads and in most private and 
public buildings telecoms capacity will exceed our ability to use it
n  High GDP/km 2  countries will signpost the way forward 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  16 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
2. Technology change is at least as fast and broad as in IT

The future is limited by our imagination, not by the performance, cost 
and pervasiveness of IT/telecom technology – and Congresses are a 
good way to stimulate our imagination!
n  Moore’s Law: micro­chip power doubles every 18 months, and 
cost decreases 30% ­ true since 1975 (annual doubling before 
that) and no barrier over next 10 years
n  Data traffic doubles every year (not every 100 days, as in the 1995 
– 2000 myth of “Internet Time” that created the bubble)
n  Capacity of a fibre­optics cable doubles every 12 – 18 months
n  Fibre­optics cost is 90% trenching/ducting which is $80/m – with a 
budget of $1,200/user, all desks closer than than 15m and 4 
person households closer than 60m apart will be served
n  Will fibre­optics and next generation wireless be the standard for 
Congress stands and seats? 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  17 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
2. Technology change is at least as fast and broad as in IT

By 2010 everyone, everywhere will have affordable Telecoms – so it 
will be a key to all other sectors, so expect a telecom stream in all 
Congresses?
n  3 – 6 billion mobile phones compared with 1 billion PCs and 0.5 
billion cable TV subscribers
n  By 2010 a mobile phone the size of a Euro­coin and costs 10 Euro; 
next generation wireless Bluetooth and WLAN on a chip are 
already here
n  Internet routers the size of a Euro­coin and costs 10 Euro
n  At least as ubiquitous as embedded micro­processors today, 
wireless­links will be in consumer electronics, cars, Coke­ 
machines, appliances as well as communicators and computers
n  Single­chip WLAN soon standard in every PC, mobile phone, PCs, 
digital cameras, DVD players etc as the “wireless memory­stick”
n  Every such device will be within 5 metres of at least one other 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  18 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
2. Technology change is at least as fast and broad as in IT

What Telecom devices people wear or carry in 2010 will impact how 
business and social life is done (and Congresses!)
n  Microchip and digital storage will be 30 times today’s, and unit 
prices will sink to 1/6 th  of today’s, so for the same price, a PC has 
5 times the performance and 5 times the storage capacity of today
n  For the same price a PC would be 1/5 of the size and volume, 
leading to PDAs with the power of today’s laptops and mobile 
phones and other personal consumer electronics with the power 
of high­end PDAs
n  Increased disc storage density can put 30 times more on a CD or 
DVD, or 30 feature films could fit on a thumbnail­sized micro­disc, 
in a wearable personal entertainment server or mobile phone.
n  A business­card sized memory could carry 100 hours of 
promotional videos
n  Virtual presence, social/business networking via telecoms gives 
virtual and continuous meetings/Congresses anytime/anywhere 
th 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30  October, 2006  19 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
2. Technology change is at least as fast and broad as in IT

Advances in price performance of IT/Telecom can provide powerful 
tools previously limited to very specialised purposes
n  Arcade game computers and high­end home computers become 
30 times more powerful, opening up potential for virtual 
reality/simulators for life­like interactive games.
n  Simulators play a major part in the education of airline pilots. Will 
wide access to PC­based virtual­reality simulation and roll­playing 
lead to their use for
à  education in Business Studies, Languages, Engineering, Medicine, 
etc.?
à  entertainment – interaction and involvement in movies
à  virtual presence in meetings (Congresses!), soccer matches, rock­ 
concerts, massively multiple participant games 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  20 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
2. Technology change is at least as fast and broad as in IT

Software developments are more difficult to quantify, but some trends 
are at least qualitatively predictable
n  You will be able to search sound and video archives such as 
YouTube, all past BBC TV programmes from your note­book
n  Interactive searching, learning, commenting during a Congress!
n  Digital Copyright and Flickr/Zazzle commercialisation enables 
everyone to be an author wherever they are, protection their new 
intellectual­property and PayPal ensures you get royalties paid
n  Authentication schemes ensure content is going to the intended 
party and that the response is truly from them
n  Studio­quality graphics, video and audio production tools are 
cheap and easy enough for individuals to produce professional 
material and broadcast it through Internet bypassing the current 
media sector. Some music artists only commercialize their work 
through the Internet 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  21 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
2. Technology change is at least as fast and broad as in IT

Optical fibre gives unlimited capacity, eliminating distance and giving 
advantage to the first­to­market
n  Fibre­optic cable have over 100 fibres, each with 64 laser 
”colours”, each colour can carry 5,000 CD­quality telephone calls
n  Such a cable pays back at 2,000 voice channels (0.001% fill)
n  Such a cable offers 10,000 full broadcast quality simultaneous 
two­way video channels, or 10 million simultaneous video­ 
conferences
n  Every year advances in the electronic links to the cable doubles 
the number of laser colours that an existing cable can transmit, 
growing capacity faster than demand, at negligible extra cost
n  This surfeit of capacity may mean late entrants won’t get market 
or financing: telecom again becomes a “natural monopoly” 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  22 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
2. Technology change is at least as fast and broad as in IT

In most urban environments, along roads and in most private and 
public buildings telecoms capacity will exceed our ability to use it
n  Fibre cables economically serve large office buildings along the 
main streets of most financial centres in major cities, even in the 
developing world
n  Office workers links to the corporate network are 20 – 50 times 
faster than DSL – the bottle neck is in the database or terminal
n  WLAN “hotspots” in public locations along the fibre cable or DSL 
branches from it can give 50m circles of 100 Mbps (mega­bit per 
sec.) access, 50 times the capacity of DSL at home
n  Fon (www.fon.com) is just a few months old, in alpha test, yet has 
built a community of 100,000 “fonderos” with private wireless 
access points who allow others to use their spare capacity free
n  WLANs chain “peer­to­peer” can give 100 Mpbs everywhere in 
urban areas leapfrogging traditional telecom infrastructure 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  23 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
2. Technology change is at least as fast and broad as in IT

Cost reductions and performance enhancements will bring this 
capacity at much lower costs than voice today e.g. the UK
n  UK has 393,000 km of A, B and minor roads. If fibre laid on every, 
then 393 Million metres at €80/metre = €32 B over 60M pop = 
€500/pop. A WLAN every 50m = 8Million times €50 = €400M = 
€7/pop

n  Singapore municipal WLAM project: 5,000 hotspots: for $US 63M 
= $12,000/hot spot = 700km2 = 1 every 300m, 4.5M people = 
$14/pop
n  Today’s telephone network cost around $1,200 per phone to 
install 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  24 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
2. Technology change is at least as fast and broad as in IT

High GDP/Capita countries enable operators to roll­out nationally very 
high bandwidth services to every office and every urban household: 
even if only voice services were purchased, revenue covers costs
n  These operators can install dense fibre meshes to explore needs 
of the Information Society, at very low risk, and will discover 
demand for high speed and advanced services first
n  Such operators are lead customers for next generation networks

n  There are operators pursuing this strategy at least partially in all 
the critical markets, but most are holding back to fiber MANs and 
backbones, or ADSL “try it and see”
n  Candidate nation­wide “showcases” of this new information­ 
centric world include Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, 
Netherlands, (Malta) – signposts if the broadband future emerges
n  US, UK, France, Germany etc. will lag except in small parts of 
large cities 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  25 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
2. Technology change is at least as fast and broad as in IT
High GDP/km 2  markets are signposts: Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, 
Netherlands, Malta can put in ubiquitous broadband risk­free so as to 
experiment with knowledge­based working & the information society
n  Massive savings in local loop costs, due to dense populations
n  Local loop is 0.5 km, compared to European average of 4km and 
US 8km; ($70/m trenching costs and $10/m fiber cost local loop)
n  The cost of a dense urban mesh wiring up all businesses nation­ 
wide pays back with 10 – 20% of today’s voice traffic
n  A business customer in these countries has an easy choice:
àADSL from the incumbent, not available everywhere, expensive, 
subject to poor quality and a delay in installation
àVoice services from the next generation carrier, with on­demand 
upgrade to 10 MBPS “always­on” to the desk, or any higher data 
service up to the fibre limit (10 million simultaneous video­ 
conferences), with entry price the same as incumbent’s POTS 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  26 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
2. Technology change is at least as fast and broad as in IT

Summary: Possible impact of fast technological change in the 
Telecom sector on the Conference and Congress industry 
7.  Events have to be more often for delegates to keep up with 
changes 

8.  Mega­events fragment into more parallel sessions 
9.  More events, each more specialised and smaller 
10.  Peer­networking at events and between events is key 
11.  More demanding and expensive state­of­the­art support facilities 
are key to selecting Congress location/facilities 
12.  Telecom and IT services to delegates become a major source of 
revenue to Congress centers 
13.  Many more corporate and internal training events 
14.  Telecom will be a key theme in Congresses in many other sectors 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  27 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
3. Even the big directions for the telecoms industry are foggy

Possible impact of fogginess in the Telecom sector on the 
Conference and Congress industry 
15.  There is money in journalists and conference organisers who are 
early trend spotters/setters, whether right, or more often wrong 

16.  Telecom decision makers have a herd instinct – are they migrating 
to new pastures or “5 million Lemmings can’t be wrong”! 
17.  More short­term changes in size and nature of congresses 
18.  More short­term cancellations, fewer long­term contracts 
19.  New conferences move in a few years from obscure to fashionable 
to obsolete 
20.  Diversify away from dependence on mega­telecom conferences, 
have back­up plans and contingencies 
21.  Get paid in advance! 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  28 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
3. Even the big directions for the telecoms industry are foggy

The technology base might be clear, but there is uncertainty in market 
demand, competitive structure, business models
n  Multiple dramatic changes will cloud and confuse the IT, telecoms 
and content industries for the next five years

n  The industry is uncertain about convergence vs divergence, IP vs 
switched, data/voice, local vs long­distance, optical vs copper, 
mobile vs fixed, so beware of jumping on the “next big thing”
n  The industry did a great job penetrating the global population, but 
getting overcapacity used is a more fundamental challenge
n  When dramatic change hits an industry, who emerges from the 
chaos as leader often depends on the size of the commercial 
consequences
n  The leaders should prioritise their attention to ensure they are 
ready for high uncertainty, high­impact drivers 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  29 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
3. Even the big directions for the telecoms industry are foggy

Multiple dramatic changes will cloud and confuse the IT, telecoms 
and content industries for the next five years 
§  Performance, cost and pervasiveness of IT/telecom devices and 
bandwidth are highly predictable, even if specific products are not 
§  Asia­Pacific buying power will influence product and service design 
§  The 'ation crisis will continue to destabilise the telecom sector: 
liberalisation, globalisation, privatisation, re­regulation, consolidation ..... 
§  The financial industry will drive a stronger business culture 
§  It is unclear which future structure and winners will emerge from shifting 
boundaries between IT/content/fixed & mobile telecoms; 
operators/service­providers/vendors/customers; consumer/professional 
§  Markets will be driven more by customer­need and less by technology 
and economics of networks 
§  The biggest money and growth is in the businesses that apply Internet 
and Intranets, rather than in the telecom/IT sector 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  30 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
3. Even the big directions for the telecoms industry are foggy

The industry is uncertain about convergence vs divergence, IP vs 
switched, data/voice, local vs long­distance, optical vs copper, mobile 
vs fixed, so beware of jumping on “the next big thing”
n  Many cases of mobile and fixed diverging in both market and 
technology, show convergence is not a law of nature
n  Convergence of voice and data in technology or market is also not 
a law of nature
n  The myth of „Internet traffic doubling every 100 days“ when in fact 
it was doubling annually led to five years of over­investment in 
capacity, leading to 2 3.65*5  overcapacity that it will take a decade of 
growth to use up
n  ISDN, India, China, ADSL have been hypes that yielded no 
sustainable profitability for telcos
n  So the industry needs to learn: solid research, future­proof 
planning, fast payback, with conservative demand prognoses 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  31 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
3. Even the big directions for the telecoms industry are foggy
The industry did a great job penetrating the global population, but 
getting overcapacity used is a more fundamental challenge
n  Got a fixed phone into every (Western) home and office by 1980
n  Phase 1: 1978 – 1985: Prove the technology for automatic cellular 
mobile telephone systems – analogue car­phones. Demand many 
time what expected, despite high prices for service and handsets.
n  Phase 2: 1985 – 2000: Digital cellular puts a mobile phone in 
everyone’s hand. Supply finally catches up demand.
n  Phase 3: 2000 – 2010: The quest to fill capacity: how to stimulate 
consumers to use mobile as their principal communications media
n  Broadband will follow this model well within a decade
n  Phase 1: growing number of small, specialised congresses
n  Phase 2: global mega­congresses, promotion, sponsorship
n  Phase 3: focussed training, optimisation, cost­sensitive meetings 32 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
3. Even the big directions for the telecoms industry are foggy 

(Mobile) operators are so focused on desperately seeking revenues 
from broadband and content, they are overlooking the opportunity to 
double or more revenues from voice, at low risk and low cost
n  Mobile penetration is saturating in terms of % pop with a mobile
n  Saturation is unproven in terms of
ànumber of minutes of voice conversation per person
àroles that mobile communications can play in people’s lives
àthe share of wallet ­ 52% of under 16 UK kids are spending less on 
burgers & chocolate to buy mobile top­up cards for chatting and SMS
n  Most waking minutes are spent silent. 98% of talking minutes are 
face­to­face. 80% of  phone minutes are spent on the fixed phone.
n  We don’t need to debate how much of this is realistically available 
to mobile as just 1% of this potential captured as mobile voice 
traffic would double mobile voice usage 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  33
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
3. Even the big directions for the telecoms industry are foggy
When dramatic change hits an industry, who emerges from the chaos 
as leader often depends on the size of the commercial consequences
Digital Watches = n  Minor product 
1970: Swiss  1997: Swiss  performance 
rule the  Chaos  almost  rule  improvements
watch  the watch 
industry  industry  n  Minor growth in total 
market size 

Airplanes n  Travel speed multiplied 
1930: Railways  1997: Airlines  by ten
rule long­  Chaos  almost  rule 
distance  long­distance  n  Total travelling public 
transportation  transportation  multiplied by ten 

1970: 40  Digitisation  n  Massive R&D costs


telecom  1997: 5 telecom 
vendors rule  vendors rule  n  Change in skills required
Chaos 
the switch  the switch 
industry  industry  n  No change to operators 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  34 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
3. Even the big directions for the telecoms industry are foggy

Most of the changes facing Telecoms either favour consolidation or 
new­comers, so it is likely the major customers for meetings and 
congresses will change dramatically 

Paradigm Shift  Change In  Change In  Who Wins 


Market  Performance 
‘ation Crisis  Minor  Minor  Consolidation 
Mobile Growth  Major  Major  New Comers 
Customer­Driven  Minor  Major  Uncertain 
Data/IP Growth  Major  Major  New Comers 
Electronic Commerce  Minor  Major  Consolidation 
Asia Markets Key  Moderate  Minor  Consolidation 
Distance Eliminated  Minor  Major  New Comers 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  35 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
3. Even the big directions for the telecoms industry are foggy 
Any one of four extremely different futures is believable so could 
happen; each would have a different impact on meetings and 
congresses! 
Click To Chat, Information Society
Anytime, Anywhere Supply: Knowledge‐based working
Few, global players
n Telecom seen as flat‐rate monopoly n IT, Telecom, content „High priest“ More of „sexy 
Function­specific  utility bundled with water & power ‐ practitioners highly esteemed
(e.g. „Association  essential but not valued; mainly voice n „Unlimited bandwidth, everywhere“ technology“ Mega­ 
of Wearable Phone  n Large communities reject IT/telecom real‐estate has premium price Congresses 

custom, intense product / service


with fear of „big brother“/privacy & n Logical rather than geographic
Marketeers“)  technology „communities“ and „nationalities“;
n Supply exceeds demand; like airlines, virtual corporations
simple, generic, free

„high tech“/sexy industry still attracts n Eight global operators who have earned
newcomers, but none are profitable their monopoly: Microsoft, Sony,
n Slower innovation cycles, longer life of Citibank, Shell, China Telecom,
Demand:

Demand:
infrastructure and services Carrefour, Hutch

n WLAN embedded in devices (toasters, n Everyone can create their own network
camera) & services (Banking) and service mix to match their needs
and can dynamically change it;
n Peer‐to‐peer meshed networks bring Telecom/IT architecture taught as
universal broadband; Telecom is creative arts not engineering
ubiquitous;
n Telecom embedded or bundled into
No Telecom­Sector  n „Operators“ only link communities’ customized applications giving Massively multiple 
wireless access points; Verisign,
meetings but  Macrovision manage content rights and
specialized benefits with very high value small very 
specific to niches
telecom­streams in  royalties; everyone can author
n Thousands of suppliers of specialized
specialieds 
all meetings n “Click to move” if plan extensive devices, installers for specific „Artisan“ meetings 
mobiliity during a call applications

Supply: My Own
Meshed Many, everyone can do it Network 
Community
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  36 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
3. Even the big directions for the telecoms industry are foggy

Summary: Possible impact of fogginess in the Telecom sector on the 
Conference and Congress industry 
15.  There is money in journalists and conference organisers who are 
early trend spotters/setters, whether right, or more often wrong 

16.  Telecom decision makers have a herd instinct – are they migrating 
to new pastures or “5 million Lemmings can’t be wrong”! 
17.  More short­term changes in size and nature of congresses 
18.  More short­term cancellations, fewer long­term contracts 
19.  New conferences move in a few years from obscure to fashionable 
to obsolete 
20.  Diversify away from dependence on mega­telecom conferences, 
have back­up plans and contingencies 
21.  Get paid in advance! 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  37 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
4. The financial industry has a strong, growing influence

Possible impact of financial industry influence in the Telecom sector 
on the Conference and Congress industry 
22.  Stricter criteria on who and how many can attend meetings, what 
value is expected from attendance, where is acceptable 

23.  Higher price­sensitivity 
24.  Shift of themes from exciting technology to market needs, 
optimised operations, business cases, innovative business 
models, future­proof strategies 
25.  Opportunity to stimulate “professionalisation” of Telecoms, hence 
stimulating many new congresses 
26.  Telecom again becomes a key topic in financial and investor 
congresses 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  38 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
4. The financial industry has a strong, growing influence

The financial industry is seizing control either through Private Equity 
M&A of telcos or through pressure on incumbent management
n  Private Equity does not see telecom management maximising 
enterprise value by balanced their attention and the companies 
resources on all the parameters that make up that value
n  Measured on the 7 capabilities/functions key to be successful, 
operators are mediocre compared with leaders in other industries
n  2005 saw $ 200 Billion of M&A activity in Europe telecoms, 20% of 
all M&A.
n  This is only scratching the surface of the potential as most 
incumbent telcos world­wide share the characteristics that make 
them so interesting for PE 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  39 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
4. The financial industry has a strong, growing influence

Private Equity does not see telecom management maximising 
enterprise value by balanced their attention and the companies 
resources on all the parameters that make up that value: (Illustrative) 
Parameter Driving Value  Management  Financial Analyst 
Attention  Attention 
Discount  Interest rate  Moderate  Low 
Rate 
Financial analyst confidence in industry  Moderate  High 
Track record  Low  High 
Revenue uncertainty  Low  High 
Cost uncertainty  Low  Moderate 
Technology uncertainty  High  High 
Competitive intensity uncertainty  Moderate  High 
Revenue  No. of customer groups  Low  Moderate 
Pop. of customer group  High  High 
Market share  High  Moderate 
Lifetime of customer  Low  Moderate 
Portfolio of product/services  High  Moderate 
Value of product/service to customer  Low  Moderate 
Unit price  High  High 
Intensity of use  Low  Moderate 
Cost  Capex  Moderate  High 
Opex  High  High 
Accounting Rules  High  High 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  40 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
4. The financial industry has a strong, growing influence
Measured on the 7 capabilities/functions key to be successful, 
operators are mediocre compared with leaders in other industries 
such as P&G, Sony, Nokia etc, (scores out of 5) 
Capabilities / Functions  Operator 1  Operator 2  Operator 3  Best In Class 

1) Understanding customers and their needs  2  3  2  P&G 
2) Developing products/services to meet customer needs  2  2  3  Sony 

2a) Bring value to customers, value>price, price doesn’t matter  2  2  2  Sony 

2b) Customer perceives get the best offer (product, tariff, care”)  3  3  3  Avis 

2c) Select and develop sales channels  3  3  3  P&G 
3) Acquire and retain the high NPV customers  2  3  2  Dior 
3a) Build desirable brand  3  4  2  Coke 
3b) Create Image and communicate to customers  2  3  2  Beneton 
3c) Create emotional relationship to customer  1  2  2  Nike 
4) Serve customer through operational excellence  2  3  2  FedEx 
4a) Address all customers  3  3  2  Coca Cola 

4b) Develop/maintain best in class staff  2  3  2  IBM 
4c) Network quality/coverage  3  3  3  McD 
4d) Provisioning/billing  3  3  3  Dell 
4e) Cost efficient  2  2  2  Dell 
5) Ease of use of services  1­2  1­2  1­2  Post­its 
6) Partnerships – get and mange partners  2  2  2  Visa 
7) Financial predictability – Having clear business model(s)  2  2  1  J&J 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  41 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
4. The financial industry has a strong, growing influence

Executives should balance their attention across all the elements that 
make up shareholder value (in telecoms as in any business)
n  Look to match best­in­class benchmarks productivity across all 
parts of the Telco
n  Pay more attention to discount rate and customer lifetime to 
balance the recent emphasis on cost and revenue elements that 
create shareholder value

n  Reverse overemphasis of management attention
à  Less on customer acquisiton, more on retention and usage
à  Less on next generation, more on today‘s services (e.g. Voice)
à  Less on „content“, more on „contact“
à  Don‘t believe that media­hype correlates with real potential 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  42 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
4. The financial industry has a strong, growing influence

As high margins come under pressure, the Telecom industry must 
move to optimising each function, and customer­specific which will 
lead to professional standards, training and so new professional 
associations & specialised Chapters: analogous to Cardiography, 
Radiography; Cardiologists; Paediatrics; Pharmacy; examples:
n  Financial and controlling diagnostics
àRevenue leakage forensics – revenue operators cannot collect
n  Understanding customer needs
àField­sales force application analysts
n  Advising the customers on the best solution for them
àTele­coaching customers to upsell mobile + fixed + media + Internet
n  Dispencing best solutions for the customer‘s needs
àVenders of custom handsets 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  43 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
4. The financial industry has a strong, growing influence

Telecoms is 20% of mergers & acquisitions (M&A), a big driver of 
corporate events, to re­educate staff and realign partners/channels. 
By increasing order of cash available for telecom M&A:
n  Telcos: “Two dinosaurs do not produce a mammal” but still telcos 
buy other telcos: In 2005/6 SBC bought AT&T $ 16 B; Telefonica 
O2 for GBP 18.5 B and $3.6 Billion for 51% of Cesky; FT paid € 10.6 
B for Amena.
n  Private Equity: six PE funds clubbed to buy TDC for $12 B. The top 
20 PE firms have $300 B to invest.
n  Middle­East: Orascom bought WIND $ 12 B; MTC bought Telecel 
$3.4 B; Etisalat (Dubai) paid $ 2.9 B for the 3rd Egypt mobile 
license and has $4 B “to be ready for the 3rd mobile license in 
Saudi Arabia”; MTN paid $5.5B for Investcom.
n  China: Profits far exceeding domestic expansion needs means 
China Telecom ($ 4 B) and China Mobile ($ 6 B) in the last year. 
The temptation is to use this to expand globally or risk having their 
government owners extract the cash  44 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
4. The financial industry has a strong, growing influence

This is only scratching the surface of the potential as most incumbent 
telcos world­wide share the characteristics that make them so 
interesting for PE:
n  Massive fixed­assets that can be monetised (e.g. sell and lease­ 
back of buildings)
n  High and stabile cash flow, with good credit ratings to raise debt
n  High potential for productivity improvements
n  Out of favour with investment analysts: historically low stock­ 
ratings and so cheap(er) to buy
n  Many lines of business that can be split and sold separately if 
possible
n  Lots of potential buyers 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  45 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
4. The financial industry has a strong, growing influence

Summary: Possible impact of financial industry influence in the 
Telecom sector on the Conference and Congress industry 
22.  Stricter criteria on who and how many can attend meetings, what 
value is expected from attendance, where is acceptable 

23.  Higher price­sensitivity 
24.  Shift of themes from exciting technology to market needs, 
optimised operations, business cases, innovative business 
models, future­proof strategies 
25.  Opportunity to stimulate “professionalisation” of Telecoms, hence 
stimulating many new congresses 
26.  Telecom again becomes a key topic in financial and investor 
congresses 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  46 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
5. Power is shifting from operators to equipment, device and service vendors

Possible impact of this power shift to vendors in the Telecom sector 
on the Conference and Congress industry 
27.  More mega­events sponsored by specific mega­vendors and 
vendor rather than operator associations 

28.  More vendor sponsorship in events and more “trade­show” 
flavour 
29.  Telecom seen as an enabler rather than the main theme of events 
over a wider range of events featuring specific equipment, device 
and service themes 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  47 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
5. Power is shifting from operators to equipment, device and service vendors 

Dominant for decades, operators are now showing signs of weakness
n  The telcom operator sector is very fragmented, with the largest 31 
operators making up 30% of the total $US 5,000 Billion stock 
market valuation, and the largest having just 2.5%

n  The vendor sector is highly concentrated, with on­going 
consolidation and rising Chinese vendors (HuaWei & ZTE not 
quoted)
n  Telecom operators are valued for their profitability, but Internet e­ 
commerce on much higher rated for growth and expectations of 
future profitability
n  Vendors are beginning to demonstrate their power relative to 
incumbent operators
n  New businesses enabled by telecoms emerge suddenly 
However, operators have show in the past they can use their size and 
cash reserves to buy themselves out of trouble
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  48 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
5. Power is shifting from operators to equipment, device and service vendors

The telcom operator sector is very fragmented, with the largest 31 
operators making up 30% of the total $US 5,000 Billion stock market 
valuation, and the largest having just 2.5% 
Rank  Telecom Operator  $US Billion % of total  Rank  Telecom Operator  $US Billion % of total 
1  Vodafone  126  2.53%  18  SingTel  27  0.54% 
2  ATT  105  2.11%  19  Etisalat  25  0.50% 
3  China Mobile  104  2.09%  20  Alltel  25  0.50% 
4  Verizon  100  2.01%  21  KPN  24  0.48% 
5  Saudi Telecom  87  1.75%  22  KDDI (Japan)  24  0.48% 
6  Telefonica  77  1.55%  23  BCE (Canada)  22  0.44% 
7  NTT  76  1.53%  24  Amtel (Mexico)  20  0.40% 
8  Sprint  74  1.49%  25  Swisscom  20  0.40% 
9  Deutsche Telekom  72  1.45%  26  Telenor  18  0.36% 
10  NTT DoCoMo  69  1.39%  27  Chunghwa (Taiwan)  18  0.36% 
11  BellSouth  62  1.25%  28  Bharti (India)  18  0.36% 
12  France Telecom  58  1.17%  29  MTN (S. Africa)  17  0.34% 
13  Telecom Italia  55  1.11%  30  Etihad Etisalat (Saudi Arabia)  16  0.32% 
14  America Movile (Mexico)  43  0.86%  31  SK Telecom  16  0.32% 
15  Telstra  34  0.68% 
16  BT  32  0.64%  Others  3481  70.00% 
17  TeliaSonera  28  0.56% 
Total  4973 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  49 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
5. Power is shifting from operators to equipment, device and service vendors

The vendor sector is highly concentrated, with on­going 
consolidation and rising Chinese vendors (HuaWei & ZTE not quoted) 
Rank  ITC Vendor  $US Billion  % of total  $US Billion  Rank  ITC Vendor  $US Billion  % of total  $US Billion 
Market Cap  Sales  Market Cap  Sales 
1 Microsoft  281  8.57%  39.8  18 Comcast  57  1.74%  22.3 
2 Cisco  133  4.06%  24.8  19 e‐Bay  55  1.67%  4.6 
3 IBM  129  3.94%  91.1  20 News Corp  54  1.65%  23.9 
4 Intel  115  3.49%  38.8  21 Walt Disney  54  1.64%  31.9 
5 Samsung  107  3.27%  58.4  22 Apple Computer  53  1.62%  13.9 
6 HP  93  2.84%  86.7  23 Texas Instruments  52  1.59%  13.4 
7 Nokia  92  2.79%  41.5  24 Taiwan Semiconductor  49  1.49%  8.2 
8 Qualcom  84  2.55%  5.7  25 Sony  46  1.41%  55.9 
9 Siemens  83  2.53%  91.5  26 Yahoo!  46  1.39%  5.3 
10 Google  81  2.46%  6.1  27 Corning  42  1.27%  4.6 
11 Time Warner  74  2.26%  43.6  28 Vivendi Universal  40  1.21%  23.6 
12 Oracle  71  2.16%  11.8  29 EMC  32  0.99%  9.7 
13 Dell  69  2.09%  55.9  30 Softbank  31  0.94%  7.1 
14 SAP  69  2.09%  10.3  31 Viacom  28  0.87%  9.6 
15 Ericsson  61  1.87%  19.6 
16 Canon  59  1.79%  32.0  Others  984  30.00%  398 
17 Motorola  57  1.75%  36.8 
Total  3280  1326 
Source: http://www.ft.com/reports/ft5002006/ 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  50 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
5. Power is shifting from operators to equipment, device and service vendors

Vendors are beginning to demonstrate their power relative to 
incumbent operators
n  Leading device vendors have global and stronger brand 
recognition, so higher loyalty, than operators (e.g. Sony, Nokia, 
Samsung, Apple etc.)
n  If embedding telecoms inside devices leads to peer­to­peer 
meshed networks, this by­passes the telco networks
n  Google, e­Bay, Skype, Fon, MySpace enabled by telecoms have 
innovated and grown much faster than telco operators
n  Virtual network operators have demonstrated they are much better 
at capturing customer bases than traditional retail arms of 
operators (e.g. UK‘s Virgin Mobile rated higher than host T­Mobile)
n  Operators are saddled with debt, are under increasing competitive 
pressure and are distracted by internal productivity and 
organisation problems 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  51 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
5. Power is shifting from operators to equipment, device and service vendors

New businesses enabled by telecoms emerge suddenly
n  Yahoo! 970M streaming video sessions (mainly music) in 3 months
n  Korea – TV channels charge $1 to download programmes
n  Google launched upload.video.google
n  Camera phones 264M sold in 2004
n  Digital music 480M iTunes (mid July 2005) (7% of all music sold)
n  PayPal 72M accounts, 22M active, 110M payments value $6B (3­8% of 
iTunes)
n  Online paid content ­ $1.8B US revenue in 2004 per OPA
n  7% of 120M Internet users in USA write blogs
n  25% of searches are local and 10% or these are commercial
n  Microsoft reached 1M paid subscribers to XBox live in 1st year; MM 
player games 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  52 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
5. Power is shifting from operators to equipment, device and service vendors

Summary: Possible impact of this power shift to vendors in the 
Telecom sector on the Conference and Congress industry 
27.  More mega­events sponsored by specific mega­vendors and 
vendor rather than operator associations 

28.  More vendor sponsorship in events and more “trade­show” 
flavour 
29.  Telecom seen as an enabler rather than the main theme of events 
over a wider range of events featuring specific equipment, device 
and service themes 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  53 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
6. Other industry sectors are shifting by embedding telecoms

Possible impact of embedding Telecoms in other sectors on the 
Conference and Congress industry 
30.  Telecoms becomes a theme track in a broader range of 
congresses 

31.  State­of­the­art telecom facilities become an important selection 
criteria for a wider range of all congresses 
32.  Providing telecom services becomes an important revenue stream 
for congress locations (€5 – 20 per delegate per day in mobile 
phone revenue) 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  54 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
6. Other industry sectors are shifting by embedding telecoms

As the biggest part of the GDP, telecom growth may only come if it 
finds ways of getting paid for enabling other big parts of the GDP
n  Recent successes show there is room for innovative business 
models and growth, although maybe under terms different from 
the old monopoly­oriented ones e.g. value added segment focused 
MVNOs; Skype; Google; etc.
n  The range of indirect opportunities is likely to be larger than the 
direct telecom markets.
n  Telecoms brings characteristics that change the rules of many big 
industries, particularly those based on information
n  These trends force Telecom to enable specialisation to better suit 
fragmented segments which become increasingly different
n  Many of the applications of next generation telecom services 
require skill sets that NetCo­style operators are not well suited for 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  55 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
6. Other industry sectors are shifting by embedding telecoms
The range of indirect opportunities is likely to be larger than the 
direct telecom markets.
n Just like the internal combustion engine and trains.... cars: 
suburbs, paved roads, vacations, wider range of potential social 
partners, freedom to live away from work location
àRailways created real­estate value (then went bust)!

n .... telecom has potential to change societal structure
àFlexibility to mix work, play location and time
àActivation of on­demand ad hoc part­time work force; intelligent car­ 
pooling; selling down­time
àTime­shifting a rainy vacation day
àInstant intelligent dating/matching to partners
àStock­less product showrooms 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  56 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
6. Other industry sectors are shifting by embedding telecoms
Telecoms brings characteristics that change the rules of many big 
industries, particularly those based on information
n  Logical communities with shared interests or common values replace 
physical communities
à  Peer­to­peer financing and insurance
à  Education – Open University
à  Meetings (and congresses!)
à  Ethnicity; nationality; Government
n  Telecoms decentralisation of activities that have been centralised for 
physical­proximity reasons
à  Dating and friendship – MySpace
à  Retailing – e­commerce replaces physical stores;
à  Peer­to­peer commerce – e­Bay; My­Hammer;
à  Resource sharing – ad hoc car­pooling; transportation/delivery
à  Entertainment and media e.g. No need for record companies; 
everyone authors; YouTube;
n  Enables activities less dependent on time and place
à  Mix of work/play/relationship roles; virtual jobs; more roles;
à  Fragmented/multiple­roles teacher/pupil 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  57 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
6. Other industry sectors are shifting by embedding telecoms
So there is likely to be more Congress capacity required for streams 
discussing telecoms as part of other sectors’ meetings than there will 
be additional “application” streams in telecom meetings
n  Sectors most impacted first by telecoms
àBanking, financial
àRetail and wholesale; trading; commerce
àMedia and entertainment; social networking
àEducation
àCongresses and meetings
n  Such streams will require Congress Centers to offer the state­of­ 
the­art telecom facilities currently needed by ICT congresses 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  58 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
6. Other industry sectors are shifting by embedding telecoms

Many of the applications of next generation telecom services require 
skill sets that NetCo­style operators are not well suited for
n  Gaining and serving corporate customers
n  Customer care and management
n  Marketing (WAP was the industry’s first attempt, and failed)
n  Content collection, packaging

n  Payment (including micro­payment) with low fraud rates
n  Partnerships rather than vendor/supplier transactions
n  Venture­capital risk­taking, assessment, tracking and management
n  Logistics (e.g. delivering physical goods) 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  59 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
6. Other industry sectors are shifting by embedding telecoms

Like Sabre had to be arms­length to enable the development of the 
richness of the travel and hospitality industry, will the Telecom 
Enabler (enableco) be a necessary addition to facilitate the richness 
of businesses to develop that can serve specific needs of end­users? 

Telco B/C end‐users

Enabled New USD 500bn


Enableco
businesses 
Netco

Serveco Old USD 1,000bn

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  60 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
6. Other industry sectors are shifting by embedding telecoms

Best is enabling with telecoms the existing relationship of a provider 
with the customer that promotes loyalty, increased use of existing 
services and introduces them to new services
n  understands the customer’s needs and the value to them of 
satisfying that need (e.g. a football fans need to feel important to 
his peers by showing off his team’s goal)
n  develop an application that meets that need, together with any 
partners necessary to deliver parts of the service, e.g. so that the 
customer can share a digital video clip with a peer without piracy
n  develop a proposition emphasizing the application, the benefit 
and the value to the customer
n  launch this with representative early adopters to fine tune the 
proposition and to evolve it to be easy to use for less committed 
majority in this segment
n  develop branding and promotion, distribution and customer care 
for the proposition 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  61 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
6. Other industry sectors are shifting by embedding telecoms
With over 1M students worldwide, the UK Open University shows IT 
and telecom for distance learning, make virtual class­rooms effective 
(lessons for Congresses?)
n  IT, telecom and media technologies expand the richness of 
content available to students, and extend the reach of distance 
learning to open bigger and even more diverse markets
n  They enable many "traditional" higher education institutions to 
provide distance learning and so compete with you globally
n  They enable customisation and personalisation, which match 
changing student needs: shorter career phases, broader 
spectrum of interests, fragmentation of students’ time/attention, 
demand for shorter course duration, how often courses need to 
be updated, needs for continuing education and update
n  Interactive learning changes and blurs the relationship between 
faculty, educator and student with any individual becoming 
comfortable playing different roles in several/many virtual 
corporations, institutions, communities, and networks 
The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  62 
Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
6. Other industry sectors are shifting by embedding telecoms

Interactive learning changes and blurs the relationship between 
faculty, educator and student
n  Telecommuting opens opportunities for an individual to play 
different jobs/roles in several/many virtual corporations, 
institutions, communities, and networks.
n  This has major impact on the need for incorporating ethics, 
standardizing presentation skills, basic skills in running your own 
business etc. into any educational programme for professionals
n  The individual can be a student one part of their life and a teacher 
in another.
n  In these circumstances the learning institutions can play key roles 
in codifying, qualifying and certifying content and teacher, and 
authenticating and certifying student performance. 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  63 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
6. Other industry sectors are shifting by embedding telecoms

Example: Media companies have all the factors to control content, so 
partner with them, not compete:
n  access to existing content producers, and an efficient scouting 
mechanism to identify and capture new sources of content
n  established distribution channels and are used to building and 
exploiting new channels as they arrive
n  IPR (intellectual property rights) mechanisms and contract 
mechanisms for artists and content produces
n  track record in adding to their rich portfolio of technical platforms 
as each new media has emerged
n  vast libraries of archived content
n  comfort with targeting multiple market niches 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  64 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
6. Other industry sectors are shifting by embedding telecoms

Example: rather than Telcos going for “Quadruple­Play”, media 
companies know where the new media(s) can be applied effectively
n  Media companies know the strengths and weaknesses of existing 
media
n  Advertising is the customer of TV, Radio and print media, and 
existing players know how to cluster “eye­balls” of particular 
target groups to a particular sponsor’s ad
n  Existing media players are best positioned to discover how the 
new media can be more effective at manipulating eyeballs
n  Existing media players have long­standing relationships with 
advertisers
n  They are also well placed to capture any new revenue streams that 
might be generated by user’s buying content 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  65 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
6. Other industry sectors are shifting by embedding telecoms

Summary: Possible impact of embedding Telecoms in other sectors 
on the Conference and Congress industry 
30.  Telecoms becomes a theme track in a broader range of 
congresses 

31.  State­of­the­art telecom facilities become an important selection 
criteria for a wider range of all congresses 
32.  Providing telecom services becomes an important revenue stream 
for congress locations (€5 – 20 per delegate per day in mobile 
phone revenue) 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  66 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
Summary

At least six shifts in the Telecom sector might influence the size, 
frequency, location and themes of meetings and conferences 
1.  The shift of buying power, manufacturing capacity and innovation 
to Asia is accelerating 

2.  Technology change is at least as fast and broad as in IT 
3.  Even the big directions for the telecoms industry are foggy 
4.  The financial industry has a strong, growing influence 
5.  Power is shifting from operators to equipment, device and service 
vendors 
6.  Other industry sectors are shifting by embedding telecoms 

The Global Telecoms Industry, ICCA Rhodes. 30 th  October, 2006  67 


Malcolm Ross, Merlin Consulting, Valletta, Malta eMail: malcolm.ross@gmail.com Web: www.consultmerlin.com 
International Congress & Convention Association

Thank you! 
45 th  ICCA Congress & Exhibition 
Monday 30 October 2006 

www.iccaworld.com