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Life Skills

Activity Book

2007
P E A C E C O R P S G E O R G I A
Contents:
Ice Breakers...................................................................7

Communication ............................................................ 15

Character Building and Responsible Behavior........................ 29

Self-Awareness and Self-Esteem........................................ 43

Teamwork and Leadership................................................ 57

Emotional Health........................................................... 67

Decision Making ............................................................ 77

Peer Pressure............................................................... 87

Saying No..................................................................... 95

Peer Mediation and Conflict Management .......................... 101

General Health, First Aid and Safety................................. 109

General Hygiene.......................................................... 119

Dental Health.............................................................. 127

Nutrition and Consumer Health....................................... 135

Fitness...................................................................... 157

Gender Issues............................................................. 163

Smoking and Substance Abuse......................................... 169

Sexual Education ........................................................ 183

HIV/AIDS.................................................................... 189


Peace Corps Georgia
March, 2007

Layout and design by Tengiz Gogotishvili



About the Activity Book
This activity book was designed for Peace Corp Volunteers and their counterparts in Georgia. Most of these
activities were taken from other sources and tailored to fit a Georgian classroom/camp setting. The book was
created in order to encourage Georgia-appropriate Lifeskills clubs and/or lessons. These are not lesson plans or
a curriculum for clubs/lessons. Some of these activities may need to be further changed to fit your club/lesson.
Information is provided in order to insure the activities are culturally sensitive and age-appropriate, but not all
activities may be appropriate for your group. Make sure you talk to your counterpart and other members of the
community before using these activities. You also may need to look up additional information to supplement your
activity. If you have any questions, please contact your program managers or the Lifeskills staff.

Thanks to the Editors


Edited by: Emily Dumovich

The following volunteers/staff contributed to the editing process of this book:

Eka Zhvania Michael Cecire Shane Humphrey


Chris Jones Carole Kindling Rebecca Madden-Sturges
Travis Mecum Elise Pizzi Cathrine Scott
Aaron Yarbrough Erica Zaiser

Special Thanks
A very special thanks to other Peace Corps countries who contributed their lesson plans!

Peace Corps Moldova Peace Corps Ukraine Peace Corps Armenia

A Note from Life Skills Staff


Life Skills/HIV/AIDS Awareness is one of the priorities in terms of initiatives introduced by Peace Corps posts.
Even though the importance of the Life Skills/HIV/AIDS education was fully acknowledged Peace Corps Georgia,
the initial progress due to its implementation was very slow. The first effort to promote the idea of Life Skills
Education at the Secondary School level was made in year 2005 at the meeting with the Ministry of Education
representatives. That was the crucial time for the Ministry itself, since it undertook the first step to try out the
supplementary textbook on Healthy Life Style/Sexual Education on secondary school level. As a result, the initia-
tive encountered significance resistance from parents associations and the church. Therefore, the Ministry rec-
ommended PC staff just to wait for the development of the National Curriculum on Life Skills, being underway.
The second meeting with the Ministry was conducted a year later to follow-up on progress achieved in terms of
Curriculum development and find the niche for volunteers to address the initiative on regional levels. The scope
and focus of Life Skills/HIV/AIDS Education were broadly discussed at the meeting. The Ministry suggested volun-
teers to start Life Skills Education as extra-curricular activities and expressed their interest to share information
about successful practices/materials applied or any update about its progress on regional level.
In February, 2006 the first one-day Life-Skills Training Workshop was implemented by Program and Training Unit
Staff for all interested volunteers. It was the first step Peace Corps formally undertook in terms of Life Skills/
HIV/AIDS education considering the sensitive nature of this subject in Georgia. The Healthy Lifestyle Committee
was established by the end of the training. It was a lengthy discussion about cultural implications, comprehen-
siveness and feasibility of the mission statement and goals framework. It was agreed that mission statement did
not have to focus on just HIV/AIDS though there is possibility it could directly be addressed in the statement
in future. The mission statement states: “The Healthy Life Style Committee will promote education initiatives
to assist Peace Corps volunteers and Georgians alike in healthy living. The committee shall provide support and
resources for volunteers, staff, organizations, and Georgians involved in healthy lifestyle education.” The main
goal for the first year was to develop the Committee vision and materials for the volunteers’ application in their
corresponding sites.
The activity Book developed by Georgia 5 Volunteer Emily Dumovich (Georgia 5) with the assistance of Healthy
Life Style Committee members is for volunteers and their counterparts to work with different age groups of audi-
ence. The activities are screened in terms of cultural and traditional sensitivity to be appropriately perceived
by the local communities.
The Special Thanks to all the volunteers who have been involved
in creation of the first Life Skills Activity Book for Peace Corps Georgia.



Ice
Breakers



Birthday Line-up 6) Tell students to find someone they don’t know
and exchange papers (do not let them share
Topic: Ice Breaker, Teamwork names until later).
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 7) Have students come to you. Run the iron over the
from this activity?): Learning alternative forms of paper (it is not suggested that you let children
communicating, team work, and leadership. use the iron) to show the secret message!
Number of Students: 10-17 8) Now the students know who their partner is!
Age Range of Students: 8-30 9) You can use many different variations of this… be
Time Required: 15-30 minutes creative!
Materials: Patience and creativity!
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):  Have partners introduce each other to the rest
of the class
1) Tell the students that they are not allowed to
speak during the entire activity.
2) Tell students they must line themselves up in or- Pulse
der of their birthday and month.
3) This is NOT by age, just by month. Topic: Icebreaker, Teamwork
4) They can mime, use actions and gestures to fig- Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
ure it out, but they can not talk or write. from this activity?): To make students comfortable in
5) You may have to give some assistance but make a class and to build teamwork.
sure you are letting them do most of the work. Number of Students: 5 and more
6) The first person in the line should be the closest Age Range of Students: 10-17
to January 1st and the last one closest to Decem- Time Required: 5-10 minutes
ber 31st. Materials: None
7) When everyone is finished have the students call
out their birthdays.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
8) Ask the students if they were all in the right
place. 1) Have the group stand in a circle holding hands.
9) If they were not, have them fix the mistake. 2) Tell the group to shut their eyes.
3) Start a “pulse” by squeezing a person’s hand.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: That person then squeezes the next person’s hand
and so on. See how long it can travel around the
 What it was like not to be able to communicate circle before it is lost.
with words? 4) To make this activity more challenging, have the
 What were the challenges? Successes? Strate- students squeeze twice to change direction of
gies? the pulse.
 What methods of communication did you use to
overcome your challenges?
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 How did you use teamwork to complete the task?
 How did you feel during this activity?
 What were the challenges?
Invisible Ink
 What did you like/dislike?
Topic: Ice Breaker, Fun  How many people would it take to stop the pulse
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain from from getting around the circle?
this activity?): To bring fun to the class and get students  What does this teach us about teamwork?
comfortable and knowing each other.
Number of Students: 8-17 Group Music
Age Range of Students: 5-30
Time Required: 30 minutes Topic: Icebreaker, Teamwork
Materials: Paper, Toothpick, Small glass, Milk or Lem- Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
on Juice, Iron from this activity?): To make students more comfort-
able and build teamwork.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Number of Students: 5- 20
Age Range of Students: 8-17
1) Pour milk or lemon juice into several small glasses. Time Required: 5-10 minutes
2) Have students dip the toothpick into the milk/lem- Materials: None
on juice and write personal information on a piece
of paper (clean white paper works the best).
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
3) Personal information should include: name, age,
grade, favorite pet/food etc. 1) Have the group stand in a circle.
4) Give the students at least 10 minutes to finish this. 2) Ask for a volunteer.
5) Wait for it to dry.


3) Tell the volunteer to start with a single sound, Age Range of Students: All ages
(hopefully with rhythm) and tell them to contin- Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes
ue that sound the whole time. Materials: None
4) Tell the next person in the circle to make a differ-
ent sound they think will go with the first.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
5) Continue this around the circle until everyone is
making sounds. 1) Have the group get into a circle.
6) Hopefully you will create some interesting music! 2) Start off a rhythmic clap by clapping your hands,
7) They can hum and sing notes, but encourage slapping your thighs, snapping your fingers, etc in
them to do other things than sing words. time to an introductory statement. For example:
“My name” – clap clap – “is Nino” – clap clap – “I
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: live” – clap clap – “in Kobuleti” –clap clap.
3) Go around the circle in this way until all partici-
 What were the challenges of this activity? pants have introduced themselves to the rhythm.
 Why was it important to work together?
 What happens if someone is not working with the team? Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 How does this relate to teamwork in real life?
 Ask the students to repeat other students’ names
to see if they learned the names
Familiarity with Numbers
Topic: Icebreaker, Character Building Everybody With…
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To familiarize students with Topic: Icebreaker
numbers, to provide an opportunity for social inter- Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
action and the development of basic social and life from this activity?): To get people comfortable and
skills. to have fun!
Number of Students: 10-30 Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: 6-15 Age Range of Students: All ages
Time Required: 10-15 minutes Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes
Materials: None Materials: Chairs (enough for every person)

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Match up students in pairs. 1) From a circle of chairs, one less than the number
2) Have each pair face each other, hands towards of participants.
opponent, fists closed. 2) Appoint a volunteer who stands in the center of
3) Leader/teacher says “1,2,3 SHOW”. the circle of the chairs.
4) On “SHOW” each person extends any number of 3) That person calls out “Everybody with ….” And
fingers. then adds their own idea. For example: “Every-
5) The first person to add the total number of fin- body with black shoes” or “Everybody who ate
gers wins a point. bread this morning”.
6) You can vary this activity by using subtraction or 4) Everyone who fits the description stands up and
multiplication. switches chairs as quickly as possible.
7) The leader may also say “1,2,3 Add” or “1,2,3 5) They cannot stand up and sit back down in the
Multiply” to let kids know which one they need to same chair and they cannot sit in the chair next
do (this makes it more challenging). to them.
8) You can also have the pairs count for them- 6) They should stand and run to a chair across the
selves. room. The volunteer tries to sit too.
9) Variation: Have the class stand in a circle. Say 7) Whoever is left standing goes into the middle of the
“1,2,3 (number)” Anyone who extends that number circle and does the same as the last volunteer.
needs to sit down. Do this until everyone is sitting
down or you have one person left as a winner. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:  Did this activity help everyone become more
comfortable with each other?
 What were the strategies of the winner?  What did you learn about your new friends?

Rhythm Clap Life Boat


Topic: Icebreaker Topic: Icebreaker, Teamwork
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To introduce people in a fun way! from this activity?): To help students work as a team
Number of Students: 5-30 and to have fun!

10
Number of Students: 5-30 Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Age Range of Students: All ages
 Did you learn the names of the students in the
Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes
circle?
Materials: None

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): I’m Going on a Trip


1) Have all participants spread out in the room. Topic: Icebreaker
2) Tell them to imagine they are floating in a great Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
sea, like the Black Sea, after as shipwreck. from this activity?): To get to know the people in the
3) They need to form life boats to survive. group.
4) The facilitator will call out a number (6 for ex- Number of Students: 5-40
ample). Age Range of Students: 8 and up
5) Participants must form strong groups according Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes (depending on group size)
to that number (so if you call six, they must form Materials: None
groups of six) to keep from drowning in the sea.
6) If the group is formed with less or more than the Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
number the facilitator calls, they “sink” and must
stand on the side until the group continues. 1) Ask the participants to stand in a circle.
7) If there is only one or two people left they also 2) Start by saying “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking
“drown”. a hug”.
8) Play this until there is only a few left. 3) Hug the person to your right.
9) Play this twice for those who get out early and 4) He or she then has to say, “I’m going on a trip
want to play again. and I am taking a hug and a pat on the back” or
anything else that person wants to “bring”.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: 5) He or she then has to give the next person a hug
and a pat on the back.
 What were the challenges of this activity? 6) Go on around the circle until everyone has had
 Did you have to work together? Why or why not? a turn, adding what they would like (encourage
 Why was teamwork important for this activity? creative thinking!).
7) Each person must repeat what the last one said
and then add their own to the list.
Shout, Whisper, Sing! 8) If someone has trouble remembering, encourage
others to help him or her.
Topic: Icebreaker, Communication
9) You can do this same exercise with other objects
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
or with names as well (“My name is Nino and I am
from this activity?): To help student’s learn each oth-
going on a trip. I am taking a nut cracker).
er’s names. To practice communicating.
Number of Students: 5-30
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Age Range of Students: All ages
Time Required: 10- 15 minutes  What did you learn about the other people in
Materials: None your group?

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Meat! Meat! Meat!


1) Ask participants to stand in a circle. Topic: Icebreaker
2) Explain that you are going to call out someone’s Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
name as you cross the circle towards that per- from this activity?): To get the class comfortable and
son. have fun!
3) He or she should then move from his or her posi-
Number of Students: 5-30
tion in the circle to the place where you were
standing. Age Range of Students: All ages
4) That person should call out someone else’s name. Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes
That next person should also move, and so on. Materials: None
5) When your name gets called again, continue with
the game, but this time, whisper the name of the Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
person you chose next.
6) Ask everyone to whisper next when it comes their 1) Ask participants to stand in a circle.
turn. 2) Ask for a volunteer.
7) Finally, when your name is called again, say that 3) The volunteer calls out “Meat! Meat! Meat!”
this time they name of the next person must be 4) The group responds “Meat!”
sung out. 5) Again the volunteer says “Meat! Meat! Meat!”
8) Continue until everyone has had a chance. 6) The group again responds “Meat!”

11
7) The volunteer then lists type of meat that can Time Required: 10-15 minutes
and cannot be eaten, such as chicken/pig/cow or Materials: None
dolphin/hawk or dinosaur.
8) If it can be eaten, the group must jump and say
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
“Meat!”
9) If the animal cannot be eaten, they must stay still. 1) Ask participants to sit or stand in a circle.
10) Whoever fails to jump and say “Meat!” on a ani- 2) Choose a volunteer.
mal that can be eaten or jumps when the animal 3) That volunteer walks behind the chairs or peo-
cannot be eaten must move to the center and call ple.
the next round. 4) He or she touches each volunteer while saying
“Banana, banana, banana” as they touch each
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: person.
5) When the volunteer finally says “Coconut!” the
 Were there any disagreements on what you can person who he or she touched must chase the vol-
eat? What about dog? Bear? unteer around the circle.
6) The volunteer tries to get into the empty spot
Fire On the Mountain before being caught.
7) Whoever is left standing outside the circle leads
Topic: Icebreaker the next round.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To get comfortable and have fun! Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Number of Students: 10-50
Age Range of Students: All ages  You can change the words to this game to objects
that relate to your group (healthy, health, sick etc)
Time Required: 10-15 minutes
Materials: None
Water, Land, Sky
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Topic: Icebreaker
1) Ask participants to stand in two circles – a small Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
one inside of a larger one. from this activity?): This is just a fun warm up
2) Every person in the inner circle should have one Number of Students: 5-30
person behind him or her. Age Range of Students: All ages
3) There must be an equal number or participants in Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes
each circle. Materials: Optional: tape or chalk (to draw lines on
4) You stand in the center of the circles. the floor), paper, marker, prize for the winner
5) The outer circle should then start running around
the outside of the inner circle while you say “Fire
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
on the mountain!”
6) They respond by saying “Fire!” 1) Before class make three signs, “Water” “Land”
7) You say “Fire on the mountain!” and “Sky”.
8) They say “Fire!” 2) Draw three long lines down the center of the room.
9) You continue on and on until you say “Put it out!” 3) Mark one with the “Water” sign on the first line.
After you shout “Put it out!” jump in front of one 4) Mark the middle one with the “Land” sign.
of the members of the inner circle. 5) Mark the last line with the “Sky” sign.
10) Each of the participants from the outer circle 6) All participants should stand on the “Water” line.
then also tries to get in front of a member of the 7) The caller cries out “Water, Land,” or “Sky” re-
inner circle. peatedly
11) The person left without a place moves to the cen- 8) The participants must hop from one line to the
ter and starts the game again. other.
9) Any participants who fails to hop, hops to the
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: wrong line, or wavers, is out and must stand out
of the game.
 Did this activity help you become more comfort- 10) The person who is in the game longest wins the game.
able with the group? How?
11) You can also have them do other actions to each
line, like crab walk, crawl or hop on one foot.
Banana-Banana-Coconut 12) Have a student be the caller after you have done
one round.
(Duck, Duck, Goose)
Topic: Icebreaker Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain from
this activity?): To get comfortable and to have fun!  What were the challenges of this activity?
Number of Students: 5-30  What advice would you give to another group who
were going to play this game?
Age Range of Students: All ages

12
Keep On! Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

Topic: Icebreaker  None, this should be the last activity of the day.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To get comfortable and have fun! Fun Bag
Number of Students: 10-30
Age Range of Students: 10 – 17 Topic: Fun
Time Required: 10 - 20 minutes Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Materials: A small item from this activity?): Just for fun!
Number of Students: 5-30
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Age Range of Students: All ages
Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes
1) Ask students to form a circle. Materials: Paper, Scissors, Pen/pencil, Bag/box
2) Choose a volunteer.
3) The volunteer must then go outside the room. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
4) The circle of participants choose small item to
hide from the volunteer. 1) Cut up small papers and write different words,
5) The entire group starts to sing “Keep On! Keep actions or people on the papers (sample words
On! Keep On!” (to the tune of a Auld Lang Syne or are given at the bottom).
some other familiar tune – maybe Jingle Bells?). 2) Fold up the papers and put the names of different
6) The volunteer is asked to come back into the participants on the front of the folded paper.
room and starts to move around. 3) Put all the papers in a bag or box.
7) If he or she is very far from the hidden item, the 4) Whenever the group gets bored or needs a break,
singing gets louder. someone can shout “Fun Bag!” and draw a paper
8) If he or she is very close to the hidden item, the sing- out of the bag/box.
ing gets quieter (you can do the opposite as well). 5) The paper should be handed to the person whose
9) Continue signing until the volunteer finds the object. name appears on the front.
6) That person will stand in front of the room and
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: act out what is written on the paper without
speaking.
 Was it difficult to be the volunteer? Why or why not? 7) The other participants should guess what the per-
 How did the group work together to help the vol- son is trying to be.
unteer? 8) You can choose great Fun Bag words, actions and
so on to match what you are teaching that day or
that week.
Hand in Hand 9) Remember to add relevant local ideas or dances
to the fun bag!
Topic: Closing Exercise
Sample Words:
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain from
 Drunk man
this activity?): To bring closure to a session or day.
 Bus driver
Number of Students: 5-30  School director
Age Range of Students: All ages  Pregnant woman
Time Required: 5 – 10 minutes  Smoking person
Materials: None  Priest
 Tangerine farmer
 Kissing
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 Proposing to a girl
1) Everyone stands in a tight circle.
2) Ask the first person to your left to put his or her Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
right outstretched arm into the middle of the
circle and say something he or she has found dif-  None
ficult about the session.
3) Then have the students add something he or she Name Your Personality
has found good about the session.
4) Ask the students to use these phrases: “I didn’t Topic: Icebreaker
like it when…” and “I did like it when…” Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain from
5) After each student has finished, the person to his this activity?): To add more to normal introductions.
or her left will do the same, placing his or her Number of Students: 5-30
hand on top of the hand already in the middle.
Age Range of Students: All ages
6) Continue around the circle until all the partici-
Time Required: 10-15 minutes
pants have their right hand placed in a tower on
top of one another. Materials: None
7) Finish by saying that this tower of hands can rep-
resent the strength together as a group.

13
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 4) Then have everyone go around the groom and
give their names and titles.
1) Have everyone sit in a circle. 5) After everyone has introduced themselves, talk a
2) Tell each participant to say their name and a bit about the importance of feeling comfortable
characteristic that starts with the same letter as to speak freely, with no reservations, in a class
the first letter in their name (for example, “My such as this one.
name is Giorgi and I am great!”). 6) Explain that often participants feel uncomfort-
3) The next person should then say the names of the able truly expressing their opinions because their
two people before him/her and their characteris- boss might be in the room, or because some par-
tics. ticipants might feel others are more educated or
4) Every person must say the name/characteristic of more popular than they are (this will have to be
all the people before them. changed depending on age of audience).
5) The last person has to remember everyone’s 7) Stress that it is crucial to the success of the pro-
names and characteristics! gram for everyone to let go of their confining
titles and positions in society.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: 8) They must approach the ideas and discussion as
the whole, entire human beings they are rather
 Did you learn anything new about the people in than from just one angle given to us by our titles
your group? What did you learn? in life.
9) After making this speech, explain that we are
now going to free ourselves from the confines of
Title Throw Away our positions and make ourselves more comfort-
able to speak our opinions.
Topic: Icebreaker
10) Dramatically tear up your name tag and re-intro-
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
duce yourself using just the name you want ev-
from this activity?): To rid the group of labels before
eryone to call you.
they start the class/lesson
11) Go around the room with a trash can or bag as
Number of Students: 5-30 participants, one by one, tear up their name tags
Age Range of Students: 10 and up and tell everyone else the name they would like
Time Required: 20 minutes to be called.
Materials: Paper, Pens/pencils, Trash can or bag 12) Collect the torn name tags in the trash can or
bag.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 13) Reissue new sheets of paper to serve as name
tags if you like, but this time people should write
1) As people come into the room to begin the class, just what they want to be called.
give them name tags (small sheets of paper).
2) Ask them to write their names and titles on the Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
name tags (for example, Name: Maqvala, Title:
English Teacher). For younger students, have  How did this activity make you feel?
them write down a label that has been given to  How can titles be harmful?
them by their peers or their family (for example,  Can titles sometimes be a good thing? How?
Name: Dato, Title: Eating a lot).
3) When everyone is seated and ready to do the
introductions, make sure you begin by stressing
your own name and title.

14
Communication

15
16
Peek-a-Who 4) Explain that they will get three chances to as-
semble the puzzle.
Topic: Communication, Teamwork, Icebreaker 5) Tell the class: Do not take the pieces of the puz-
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain zle out until the volunteer says so. Under no cir-
from this activity?): To help students work as a team cumstances are you allowed to look at someone
and develop communication within the team. To else’s puzzle. Absolutely no talking is permitted.
learn names of students in the group. There can be no questions. Wait for the volunteer
Number of Students: 10-30 to give instructions. Follow the instructions step-
by-step. After the volunteer is finished, we will
Age Range of Students: 8-17
check each puzzle for a winner before going to
Time Required: 20 minutes the second round.
Materials: Large tarp or large sheet 6) Tell the volunteer: Give the volunteer a cope of
the puzzle sheet. Tell him/her to make sure that
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): the participants can’t see the sheet. Explain that
each member has pieces of the puzzle. The vol-
1) Divide the class into two groups. unteer is to go inside and explain step-by-step
2) Place them on either side of the tarp/sheet. how to put together the puzzle. Emphasize that
3) Ask team members on each end to of the tarp/ under no circumstance should the volunteer an-
sheet to hold it up so that neither team can see swer any questions. There should be complete
each other. Taller students work better. silence from the members. If a question is asked,
4) One person must go up to the front on each they are to ignore it. Ask the volunteer to stand
side. with his or her back to the group while providing
5) When the tarp/sheet is dropped the team must instructions on how to complete the puzzle.
shout the person in the front’s name first. 7) The volunteer goes back to the room. Make sure
6) Who ever shouts first takes the other person over his/her back is to the group while he/she talks.
to their team. 8) When he/she has finished, see who has put to-
7) Do this until everyone is on one team. gether the puzzle correctly Ask the volunteer to
leave the room again and wait for more instruc-
tions.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
9) If someone has finished the puzzle, congratulate
 How did you feel when you played the game? him/her, make sure no one sees the puzzle and
take him out of the group.
 How did you have to work together, what were
your strategies? 10) Second round say the same thing as before, but
this time they can ask questions if they want.
 How did you communicate?
11) For the volunteer, they are allowed to face the
group, BUT he/she is NOT allowed to answer any
Communication Puzzle questions. Tell him/her to ignore any questions
given to him/her.
Topic: Communication 12) Guide the volunteer back to the room and con-
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain duct the second round. Some will be annoyed,
from this activity?): To list barriers to good communi- but that’s part of the point. If someone gets the
cation. To identify good communication skills. puzzle right, do the same as the last round.
Number of Students: 10-30 13) For the third and final round, participants should
Age Range of Students: 10 and up feel completely free. They may ask questions
Time Required: 1 hour and/or look at puzzles around them. They should
do whatever they want to do to finish.
Materials: Communication puzzle (cut up in five piec-
14) The volunteer is also to feel complete free. He/
es) in an envelope for each participant, Blackboard/
she can answer any questions, or do whatever it
whiteboard/flipchart, Markers or chalk, Handout:
takes to make sure all the participants finish the
Communication puzzle (complete), Handout: Pro-
puzzle.
cessing Exercise (one for you only); Optional: Prizes
for winners, Candy for the whole class 15) Use the handout “Processing Exercise” to fill out
the three flipcharts as a class: First Round, Sec-
ond Round, Third Round.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 16) Bring out the blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart
and have the group make a list of good communi-
1) Tell students that communication skills are per-
cation skills.
haps the most important skills you can have.
Examining barriers to good communication and
thinking about steps to good communication is
very important.
2) Pick a volunteer to leave the room. Tell the rest of
the class to remove everything from their desks.
3) Give one envelope to each student and tell them
they must not open it or even touch/look at it.
Tell them to wait for further instructions.

17
Communication Puzzle

Processing Exercise  He/she slowed down because it was clear


we were not getting the puzzle
 Faced us this time, looked at us, felt more
First Round in touch with speaker

 What are some of the problems that came up dur- Third Round
ing the first round?
 Why was it difficult to complete the puzzle?  Why was it much easier to complete the puzzle?
 What was good about this round? Frustrating?  List all the things that were helpful that hap-
 What would have made it easier to complete the pened during this round. Ideas might include
puzzle? 1) Moved around the room and helped us
 How did they feel during this round?
2) More encouraging, improved body and eye
contact
Examples:
 No way to communicate 3) Answered our questions, responded to our
 Volunteer not even facing us or looking at needs
us
4) Seemed much more friendly and helpful
 No eye contact or encouragement
 Went too fast or did not realize we were 5) We were allowed to help each other, more
not getting the puzzle support
 Did not understand any of his/her instruc-
6) Thought we knew what the puzzle would turn
tions
out to be, but it does not look like anything

Second Round
Good Communication Skills Examples:
 How was it better this time?
 Was anything improved?  Body language, gestures, good eye contact
 What were the frustrations?  Responsive to questions, encouraging attitude
 What were feelings associated with being ignored  Important not to assume you know what the per-
by the speaker? son is saying, but to keep your mind open (corre-
sponds with thinking they knew what the puzzle
 What does this mean for communication skills?
would look like in the end)
 Encouraging words or sounds
Examples:
 Listening skills
 Asked questions, but was ignored
 Feedback
 Volunteer was not helping us
 We could see his/her face this time, and
that helped sometimes

18
Statues of Power (Tableaux) 2) If they think they do an action often, they should
put both hands in the air.
Topic: Communication 3) If they think they do an action sometimes, they
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain should put one hand in the air.
from this activity?): To stimulate some of the emo- 4) If they think they never do an action, have them
tions associated with power and how these emotions keep their hands down.
effect us. 5) Pause a few moments after reading each action
Number of Students: 10-30 to let the class gage how many hands there are
Range of Students: 12 and up in the classroom (don’t do this too long or people
Time Required: 40 minutes might be afraid of being judged).
6) Tell the students that the actions are from two
Materials: None
groups: attacking and avoiding (write these two
groups in the board if you have one).
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 7) First read the attacking group and pause a mo-
ment to let the kids think about it
1) Divide the class into pairs.
8) Then read the avoiding group and do the same.
2) Each pair is going to produce a tableaux (frozen
9) Brainstorm with the group the word “attack”
image) showing one person in a position of power
and the word “avoid” – ask everyone what that
and other in a powerless position.
word means to them (you can write this on a the
3) Allow a few minutes for the pairs to make their
board). Allow two minutes for each word.
first tableaus.
10) Ask the group why they would behave in an at-
4) Ask them to also change roles during their prepa-
tacking or avoiding way. Ask a few volunteers to
rations.
describe their examples to everyone.
5) After they have had time to prepare their tab-
11) Ask participants to consider how “attacking” or
leaux, give each pair the opportunity to show
“avoiding” could be expressed. What would they
them to the rest of the class.
say? How would they say it? How would they say it
6) Ask for quick comments about what people ob- with their bodies? You can write the ideas on the
serve. board.
7) Ask the members of each tableau to express what 12) Ask the group to come up with examples of phras-
they are feeling in one word (proud, scared, hum- es they could use in attacking and avoiding situ-
ble, and so forth). ations. This can be fun, so try to encourage cre-
8) Ask the class the following questions: ativity! Give them a few examples: “Why do you
 Which of the two positions felt more fa- care??” “You are wrong!” “If you don’t answers
miliar? me I will…” (attacking), “I don’t feel so good”
 Can they relate any of the emotions they “Nevermind” “It doesn’t matter” “Whatever”
felt to situations in their lives? (avoiding).
 What did they feel for the powerless per- 13) For more advanced students, you may say a
son when they were in the position of phrase and ask them how they would change it
power? Vise versa? into an attacking or avoiding phrase.
14) Point out that body language can change every-
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: thing!

 What does power mean to you?


Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 What are traits of powerful people? Are they all
the same?  How did the attacking phrases make you feel?
 How did the avoiding phrases make you feel?
Assertiveness: Attack and Avoid
List of Actions
Topic: Communication
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Attacking
from this activity?): To examine attacking and avoid-  Nagging
ing behavior, where and when they use these behav-  Shouting
iors and how tone and body language can create each  Persisting (I am right!)
of these behaviors: 5-30  Revenge (I’ll get you back!)
Number of Students: 10 and up  Warning (If you don’t…)
Time Required: 40 minutes  Interrupting
 Exploding
Materials: List of actions (one for you); Optional:
 Sarcastic
Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Paper, Pen/paper
 Insulting
 Correcting
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Avoiding
1) Ask participants to listen to a list of actions you
are going to read out. A list of actions can be  Withdrawal
found on the next page.  Sulking in silence
 Taking it out on the wrong person

19
 Saying that you are being unfairly treated Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
 Talking behind someone’s back from this activity?): To learn the differences between
 Feeling ill passive, assertive and aggressive behavior. To discuss
 Being polite but feeling angry what actions make behavior passive, assertive or ag-
 Feeling low and depressed gressive.
 Not saying anything but now wanting to Number of Students: 10-30
hurt the other person Age Range of Students: 12 and up
 Trying to forget about the problem
Time Required: 45 minutes – 1 hour
Materials: Behavior handouts for each group; Option-
The Yes or No Game al: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart

Topic: Communication, Self-Awareness, Character


Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Building
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 1) Explain to the class that they will see three role
from this activity?): To show how body language, plays to understand the differences between pas-
tone and other forms of expression can affect both sive, assertive and aggressive behavior. Before
sides of an argument. the exercise you should go over what the three
Number of Students: 5-30 behaviors are (see handout below). Ask group to
Age Range of Students: 10 and up come up with examples of each.
Time Required: 20 minutes 2) Divide the class into three groups.
Materials: None 3) Give each group one of the behaviors: passive,
assertive and aggressive (try to keep this a secret
from the rest of the class!).
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
4) Give each group a handout with a description of
1) Ask students to stand up and split into two each behavior.
groups. 5) Tell the groups they are to come up with a short
2) One group should make a line facing the center of role play to express their behavior.
the classroom. 6) Give the groups at least 15 minutes to come up
3) The other group should make a line facing the with their role play.
other group. 7) When everyone is finished, have the aggressive
4) Explain that one group is the “yes” group and one group go first (don’t let them say what they are
group is the “no” group. before the role play).
5) In the “yes” group, the only word allowed is “yes” 8) After the first one discuss the following questions:
and in the “no” group the only word allowed is  Is (name)’s behavior passive, assertive or
“no”. aggressive?
6) When you say “go”, each group needs to try to  Why? What did (name) do to make you de-
convince the other, but they can only use the as- cide he/she was aggressive? What did he/
signed words – yes or no. They do this by using she say? How did he/she say it? Describe
body language and tone of voice, not words. body language.
9) Have the passive group go next.
7) After a minute or so, have the group change
roles. 10) After they have finished ask the same questions
as the first group.
8) After another few minutes, ask the students to
describe how they felt about doing this exercise. 11) Have the last group go (assertive).
9) Ask about body language or use of “attacking” or 12) Ask the same questions to the class as the first
“avoiding” actions. two groups.
10) Discuss how laughter is also another form of ex- 13) Emphasize the actions in assertive behavior.
pression. Laughter can be both good and harmful These might include:
depending on the timing.  Speaking in a calm, firm voice
 Discussing needs, making feelings clear
11) Ask for examples.
 Checking to see if the other person is com-
fortable with statements made
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:  Body language – facing the other person,
looking him/her in the eye
 What other expressions do you use when you are
trying to convince someone?
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 Why are expressions important in communication?
 Can you communicate only using expressions?  What behavior is the most productive? Why?
Why or why not? How?  What behavior do you see yourself doing the
most? Why?
Passive, Assertive, Aggressive:  How does it feel when someone is being passive
with you? Aggressive? Assertive?
Role Plays
Topic: Communication, Character Building

20
Behavior Handout

Passive Behavior

 Giving in to the will of others, hoping to get what you want without
actually having to say it. Leaving it to others to guess or letting
them decide for you
 Taking to action to assert your own rights
 Putting others first at your expense
 Giving in to what others want
 Remaining silent when something bothers you
 Apologizing a lot
 Acting submissive – for example: talking quietly, laughing nervously,
sagging shoulders, avoiding disagreement, hiding face with hands

Assertive Behavior

 Telling someone exactly what you want in a way that does not seem
rude or threatening to them
 Standing up for your own rights without putting down the rights of
others
 Respecting yourself as well as the other person
 Listening and talking
 Expressing positive and negative feelings
 Being confident but not too “pushy”
 Staying balanced – knowing what you want to say, saying “I feel”
not “I think”, being specific, using “I” statements, talking face to
face with the person, no whining or sarcasm, using body language
that shows you are standing your ground and staying centered.

Aggressive Behavior

 Expressing your feelings, opinions or desires in a way that threat-


ens or punishes the other person
 Standing up for your own rights with no thought of the other per-
son
 Putting yourself first at the expense of others
 Overpowering others
 Reaching your own goals, but at the sake of others
 Dominating behaviors – for example: shouting, demanding, not lis-
tening to others, saying others are wrong, leaning forward, looking
down on others, wagging or pointing finger at others, threatening,
or fighting

21
Opening a Fist Assertive Messages
Topic: Communication, Character Building Topic: Communication, Peer Pressure, Character
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Building
from this activity?): To practice assertive behavior Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
when facing someone aggressive. from this activity?):To practice creating assertive
Number of Students: 10-30 messages.
Age Range of Students: 14 – 17 Number of Students: 5-30
Time Required: 25 minutes Age Range of Students: 10 and up
Materials: None Time Required: 40 minutes
Materials: Handout: Steps to Deliver an Assertive Mes-
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): sage, Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Scenario

1) Explain to the class that body language can in- Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
fluence other people’s responses to us. For in-
stance, if someone is acting us aggressively, he 1) Review the definitions of passive, assertive and
or she may be leaning towards us with clenched aggressive:
fists. By changing our body language we can im-  Passive: not reacting visibly to something
prove the situation. For example, if we are sit- that might be expected to produce mani-
ting down, we can relax our shoulders, uncross festations of an emotion or feeling
our arms, open our palms upwards, uncross our  Assertive: confidently aggressive or self-
legs, hold our heads straight, and/or look right at assured; positive: aggressive; dogmatic
the aggressive person. All of these changes help  Aggressive: characterized by or tending
to create a more balanced response in the ag- toward unprovoked offensives, attacks,
gressive person. invasions, or the like; militantly forward
2) Ask the participants to divide into pairs. or menacing
3) Tell them that first, one will act as the aggres- 2) Talk briefly about how assertive behavior can im-
sive person and the other will act as the assertive prove communication and interactions.
person. Then they will switch roles. 3) Hand out the sheet “Steps to Deliver an Assertive
4) The aggressive ones must hold their hands up in a Message” (you can also have it on the board if you
very tight fist and pretend to feel very angry. like)
5) The assertive ones must try to persuade or con- 4) Explain the situation at the top and then go step-
vince the aggressive ones to undo their fists. by-step through the handout
6) The assertive ones should use all their skills to 5) Act out the “messages”
persuade the aggressive ones to calm down and 6) Remind the group that body language and tone is
open their fists. very important!
7) The aggressive and assertive people should not 7) Make sure everyone is clear on the steps before
touch each other. proceeding
8) The assertive one can say anything that they 8) Use the following message to develop assertive
think will convince the aggressive one. messages:
9) If the aggressive ones think the assertive ones Giga and Giorgi are good friends. Giga has a
have done a good job, they may open their fists. part-time job and he has loaned money to
But they must NOT give in too easily! Giorgi on several occasions. Lately, Giga has
10) Give the pairs eight minutes to try out their as- noticed that Girogi is becoming slower to pay
sertiveness skills on each other. the money back. Giga decides to discuss this
11) Praise and encourage everyone and explain that matter with Giorgi and ask Giorgi to pay the
it gets easier with practice. money back sooner
9) After reading the situation aloud and making
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: sure it is clear, go through the steps and have the
group come up with their own messages
 How did it feel to be talked to with a closed fist?
With an open fist?
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 How do expressions help us communicate?
 Do we sometimes expression one emotion but say  Why is delivering an assertive message sometimes
another? important?
 In which situations would you use an assertive
message?
 Can being assertive sometimes be negative?
When?

22
Steps to Deliver an Assertive Message

Giga and Giorgia are good friends. Giga has a part-time job and he has loaned money to Giorgi on several occasions.
Lately Giga has noticed that Giorgi is becoming slower to pay the money back. Giga decides to discuss this matter
with Giorgi and to ask Giorgi to pay the money back sooner.

Steps Description Words you might say… Messages

1) Explain your State how you feel  “I feel frustrated when…” “I feel as if I’m being used
feelings and about the behavior or  “I feel unhappy when…” when I lend you money
the problem problem. Describe the  “I feel…when…” and don’t get it back in
behavior or problem  “It hurts me when…” good time.”
that violates your rights  “I don’t like it when…”
or disturbs you
2) Make your State clearly what you  “It would like it better if…” “I would like it better if
request would like to have hap-  “I would like you to…” when you borrow money
pen  “Could you please…” you would give it back as
 “Please don’t…” soon as possible.”
 “I wish you would…”
3) Ask how the Invite the other person  “How do you feel about it?” “Is that okay with you?”
other person to express his or her  “Is that okay with you?”
feels about feelings or thoughts  “What do you think?”
your request about your request  “Is that all right with you?”
 “What are your ideas?”
Answer The other person indi- The other person responds “Yes, I guess you’re right.
cates his or her feelings I’m not too good at get-
or thoughts about your ting money back right
request away, but I’ll return it
sooner next time.”
4) Accept with If the other person  “Thanks” “Thanks for understand-
thanks agrees with your re-  “Great, I appreciate that.” ing. Let’s go and listen to
quest, saying “thanks”  “I’m happy you agree.” some music.”
is a good way to end  “Great!”
the discussion

Creating Our Own 5) After reading each situation, each person will
write out assertive messages following the steps
Assertive Messages on the handout “Steps to Delivering an Assertive
Topic: Communication Message”.
6) Then each person will share the messages with
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
their partners, getting any advice and making any
from this activity?): To create assertive messages.
changes that they might decide together.
Number of Students: 5-30
7) The pair will act out each situation with each
Age Range of Students: 10 and up other and practice delivering their assertive mes-
Time Required: 1 hour sages.
Materials: Scenario cards (next page), “Steps to De- 8) Go around to each pair and ensure that the in-
livering an Assertive Message” handout (found on structions are clear and assist people if needed.
page before activity) 9) Allow 30 minutes for this part of the exercise.
10) After each pair practices two different situations,
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): invite interested pairs to come up in front of the
class and act out their assertive messages.
1) Explain that the class will be creating their own 11) Use this time to spark discussion.
assertive messages.
2) This may be hard/awkward at first but will be-
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
come easier with practice.
3) Split the class into pairs.  Can you think of any real life situations where
4) Give each person a different scenario card (each you have had to be assertive?
pair will have two scenario cards, one each) and  Can being assertive be a negative thing? When?
a handout.  Do leaders sometimes deliver assertive messages?
When/why?

23
Assertiveness Scenario Cards 6) Ask the group “What do you say when someone
tries to get you off the Topic:?” (you can also
1) A person of the opposite sex asks you to go to write this on the board).
a party with him or her. You don’t know any- 7) Brainstorm possible ideas with the class.
one who is going, which makes you feel a little 8) Some ideas might be:
uncomfortable. You have also heard that this  Please let me finish what I’m saying.
person uses drugs and does not have a very  Please don’t stop me until I’m finished.
good reputation at school. You decide to be as-  That’s fine, but please listen to what I
sertive and say no. have to say.
2) You are talking to a number of your friends. Most  I know you think… but let me finish what
of them smoke and are teasing you about the I’m saying.
fact that you do not smoke. One of the mem-  Thank you, but…”
bers of the group hurts your feelings by saying 9) Ask the class “What do you say when someone is
something inappropriate. You decide to make trying to persuade you?” and brainstorm.
an assertive reply. 10) After you brainstorm, categorize them into three
categories:
3) You decide to get your ears pierced. You friend
tells you that you can get it done at a place Refuse
in town. You go to the place, but it does not  No, no, I really mean no.
look very clean. You have heard about people  No, thank you.
getting serious diseases from dirty needles.  No, no – I am leaving.
You decide to ask the person if the needles Delay
are clean and to see the equipment used for
 I am not ready yet.
cleaning. The person won’t show you, but in-
 Maybe we can talk later.
sists that the shop is very clean and safe. The
 I’d like to talk to a friend first.
person urges you to get the procedure done.
You decide to say no assertively. Bargain
 Let’s do… instead.
4) A friend of your family asks if you wan t a ride
 I won’t do that, but maybe we could do…
home from school. You do not feel very good
 What would make us both happy?
about this person and you feel uncomfortable
about the situation. You deice to be assertive
and refuse the ride. Large Persuasion Cards

 Reasons
Persuasion Categories  No Problem
 Threaten
Topic: Communication, Peer Pressure, Character Building  Put You Down
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain from  Getting Off the Topic:
this activity?): To recognize persuasion and distraction  Argue
from assertive statements and come up with responses.
Number of Students: 10-30 Small Persuasion Cards
Age Range of Students: 13 – 17  You’re just afraid
Time Required: 1 hour  Why not? Everyone is doing it!
Materials: Large Persuasion Cards, Small Persuasion  You know that I love you.
Cards (for each participant), Tape; Optional: Black-  I’ll find someone else who will.
board/whiteboard/flipchart  Nothing will go wrong.
 I’ll take care of everything.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):  Aren’t you grown up enough to do this?
 But we’re getting married anyways.
1) Tell the group that they will take a look at the  You have nice eyes.
different ways people might try to get you off  What do you know about… anyways?
your Topic: (an assertive message) or refuse to  You owe me.
accept your assertive message.  What do you think can happen?
2) Tape the different Large Persuasion Cards at dif-  Do it or goodbye.
ferent points along a blank wall.  I can hurt you if you don’t.
3) Review each card and discuss how people can use  Don’t worry.
the technique to convince, persuade, or distract  I’ve got it all handled.
from assertive messages.  You can’t get addicted if you just do it once.
 You’re old enough now.
4) Hand on Small Persuasion Card to each participant.
 I like you when you’re angry.
5) All members of the group should stand up, read
the statement on their cards, explain the possi-
ble categories where the statement might belong Persuasion Categories
and tape the statement to the wall underneath
the appropriate category. Put you Down
 You’re just afraid
 Aren’t you grown up enough to do this?

24
Argue Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 Why not? Everyone’s doing it!
 What do you think can happen?  Have you ever had a friend/family member try
 What do you know about… anyways? to persuade you to do something you didn’t want
Threaten to do?
 Do it or goodbye.  Can persuasion be a good thing? How?
 I’ll find someone else who will.
 I can hurt you if you don’t. Persuasion Role Play
No Problem
 Nothing will go wrong Your older brother is supposed to give you a ride
 Don’t worry. home in his car. You meet him but he is staggering
 I’ll take care of everything. and slurring his words. You feel that he has had too
 I’ve got it all handled. much to drink and it would be not wise to ride with
Reasons him in his car when he is driving. He tires to persuade
 But we’re getting married anyways. you to go with him. Each group will do the role play
 You can’t get addicted if you have it just using different endings (refuse, delay or bargain)
once. Work together to come up with a SHORT role play to
 You owe me. show this situation. Use the following kinds of state-
 You’re old enough now. ments in your role play.
Getting Off the Topic: Sister: “I feel scared about driving with you when
 You have nice eyes you have been drinking”
 I like you when you’re angry Brother: “What do you know about drinking any-
 You know that I love you. way?”
Sister: “Please let me finish what I am saying. I
don’t want to drive home with you and I
Persuasion Role Play really don’t think you should be driving.
Topic: Communication, Peer Pressure, Character Building What do you think? Will you please not
drive home?”
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To practice using phrases when Brother: “Hey, I’m fine. You have nothing to worry
someone is trying to distract or persuade you. about.”
Number of Students: 6-30 Sister: (Use alternative endings)
Age Range of Students: 10 and up
Time Required: 1 hour Mother-Child Trust Call
Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart; Option-
al: Role Play Cards; Topic: Communication, Trust
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To build communication skills
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
and trust within the group.
1) Review and explain the three categories for re- Number of Students: 6-30
sponding to persuasion or people trying to dis- Age Range of Students: All ages
tract you (refuse, delay, bargain). Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes
Refuse Materials: Optional: Blindfolds
 No, no, I really mean no.
 No, thank you. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 No, no – I am leaving.
Delay 1) Ask the participants to divide into pairs.
2) The pairs should select one person to be the
 I am not ready yet.
“mother” and one person to be the “child”.
 Maybe we can talk later.
 I’d like to talk to a friend first. 3) Each pair should also choose one animal.
4) The “mother” should make the sound that animal
Bargain
makes so the “child” will know the “mother’s”
 Let’s do… instead. voice.
 I won’t do that, but maybe we could do… 5) Now separate the groups – all “mothers” on one side
 What would make us both happy? of the room and all the “children” on the other side.
2) Split the class into three groups. 6) “Children” must close their eyes. You may also
3) Assign each group one of the categories. use blindfolds.
4) Give each group a role play card. 7) “Mothers” will make the animal sound while mov-
5) Tell them they must make a role play using a ing about the room.
phrase or strategy from their category. 8) With their eyes closed, the “children” must try to
6) Give each group at least 15 minutes to come up find and touch their “mothers”.
with their role play.
7) Have each group perform in front of the class. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
8) Discuss each role play after they are finished.
 What does this activity show about communication?

25
Body Language Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

Topic: Communication 1) Ask for five volunteers to leave the training area
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain for a few minutes.
from this activity?): To demonstrate how easy it is 2) Bring out a piece of flip chart paper (or plain pa-
to read body language and the importance of body per).
language in communication. 3) Ask the remaining people to agree on a picture,
Number of Students: 6-30 and two or three people to draw it.
Age Range of Students: 4) The picture could include, for example, a house,
animals, a tree and so forth.
Time Required: 20 – 30 minutes
5) They should not make it too complicated.
Materials: None
6) Then hid the picture and ask someone to call the
five volunteers into the room.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 7) One volunteer is then shown the picture for about
a minute.
1) Divide the group into pairs.
8) This volunteer must then describe the picture in
2) Each pairs should think of a discussion that one of words to the second volunteer.
them has had with their spouse, friend, or any-
9) The second volunteer in turn describes the pic-
thing that developed into an argument.
ture to the third volunteer and so on.
3) The pair should first establish the two characters
10) When the fifth volunteer has heard a description
and their relationship.
of the picture, he or she should be handed a new
4) They should then re-enact the argument between piece of paper and some markers.
them in mime, only using their bodies and faces,
11) He or she should then try to draw the picture as
with no words.
he or she understands it to look from the descrip-
5) Give the pairs a few minutes to work on this. tion.
6) Then ask everyone to return to the group. 12) He or she should receive no help from the rest of
7) Pick out two pairs whose scenes looked particu- the group!
larly clear. 13) When he or she is finished, compare it with the
8) Ask the first pair to re-enact its scene in the mid- original picture.
dle of the circle. 14) There should be some interesting differences.
9) Ask members of the audience to tell the story the 15) Thank the five volunteers.
pair is acting out.
16) Point out that it is often much harder than we
10) Point out how easy it can be for us to know what supposed for all of us to understand things in the
is going on in general through what we do with same way.
our bodies.
11) Repeat with the second pair.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
12) Point out the different types of body language,
such as eye contact, distance between people,  What does this activity show us about communi-
and positions. cation?
13) Finish by suggesting that participants think over  How does this relate to real life?
the next few days and week, about the ways they
use their own bodies to say things to one anoth-
er. Rumors, Telephone
14) Encourage them to think how they might use their
bodies differently in different contexts to convey Topic: Communication
different messages to people. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To show how rumors can distort
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: information and make it far from the truth.
Number of Students: 5-30
 What are the different types of body language? Age Range of Students: All ages
 Do we sometimes subconsciously communicate Time Required: 10-15 minutes
with our body without even knowing it? How? Materials: None

Pass the Picture Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

Topic: Communication 1) Ask everyone to stand in a circle or line.


Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 2) Think of a phrase to whisper beforehand, such
from this activity?): To demonstrate how people can has “How many people like khajapuri?” or “I wish
understand things differently. I could go to the sea”.
Number of Students: 10-30 3) Whisper this phrase quietly to the person to your
Age Range of Students: All ages right. Make sure no one else can hear you.
Time Required: 20 – 30 minutes 4) This person whispers exactly what they heard to
the person to his or her right and so on until you
Materials: Flipchart paper or large plain paper (2),
get to the last person.
Markers

26
5) The phrase is not allowed to be repeated and Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
they must say exactly what they heard.
6) The last person says what they heard out loud to  Was it easy to find the Pooey? Why or why not?
the group.  Did it confuse you when people who were not the
7) Announce to the group what you had originally Pooey said, “I am the Pooey”?
said.
8) There should be some funny differences! Animal Noises
9) Let someone else try and make up a phrase.
10) Discuss how this relates to communication and Topic: Communication
spreading rumors about people. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To demonstrate the strength of
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: communication with only sounds.
Number of Students: 10-40
 Based on this activity, should we always believe Age Range of Students: 10 and up
the rumors we hear? Why or why not? Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes
 What can we do to stop bad rumors?
Materials: A large open space, Blindfolds for each
child or complete darkness
Pooey
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Topic: Communication
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 1) Hand out blindfolds to each child in the group. If
from this activity?): To demonstrate different meth- there are no blindfolds available, make sure you
ods of communicating. are in a dark room with NO LIGHT.
Number of Students: 10-40 2) Before the students are blindfolded/you turn off
Age Range of Students: 10 and up the light, explain the rules to the game,
Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes 3) When they are blindfolded or when the lights are
off, name three animals.
Materials: An open space for walking around; blind-
fold for each student or complete darkness 4) Tell the students to chose one of those animals to
be WITHOUT saying it (it is important they don’t
let anyone else know what they are).
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 5) When the students are blindfolded or the lights
are off, the students must find other students
1) Hand out blindfolds or make sure you are in place
who are the same animal as them by making the
where all light can be blocked out. You can ask
animal’s noise.
students to close their eyes, but this is hard to do
and many students will peek. 6) They must NOT say their animal’s name nor talk
at all. ONLY ANIMAL NOISES!!!
2) Ask everyone to put on their blindfolds or turn off
the lights. 7) When the students are finished, they will let you
know.
3) Tell the group to stay still.
8) When they are finished, ask the students to take
4) Tap one person quietly without letting others
off their blindfold or turn on the light.
know who you tapped.
9) Ask the students to check and see if they are in
5) Tell the group that the person who you touched
the right groups.
cannot speak, but they are the Pooey. The other
members of the group should NOT know who the 10) Once they understand the game, name animals
Pooey is. with more difficult sounds. If you want a big
challenge, name animals which don’t have a
6) Tell the group that they must shake each others
real sound (for example, a giraffe, hippo, rabbit
hands and ask “Are you the Pooey?”
etc).
7) If they are NOT the Pooey, the other person must
11) Discuss the activity after it is finished.
say “Yes, I am the pooey.” The students then must
leave that person and try to find another person
who is the Pooey. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
8) If a student shakes hands and the other person IS
the Pooey, the Pooey does not speak. That person  Was this a difficult activity? Why or why not?
then must hold hand with the Pooey and become  What strategies did you use to find the other ani-
part of the Pooey. This means that if another per- mals in your group?
son shakes hand with that part of the Pooey, they  Was there a leader in any of the groups? How did
must also be silent. that leader help?
9) This will continue until everyone is holding hands
and have become part of the Pooey
Listening Pairs
10) After everyone has become part of the Pooey,
stop the game. Topic: Communication
*Note: The name “Pooey” doesn’t translate well, so Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
you may want to change the name. Any name will be from this activity?): To show the importance of good
okay, but try to make it funny if you can. listening and to talk about how it feels not to be
listened to.

27
Number of Students: 6-30 Folding Paper Game
Age Range of Students: All ages
Time Required: 15 – 20 minutes Topic: Communication
Materials: None Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To show students different forms
of communication and how a lack of any of those
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): forms can make communication harder.
1) Divide the group into pairs Number of Students: 10-30
2) Once should describe to the other an event in Age Range of Students: All ages
his or her life which make him or her feel very Time Required: 20 – 30 minutes
happy. Materials: Sheets of paper (one for each partici-
3) The listener should say nothing but just concen- pant)
trate hard on hearing what is being said.
4) After a couple of minutes, ask the listeners to Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
stop listening.
5) At this stage, the speaker should continue to de- 1) Ask every participant to close their eyes.
scribe his or her happy experience, but the lis- 2) Make them promise to keep their eyes shut!
tener should stop listening completely (maybe 3) Hand each participant a sheet of paper.
plug ears or talk to another listener). 4) Ask participants to do the following:
6) He or she could yawn, look elsewhere, turn  Fold their paper in half
around, or whistle too.  Tear off the bottom right-hand corner of
7) The important thing is that he or she is not longer the paper
listening to the speaker as the speaker continues  Then fold the paper in half again
the story.  Next tear off the lower left-hand corner
8) After a couple of minutes, yell “STOP!” 5) Remind them not to peek!
9) At this stage, the speaker and listener should 6) Now ask them to open their eyes and unfold their
change roles and do the exercise again. pieces of a paper.
10) Ask participants how they felt as speakers telling 7) Have them show their paper to the other stu-
their story to a willing, interested listener com- dents.
pared with telling it to a bad listener. 8) The papers should look different.
11) Process the exercise. 9) Ask participants what this exercise can show us.
10) One point is to show everyone how even simple
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: instructions can mean very different things to
different people. We often think we are saying
 Is it always easy to listen to people? Why or why something clearly to someone, only to discover
not? later that what we meant and what they under-
 Why is listening important? stood were quite different.
 What can happen if you don’t listen? 11) Everyone followed the instructions correctly, but
 How do you feel is someone is not listening to the results were different.
you?
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 What does this tell us about communicating with


different people?
 How does culture affect communication?

28
Character
Building
and
Responsible
Behavior

29
30
The Problem With Excuses Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

Topic: Character Building 1) Give students the questionnaire and have them
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain fill it out (five minutes) – you should of course
from this activity?): To analyze common excuses for translate it before handing it to students.
dangerous behaviors. Are You a Caring Person?
Number of Students: 5-30 True/False
Age Range of Students: 12 – 17
___ ___ I am never mean, cruel, or insensitive
Time Required: 1 hour ___ ___ I treat people with kindness and gener-
Materials: List of dangerous activities, Blackboard/ osity
whiteboard/flipchart; Optional: Cards with excuses ___ ___ I am charitable
prepared
___ ___ I give of myself for the benefit of oth-
ers
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): ___ ___ I am responsive to the concerns and
needs of others
1) Before class, create a list of dangerous activities
that students should not participate in
I conclude that: ___________________________
2) Divide class into groups of three or four
3) Give each group one of the following excuses
2) Have students write an essay on one of the fol-
 Just one (or a little won’t hurt)
lowing Topic:
 I can control myself, so this one time
won’t matter  Describe the most caring thing anyone has
 Everybody’s doing it ever done for you. What effect did that
 I don’t want to be left out have on you?
 I deserve this  Write a thank you note to someone in your
 I feel stressed out. This will help me relax community who did something very car-
 If I don’t do this, they will think I’m a … ing.
 If I don’t do this, they might not like me  Write about a real or an imagined experi-
 If I don’t do this, they might get made at ence in which you performed a random act
me of caring and the results it produced.
 I’m too young for this to hurt me  Imagine that you have just inherited
$20,000, and you want to spend it all to
4) Have each group analyze each excuse
help other people. What would you do
5) They should first determine in what situation
with it and why? What effect would it have
might someone use the excuse
on the people you would be helping?
6) Then have the group determine why it isn’t a
good reason to do something
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
7) After five minutes, rotate the excuses
8) Give each group an opportunity to discuss eat of  What kinds of activities did you identify in your
the excuses essay as caring?
9) Have each group chose a dangerous behavior  How does it feel when someone does something
10) Ask them to write a list of excuses NOT to do the you identify as caring for you?
behavior  How does it feel when you do something caring
for someone else?
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 What other excuses do people use to rationalize Making Introductions


dangerous or inappropriate behavior?
Topic: Character Building, Self-Esteem
 Why do we talk ourselves into doing things that
we know we shouldn’t be doing? Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To feel at ease when introducing
people and themselves.
Are you a Caring Person? Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: 10 and up
Topic: Character Building
Time Required: 30 minutes
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To identify and discuss personal Materials: None
emotions with regard to caring.
Number of Students: 10-30 Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Age Range of Students: 10-17
Throughout your whole life you will be meeting new
Time Required: 45 minutes people almost every day. Being able to do this eas-
Materials: Paper, pen, questionnaire ily is one of the first and most important steps of
making friends. A person’s first impression of you is
formed within the first few minutes after meeting
you. This impression often stays with them and af-

31
fects what they think of you or how they feel about Number of Students: 5-30
you. People often decide if they want to get to know Age Range of Students: 11 and under
someone because of a first impression. Time Required: 40 minutes
1) Discuss how this skill can help the student. Your Materials: Paper (for each child), Makers/pens/col-
ability to handle meeting people and making intro- ored pencils; Optional: Glue, Scissors, Yarn, Stickers
ductions with ease will be valuable to you through-
out your whole life. This skill can help you to:
 Feel more comfortable at parties, in a Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
new club, at school, or any time when you
1) Before this activity, talk with the group about be-
are around strangers
ing nice to others. Here are some questions you
 Make friends more easily
could ask:
 Give an impression of poise and self-con-
 Why should we be nice to other people?
fidence
 Should we be nice to people who are dif-
 Be at ease when applying for jobs
ferent from us? Why?
2) Discuss how you make introductions - When you
 What does respect mean?
are being introduced:
 Why should we respect the feelings and
 Smile
property of others?
 Try to think about making the other person
 Why should we be polite to others?
feel at ease and then you won’t have time
 There is a Golden Rule that says “Do unto
to feel nervous or uncomfortable
others as you would have them do unto
 Be warm and friendly
you”. What does that mean to you?
 Look the other person in the eyes
 Do you think the Golden Rule is a good
 Step forward
rule? Why or why not?
 Be sincere in what you say
2) Hand out paper and markers/pens/colored pen-
What you might say: cils to the students.
 How do you do? 3) Tell the class that they are going to make greet-
 Hello, how are you? ing cards for someone they think would need a
 I am glad to meet you nice card or a smile. Examples could be nursing
 I have been looking forward to meeting homes, orphanages, family members that get ig-
you nored, sick people, people in hospitals etc.
 How do you do, “name”? 4) Have children make their cards.
3) Have students list other possible ways to respond 5) Tell the children to be sure to say something nice
to an adult and to a person their own age. about that person in the card.
4) Tell students each person must find out what is 6) If the people are in one place collect the cards
most comfortable and natural for them to say. and deliver them to the place as a class.
This comes only through practice. The most im- 7) If they are in several places, have the students
portant thing is to say SOMETHING. No one wants deliver their cards to that person (be sure to have
to feel ignored. a way of checking up on if they brought them or
5) If the other person puts his hand out to shake not, try to really encourage them to give them to
hands, meet him with a warm, firm handshake. the people).
Discuss methods of greeting in Georgia (kissing on
a cheek). What are appropriate gestures between
men/women? Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
6) When you are doing the introduction:  How do you feel if someone is mean to you?
 In introducing man-woman, say lady’s  What happens when people aren’t nice to each
name first (Nino Jashi, I would like you to other? Among your friends? In your family? In the
know Giorgi Gugunava) world?
 When introducing a much older person to
 What does it feel like to be left out of a group
a younger person, say the older person’s
activity?
name first
 After your two friends have had a chance  What is embarrassment? Jealousy? Anger?
to speak, it is thoughtful to give them  What might make us feel these things? Are they
something to talk about normal feelings?
7) Try introducing:  What can you do if someone makes you feel em-
 One group member to another barrassed, jealous or angry?
 Your leader or teacher to another student
8) When students are comfortable with this, take Pleasing Others
turns introducing one person to the whole group.
Topic: Character Building
Give a Smile Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To think about activities that
Topic: Character Building please other people.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Number of Students: 5-30
from this activity?): To show children how doing Age Range of Students: 11 and under
things for other people can make them happy. Time Required: 30 minutes

32
Materials: Paper (for each student), Colored mark- 3) Ask the students how they felt when their friend
ers/pencils/pens; Optional: Other art supplies to did a nice thing.
make the pictures more fun, Blackboard/white- 4) Tell the students you are now going to make
board/flipchart, Chalk/markers cards for their friend who has done nice things
for them.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 5) The cards should say “Thank you” on them and
say what their friend did and how it made them
1) Ask the students if they think it is right to do feel inside the card.
things for other people. 6) Give each student a piece of paper and colored
2) Ask them to come up with examples of things they markers/pens/pencils.
could do for other people to make them happy. 7) Give them at least 15 minutes to complete their
3) Tell the students that there are probably already cards.
things they do on a regular basis that they do to 8) If you have envelopes, give them an envelope and
please other people. have them put their friend’s name on it.
4) Ask students to sit and brainstorm for a minute or 9) Tell the class they must give the envelope to their
two about things they do to make other people friend before the next class.
happy. 10) At the next class, ask the students how their
5) Give each student a piece of paper and colored friends reacted when they received the card.
markers/pens/pencils. 11) If you have a board, write down the reactions on
6) Tell the students they must now draw a picture the board.
of something they do in a normal day that makes 12) Ask the class how they felt giving the card (write
others happy (something they don’t do just for them on the board if you can).
themselves). 13) Discuss how doing nice things for people make
7) Some examples are: you and the other person happy and how saying
 doing chores around the house thank you is always a good idea.
 getting dressed up for a special occasion
 not talking in class or at a performance
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 washing the dishes
 visiting a relative you don’t really like  Are there ever times you should say thank you,
8) Give the students at least 10 – 15 minutes to work but you don’t want to?
on their drawing.
9) When they are finished have the students stand
up and explain their picture to the class briefly. Manners in the Bag
10) You can write these on the board to make a list if
you would like. Topic: Character Building
11) Discuss the activity and how it made them feel. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To learn to share and to say
please and thank you.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Number of Students: 10-30
 Why is it a good thing to make other people happy? Age Range of Students: 10 and under
 What are some things that you would like others Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes
to do for you to make you happy? Materials: Small paper bags (one for each student),
Scissors (one pair for each group), Puppet face cut-
outs (one per student) (see next page), Yarn (in
Thank a Friend balls), Glue (one for each group), Markers (only one
or two for each group); Optional: Colored markers/
Topic: Character Building
pens/pencils, Other items to make puppets more
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain decorative
from this activity?): To explore people’s reactions
when you do something nice for them, or just say
thank you! Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Number of Students: 5-30 1) Tell the class they will be learning about sharing,
Age Range of Students: 11 and under saying please and saying thank you today.
Time Required: 30 minutes in two class periods 2) Split the class into small groups of four or five.
Materials: Paper (for each student), Colored mark- 3) Give each student a paper bag and a puppet face
ers/pens/pencils, Pencils; Optional: Stickers, Glue, cut-out sheet.
Scissors, Colored paper, Blackboard/whiteboard/ 4) Tell the groups that they must make a puppet
flipchart, Chalk/markers, Envelopes (have an example ready to show them).
5) Give the groups one pair of scissors, one glue
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): bottle/stick, and only one or two markers.
6) Tell them that they must share these items.
1) Ask the students to think of a nice thing a friend 7) When they ask for an item, they must say
has done for them recently. please.
2) Ask the students why they think their friend did 8) When they receive an item they must say thank
that thing. you.

33
9) Give them at least 15 – 20 minutes to finish their 7) Tell the groups to write “respect” in large letters
puppet. in the middle.
10) Monitor the class to make sure they are saying 8) Now tell the group to either illustrate or cut and
please and thank you. paste different ways they can show respect to
11) After everyone is done, ask them if it was easy to other people.
say please and thank you and how it made them 9) Examples include:
feel to share.  Sharing
*Note: This can also be a fun activity for beginning  Helping with chores
English classes when learning “please” and “thank  Cooking for someone
you”.  Helping someone feel better if they feel
bad
 Helping someone who is hurt
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 Assisting a teacher
 Are there ever times when you should share but 10) Give the groups at least 15 – 20 minutes to com-
you don’t want to? plete their posters.
11) After each group is done, have them come up
and present their posters to the class, explaining
Puppet Face Cut-outs
what each picture means.
12) If you have the space, put the posters on the wall
to remind the students how they can show re-
spect to others.

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 Are there also ways you can be disrespectful?


What are some examples? How do they make the
person feel? How do they make you feel?

Courtesy Circle
Topic: Character Building
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To practice giving compliments
to each other.
Number of Students: 5-30
Showing Respect Age Range of Students: 15 and under
Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes
Topic: Character Building Materials: Optional: Blackboard/whiteboard/flip-
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain chart, Chalk/markers
from this activity?): To talk about different ways of
showing respect to other people. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Number of Students: 10-30
Age Range of Students: 17 and under 1) If you have a blackboard and the time available,
Time Required: 45 minutes – 1 hour ask the class to come up with some examples of
Materials: Large poster board (one for each group), compliments they could give to each other and
Markers, Pencils; Optional: Old magazines, Scissors, write them on the board before the activity.
Glue, Colored markers/pens/pencils, Blackboard/ 2) Ask the class to get into a circle.
whiteboard/flipchart 3) Tell them that this activity will help them prac-
tice to say nice things to others.
4) Start off the circle by giving a compliment to the
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
student on your right.
1) Ask the class what the word respect means to 5) Tell the students that they must all give a compli-
them (if you have a board, write the word on the ment to the person on their right in turn.
board). 6) Once they have gone all the way around the cir-
2) Come up with ideas (if you have a board, write cle, reverse the direction so that they are now
the ideas on the board). saying a compliment to the person who previ-
3) Ask the class to think of different ways they can ously gave them a compliment.
show respect to other people (write these on the 7) Ask the class how they felt during the activity.
board if available).
4) Divide the class into groups of four or five. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
5) Give each group a poster board and markers.
6) If you have old magazines, scissors and glue, give  Who are people you could give compliments to
those out to the groups. during a typical day?

34
 When do you think it is most important to give Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
compliments?
 How do you think compliments make other peo- 1) Explain to students that we cannot always say
ple feel? what we want to say. Sometimes we have to be
careful not to hurt other people’s feelings so we
must be careful with what we say. If you are in a
Heart of Gold situation where you want to say something nega-
tive, you should still say something positive.
Topic: Character Building 2) Give some examples of these kinds of situations.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 3) Divide the class into groups of four or five.
from this activity?): To discuss and act out kind things 4) Give each group a situation card with different
we do to other people. awkward situations.
Number of Students: 10-30 5) Tell the groups they must come up with a skit to
Age Range of Students: 15 and under show how they would handle the situation.
Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes 6) Give the groups about 10 or 15 minutes to make
Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Chalk/ their skit.
markers; Optional: Props for skits 7) After everyone is finished, ask the groups to per-
form their skits to the class.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 8) After each skit, ask the class if they thought what
the skit showed was the appropriate response.
1) Ask your class to think about nice things they do Ask for additional ideas
for other people.
2) Write these ideas on the board. Situations for cards (translate with your coun-
terpart, then write)
3) Now ask your class for ideas on nice things they
could do for other people.  Your aunt Nino comes to your house wear-
4) Write these ideas on the board. ing a very big and silly looking hat. She
asks you if you like her hat. What do you
5) Some ideas might be:
do?
 Helping a friend who feels bad
 You visit your friend’s house and his/her
 Helping your mother with the dishes
mom makes you dinner. You do not like the
 Helping a teacher clean the chalkboard
food that she made. What do you do?
 Opening the door for someone
 You are having a birthday supra and your
 Giving directions to someone who is lost
friend comes and brings you a gift. When
 Sharing candy with a sister or brother or
you open the gift, you find that it’s some-
friend
thing you didn’t want and you are disap-
6) Divide the class into groups of four or five.
pointed. What do you do?
7) Tell the groups that they must choose one of the  You are watching your favorite show on
things on the board and create a skit. TV, when your uncle, who is visiting from
8) Give them at least 10 to 15 minutes to create Russia, asks you to change the channel to
their skit. something you don’t like. What do you
9) Have each group perform their skits in front of do?
the class.  Your friend has spent all day drawing you
10) After each skit, ask the class what the nice thing a picture and he/she gives it to you before
was and how they think it made the person feel. you leave school. When you look at it, you
can’t tell what it is! He/she asks you if you
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: like it. What do you do?

 How do nice acts make you feel? Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 How do nice acts make other people feel?
 Did this activity give you any new ideas on how to  Can you think of any real life examples of when
be nice to others? you have had to say something nice when you
wanted to say something negative?
 When are good times to say what you truly feel?
Pretend It’s You
Topic: Character building Share and Share Alike
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To practice how to act without Topic: Character Building
hurting someone’s feelings in awkward situations. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Number of Students: 10-30 from this activity?): To practice sharing with others.
Age Range of Students: 15 and under Number of Students: 5-30
Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes Age Range of Students: 10 and under
Materials: Situation cards; Optional: Props for skits Time Required: 20 minutes
Materials: Favorite objects or toys from each child

35
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Loud
 At the beach
1) Before the class (in the pervious class is best) tell
 In a park
the students that they must bring their favorite
 On the playground
toy, object, picture, book etc to class for an ac-
 In the yard
tivity.
 During a sports event (like soccer)
2) Have everyone take out their object.  During a dance party
3) Tell the class that they now must all “share” their 7) Divide the class into groups of 4 or 5.
object with the rest of the class. 8) Assign each group a different place where low
4) Ask them to go around and talk about and let voices or silence is needed.
other’s look at/use their object. 9) Tell the groups they must create a skit to show
5) Give them enough time so that everyone will be the kind of voices that are needed in that place.
able to see each other’s things. 10) Give the groups at least 10 to 15 minutes to cre-
6) When you are finished, ask the students, one at a ate their skits.
time, to come to the front of the class with their 11) After everyone is done, have the students per-
object. form their skits.
7) When the students is in front of the class, ask the 12) After each skit, ask the class if the voice level
class about the object in his/her hand. used was appropriate and why or why not.
8) They should know a good amount about it if that 13) Discuss the reasons why low voices or silence is
person shared. needed in certain places.

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:


 How did it feel to share?  How does it feel when someone is using loud
 How did it feel to be shared with? voices during your performance or when you are
 What other things can you share besides your fa- saying something?
vorite objects?  What can you do if someone is being loud and an-
noying when they aren’t supposed to?
Shhhhhhh
Good Deeds Checklist
Topic: Character Building
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Topic: Character Building
from this activity?): To teach children about the dif- Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
ferent places low voices or silence is needed. from this activity?): To keep track of good deeds dur-
Number of Students: 10-30 ing the week.
Age Range of Students: 10 and under Number of Students: 5-30
Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes Age Range of Students: 15 and under
Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Chalk/ Time Required: 10 minutes in-class, one week out
markers; Optional: Props for skits of class
Materials: Good Deed’s checklist, Pencil; Optional:
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Notebook, Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Chalk/
markers
1) Explain to the students that are some places and
situations where low voices or silence is needed
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
and some places where you can be noisy.
2) Ask the class for examples of places they know 1) Give each student the checklist and explain what
low voices or silence is required. to do.
3) Write the ideas on the board. 2) If you don’t want to print out lists for everyone,
4) Now ask the class for examples of places they can write it on the board and have the students write
be noisy. it in their notebooks.
5) Add onto the list if needed. 3) Tell the students they must keep this list with
6) Examples are: them during the week.
Quiet 4) When they have done a good deed on the list,
they must check it off.
 During a performance (dance, theatrical,
5) Tell them that this is NOT a contest and honesty
vocal, school, etc)
is expected.
 In class
 In a library 6) After the week is over, have students look at their
 When someone else is talking in class lists and think about the good things they have
 During a test done for others and the things they would like to
 In a hospital do next week.
 In church 7) This would also be a good time for a journal write
so students can reflect on the week.
8) Be sure to translate the checklist before giving it
to your students.

36
Good Deed Checklist:  Take care of your nails and be aware of
biting them.
Share something ...........................................  Wait until someone has finished his/her
Open a door for someone . ............................... sentence before you say anything.
Take turns playing with a toy ............................  Don’t start smoking! Or exercise and keep
Pick up some trash . ....................................... busy to distract yourself from smoking if
you already have started.
Help a classmate with a lesson ..........................
 Be sure to look around a room and see
Give someone a compliment ............................. what you have left around before you
Help a young child ......................................... leave the room.
Help someone with a chore ..............................  Set up a “bad word” jar, where you have
Help someone carry something .......................... to put in 20 tetri every time you say a bad
Pick up something dropped .............................. word.
 Always say “please” and “thank you” to
Help your parents with a job at home . ................
your parents.
5) Give each student paper and pens. Tell students
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: to draw a vertical line down the center.
6) On one side they draw a bad habit they have - the
 How did doing good deeds make you feel?
other side they draw the solution for this habit.
 How did doing good deeds make others feel?
7) Have a few students present their drawings to the
 Will you do these again? class.
 Were there any that were particularly difficult?
Any particularly easy?
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 Which ones did you miss? Would you like to do
them soon?  How do bad habits hurt us?
 Are their any good habits? What are they?
Bashing Bad Habits
Topic: Character Building What Does it Mean?
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Topic: Character Building, Responsible Behavior
from this activity?): To describe bad habits and ways
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
in which we can stop these bad habits.
from this activity?): To assist students in understand-
Number of Students: 5-30 ing what is responsible behavior.
Age Range of Students: 10 and under Number of Students: 5-30
Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes Age Range of Students: 10-17
Materials: Paper (for each student), Colored pens/ Time Required: 10-15 minutes
pencils/markers, Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart,
Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart
Chalk/markers; Optional: Tape

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):


Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
1) On the board write these definitions of responsi-
1) Ask your students what is a bad habit and if they
bility and irresponsibility:
think bad habits are hard or easy to break.
2) Explain to your students that even if bad habits A responsible person…
are hard, they CAN be broken with good decision - thinks ahead
making. Ask the students to give you suggestions
of bad habits and make a list on one side of the - uses self-control
board. Examples can be: - accepts the consequences for his or her ac-
 Chewing fingernails tions
 Watching too much TV
 Interrupting people when they are talking - meets his or her obligations
 Smoking - sets a good example
 Talking disrespectful to parents
 Eating too much candy/fatty foods An irresponsible person…
 Not picking up after yourself - blames others
 Saying bad words
3) Now ask for suggestions on how to overcome - doesn’t complete tasks they were assigned or
these bad habits. agreed to do gives up, especially when others
4) Write a list on the other side of the board, con- are depending on him or her
necting habit w/ solution. Some examples can - doesn’t offer to help even if he or she can
be: help
 Replacing candy/fatty foods with healthy
2) Lead a class discussion on the meaning of each
snacks like vegetables.
aspect of responsibility.
 Start another hobby such as playing foot-
3) Variations may include:
ball or reading instead of watching TV.

37
On the board write definitions of responsibility Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
and responsible:
 Do you need to be responsible to own a pet?
Responsibility:
 What happens if you don’t provide certain things
- A task or duty a person must accomplish or for your pet? (for example, if you don’t pet your
complete in a satisfactory manner dog he may get frightened of people or not like
you)
- An object, person, or animal which are in the
care of a person
Responsible:
Keep Going
- A person legally or morally obligated or held Topic: Character building, Responsible Behavior
accountable to carry out a duty, care for a Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
person or thing from this activity?): To teach the value of following
through and to help students recognize the effects
- A person charged with making decisions for
of quitting.
others and taking the blame for their mistakes
Number of Students: 10-15
- A person who can be relied on to do what they Age Range of Students: 10-17
agree to do
Time Required: 15 – 20 minutes
Lead a discussion on the meaning of responsibil- Materials: Books, Whiteboard/blackboard/white-
ity and responsible. Ask students to work in pairs board/flipchart
(small groups) and make two lists of what a re-
sponsible person does and doesn’t do.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: 1) Explain to your students that a person of charac-
ter doesn’t quit, especially if others are depend-
 Identify example responsible/irresponsible ac- ing on him/her.
tivities with the class. 2) Demonstrate the effect that quitting can have on
 Conduct skits to show responsible/irresponsible others by the following activity:
behaviors. 3) Choose two pairs of students and have them stand
at the front of the room.
4) Put a pile of about twenty books in front of each
The Furry, Scaly and Feathered pair.
Topic: Character building, Responsible Behavior 5) Instruct the children to move the books as fast
as they can to the back of the room, but each
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
person can move only one book at a time;
from this activity?): To communicate responsibility
towards pets. 6) The team who moves all the books first wins.
7) Before they begin, choose one child to quit after
Number of Students: 5-30
carrying five books, complaining that the work is
Age Range of Students: 8-17 too hard.
Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes 8) When the activity is over, ask everyone how they
Materials: Paper, Pens/pencils; Optional: Colored felt about the fact that one child quit/or the gen-
pens/pencils eral outcome of the game.
9) Ask how it changed the contest.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 10) Have all the students think of phrases a person
uses to “give up” on doing a task.
1) Ask the class how many students have pets. 11) Write them on the board.
2) Ask the students who have pets to explain to 12) Include the following:
the class the responsibilities they have for their  It’s too hard
pets.  I can’t
3) Tell all of the students to draw pictures of their  I’m too tired
pets if they have one, or draw imaginary pets if  Who cares?
they don’t have one (they can be as creative as  I don’t want to
they want!).  I won’t succeed anyway
4) You can also have all students create an imagi- 13) As a group, think of positive phrases to counter
nary/exotic pet for more fun. the negative ones.
5) Ask the students to list the things they think are
important when caring for their pets.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
6) Remind the students that caring for a pet means
giving the animal not only food and water but  Why is it important not to give up? Why is it im-
also regular attention and cleaning up after it. portant not to give up on a team?
7) If the students can’t think of pets that they prop-  What are some examples of people in history who
erly take care of, have them pretend it is a show didn’t “give up”?
dog or an animal at a zoo (something they can’t
just throw bread to and leave outside).

38
The Price of Choice  You get too much change at the store
 You find a wallet or purse
Topic: Character Building, Responsible Behavior  You break your mom’s favorite lamp
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain  You didn’t finish your homework in time
from this activity?): To teach students responsibility  You lose a library book
with their every day duties. 3) Give each group a different situation from your
Number of Students: 5-30 situation card pile.
Age Range of Students: 8-17 4) Have the groups work together to create a list
of do’s and don’ts for each situation in response
Time Required: 20-25 minutes
to the question “How would a responsible person
Materials: 3x5 index cards (or pieces of paper) handle this problem?”
5) After the groups are finished, ask them to share
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): their answers with the class.

1) Create a matching game of actions and conse-


Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
quences.
2) On a 3x5 cards (or pieces of paper), write ac-  What would an irresponsible person do in this
tions such as “I watched TV instead of studying situation?
my spelling words” or “I did not wear my helmet  What would you do? Is it responsible or irrespon-
while riding my bike”. sible? Why or why not?
3) On other cards write corresponding consequenc-
es, such as “I did not do well on my English test”
or “I crashed and had to go to the hospital”. Travel Safety
4) Create twenty pairs.
5) Put your students in groups of five or six. Topic: Character Building, Responsible Behavior,
Safety
6) Give each group an opportunity to play the
matching game (at the same time). Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To teach students to be respon-
7) See which group can do it the fastest (have them
sible for their own safety and health.
race each other).
8) Once the games are finished, lead a discussion Number of Students: 5-30
about actions and consequences. Age Range of Students: 13-17
Time Required: 45 minutes – 1 hour
Other options: Materials: Paper, Pens/pencils; Optional: Black-
board/whiteboard/flipchart
* In a smaller class, do the matching game as a class
without the competition Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: 1) Read the following quote to the class:
“I like feeling when I’m traveling that I am re-
 Can you think of real life examples where irre- sponsible for myself and my few possessions.
sponsible behavior led to bad consequences? In some ways I am in complete control of ev-
 Why do you think some people decided to partici- erything I do.”
pate in irresponsible behaviors?
*Nino Japaridze, executive, Tbilisi
 What are ways you can help someone make a re-
2) In pairs or small groups make a list of what you
sponsible decision?
will need for a week long trip.
3) Tell the class to justify their choices from a posi-
What Would You Do If… tion of a responsible person.

Topic: Character Building, Responsible Behavior, De- Variation


cision Making
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 1) Read the following text:
from this activity?): To teach students to be respon- Before we do anything in life, even the most
sible and trustworthy in everyday life impulsive of us do some preparation. We edu-
Number of Students: 10-30 cate ourselves to prepare for careers, plan
Age Range of Students: 10-17 strategies for important meetings, develop
Time Required: 15-25 minutes menus for simple or extravagant meals. Prepa-
Materials: Situation cards; Optional: Blackboard/ ration helps us reduce our fears by giving us
whiteboard/flipchart knowledge and builds confidence by increasing
our comfort with the unknown. Preparing men-
tally and emotionally for traveling overseas is
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): just as important as obtaining your visas and
shots. Give yourself time to work through fears
1) Divide the class into five or six groups.
you may have about safety, traveling alone, or
2) Think of a variety of situations as a class. Some fitting into a different culture.
examples are:

39
2) Ask students to make a list of things to do before  Reading about how smoking is bad for you
a trip abroad (discuss each item from the position  Making sure the water is safe before going
of being responsible for your own safety and life. swimming
3) Ask students (especially girls) to make a list of  Staying at a friend’s house when you are
things to do before a trip alone (discuss each drunk
item from the position of being responsible for 3) For younger kids, have them draw one picture of
your own safety and life). a healthy behavior and one picture of a risky be-
4) Ask girls to come up with strategies for avoiding or havior.
responding to unwanted attention. For example, 4) For older kids have them write down one healthy
to avoid unwanted advances, a woman should: and one risky behavior (they can also illustrate it
 Walk with purpose if they want).
 Think and look ahead to anticipate com- 5) Ask them to read out loud to the class/show their
promising situations picture beginning with their risky behavior.
 Consider wearing a wedding ring 6) Go back and have them read/show their healthy
 Dress conservatively behavior.
 Communicate a feeling of confidence and
responsibility
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 Try to sit or stand next to other women or
families in public places  Can you think of a time when you participated in
How to respond to unwanted attention: a risky behavior? A healthy behavior?
 Completely ignore comments, cat-calls  What are ways to avoid risky behaviors?
and whistles  What risky behaviors do you see as problems in
 Avoid all eye contact your community?
 Don’t try to speak their language
 Listen to your inner voice. If you are uncom-
fortable, get out of the situation right away A Way in Which I’m Responsible
Topic: Responsible Behavior, Character Building
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain from
this activity?): To define responsibility, list responsible
 What are other dangerous situations you can
behaviors regularly performed, describe tasks students
avoid by planning ahead?
are responsible for that promote good health, and iden-
tify behaviors that do not lead to good health.
Risky vs. Healthy Behavior Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: All ages
Topic: Character Building, Decision Making, Respon-
Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes
sible Behavior
Materials: Pens, Paper; Optional: Blackboard/white-
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
board/flipchart
from this activity?): To develop an understanding of
how risky and healthy behavior compare.
Number of Students: 5-30 Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Age Range of Students: 10-17 1) Explain what “responsibility” means (you can
Time Required: 20 – 30 minutes write the definition on the board if you have
Materials: Paper, Crayons/markers, Pens one).
2) Give examples of responsibilities between teach-
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): ers and students, parents and children, friends
and friends, etc.
1) Explain the differences between risky and healthy 3) Ask students to write down two responsibilities
behaviors (for older students you can have them they have at home and two at work/school.
help you come up with differences). 4) Have everyone read them out loud.
2) Ask the class for examples of each behavior. Here 5) Ask the students to write down health responsi-
are some examples: bilities they have. Examples are good hygiene,
Risky cooking, taking care of others, going to the doc-
tor, following a doctor’s instructions, seeking out
 Throwing rocks at windows
health information, etc.
 Riding in a car without a seatbelt
 Driving too fast 6) Ask students if other people in their households
 Drinking and driving/walking home drunk have health-related responsibilities.
 Eating without washing your hands first 7) Ask the students to list behaviors they know can
 Smoking result in health problems. Examples are: drink-
 Jumping into a river head first ing, smoking, not seeking medical or pre-natal
care, throwing garbage in the river, not taking
Healthy
prescribed medications, etc.
 Eating fruits and vegetables every day 8) Ask the students what are the benefits to taking
 Talking walks with your friends responsibility for their health and the health of
 Using your seatbelt in your car those around them.
 Driving the speed limit

40
9) Emphasize the importance of being responsible it will be much easier for everyone to choose to
and each individual’s responsibility towards oth- make healthy decisions.
ers. 8) Discuss different types of issues that students
should not try to deal with by themselves. They
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: may have the opportunity to talk privately with
young people who need more information and
 What are risky behaviors? How do they effect be- counseling than they can’t provide. Therefore it
ing responsible? is important to know where to get help in the
 Why do people engage in risky behaviors? community. Use brainstorming, small group work
 Why do people engage in responsible behaviors? or a field trip.
 Why do you think that irresponsible behavior is 9) Students should identify a number of sources and
sometimes considered “cool”? how to reach them. Examples of these can be dif-
ferent clinics, NGO’s, hospitals, student centers
or even helpful teachers and church elders.
Support for Responsible Behavior
Peer Support Cards
Topic: Responsible Behavior, Community
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 1) You have been dating a person for a short time and
from this activity?): To identify common situations you feel you are in “love” and will get married.
where students’ intervention might be helpful, iden- This person is trying to persuade you to have sex
tify strategies to support responsible behavior, and before you get married. You use all your assertive
list resources available in their communities that skills but the situation gets worse. He or she will
they might use if they require assistance or informa- not agree with you and becomes impossible to talk
tion. to. You ask a friend who is with you to walk you
Number of Students: 10-30 home. On the way home, you tell your friend what
Age Range of Students: 14 and up happened. Your friend supports your decision not
Time Required: 1.5 – 2 hours to have sex and to wait by saying “………..”
Materials: Hand out: Peer Support Situation Cards 2) You have had the same sweetheart for over a year.
(next page), Slips of paper or index cards; Optional: You love each other very much and plan to get
married soon. You have talked about sex and have
Props for role plays
agreed to use a condom to protect yourself against
unwanted pregnancy or STIs (sexually transmitted
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): diseases). You decided to have sex with a condom
a few times, but this night you forgot to bring a
1) Introduce the Topic: to the group. Discuss that condom and you would still really like to have sex.
sometimes young people take risks with their Later you decide not to have sex that night, but
health and safety. Because of serious conse- just to spend time with each other. The next day
quences, taking risks can be very dangerous. you discuss the decision with your best friend. Your
Young people who make healthy decisions (not to friend supports your decision by saying, “……….”
smoke, use drugs, to use a condom or to be toler- 3) After school, you and your friends want to go to
ant) need the support of their friends, family and the local store for candy. Someone says, “I know
community. the storekeeper and he/she will give us cigarettes.
2) Divide the class into groups and give each group a We should buy some and smoke them.” Another
role play card. person says, “Smoking is really bad for you and it
3) The groups must read and discuss the situation, smells. I don’t think it’s a very good idea.” This
decide what they would do to give the main per- person asks you what you think. You say “………..”
son in the story support for their healthy deci- 4) It is Monday morning and you are talking to some
sion, and create a role play. friends about what happened over the weekend.
4) Have all groups perform their role plays. One of the members of the group is bragging
5) Discuss the strategies suggested by the group and about being at a party where there was a lot of
provide additional ideas. alcohol and sex. He even mentions they went to
6) You may want to ask the following questions: the prostitutes afterwards. A couple members of
 Why do many young people feel it is not the group are impressed and say things that sup-
“cool” to support healthy decisions? port him, like “Yeah! You must have had a good
 What difficulties might you have if you time!” You are not impressed by this, and you
support these healthy behaviors? feel you should say something. You say “………”
 How might you overcome these problems? 5) You are at a dance. You notice a group of people
7) Remind the class about the important responsibil- in the corner laughing and pushing someone. Get-
ity they have as friends. Supporting healthy deci- ting closer, you overhear them teasing the boy or
sions when they look “uncool” is one of their most girl because he or she is refusing to drink some
important, but perhaps the most difficult, tasks. of the wine they are passing around. They are a
As friends/educators, they can set the tone for bit drunk and are getting rough with that person.
behaviors of other young people. If young people The person keeps trying to refuse to drink – say-
begin to see that not using drugs, not smoking or ing he or she does not like alcohol. They continue
using a condom has the support of their friends, to tease him or her. You say “……….”

41
Please and Thank You  When your friend tells you that you look
nice today – thank you
Topic: Character Building  When you are at a store and want to try on
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain a shirt – please
from this activity?): To teach children when it is right  When your grandmother braids your hair
to use please and thank you. – thank you
Number of Students: 5-30  When your mother makes you dinner
– thank you
Age Range of Students: 11 and under
4) Now tell the children they must listen to a story.
Time Required: 30 - 45 minutes
5) Tell the children that in the story there will be
Materials: Paper (2 pieces per child), Markers/pens, Sto- different scenarios where the character needs to
ry using please and thank you (example on next page) say please and thank you. During these times you
will pause and they must hold up the correct sign
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): (if the character must use “please” have the stu-
dents hold up the “please” sign and vise versa).
1) Give two pieces of paper to each student. 6) Read the story.
2) Tell the students they must make a sign on one
sheet of paper saying “Thank you” and on the oth-
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
er piece of paper make a sign that says “Please”.
3) After the students are done making their signs,  How does saying please and thank you make you
ask them to give you some situations where they feel?
would use each word. Some examples are:  How does it feel when someone says please and
 When someone gives you a present – thank you thank you to you?
 When you would like your mother to buy  How do you think it makes the other person feel
you some ice cream – please when you tell them thank you and/or please?

Example “Please and Thank you” Story

Giga has a long day ahead of him. He needs your help to know when to say “please” and when to say “thank
you”. Listen to Giga’s day and help him say “please” and “thank you”.
Giga woke up at seven o’clock to get ready for school. He had a very long day ahead of him! He has been invited
to his friend Jaba’s birthday party after school. After Giga gets dressed and brushes his teeth, he walks downstairs
to eat breakfast. His mother gives him papa to eat. **PAUSE** (Please or thank you?) He eats his papa, but he also
wants tea. He asks his mother for tea. ** PAUSE** (Please or thank you?). During breakfast, Giga asks his father for
money to buy Jaba a present. His father says yes and gives him five lari. **PAUSE** (Please or thank you?) After he
finishes his breakfast, he walks out the door to school. His little sister runs after him. “Giga! You forgot your English
book!” She gives him his English book. **PAUSE** (Please or thank you?) Giga starts walking to school.
On the way to school he meets his friend Tengo. Tengo reminds Giga that there is a test in English today and tells
him that he will study with Giga at lunch before the test. **PAUSE** (Please or thank you?) Giga and Tengo walk to
school and arrive at school a little early. Giga wants to ask his math teacher for help before class starts. He walks
up to the math classroom and his math teacher Ia is there preparing for class. Giga asks her for help. **PAUSE**
(Please or thank you?) After his math teacher helps him, Giga walks to class. His friend Tengo has saved a seat
for Giga. **PAUSE** (Please or thank you?) After class, Giga walks outside. On the way he meets his friend Lali.
Lali tells Giga that she likes his new hat. **PAUSE** (Please or thank you?) During break, his friend Jaba meets
him in the school yard. “Happy Birthday Jaba!” says Giga. Jaba says… **PAUSE** (Please or thank you?) His friend
Tengo has brought a basketball to school to play with. Tengo tells Giga that he can use it for a while. **PAUSE**
(Please or thank you?) When Giga goes back to class, he realizes that he lost his pen. He asks his friend Nino to
borrow a pen. **PAUSE** (Please or thank you?)
After school, Giga takes the money he received from his father to go buy Jaba a present. He walks into a store
that sells toy cars. Giga finds a toy car that Jaba would like very much. It costs four lari. He brings the car to the
storekeeper and asks to buy the toy car. **PAUSE** (Please or thank you?) The storekeeper takes the five lari and
gives Giga back one lari. **PAUSE** (Please or thank you?) Giga walks out of the store and starts to walk towards
Jaba’s house. One the way he forgets which house was Jaba’s. He asks a neighbor to tell him which house was
Jaba’s. **PAUSE** (Please or thank you?) The neighbor tells him that Jaba’s house is the blue house on the right.
**PAUSE** (Please or thank you?) When Giga arrives at Jaba’s house, Jaba is at the door to greet him. Giga gives
Jaba his present. Jaba says… **PAUSE** (Please or thank you?). Jaba’s mother asks Giga to sit down and brings
him a glass of campoti. **PAUSE** (Please or thank you?). Soon other friends arrive and they all sit down at the
table to eat khinkhali and eat cake. Giga wants the pepper that is on the other side of the table and asks his
friend Nino to give it to him. **PAUSE** (Please or thank you?) After a while, Giga needs to use the restroom,
but doesn’t know where it is. He asks Jaba’s mother. **PAUSE** (Please or thank you?) Soon it is time for Giga to
go home. He has had a lot of fun at the party. Jaba and Jaba’s mother say goodbye. **PAUSE** (Please or thank
you?) When Giga arrives back home, he is very tired. He says goodnight to his parents and falls asleep. It was a
very long day!

42
Self-Awareness
and Self-Esteem

43
44
“Me” Collage make sure you can fit every envelope on the
string).
Topic: Self-Awareness, Self-Esteem, Communication 2) Give each student one envelope.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 3) Have each person in the group put his/her name
from this activity?): To help students express them- on the envelope.
selves and identify what make them who they are 4) Have students punch a hole in the corner of the
and what is important to them. envelope and thread through the string (so every-
Number of Students: 5-30 one’s envelope is dangling on the string).
Age Range of Students: 10-17 5) Attach the rope or heavy string along a wall or in be-
Time Required: 45 minutes - 1 hour tween chairs so the envelopes dangle in the middle.
Materials: Magazines (many), Scissors (several pairs), 6) Cut 3x5 cards in half and provide a stack for the
Pens, Glue, Paper; Optional: Colored paper, Poster group members to use at any time.
board, Colored pens/pencils, Markers 7) Inform everyone to write a nice note or compli-
ment on a card to anyone else in the group.
8) Put that comment or note in that person’s envelope.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
9) Encourage the group to write positive notes to as
1) Tell students to individually cut pictures or word many people as they can (if the activity happens
phrases out of magazines that represent their over several days group members should write
personal interests and abilities, or who they are. notes to everyone).
2) Tell students to glue pictures and words onto a sheet 10) At a designated time allow everyone to read his
of construction paper/regular paper to form a col- or her “love line” notes.
lage (give them at least 20 minutes for this) Encour- 11) When the activity is finished, a group member may
age them to put down many different things. take his/her envelope home to read in the future.
3) When they are finished, collect the collages.
4) Number the collages and hand them up. *Note: This activity can be finished in one class pe-
5) Completed collages will be displayed and num- riod or over a period of time
bered.
6) Tell students to write down who they think each Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
collage belongs to (this is to be done with NO
talking). Give them several minutes for this.  How do you feel after reading all the notes that
7) Each collage should be matched with its owner you have been given?
and the owner should be given time to explain  How did you feel when writing notes to other
what he/she put on their collage and what the people?
symbols meant.  Why is it important to be able to accept and to
8) You can keep them in your room on display if stu- give compliments?
dents allow you to.
Glory Story
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Topic: Self-Esteem
 Discuss what students think makes up a person.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
 Talk about how everyone is different inside and from this activity?): To increase students’ self-es-
out (diversity). teem by recognizing positive traits in others and
 Talk about self-esteem. hearing positive comments about them.
Number of Students: 10-30
Love-Line Age Range of Students: 12-17
Time Required: 25-30 minutes
Topic: Self-Esteem Materials: Paper, Pens/pencils
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To communicate feelings and to
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
improve the self-esteem of others.
Number of Students: 10-30 1) Divide the class into groups of 3-5.
Age Range of Students: 10-17 2) Separate the groups so that they cannot hear
Time Required: 30 – 40 minutes each other.
Materials: 1 large envelope for each student, A stack 3) Have each group take out a couple sheets of pa-
of 3x5 cards cut in half (or paper), Pens or pencils, per and a pen/pencil.
One piece of heavy string or rope (length depends on 4) Assign each group one of the other groups and ask
group size), Hole punch (or something to poke holes them to write down all the names of the people
in cards/paper in that other group on their paper.
5) Ask each group to write a story that includes all
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): the members of the other group as the charac-
ters. Include the positive traits, strong points and
1) Before class, cut a large piece of string (length assets of each person as a part of the story line.
depends on how many students are in the class, You may need to provide guidance to students
who are having trouble writing a story.

45
6) Once all the stories are written, ask each group Age Range of Students: 12-17
to read their story to the entire group. Time Required: 30 – 40 minutes
7) Leave room for discussion. Materials: Large pieces of paper for each group, Col-
ored markers/paint, Tape
* Note: The group should know each other well be-
fore they do this activity Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: 1) Divide the class into groups of 3 or 4.


2) Give each group a large piece of paper and mark-
 Were you surprised by any of the attributes that the ers/paint.
other group included as part of your character? 3) Tell them they must create a storefront that ex-
 Can you think of any additional positive traits presses everyone in the group’s positive attri-
that you could add to your character or to anyone butes and personal qualities.
else’s character? 4) They can use signs, posters, or items (for exam-
 How can you build upon your strong points to ple: they might advertise books for people who
improve you life and to develop you “character” like to read, skis for a skiing fan, a radio for a
into what you really want to be? music lover etc).
5) After each group has finished, have them present
it to the class.
Bold Billboard 6) Put up the storefronts and allow time for every-
Topic: Self-Esteem one to look at the posters.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To give students the opportunity Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
to express their positive traits and attributes in a
non-threatening environment.  Did anyone have difficulty thinking of things to
but on your storefront?
Number of Students: 10-30
 How did you feel when others were looking at
Age Range of Students: 10-17
your storefront?
Time Required: 30 minutes
 Why is it important to be able to identify positive
Materials: One large sheet of paper for each group, things about yourself? Why is it important to be
Paints, paintbrushes or fat colored markers, Tape able to tell other people these things?

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):


Self-Esteem Graffiti
1) Divide the class into groups of 3 or 4.
Topic: Self-Esteem
2) Give each group a large piece of paper.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
3) Tell the groups that they must make a billboard
from this activity?): To give students the opportunity
that is big, bold and colorful.
to express their positive trains and attributes in a
4) The billboard also must have words and pictures
non-threatening environment.
that reflect the positive traits of those creating it.
Number of Students: 10-30
5) Each person must advertise him/herself through
their group’s billboard by highlighting his/her Age Range of Students: 12-17
own unique and positive traits. Time Required: 30 minutes
6) Once everyone has completed their billboard, ask Materials: Large pieces of paper for each group, Col-
each person to read their billboard to the group. ored markers/paint, Tape
7) Hang billboards on the wall if there is room to do so.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
1) Divide the class into group of 3 or 4.
 Did anyone have difficulty thinking of things to 2) Give each group a large piece of paper and col-
but on your billboard? ored markers/paint.
 How did you feel when others were looking at 3) Tell each group to make “graffiti” on their paper.
your billboard? 4) First, everyone should put their names on their
 Why is it important to be able to identify positive papers and then paint two positive words de-
things about yourself? Why is it important to be scribing themselves.
able to tell other people these things? 5) Each person must then go around the group and
paint at least one nice word or comment on ev-
eryone else’s paper.
Storefront 6) Let everyone have time to look at their paper and
everyone else’s paper.
Topic: Self-Esteem
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To allow students to use adjec- Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
tives, pictures and objects to express who they are.
 Did anyone have difficulty thinking of things to
Number of Students: 10-30
put on your graffiti?

46
 How did you feel when others were looking at Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
your graffiti?
 Why is it important to be able to identify positive 1) Give each student a balloon.
things about yourself? Why is it important to be 2) Tell the students to blow it up, but NOT to tie it.
able to tell other people these things? They should hold it closed with their fingers.
3) While holding it in the air, have them write their
names on the balloon (they may need a partner’s
King’s Throne help for this).
4) Tell the students to let the air out of their balloons.
Topic: Self-esteem
5) Pass out the paper, scissors, pens/pencils to everyone.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
6) Gather the group in a circle.
from this activity?): To increase self-esteem through
receiving positive comments from peers. 7) Tell the students to pass their balloon to the per-
son sitting next to them.
Number of Students: 10-30
8) Once everyone has somebody else’s balloon, each
Age Range of Students: 10-17
person needs to cut a piece of paper small enough
Time Required: 25-30 minutes so that it can have a comment on it and fit into
Materials: Paper, Pen/pencils, Chair the balloon.
9) Have the students write a comment about the
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): person whose balloon it is.
10) Have the students put the comment into the balloon.
1) Set up a chair at the front of the room. This is the 11) Have the students pass the balloon to the next
“king’s throne”. person.
2) Divide the class into groups of 10 – 15. 12) Continue this until everyone has their own bal-
3) Have each person write down a positive comment loon again.
about each member of the class. 13) Ask the group if they want to know what the com-
4) Once everyone has completed writing down their pliments are in the balloon.
compliments, select one member of the class to 14) Ask them to figure out the best way to get the
sit in the chair (the king’s throne) at the front of compliments out of the balloon so they can read
the room. them.
5) Have the class take turns and read their comment 15) Now everyone may blow up their balloon and tie it.
about the person in the “king’s throne”. 16) Each person must then pop his/her balloon and
6) Allow enough time for each person to sit on the read the compliments that are found there
throne and hear all of the comments written
about them.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
7) Discuss the activity.
 How do you feel after reading the positive com-
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: ments found in your balloon?
 Do you believe these compliments? Why or why
 How did you feel when you were on the king’s not?
throne?  Is it easier to give and receive compliments anon-
 How does it make you feel when you hear positive ymously or directly? Why?
comments about yourself?
 Why is it important to hear positive things from
others? Ten Seconds
 Do you more often hear positive comments made
Topic: Self-Esteem
about yourself or negative comments?
 If you mainly hear negative comments, how can Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
you put yourself in situations where you will hear from this activity?): To build self-esteem and to cre-
more positive comments? ate a positive atmosphere by saying and hearing pos-
itive comments and help those who need to learn to
think positively.
Balloon Burst Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: 10-17
Topic: Self-Esteem
Time Required: Depends on group size (ten seconds
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain are needed for each participant)
from this activity?): To learn to give and receive
Materials: A watch/stop-clock/timing device (must
compliments and to recognize positive qualities in
measure seconds)
oneself.
Number of Students: 12-30
Age Range of Students: 10-17 Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Time Required: 40 minutes 1) Gather the class in a circle.
Materials: 1 large balloon (not inflated) per person, 2) Ask for a volunteer.
Permanent markers, Paper, Pens/pencils, Scissors 3) The volunteer has ten seconds to say something
positive, nice or uplifting.

47
4) These comments can be about anything, or you Soccer shot:
may limit the comments to the group, group 1) Set up a soccer goal that is challenging but not
members, and or/individual giving the comment. too difficult.
5) After the positive comment has been given, the 2) Each person takes a turn and attempts to make a
next person in the circle gets ten seconds to come goal from a predetermined spot.
up with his/her own positive comment. 3) If the shooter makes a goal, then everyone in the
6) Allow each person around the circle ten seconds group must say something nice about him/her.
to say something positive, nice or uplifting. 4) If the shooter misses the goal, then he/she must
7) If someone doesn’t say something nice they are say something nice about the next person in
“out”. line.
8) You may also be put out if you say a positive com-
ment that has already been said or if you say Write and run:
something negative.
1) Divide the group into two teams.
9) You may also add that a person can enter back
2) Tell each team to form a single file line.
into the game if people say two nice things about
3) Set a large piece of paper and fat tipped marker
you.
at the other end of the room or a good distance
10) You can change difficulty by adding or subtracting
away.
time.
4) Give the group a three-minute time limit.
5) Tell the team this is a race to see who can come
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: up with the most positive things written on their
paper.
 Was it hard or easy for you to come up with posi-
6) Tell the teams that the first person in each line
tive comments?
must run to his/her team’s paper and write down
 Do you usually say negative words to others or
something that he/she is good at doing or a spe-
positive? Why?
cial quality he/she has.
 What is the effect of positive words on a group?
7) Once they have written something down, they
 How can positive words affect your everyday leave the pen by the paper and run back to the
life? line and tag the next person in line.
 Do you need to hear or say positive words more 8) That person runs and does the same thing and so
often? on until the three minutes are up.
9) After the race is over, the teams count their com-
Three for Me ments and you declare a winner.

Topic: Self-Esteem Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:


Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To demonstrate how to accept  Did anyone feel uncomfortable today for any rea-
and give compliments as well as make positive state- son? If so, why?
ments about oneself.  How did it feel to get compliments?
Number of Students: 5-30  How did you feel when you gave compliments?
Age Range of Students: 10-17  Was it easier to give and receive compliments
Time Required: 40 minutes during a game than in real life? Why?
Materials: Frisbee, Hula Hoop (or any type of target),
Soccer ball, Two orange cones or boundary markers Me on TV
for a soccer goal, Two large sheets of paper and two
fat tipped markers, Stopwatch or timer Topic: Self-esteem
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): from this activity?): To identify and advertise one’s
positive traits.
Engage the group in the following three activities Number of Students: 4-30
(one after the other) Age Range of Students: 12-17
Time Required: 40 minutes
Frisbee throw: Materials: Paper, Pens/paper
1) Lean a hula-hoop or other target against a wall or
other stable surface.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
2) Each person takes a turn throwing the Frisbee at
the target from a predetermined spot. 1) Divide the class into groups of 4 – 5.
3) If the Frisbee goes in the hoop, the individual 2) Give each person in the group paper and a pen-
who threw it must say on nice thing about him/ cil.
herself.
3) Instruct the group that each person must create
4) If the target is missed, then the individual must a TV commercial that advertises his/her positive
point to anyone else in the group and that person traits. If time is limited, ask the group to create a
must say something nice about that individual. TV commercial for only one person in the group.

48
4) Each commercial must contain at least three pos- Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
itive traits and must convince the audience that
the person being advertised has special gifts,  Were you surprised by some of the questions you
talents or personality traits that make him/her received from your peers? Which ones?
great!  How did this activity make you feel?
5) Allow time for each person to create a screenplay  Is it easy to receive compliments? Why or why
for his/her commercial. not?
6) Each person must be in his or her commercial and
may use as many of the other group members as
needed to play characters or props.
The Car Wash
7) Set a time limit for planning and for how long each Topic: Self-Esteem
commercial is according to the size of the class.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
8) Have each student present his/her commercial. from this activity?): To boost group members’ self-
esteem.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Number of Students: 10-30
Age Range of Students: 10-17
 Was this a difficult thing for you to do? Why or
why not? Time Required: 5-10 minutes
 Would it have been easier to make a commercial Materials: None
for your friend than for yourself? Why?
 What did you learn about others in the group Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
when doing this activity?
 Is it hard to tell others the good things about 1) Line up your class in two parallel lines quite close
yourself? Why? together.
2) One student is sent through the wash (between
the lines) and everyone touches him or her and
Ten Questions says words of praise and affection and encour-
agement.
Topic: Self-Esteem 3) The pats on the back, hand-shaking, and verbal
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain support produce a sparkling, shinny and happy
from this activity?): For each student to get bom- car at the end of the wash.
barded with qualities that classmates find positive 4) It’s best to run one or two people through the
about him/her. car wash each day rather than everybody on one
Number of Students: 4-30 day (that makes sure the compliments are fresh,
Age Range of Students: 10-17 energetic and authentic).
Time Required: 40 minutes
Materials: Paper, Pen/pencils Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 How did this activity make you feel?


Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 Why do you think people need to receive compli-
1) Have the students write down a list of personal ments?
characteristics that are positive about them.  What happens if people receive a lot of negative
2) This list should focus upon personally and char- remarks?
acter traits, but can also include physical charac-
teristics, skills, hobbies or interests.
IALAC
3) Tell students to keep their private lists with them
as they form groups of three or four. Topic: Self-Esteem
4) When the groups are together, have members Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
count off as one, two, three and four. from this activity?): To illustrate how one’s self-con-
5) The number one person starts by saying “You cept can be destroyed by others.
have ten questions to guess which of my positive Number of Students: 10-30
qualities I am pointing to on my list”.
Age Range of Students: 12-17
6) The group then takes turns trying to guess what
Time Required: 30 minutes
the quality might be.
Materials: A sheet of paper with the letters IALAC writ-
7) Be sure to emphasize that both the characteris-
ten on it in large bold print (pronounced I-ah-lack)
tics and the guesses must be positive.
8) When a group member offers a guess, the focus
person responds by saying “Yes, thank, I am hon- Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
est, a generous person, etc, but that’s not the
one I’m pointing to”. 1) Hold the paper with IALAC on it on your chest so
everyone can see it.
9) When the correct one is said, the person says “yes,
thank you, that’s it. I am a good football player”. 2) Tell them “everyone carries invisible IALAC signs
around with them at all times and wherever they
10) When ten questions have been exhausted or when
go. IALAC stands for “I am lovable and capable”.
the quality has been guessed, the next person
This is our self-concept, or how we feel about
takes a turn.

49
ourselves. The size of our sign (how good we feel Number of Students: 10-50
about ourselves) is affected by how others inter- Age Range of Students: All ages
act with us. If someone is nasty to us, teases us, Time Required: 20 minutes
or puts us down, rejects us, hits us etc, then a
Materials: Paper, Pens; Optional: Colored pens/pencils
piece of our IALAC sign is destroyed (illustrate
this by tearing off a piece of the sign).
3) Tell the students a story to show how this hap- Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
pens in every day life.
1) Teach students how to say “I love myself” and
4) The main character is a boy or girl who is the
what it means.
same age they are (pick a name that no one in
the class has). 2) Have the students write “I love myself” on a
piece of paper.
5) As you tell the story try to be as emotional and
dramatic as you can without overdoing it. 3) Tell them they must add “because” and then fin-
ish the statement.
6) A sample story is below, but you will have to use
your own imagination to fill it in (some teachers 4) Tell the students they must have at least three
have their students help write the story). finishes to their statements.
7) As you describe each event, tear another piece 5) When they are finished, have them draw a pic-
off the sign until at the end you are left with ture about how they love themselves.
almost nothing. 6) Have them share their statements and picture
with the class.
Story: A 7th form boy named Lasha is still lying
in bed three minutes after his alarm goes off.
All of a sudden his mother calls, to him, “La- Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
sha, you lazy-head, get your body out of bed
and get down here before I send your father up  Why is loving yourself important?
there!” (rip) Lasha gets out of bed, goes to get  Do you think it is easier to love yourself or love
dressed and can’t find a clean pair of socks. His others? Why?
mother tells him he’ll have to wear yesterday’s  What are ways you can show that you love yourself?
pair. (rip) He goes to brush his teeth and his
older sister, who’s already locked herself in
the bathroom, tells him to drop dead. (rip) He
Introduction to Self
goes to breakfast and finds cold tea waiting for Topic: Self-Awareness, Icebreaker
him. (rip) As he leaves for school, he forgets
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
his lunch money and his mother calls to him,
from this activity?): To identify and explain at least
“Lasha, you’ve forgotten your money, you’d
four things that symbolize who they are, and then
forget your head if it weren’t attached!” (rip)
identify and explain four things that identify what
As he gets to the corner, he sees he see the
they want to be in the future.
marshutka pull away and he has to walk a long
way to school. (rip) He’s late to school and gets Number of Students: 5-30
yelled at by his teacher. (rip) Age Range of Students: 10 and up
Time Required: 30 minutes
Other examples: being criticized for forget-
ting homework, getting a bad mark on a test, Materials: Colored/white paper cut in half, One big
being called on for the only homework ques- magic marker, Assorted colored pencils (pens are
tion you can’t answer, being picked last to okay too)
play soccer, dropping khachapuri in the dirt
with everyone laughing, being picked on by Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
bullies on the way home from school, being
referred to as “hey you” in gym class. 1) Let the students pick their favorite color paper
(or just take a paper if it’s all white).
2) Have them fold the paper lengthwise so that it
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: makes a “tent” that can stand on its own.
 How does your IALAC sign get torn up? What things 3) Have the students write their name in BIG letters
affect you the most? on one side.
 What do you do that destroys the IALAC signs of 4) On one side have the students 4 symbols of who
others in school, family etc? they are in the 4 corners (religious symbols, fa-
vorite food, favorite animal, flowers, family
 How do you feel when your IALAC sign is ripped?
members etc).
When you rip someone else’s?
5) On the other side have the students draw 4 sym-
 What can we do to help people enlarge their signs
bols of what they want to be in the future (teach-
rather than make them smaller?
er, mother, father, doctor, happy, rich, etc).
6) Have them come to the front of the class and ex-
I Love Myself plain their drawings (show encouragement, this
might be hard for some).
Topic: Self-Esteem 7) Use the nametags during the rest of the lessons.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): Students will be able to describe * Note: An example nametag is shown on the next page
at least one quality they like about themselves.

50
teem, good communication skills and resistance
to peer pressure.
10) Let the group brainstorm about the many life
skills that might have helped the young person
effectively manage the situation in the role play.
11) Use this exercise as means of exploring the way
these life skills could change a situation in a
young person’s life.

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 Have students come up and explain the bridge


model to the class.
 Discuss any personal experiences that relate to
this activity.

Do We Have Self-Esteem?
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Topic: Self-Esteem
 Why is it necessary to have a good idea of who Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
you are? from this activity?): To define self-esteem and find
 Why should you think about what you want to be/ whether or not we have self-esteem.
your future goals? Number of Students: 5-30
 How can you communicate to people who you Age Range of Students: 10 and up
are? Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes
Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Mark-
ers/chalk, Paper (for each student), Pens/pencils
Identifying the Missing Life Skill
Topic: Self-Awareness, Character Building Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To identify specific life skills that 1) Write the term “self-esteem” on the board.
are missing or need reinforcement in common com- 2) Ask for possible definitions of “self-esteem” from
munity situations. To describe the bridge model. the class.
Number of Students: 10-30 3) Possible definitions could be:
 How you see yourself
Age Range of Students: All ages
 Believing that you are worth a lot
Time Required: 1.5 – 2 hours
 Person strength (etc)
Materials: Bridge Model; Optional: Assorted props for 4) Ask the students where self-esteem comes from.
role plays, Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart
5) Write down what the students come up with on
the board.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 6) Possible ideas include:
 How your parents raise you or treat you
1) Review the Bridge Model (the Bridge Model is  Image of girls or boys in the community
found in the original Lifeskills Handbook).  Treatment by brothers, sisters, other fam-
2) Divide the class into small groups. ily members
3) Tell each group to create a role play showing a  Personal reflections on our lives
typical risk situation that a young person might  Belief in God or higher power (part of His
face. creation etc)
4) Examples might include being pressured to have 7) Tell the class to think for a few moments about
sex, doing drugs or doing something they don’t their own image. What are the most important
feel comfortable with. parts of you? How do you see yourself?
5) The role play should show the young person en- 8) Tell the class to write 10 sentences about them-
gaging in the risk behavior because one of the life selves starting with “I am” (examples can be “I
skills we listed on the bridge is missing. am intelligent”, “I am hard working” etc).
6) For example, the role play might show a young 9) After they are finished, ask the students to check
person incapable of being aggressive and then the things they wrote which they like about them-
giving in to drinking alcohol. selves.
7) After the group has come back together, invite 10) Have them put a question mark next to the parts
each group to perform its role play. they would like to change.
8) Members of the larger group should then identify 11) Ask the class, after looking at their lists; do they think
which skill is missing in the role play. they have good self-esteem? Do they need to maybe
9) The group may notice more than one life skill is work on developing their self image a bit more?
missing – perhaps the person is lacking self-es-

51
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: All ages
 Journal about self-esteem, including ideas on
Time Required: 30 minutes
where self-esteem comes from.
Materials: None
 Write down five things you could do to increase
your self-esteem.
 Think about what kind of things bring down self-esteem. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Ask students to stand in a circle.


A Pat on the Back 2) Ask one volunteer to stand in the middle.
3) Ask him or her to stand still, facing the same way
Topic: Self-Esteem through the questions and answers which are to
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain follow.
from this activity?): To build self-esteem and encour- 4) Explain to all participants that you are going to
age others to build up the people around them. ask some questions.
Number of Students: 5-30 5) Ask everyone to answers at all times according to
Age Range of Students: All ages what they can actually see from their own posi-
Time Required: 30 -45 minutes tion, not what they know is there.
Materials: Paper for each student, Markers or pens for 6) Ask someone standing in front or the volunteer
each student, Tape, Pins, clothespins or paperclips “How many eyes does he or she have?”
7) Ask someone standing behind the volunteer the
same question.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
8) Ask someone standing directly to the side of the
1) Give each student a piece of paper, a pen/marker volunteer the same question.
and a pin/paperclip. 9) Then place someone else in the middle.
2) Explain to the group that we all have positive 10) Choose another part of the body, such as the
things we would like to say to one another, but arms.
sometimes we forget to tell each other the good 11) Go through the same questions with three differ-
things. Tell the class this exercise will give every- ent people.
one a chance to do that. 12) Finally, ask one participant to walk around whole
3) Tell each student to write their name in the up- circle, looking at the volunteer and from all angles.
per right-hand corner. 13) Ask the walker to give a running commentary on
4) Tell the students to draw a symbol that represents what he or she is seeing and how his or he vision
themselves in the center of the paper (this can be of the volunteer changes.
their hand, a sun, star or any other symbol). 14) After everyone sits down, ask participants to con-
5) Tell the students to help each other pin the pa- sider how our perspective on a situation shapes
pers onto their backs. our understanding of it.
6) Give them a few minutes to think about good
things they could say about people in the room. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
7) When you say “go”, each person goes around the room
and writes positive things on everybody’s back.  How can we give ourselves a more complete pic-
8) When most have seemed to finish, you can say ture of the time?
“stop”.  In what way can we relate this exercise to our
9) Have the students remove the papers from their backs everyday experience?
and read what others have written about them.
10) You can have each student (if you have time)
stand up and read off their list to the class.
Personal Snowflake
11) You can also have them read the list of as self state- Topic: Self-Awareness
ments. For example “My name is Nino and I am
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
beautiful, kind, funny, smart and a good leader”.
from this activity?): To demonstrate how everyone is
unique and special!
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: 15 and under
 What are things you can do in real life to build
other’s self-esteem? Time Required: 30 minutes
 What are some things you can say when someone Materials: White paper (at least two for each student),
else has lowered someone’s self-esteem? Scissors (one per 3 students), Markers, Tape; Optional:
Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Chalk/markers

Fixed Positions Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):


Topic: Self-Awareness, Decision Making 1) This activity can be extra fun in winter!
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 2) Give each student a couple of white pieces of pa-
from this activity?): To show how things can be seen per and have scissors available for every three
differently from different perspectives. students or so.

52
3) Demonstrate to the students how to make a pa- Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
per snowflake.
4) Have each of your students cut out a big paper  How did your parents choose your name?
snowflake. This is done by folding one corner  Do you think you would be/act different if you
of the paper across to the opposite corner. You were given a different name? Why or why not?
should have a rectangular shape left over. Cut
this part off so you have a perfect triangle. Fold
the triangle again two times. On the folded edg-
All About Me!
es, cut out shapes in the paper. Be sure not to Topic: Self-Awareness
cut across all the way, or the snowflake will fall
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
apart. After you are finished, unfold the paper
from this activity?): To demonstrate self-awareness
and you should have a snowflake!
and share with others characteristics and qualities
5) Explain that no two snowflakes are exactly alike,
that make up who we are.
just as no two people are exactly alike.
Number of Students: 5-30
6) Have the students write words that describe
themselves on the points of the snowflake. Age Range of Students: 15 and under
7) Have each student (if they are comfortable) share Time Required: Several class periods
their snowflake and read the words they wrote Materials: Paper (at least 10 pieces for each stu-
about themselves. dents), Colored markers/pens/pencils, Pens/pen-
8) Tape the snowflakes on the wall for a fun decoration cils/markers, Cardboard or card stock, Yarn, Scis-
and to remind students what they see in themselves. sors, Hole punch (or something to punch a hole in
thick paper); Optional: Glue
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 What is diversity?
 Why is diversity important? 1) This is a good activity to do throughout the year
 What other kinds of diversity do we see in nature? or over several weeks
2) Have students create a book about themselves
including:
What’s In a Name Game  A self portrait or photo
 Drawings or photos of family members
Topic: Self-Awareness  Lists and drawings of things the child likes
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain about school
from this activity?): To brainstorm qualities and  Drawings or photos of favorite foods, toys,
characteristics about ourselves and express them books, people, games, etc.
creatively. 3) Once the pages are finished, make a cover out of
Number of Students: 5-30 cardboard or card stock. The students can glue dif-
Age Range of Students: 17 and under ferent decorations if they would like (if you have
Time Required: 15 – 25 minutes glue). You can also decorate it with stickers.
4) Bind the book by punching two or three holes on
Materials: Paper (one for each student), Pens/pencils/mark-
one end. Weave a long piece of yarn through the
ers, Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Chalk/markers
holes and tie them in a bow in the middle.
5) Set aside a special shelf or place in the room for
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): the students’ books.
6) Ask each student to share his or her “All About
1) Have students write their names in block letters
Me” book with the class.
down the side of a paper.
7) Explain that each book is different because each
2) Have them write a word or phrase that begins
person is unique.
with each letter in their name.
8) You may want to do this project at the beginning
3) Write examples on the board with your name and
of the school year and again at the end so your
other names.
students can compare the two books to see the
4) Encourage them to write words describing per-
changes in their lives and interests.
sonal strengths, qualities, hobbies, cultural back-
ground, etc.
5) An example can be: Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
N – nice
 What kind of changes did you see in your lives/in-
I – interesting
terests over the last year?
N – never late
 Were there any surprises when you looked at your
O – open to new ideas
book again? What were they?
Or
G - giving
I – imaginative Do Well. Do Better
O – only child
R – really likes football Topic: Self-Awareness, Character Building
G – great friend Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
I – ice cream lover from this activity?): To think about things you do well

53
and do not do well and to brainstorm on how to do 3) You could also get small pictures for the students
better. and put those on the poster.
Number of Students: 5-30 4) On every student’s birthday, take ten minutes to
Age Range of Students: 15 and under sing happy birthday and let them choose a game
Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes or a prize (if you have any).
5) You can also create a crown or badge for the
Materials: Paper (at least one for each student), Col-
birthday girl or boy to wear during that class.
ored markers/pens/pencils; Optional: Blackboard/
whiteboard/flipchart, Chalk/markers 6) Make sure you make the student feel extra spe-
cial on his or her special day!
7) Set a day for weekend and summer birthdays.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Hand out a piece of paper to each student. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
2) Ask each student to draw a line down the center
of the paper.  Why is it important to celebrate birthdays?
3) On one side have them write “well” and on the  How do you feel on your birthday?
other side “not so well”.
4) Have your students draw pictures of something Guess Who?
they do well on the side that says “well”.
5) Have them draw something they do not do well Topic: Self-Awareness
on the side that says “not so well”. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
6) When the students are finished, ask for volun- from this activity?): To encourage students to think
teers to talk about their pictures. about positive characteristics and qualities in others.
7) The class can then offer suggestions on how to Number of Students: 5-30
improve each other’s abilities. Age Range of Students: All ages
8) For example: Time Required: Preparation 5 – 10 minutes, 5 minutes
 I don’t run very fast. Solutions – try run- every class
ning every day and time yourself. With
Materials: Descriptions of each student; Optional: Prizes
practice you may run faster!
 I don’t do math very well. Solutions – make
sure you do all your homework. Ask the Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
teacher for help. Ask a lot of questions in
class. Do extra practice problems. Study 1) Before the classes, create a list of characteris-
before tests tics/qualities for each student (you may want to
wait until you know the students well).
2) At the beginning or the end of every class, read
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
a list of characteristics/qualities of a “mystery
 Were the solutions you found to the things you student” in the class.
did not do well easy or hard? Why? 3) Tell the class they must guess who that “mystery
 What kinds of characteristics are important when student” is.
trying to improve? 4) The first person who guesses the person described
wins.
5) You can hand out prizes of you have them.
Today’s My Day!
Topic: Self-Esteem Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain  Why is it important to hear positive things about
from this activity?): To make students feel special on yourself?
their birthday.  Why is it important to say positive things about
Number of Students: any other people?
Age Range of Students: 17 and under
Time Required: 10 minutes on any student’s birthday
Materials: Poster board or large paper, Markers, Col-
Citizen of the Week
ored markers/pens/pencils, List of birthdays from Topic: Self-Esteem
the class, Game ideas; Optional: Small pictures of
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
students, Prizes, Birthday badge/crown
from this activity?): To make a student feel special
and reward good behavior.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Number of Students: any
1) Before the school year or before your club starts Age Range of Students: All ages
up, make a poster displaying every student’s Time Required: Depends
birthday. Materials: Paying attention to good behaviors; Op-
2) You could make it a calendar or you could draw tional: Prizes, Certificates, Badges
small birthday balloons or presents and write the
name and the date in the picture.

54
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): I Am Special!

1) Start a program to recognize students for non- Here are some special things about me:
academic, positive behavior. (e.g. good citizen-
ship, politeness, cheerfulness, achieving a goal, 1. My name is ............................................. .
helpfulness, attention to rules, etc.).
2) Students and/or teachers could take part in the
2. My address is .......................................... .
selection process.
3) The “Citizen of the Week” should receive some
3. I live with .............. (how many) other people.
extra attention, for example:
 a badge proclaiming him or her as “Citizen
of the Week” 4. My phone number is .................................. .
 become special monitor or helper for the
week 5. I go to ......................................... School.
 be allowed to help choose a craft project
or game for the class to do 6. I am in .......................................... grade.
 have his or her picture put up on a class
bulletin board 7. My birthday is ......................................... .
 receive a “proclamation” describing his or
her positive behavior
8. My favorite game is .................................. .
 be honored with a “good citizen ceremo-
ny” at a parent or school function
4) This can be something within your class or some- 9. My favorite color is ................................... .
thing to implement in your whole school. Talk to
you director about this idea. 10. One thing I do really well is: ........................
............................................................
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
11. One thing I would like to learn to do better is:...
 What is a citizen? ............................................................
 What are the characteristics of a good citizen?
12. One thing I like to do with my family is: ..........
Mirror, Mirror ............................................................
13. One thing I like to do in school is:..................
Topic: Self-Awareness, Self-Esteem ............................................................
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To boost self-esteem/self-aware- 14. One thing I like to do with my friends is:..........
ness and have some fun! ............................................................
Number of Students: 7-30
Age Range of Students: 12 and under DRAW OR PASTE
Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes YOUR PICTURE HERE
Materials: Hand mirror; Optional: Radios/CD/Cas-
sette player, Recorded music

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Have your students sit in a circle.


2) Turn on music (or make your own music!).
3) As the music plays, the children pass the hand
mirror around the circle. Tell students they must
look into the mirror quickly, think of something
that makes them special and quickly pass it to
the next person.
4) When the music stops, the child with the mirror
looks into it and says, “I am special because .....
.................................,” filling in the blank.
5) The game proceeds giving everyone a turn.

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 Was it easy or difficult to think of something spe-


cial about yourself? Why
 Why is it sometimes difficult to say good things
about yourself?

55
The Person I Admire 8) In the groups, chose one of the stories you told in
a pair to share with the other pair (there should
Topic: Self-Awareness, Character Building be two stories).
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 9) Have the groups of four find another group.
from this activity?): To think about and share sto- 10) Have each group pick a story and share it with the
ries about people we admire and to find the qualities other group.
they hold in common 11) Do this until you have two or three large groups.
Number of Students: 5-30 12) Have each group pick a story to share and ask for
Age Range of Students: All ages three stories be shared to the class.
Time Required: 45 minutes – 1 hour 13) Split the groups back up into groups of four.
Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Mark- 14) Give each group a large piece of paper and a
ers/chalk, Large paper(one for each group), Pens/ marker.
pencils 15) Tell the groups to think about what the role mod-
els in each of the stories told had in common.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 16) Tell the groups to write down the qualities in
common on their large piece of paper and title
1) To begin the lesson, write down the term “role the piece of paper “Qualities We Admire”. Give
model” on the board. the groups about 5 or 10 minutes for this.
2) Discuss the meaning of “role model” with the 17) After they are done, have them present their list
class. to the group.
3) An example definition could be “Someone whose 18) As a class, discuss what they think are the top ten
example you follow in life” or “Someone you ad- qualities they admire in a person and write them
mire and wish to be like”. on the board.
4) Ask the participants to think about who is the 19) Discuss the importance of roles models and the
person they most admire in the world. It could qualities they chose
be anyone, not just someone famous. It could be
a neighbor, a friend, a family member or a celeb- Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
rity. Give them a few minutes to think about it.
5) Tell the class to get into pairs.  What things could you do to make yourself more
6) Give ten 5 – 10 minutes each for each person to like the person you admire?
tell their pair a story about their favorite person.
7) After this is done, tell the pairs to find another
pair (now there should be groups of four)

56
Teamwork
and Leadership

57
58
Team Counting 5) The only time you can touch the “blind man/
woman” is if the he/she is in danger
Topic: Teamwork, Icebreaker 6) Before the blindfolds are put on the “blind man/
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain woman”, be sure to explain to the leaders that
from this activity?): To help students learn to work they are responsible for their partner’s safety. If
as a team. they purposely put their partner in danger, they
Number of Students: 10-30 will have to sit out for the rest of the game.
Age Range of Students: 10-17 7) Allow the pairs to walk around for at least ten
minutes.
Time Required: 10-30 minutes
8) Encourage the leaders to try more difficult plac-
Materials: A room with a lot of empty floor space
es, like stairs or doors.
(enough for kids to lay down spaced out)
9) After ten minutes, ask the blind men/women to
take off their blindfolds and call everyone in to-
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): gether.
10) Discuss the activity.
1) Have each student spread out in a room and find
a place.
2) Have the students lay down on the floor, hands at *Note: You can create a fun variation of this activity if
their side, eyes facing the ceiling your group finds this too easy. Designate a path with
obstacles and have a blind man/woman’s race! Make
3) Explain to students that they are not allowed to
sure that you don’t include dangers such as stairs or
move, make noises or say anything besides the
holes which could seriously injure a student. A park
numbers.
with tress and bushes is the best location for this.
4) Explain to students that they must count to twen-
ty (or however many students are in the class)
without saying the number at the same time, Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
without any student saying a number twice and
without communicating who goes next.  How did it feel to be blind? Were your frightened?
Did you trust your leader?
5) If the students can’t get it down, try to give them
hints (for example, try to go slow or if you say  Was it difficult to be the leader? What was the
a number, continue to say that number every more difficult part? Why?
time).  What are other examples of times when you have
to trust someone else to lead you?
 What are other examples of times when someone
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
must lead others?
 You may try to discuss what happened and what  Why is trusting others important? In the game?
were the challenges and the successes of the ac- In life?
tivity. Also ask what made it better/easier and  Why is good leadership important? In the game?
what they learned in terms of teamwork. In life?

Blind Man’s Walk Rope Square


Topic: Leadership, Teamwork, Communication Topic: Teamwork, Icebreaker
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To increase student’s ability to from this activity?): To increase students’ ability to
rely on other members of the group and to teach work as a group, increase group communication, and
student’s how to lead others. strengthen individual communication.
Number of Students: 2-30 Number of Students: 4-30
Age Range of Students: 10 – 17 Age Range of Students: 13-17
Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes Time Required: 30 min -1 hr.
Materials:A large open, safe space (preferably out- Materials: A large play area (half a gym, open field),
side), Blindfolds (one for each pair of students) Rope (about 40 feet long), Blindfolds for each team
member; Optional: Time clock
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
1) Divide the class into pairs.
2) Give each pair a blindfold. 1) Divide the class into teams of four.
3) Tell the pairs to choose one person who will be 2) Explain activity thoroughly.
the “blind man/woman” and one person who will 3) Blindfold each member of the team (have one
be the leader. team go at a time so the other’s can observe the
4) Explain to the group that the “blind man/wom- teamwork).
an” will be blindfolded and the leader must lead 4) Coil the rope up in the large play area.
the “blind man/woman” by VOICE ONLY. This 5) Tell the group that they must make a square with
means that they cannot touch their partner at the rope and that each member had to be holding
any time! one corner of the square.

59
6) Have the team first talk about what they will do Number of Students: 20-30
(with blindfolds). Age Range of Students: 8-10
7) Encourage constant talking and communication Time Required: 10 – 20 minutes (depending on group
with the team members. size)
8) Tell the observing students to observe only and Materials: A ball, block or beanbag
do not try to help the team (unless they are giv-
ing general encouragement).
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
9) You may time the activity to make it more chal-
lenging, or maybe make it a contest between 1) Divide the class into two teams.
teams.
2) Within the teams have the students chose a part-
10) Discuss what happened with each team after ner.
everyone is done (ask what went wrong, what
3) Line up across from their partner facing each
they could do better, what strategies worked the
other.
best).
4) Have the partner link hands across.
5) Each team starts the ball/block/beanbags at
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: the end of the line and tries to pass it, everyone
keeping their hands together, down the line.
 Try asking the group to talk about how the meth-
ods used in solving this problem could be used in 6) If it is dropped, the partners must pick it up with
solving other problems as a group. their hands still held together.
7) The first team to get the ball/block/beanbag all
the way down the line wins.
Human Knot
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Topic: Teamwork, Leadership
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain  What were the difficulties of working together in
from this activity?): To develop teamwork and lead- this activity?
ership ability within the group.  How would these difficulties be experienced in
Number of Students: 5-30 real world situations?
Age Range of Students: 10-17  Despite these difficulties, what are the advan-
Time Required: 10-15 minutes tages of cooperative teamwork?
Materials: People!
The Boat is Sinking
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Topic: Leadership, Teamwork
1) If the class is large, you should divide it. There Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
should be no more than 10 or 15 students in a from this activity?): To help students develop listen-
group. ing skills and how to lead/follow a leader.
2) Have all the students get in a tight circle and Number of Students: 12-30
grab two different hands.
Age Range of Students: 8-17
3) This should create a knot.
Time Required: 10-25 minutes
4) Tell students that they must NOT let go at any
Materials: Optional: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart
time.
5) Tell the students that they must untangle them-
selves and make a circle holding hands. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
6) Remind them NOT to let go.
1) Have the class get into a large circle.
7) You may have to help them sometimes, but try to
let them be the leaders. 2) One person from the group is selected as the
leader and must stand in the center of the cir-
cle.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: 3) All students should be facing one direction (one
student should be looking at the back of the one
 Would you have been successful if you only lis-
in front of them).
tened to your own ideas?
4) The leader moves clockwise around the circle
 What was the most frustrating part?
rapidly and quickly chants “The boat is sinking,
 What were the challenges? the boat is sinking”.
 How did you overcome those challenges? 5) At the same time, the circle begins to move coun-
 What was your plan of action? Did you have one? ter clockwise.
6) Every time the leader says “the boat is sinking”,
Cross-Hand Pass the class replies “sinking”.
7) The leader can repeat this as many times as he/
Topic: Teamwork, Icebreaker she wants.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 8) When the leader says “a boat of __ (any number)”,
from this activity?): To encourage cooperation and the group must break apart quickly and form groups
team work and to just have fun! of the selected boat number by holding hands.

60
9) Those not in a group with the right numbers are Number of Students: 5-30
“all wet” and are out of the game. Age Range of Students: All ages
10) Continue until you have a few winners. Time Required: 15 – 20 minutes
Materials: Outdoors, Whatever the class brought with
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: them (no telling ahead of time)

 How hard was it to pay attention to the leader


Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
when he/she gave instructions?
 Why is it important to follow the leader of this 1) Take participants outside where they can have a
activity? large area to work.
 How does this apply to real life situations? 2) Split them into two teams (or more if the group is
large).
Toxic River 3) Explain that they are to create a long line on the
ground or floor, using whatever they currently
Topic: Teamwork have on their bodies.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 4) They are not permitted to get additional things,
from this activity?): To learn creative problem solving but only whatever they have (tissue, watches,
skills, to work together as a team, to develop com- clothing, shoes etc).
munication and demonstrate leadership abilities. 5) Their goal is to have a longer line than the other
Number of Students: 20-30 teams.
Age Range of Students: 8-17 6) If people get really creative they will lay down on
the ground and use themselves to make the line
Time Required: 30 minutes – 1 hour
longer!
Materials: Blocks of plywood or pieces of firewood
7) The team with the longer line is the winner.
about 1-1.5 feet long (5 per every five people or so)

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:


Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 How does this exercise relate to teambuilding in
1) Mark off an area about 15 feet wide (your “riv-
real life?
er”).
2) Divide the group into teams of about 10-15 people.
3) Explain to the students that they must cross the Concentration
river.
4) The river is toxic, and if anyone on the team puts Topic: Teamwork, Leadership
even one foot in the river, the whole team will Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
have to start over. from this activity?): To allow a group to work togeth-
5) Hand each team equal numbers of blocks of wood, er to accomplish a difficult task. To give the opportu-
and explain that these are “magic lily pads”. and nity for leaders to emerge and lead the activity.
that as long as someone is in physical contact with Number of Students: 10-30
a lily pad, they will float on the river and you can Age Range of Students: 12 and up
stand on them. However, if no one is touching a Time Required: 30 minutes – 1 hour
lily pad, then it will sink (you or another teacher Materials: 2 long ropes, Large space, Two poles or
will take it away). trees to tie a rope across
6) Explain that the first team to get all of their play-
er to the other side of the river will win.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
7) Every time a team has to start over, give them
back all of the blocks of wood that have been 1) Before the class starts, tie two long ropes be-
taken from them. tween two trees or poles, waist high (make sure
8) If the game lasts to long and the students are hav- no one is able to jump over the rope).
ing too much difficulty, give them more blocks. 2) Divide the group into two teams (if there isn’t
enough students for two teams, it is okay to use
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: just one team).
3) Tell the teams they must get their whole team
 Did you help one another? over the rope without touching it, but there are
 Did one person on each team become a leader? rules to follow:
 How did different teams communicate within  Every member of the team must get over
their teams? the rope.
 No one can touch the rope.
 Every team member must be touching at
The Longest Line least one other person on the team (the
team must be connected at all times).
Topic: Teamwork
 If any of the rules are broken, the team
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain must start over again.
from this activity?): To build teamwork and practice
*Note: This activity can be very challenging and
using available resources.
frustrating for students. Be encouraging and pos-

61
itive! You may need to provide assistance from 3) Ask all to put both hands on the shoulders of the
time to time. person in front of them.
4) Explain that you are going to call out “1, 2, 3
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: SIT!” and that everyone should call it out slowly
with you.
 What did you find difficult about this activity? 5) On the word sit, everyone should carefully sit
 What made working together easier? More difficult? down on the lap of the person behind him or her,
 Did you have a leader? How did the leader lead? still holding onto the shoulders of the person in
Was it helpful to have a leader? Why or why not? front of them.
6) Everyone should be supporting each other.
7) If your group is really brave, they can try moving
One-Legged Man/ around in a circle.
Women/Peer Educator 8) Ask discussion questions afterwards.

Topic: Teamwork
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To build teamwork and have fun!  How did you feel doing this?
Number of Students: 5-30  Did you think we were going to be able to do this?
Age Range of Students: All ages  How does this relate to real life experiences?
Time Required: 15 – 20 minutes
Materials: None
String Spider Web
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Topic: Teamwork, Community
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
1) Set a boundary for this game. from this activity?): To build teamwork within the
2) Explain the boundary to the group. group.
3) Ask for one volunteer from the group. Number of Students: 10-30
4) That volunteer is the “One-Legged Man/Women/ Age Range of Students: All ages
Peer Educator”.
Time Required: 30 minutes
5) He or she cannot do all the work alone to edu-
Materials: Ball of string or yarn
cate people on behavior change or Lifeskills, so
he/she must build a team of educators to help.
6) The volunteer hops on one foot and tires to catch Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
the others.
1) Ask everyone to sit or stand in a circle.
7) The group is running away from him or her within
the boundary you have set. 2) Show the big ball of string.
8) When the “One-Legged Person” touches some- 3) Hold on to the end of the string, then roll or toss
one, that person must join arms and also hop on it across to someone sitting or standing opposite
one foot to try to catch the others. to you, saying something positive to him or her as
you sent it.
9) Continue until they are all caught by the team.
4) Keep holding onto your end tightly.
5) Ask the recipient to hold onto the strong so that
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: it makes a taunt line between them and you,
 Why is teamwork important in everyday life? 6) Then ask him or her to send to ball back across
the circle to someone else, saying something pos-
 What are some examples of teams you see everyday?
itive about him or her as he or she rolls or tosses
it.
Sitting on Knees 7) Everyone continues doing this until the circle is
full of taut lines criss-crossing the circle.
Topic: Teamwork, Trust 8) Each person should be holding tightly to a bit of
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain string.
from this activity?): To build teamwork and trust 9) Next, ask everyone to look at how the string con-
within the group. Also to have fun! nects everyone, like spider’s web.
Number of Students: 5-30 10) You are all dependent on each other to keep this
Age Range of Students: All ages web firm and supportive. If anyone were to take
Time Required: 10-15 minutes his or her hand away from the web, part of it
Materials: None would collapse.

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

1) Ask everyone to stand closely in a circle, you in-  How does this exercise relate to real life?
cluded.  What happens if part of your community (your
2) Everyone should turn to his or her right, so that each village, city etc) were to disappear? How would
person in the circle is facing the back of someone else. that affect the rest of the community?

62
Trust Circles 6) People get very confused, but sort themselves
out eventually.
Topic: Teamwork, Trust
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
from this activity?): To build trust within the group.
Number of Students: 5-30  How did this feel with your eyes shut?
Age Range of Students: All ages  How does this relate to real life?
Time Required: 10-15 minutes
Materials: Optional: Blindfold Human Wall

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Topic: Teamwork


Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
1) Ask all the participants to stand together in a from this activity?): To build teamwork within the
small, tight circle in the middle of the room. group.
2) If you have a lot of people make small circles of Number of Students: 5-30
about six people each. Age Range of Students: All ages
3) Each participant in turn should stand in the mid- Time Required: 10-15 minutes
dle of the circle and then close his or her eyes or Materials: None
put on a blindfold.
4) He or she then falls backwards, sideways or for-
ward – keeping eyes closed – and will be caught in Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
the safety of the arms of the other participants.
1) This can be a little rough so maybe you can set
5) Each participant needs to have a few turns at this some ground rules for roughness to make it saf-
before someone else goes in the middle of the er.
circle.
2) Form two teams.
6) This can be quite scary for some people, but
3) One team should make a “human wall” – a wall of
should be perfectly safe if the group works to-
people that cannot be broken.
gether.
4) When you say “go” the other team will rush the
wall and try to break through.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: 5) Then switch sides and let the other team form a
“human wall”.
 What does this activity teach us about each other?
 Was it easy to trust your partner the first time?
Why or why not? Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 What made it easier to trust your partner? Did
 How does this activity relate to real life?
your partner say/do anything that made you trust
them more?  What were the challenges of this activity?
 Why is it important to build trust between friends?  What made it easier to break through the wall?
Businesses? Family? Other community members?
Tugs of War and Peace
Cross the Circle Topic: Teamwork
Topic: Trust, Teamwork Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain from this activity?): To build teamwork within the
from this activity?): To build trust within the group group.
as well as teamwork. Number of Students: 5-30
Number of Students: 5-30 Age Range of Students: All ages
Age Range of Students: All ages Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes
Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes Materials: Length of strong rope; Optional: Tape or
Materials: None chalk (to make a line)

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Ask participants to form a big circle, facing in- 1) Divide the group into two teams.
ward. 2) Ask these two teams to stand up and hold oppo-
2) Each participant identifies someone standing op- site ends of a long, strong rope.
posite him or her. 3) Mark a line across the middle of your training
3) When you say “Go!” each participant must close area, over which each team must try to pull the
his or her eyes, walk across the circle and stand other.
in the place of the person opposite him or her. 4) When you say “1,2,3 GO!” the teams should start
4) Everyone must do this at the same time. pulling against each other.
5) NO PEEKING! 5) Let hem go until one team has ended up failing
over the line.

63
6) Next, have everyone sit in a circle and hand the Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
rope to the participants so they are sitting around
the edge of it.  How does this relate to real life?
7) Ask all the participants to pull together on the  Have you ever shown support for another person
rope so they can all stand up. so they could walk “the straight line”? When?
8) Ask the participants to explain what this exercise How did you show support?
means to them.  Is it easy to make decisions on your own at all
9) The idea is to show how, instead of people pulling times? Have you ever needed support from a
on opposite ends as in a tug of war, where only friend or family member about a decision?
one team wins, we can approach situations in a
win-win way so that everyone benefits and feels
The Yurt Circle
good bout the result.
10) True, the tug of war might be fun for the victors, Topic: Teamwork, Trust
but what about the losers? Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To build trust and teamwork
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: within the group.
Number of Students: 6-30
 What are other ways to make a win-win situation?
Age Range of Students: All ages
 How do you think it feels to be on the loosing side?
Time Required: 10 – 15 minutes
Materials: An even number of students
The Straight Line
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Topic: Teamwork, Trust
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 1) Assign a name to each, alternating names, such
from this activity?): To build teamwork and trust as “Milk, Water, Milk, Water”.
within the group and to demonstrate how support 2) Everyone should link arms all the way up to the
can help a person walk “a straight line” in life. elbow.
Number of Students: 5-30 3) When you say “Milk”, all of the “Milks” should
Age Range of Students: All ages lean into the circle, while all the “Waters” should
Time Required: 15 – 20 minutes lean out.
Materials: Blindfold or scarf 4) Notice how this tension keeps the group supported.
5) Switch now, saying “Water”.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 6) All the “Waters” lean into the circle and the
“Milks” lean out.
1) Invite a volunteer to come forward and walk 7) You can continue doing this smoothly, to show
slowly in a straight line across the training area. how change and tension can still be very positive
2) Put the blindfold on him or her and turn him or for the team.
her around several times before he or she sets
off in a straight line across the training area – to Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
reach an agreed point on the opposite side.
3) Instruct the rest of the group to keep completely  What were some of the challenges of this activ-
silent, giving no encouragement or guidance at all. ity? What were some of the positive outcomes?
4) They should also not touch the volunteer.  What made it easier to work as a team? What
5) When the volunteer reaches the other side, ask made it more difficult?
him or her to take off the blindfold.  Did anyone in the group take a leadership posi-
6) Compare how close he or she is to where he or tion? How?
she intended to reach.
7) Ask him or her how he or she felt about having no
Minefield
comments from the others.
8) Ask him or her to replace the blindfold and re- Topic: Leadership, Communication
peat the exercise. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
9) This time the others are allowed to verbally en- from this activity?): To demonstrate the importance
courage him or her and give him or her advice of communication when leading others.
10) They should still not touch him or her. Number of Students: 4-30
11) Then, finally, you can ask the volunteer to repeat Age Range of Students: 10 and up
the exercise with the others using their hands to
Time Required: 10 – 20 minutes
guide the volunteer.
Materials: An open room/space, Two or more blindfolds, Ob-
12) Process the difference in how if felt during each
jects to use for mines (blocks of wood, bottles, rocks etc)
stage.
13) Emphasize how safe someone can feel with the
support and guidance of others. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Before class set up your objects around the room/


space as in a minefield.

64
2) Divide the class into pairs. 8) The volunteer has three chances to guess who the
3) Ask the pairs to get into two lines (the pairs stay leader is.
together in one line). 9) If that person guesses right, the leader becomes
4) Ask for the first two pairs to come to the front. the volunteer and they choose a new leader for
5) Blindfold one person in the pair. another round.
6) Tell the person who does not have the blindfold 10) If the volunteer cannot guess right, they have to
they must direct their partner through the mine- leave the room again and try again.
field without touching them. It is a race between
the two pairs. *Note: This is a fun activity to fill empty time with,
7) If a person touches a minefield, they are finished students enjoy this in any situation
and must go to the back of a line. The other pair
will automatically win the race. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
8) Whichever pair reaches the other side of the
minefield first wins.  What are some qualities of a good leader?
9) Continue to run races until every pair in the class  How would these qualities help the leader in this
has been through the minefield at least once. activity?
10) You can also run additional races and have the  Why do we need leaders in groups?
winners race each other until there is one cham-
pion in the class.
11) Try to switch the pairs so each person gets a Follow the Leader
chance to lead and to follow.
Topic: Leadership
12) Discuss the activity after you are finished.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To build leadership skills and al-
*Note: Make sure the rest of the class is quiet while low students to become comfortable with being in a
the pairs are racing. Remind them that it is easier to leadership position.
hear the other person when others aren’t yelling.
Number of Students: 6-30
Age Range of Students: All ages
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Time Required: 10-15 minutes
 What was the most difficult part of the minefield? Materials: None
Why?
 Was it easier to follow or to lead the race? Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 Why is communication important in this activity?
 What are the challenges of being a leader? How 1) Ask the participants to stand in a circle.
does this activity relate to leading in real life? 2) You or the group chooses a leader
3) The leader stands inside the circle, starts to run
on the inside of the circle and calls out “Follow!
Who’s the Leader? Follow! Follow!”
4) The group replies “Follow! Follow! Follow!” as
Topic: Leadership, Icebreaker the run on the outside of the circle.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 5) The leader repeats “Follow! Follow! Follow!” and
from this activity?): To build leadership in the group the group repeats.
and to have fun!
6) The leader starts to do some other action such
Number of Students: 5-30 as dancing, jumping, sitting or singing and says
Age Range of Students: All ages “I dance, I dance, I dance!” (or whatever action
Time Required: 10-15 minutes they are doing).
Materials: None 7) The group responds by mimicking everything the
leader does.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 8) The leader then goes back to “Follow, follow, fol-
low” and repeats the process.
1) Ask the group to stand in a circle. 9) Do this until everyone is tired!
2) Ask for one volunteer and send that person out of
the room. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
3) The people in the circle should secretly choose a
person to be the leader.  What qualities are important in a leader? How
4) The leader should start an action such as clapping would they help the leader in this activity?
hands, dancing or stomping feet.  Is it always good to follow a leader? Why or why
5) The action should change every 15 seconds or not?
so.
6) The other members of the circle should follow
the leader’s movements, without looking directly
at the leader and giving him or her away.
7) The volunteer is brought back into the room while
these actions are taking place.

65
66
Emotional
Health

67
68
Emotion Charades Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

Topic: Emotional Health, Expressions, Emotions  How did you feel when the game was in your fa-
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain vor?
from this activity?): To teach students how to express  How did you feel when the game was not in your
emotions and how to read other people’s emotions. favor?
Number of Students: 5-30  Do you ever feel like your life is like this game?
Are you usually winning or losing?
Age Range of Students: 10-30
 Do you ever get angry when things seem to be
Time Required: 15-20 minutes
unfair?
Materials: Emotion papers  How do you release the anger that you feel when
things are unfair? What are good ways to handle
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): an unfair situation?

1) Before class prepare a stack of papers/cards with


different emotions written on them. Examples Body of Anger
of emotions are angry, sad, tired, happy, shy,
scared, annoyed, worried, nervous, excited, etc. Topic: Anger Management
2) Students take turns. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
3) Each student picks an emotion paper. They do not from this activity?): To discuss and learn how our
show it to the class. bodies react when we become angry so that individu-
als can detect the signs of anger.
4) Without speaking they must act out the emo-
tion. Number of Students: 5-30
5) The class must guess what the emotion is, Age Range of Students: 10-17
6) Whoever guesses correctly goes next. Time Required: 45 minutes
7) You can also do this in teams to motivate every- Materials: An old white T-shirt, An old pair of pants
one to participate! (that can be written on), Face paint, Markers that
can be used on fabric
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 How do people show their emotions in real life?
 How much communication do people do without 1) Before class, find an old pair of pants and an old
talking? shirt that you do not want anymore and wash
 What were the challenges/successes of this activity? them well.
2) Ask one volunteer in the class to put on the old
pants and shirt.
Big vs. Small 3) Have the volunteer stand in front of the class.
4) Ask the class all the distinct ways their bodies
Topic: Anger Management
react when they feel angry.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 5) As people name different things, have someone
from this activity?): For individuals to practice anger write them down on the part of the body with the
control in a situation that is clearly unfair and upset- face paint or markers (if more appropriate, make
ting. a tracing of a person on a large piece of paper
Number of Students: 10-30 and mark that).
Age Range of Students: 10-17  For example: rapid breathing could be
Time Required: 15 minutes written on the chest where the lungs are,
Materials: A basketball, volleyball, beach ball or bal- or red face can be written on the cheek
loon 6) Leave time for discussion.

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

1) Ask the class to line up from shortest to tallest.  Which body reaction do you most identify with?
2) Divide the line in half so all the short people are  How do you control your anger?
on one team and all the tall people are on the  How do you release feelings of tension?
other.  Why do you think our bodies react the way they
3) Set up a game for the group to play in which do to anger?
height is the advantage (basketball, volleyball or  How can you use your body signals to help you
keep away). control anger?
4) After playing for a little while, the tall team will
most likely be winning and the short team will be
feeling upset. Good, Bad, and Ugly
5) At this point change he rules and tell the tall team
Topic: Anger Management
that they must all put one hand in their pocket or
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
behind their backs for the rest of the game.
from this activity?): To determine positive was of
6) Leave time for discussion.
handling anger. To promote discussion of different

69
ways to handle anger and discuss the effect these Age Range of Students: 8 – 17
actions have on people’s lives. Time Required: 45 minutes
Number of Students: 5-30 Materials: deck of cards, pair of dice, bag of candy
Age Range of Students: 12-17 (about 5 pieces per person), copies of the rules; Op-
Time Required: 45 minutes tional: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart
Materials: 3x5 cards or small pieces of paper, Pens/
pencils, 3 small boxes, Prepared scenarios; Optional: Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Already prepared scenarios
1) Be sure to read the directions BEFORE you start
the game! Before you start, take all but a couple
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
of spades out of a deck of cards and mix the few
1) Before class, write down several scenarios where spades left towards the top of the deck. If pos-
a person may have a negative reaction. sible, replace the spades with cards from a dif-
ferent suit using an identical deck.
2) Give each person in the class a pile of 3x5 cards
(or pieces of paper) and a pen/pencil. 2) Start by gathering the group into a circle and give
everyone five pieces of candy and tell them NOT
3) Ask them to create three piles in front of them
to eat them (they will be able to keep whatever
and write “Good” on the tope of card in one pile,
candy they have at the end of the game and they
“Bad” on another and “Ugly” on the third.
can eat it then) then develop a creative name for
4) Create a few scenarios that would likely make
the game.
the participants angry and read them to them at
3) Place a few copies of the rules on the table for
this time (you can have these prepared already).
students to refer to during the game (or just have
You can also ask the class for scenarios that would
them on the board for all to see) – it is important
make them angry
that you lead this game.
5) After a scenario is read, each person must write
4) Set a time limit or end the game when too many
down a good response to the situation on the
people are eliminated to continue, or when the
“good” card, a bad response on the “bad” card
pot is full with candy.
and an ugly response on the “ugly” card.
5) At the end of the game select the person who
6) Place three boxes labeled “good”, “bad” and
played with the best sportsmanship – of course
“ugly” at the front of the room.
this is YOU, the leader, because this is the unfair
7) Ask the students to put their cards in the respec-
game - collect all the candy in the middle.
tive boxes when finished.
6) The game should be truly unfair (like life). It is
8) Do this for several different scenarios.
best that you don’t hand out the candy to the
9) After all the situations have been read and all the group after the game is done to be fair to have
cards have been turned in, take the ugly box and a greater affect – but you can do what you want.
read the cards to the class. To heighten the effect you may also reveal the
10) After each card ask people to raise their hands trick about the deck of cards. You can also wait
if they have ever expressed their anger in this until now to reveal that this is called the “Unfair
manner, to describe the situation and discuss the Game”.
consequences or benefits of reacting in this way.
11) Do the same thing for the bad and good boxes.
Game Rules
12) Conclude with the good box.
1) When it is your turn you may roll the dice or se-
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: lect a card.
2) If you role the dice and get: Odd – you must put a
 What did you learn as a result of this activity? piece of candy in the pot (a place in the middle of
 Do you tend to express your anger in a good, bad, the table) Even – you make take a piece of candy
or ugly manner most often? Why? from anyone else’s pile, Double – you must give a
 Which way works best for you? Is this a good piece of candy to someone else in the group (this
way? does not count as an even number).
 What would be the best way for you to handle 3) If you draw a card: Heart – you must give a piece
your anger? of candy to the person on your right, Club – you
 What is the easiest way to express anger? Is that must give a piece of candy to the person on your
good/bad/ugly? left, Diamond – you must put a piece of candy in
 How do you feel when others express their anger the pot, Spade – you get two piece of candy from
this way? the pot (or from someone else’s pile).
4) If anyone loses all their candy, they are elimi-
nated from the game.
The Unfair Game 5) If you are eliminated from the game you may
continue to sit in the circle but can return to the
Topic: Anger Management game only if someone gives you a piece of candy
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain during the course of the game (no one can give
from this activity?): For individuals to practice using them candy out of the goodness of their heart, it
anger control in a situation that is clearly unfair and must be by dice or cards).
frustrating. 6) At the end, the person who has the most candy wins,
Number of Students: 3-15 and everyone may keep any candy they have.

70
7) The leader decides who displayed the best sports- Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
manship during the game, and this person gets to
keep all the candy left in the pot at the end of  Why do you think some people express their an-
the game. ger with violence?
 Have you ever wanted to become violent in an
argument? What stopped you?
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 Why do you think some violence is considered
 Was this game unfair? Why or why not? “cool”?
 How do you feel right now?  Why do you think people are entertained by vio-
 Do you ever feel like your life is unfair? If so how lence?
do you respond to unfair situations?
 Do you think it would help you in life to change how Good Feelings
you act when situations seem unfair? If so how?
Topic: Emotional Health, Self-Esteem
Agree or Disagree: Understanding Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): Students will be able to identify
Violence five things people can say and do to help them feel
pleased with themselves and be able to compliment
Topic: Anger Management
at least one person in the class.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Number of Students: 10-50
from this activity?): Students will analyze their feel-
ings regarding to violence, learn to debate their feel- Age Range of Students: All ages
ings, and how to resolve disputes without violence. Time Required: 10-15 minutes
umber of Students: 5-15 Materials: Paper (for each student), Pens/pencils
Age Range of Students: 10-17
Time Required: 45 minutes Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Materials: two signs – one “agree” and one “dis-
1) Hand out paper to each student.
agree”, flip chart paper for groups to write on
2) Have each student write five statements that
make him/her feel good about him/herself.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 3) The statements can be verbal compliments or ac-
tions that make the student feel good.
1) Put up the two signs on opposite sides of the
room. 4) Provide examples such as “You are such a good
helper!” or “Receiving flower or a piece of fruit
2) Explain that everyone must participate.
at school” or “someone saying happy birthday on
3) Read the statements and have students walk to your birthday”.
one side of the room, to the “disagree” side if they
5) Break students into small groups to share their
disagree and to the “agree” side if they agree.
statements, or have them share with the whole
4) Have the students pick two statements upon class.
which they disagree.
6) Give time for students to make a compliment to
5) Have the students break into group depending on people in their groups.
their opinion and write on the flip chart paper
7) Have them share the compliments.
reasons to support their opinion.
6) Each group should choose one representative to
present their side of the argument. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
7) The only rules of the debate are that there can
 Is it easy to receive good feelings from other
be no violence and students must listen to the
people?
other side.
 How many good feelings did you get yesterday?
8) Students must state their point of view with reason.
 Is it easy for you to give good feelings?
 Have the students say something nice to someone
Statements:
the next day
 When you get into a conflict with some-
one, it’s okay to hit and call names.
 It is sometimes necessary to fight to solve Abstract vs. Concrete
a problem.
 When somebody says something mean to Topic: Emotional Health, Character Building
you, it is okay to yell at him or her. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
 If is difficult to apologize when you are wrong. from this activity?): Students will be able to create a
 If you see someone fighting you should get piece of abstract art and organize a color scheme so
involved. that the same color isn’t touching in the pattern.
 Violence is just something you have to get Number of Students: 1-50
used to because it happens all the time. Age Range of Students: All ages
 You can do nothing to prevent becoming per-
Time Required: 30 minutes
sonally involved in a violent confrontation.
 There’s something wrong with someone Materials: Half sheets of white paper, Assorted markers and
who will just walk away from a fight. colored pencils; Optional: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart

71
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):  Did someone find something in the picture that
wouldn’t have noticed otherwise?
1) Draw a “scribble” on the board (or piece of pa-  Why do you think it’s important to hear several
per), without lifting the chalk/pen to make a se- different perspectives during a discussion?
ries of shapes.
2) Let the students pick a marker and make their
own “scribble” (don’t be surprised if this task is Relationships
very difficult for some students).
3) Distribute the colored pencils and tell them to Topic: Emotional Health, Peer Relations
color the different shapes. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
4) There is one rule: No two shapes can have the from this activity?): To learn about different types of
same color if they are touching. relationships, if they are healthy or unhealthy, and
how unhealthy relationships help us see the good in
5) Have a few students come up to the front of the
ourselves.
class to show their drawing and explain why they
colored it the way they did. Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: All ages
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Time Required: 1 hour
Materials: poster board, magazines, tape, slips of pa-
 What is abstract and concrete thinking? per, paper, pens; Optional: Colored pens/pencils
 How does this relate to abstract/concrete think-
ing? Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 Is this art?
 What did you draw/what shapes does your scrib- 1) Before the class make a poster with cut outs from
ble make? magazines (or your own drawing) illustrating dif-
 Is it pretty? Why/why not? ferent types of relationships. Do not write on the
poster.
2) Ask the students:
What’s in the Picture?  What is a relationship?
 What types of relationships are there?
Topic: Emotional Health
3) Here are some examples of relationships to use:
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain  with self
from this activity?): To describe the complexities of  with family
a picture.  with friends
Number of Students: 5-30  with boyfriend/girlfriend
Age Range of Students: 5-17  parent/child
Time Required: 20-30 minutes  with religion
Materials: Various pictures from magazines; Option- 4) As the children answer the questions about “types
al: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, tape of relationships”, put their answers on slips of
paper and tape them to the poster.
5) Ask the class the following sets of questions. En-
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
courage discussion.
1) Before class, cut out various pictures from maga-  Is there such a thing as an unhealthy re-
zines. lationship?
2) In class, put all pictures face down on the table.  Can you describe the difference between
a healthy and an unhealthy relationship?
3) Have the students sit around the table.
 What do you do if a relationship is un-
4) Pick a student to go first. healthy? (you can use another piece of
5) The first student picks a picture and identifies flipchart paper to list the qualities of a
one thing in the picture. healthy relationships and the characteris-
6) The student passes the picture around the table tics of an unhealthy relationship)
with each student identifying something differ-  Are you what other people say you are?
ent in each picture. Try to go around the table (Discuss positive and negative influences
twice without anyone repeating any answers. of relationships)
7) The student to the right of the first student gets  Do you have someone you can trust?
to choose the next picture and the same process  Are you someone other people can trust?
starts over. 6) Put blank piece of paper on every student’s
8) Once the students are comfortable with identify- back.
ing the content of pictures, they can start making 7) The other students must write one nice thing
judgments. Does the picture represent something about that student on their back. NO repeated
healthy or unhealthy? They can make two piles or comments. After every student has written one
tape them on two sections of the wall. thing, have the children read their sheet of paper
out loud: “I am nice, happy, etc” Using “I am”
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: statements is important.
8) End with discussing how our relationships can
 Why do you think different people saw different help us be healthy by helping us see the good in
things in the pictures? us and support us in our goal of overall health.

72
Rest and Taking Care of You Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

Topic: Emotional Health, General Health 1) Ask students if they have ever been in a running
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain from race. Ask them to recall the excitement before
this activity?): To talk about the need for rest, what the race began. Conclude this introduction by
could happen if you don’t, rest and ways to rest. asking if the student(s) would enjoy running a
race that lasted every hour they were awake. It
Number of Students: 5-30
can be harmful to the entire body if excitement
Age Range of Students: All ages is ongoing in a person’s life. Some stress may be
Time Required: 1 hour helpful, such as the excitement one would feel
Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Paper, just before a race.
Pens/pencils; Optional: Colored pens/markers/pencils 2) Entertain a discussion on stress with the class
employing your teacher-led questions. Suggested
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): questions include:
 “What is stress?” (a feeling of tension or
Everyone needs rest! Without it you may experience strain on your mind and/or body)
exhaustion, malnutrition and illness. You may have  “Have you ever felt stress?” (answers will
symptoms such as headaches, neck, back and shoul- vary)
der pain, and or/stomach problems.  “How can stress affect your body? (the
Rest is connected to all things: heart may beat faster; the palms of the
 physical, social and spiritual health hand may get sweaty, breathing may
 food quicken to gain more oxygen for the body;
 exercise and stored sugar may be released to allow
 disease prevention for more energy.)
1) Have students draw something or make a list of  “Can stress be helpful?” (yes)
things to do for rest.  “How?” (It can help one do his/her best
when he/she feels occasional pressure,
2) Have them write something on the board.
such as competing in a ballgame or race
3) Tell them that their homework is to do something or doing well on a test. It can give one an
restful. Examples of restful things are: energy life.)
 sleep 7-9 hours  “How can stress be harmful?” (Stress can
 avoid caffeine be harmful when events occur in one’s life
 have a bedtime routine that cause prolonged tension or worry.
 exercise This may lead to restlessness, a lack of
 drink milk sleep, nervousness, headaches, the heart
 listen to music working faster, and an inability of the body
 go for a walk to fight off disease. Over a long period of
 spend some time alone time, it could damage the heart.)
6) Discuss the fact that what you think of yourself  “How can one control stress?” (talking
affects your health. “The most beautiful people I and sharing feelings with your parents or
know are those who love themselves.” We are all friends, getting enough exercise and rest,
special and unique. eating a balanced diet).
7) Ask the class what they think about themselves. 3) Have students read the story (or read it aloud)
Rate yourself on a scale from 1-10. and answer the questions on the worksheet. This
8) List one thing you would change about yourself. may be done individually, in small groups, or with
9) List one goal. Talk about making one small change, the entire class.
towards this goal, as homework.
10) Do a name acrostic: Answers to Worksheet:
* Nino: Natelia, Imedi, Naturauli, Ori tavi 1. at the start of the game
11) Review homework assignment the next class.
Treat yourself to something resting and relaxing. 2. when he blamed himself for the loss
If your students are having a difficult time think- 3. not sharing his feelings of guilt with his par-
ing of what would relax them, discuss hobbies. ents or friends
If the problem is with finding time, discuss the
possibility of delegation/shared work. 4. assignments weren’t completed; he appeared
tired during class

Controlling Stress 5. probably not; answers will vary


6. talking with his parents helped Willy under-
Topic: Emotional Health stand the problem
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To identify at least two ways 7. talking with parents or friends about impor-
they can help reduce harmful stress in their lives. tant issues in your life; getting enough sleep
and exercise; eating a balanced diet
Number of Students: 5-50
Age Range of Students: 10 and up
Time Required: 1 hour
Materials: Wired Willy Story, Paper, Pens

73
”Wired Willy” Story Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart

Willy felt like he had butterflies in his stom- Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
ach as the soccer game was about to begin.
He wanted to do his best against the cham- 1) Ask the class: If you and your best friend had a fight
pion team. When the game started, Willy for- and you became very angry, what would you do?
got all about being anxious and played very 2) Discuss the question utilizing a flip chart if pos-
well. He led his team in scoring during this sible and listing the student’s responses:
championship game. With one second left in
the game, Willy was fouled while shooting the Acceptable Ways to Handle Anger
ball. His team was behind by one point. With  Run as hard as you can, until you cool off
a penalty kick, Willy had a chance to tie the  Go off by yourself and scream.
game. Willy missed the goal and his team  Cool off and talk it over.
lost the game. Willy felt horrible. He be-  Ask you friend why he did what he did.
lieved that he was responsibly for the loss.  Go off by yourself and cry.
Not wanting to talk to anyone after the game, Unacceptable
Willy hurried home. He went to his room  Hit him.
and refused to talk to his parents about the  Never speak to him again.
game. In his sadness, he even forgot about  Talk badly about his family.
his school project that was due the next day.  Scream at him.
All he thought about was missing the last  Pretend it never happened.
goal. His stomach hurt and he had a diffi-  Take his favorite toy.
cult time getting to sleep that night. The next  Start rumors about him.
day, Willy ignored his friends who wanted to
3) After the responses are listed, ask the class to
talk about the game. He yawned frequently
decide which ones are acceptable and which are
and almost fell asleep in class. Because his
not. Cross out the unacceptable behaviors.
project wasn’t completed, his teacher wasn’t
pleased. In fact, for several days, Willy had a
hard time getting any of his schoolwork done Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
and he seemed very tired. Willy’s parents en-
couraged him to talk about what was bother-  Which of these behaviors might allow the friend-
ing him. Willy finally shared how he thought ship to be saved?
he had lost the game for his team. His par-  Should the friendship be saved?
ents helped him realize that without Willy’s  Which behavior do you think is the easiest to do?
strong effort, his team would not have been The most difficult?
so close to winning in the first place. They  Can you think of a situation when you saw any of
also reminded him that the reason for play- these behaviors? What happened?
ing is not just winning. Someone had to lose.
Willy slept much better that night when he
realized he had done his best, and that was Oh! Henry!
all anyone could do.
Topic: Emotional Health, Character Building
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Worksheet Questions from this activity?): To explore different ways to ex-
1. When did Willy feel helpful stress in this story? press emotions with body and tone of voice.
Number of Students: 5-30
2. What caused Willy to start feeling harmful stress?
Age Range of Students: All ages
3. What created more harmful stress for Willy? Time Required: 20 minutes
4. How did Willy’s schoolwork suffer because of Materials: None
increased stress?
5. Do you think that Willy was pleasant to be Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
around during this time? Explain.
1) Have all the participants stand in a circle.
6. How did Willy relieve his stress? 2) Remind the groups that there are many ways we
7. How can you avoid harmful stress in your life? can communicate – even with our bodies and tone
of voice.
3) Explain that this activity will show how tone of
Accepting Anger voice and body language can express different
emotions.
Topic: Anger Management 4) Tell the group that they must go around and say
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain the phrase “Oh! Henry!” in different manners.
from this activity?): To learn acceptable ways to han- 5) Give examples, such as with anger, with joy, with
dle anger. passion etc.
Number of Students: 5-30 6) Encourage creativity and fun!
Age Range of Students: All ages 7) Here are some examples:
Time Required: 30 minutes

74
 sadness  fear  Stop and analyze why I am really angry
 anxiety  love  Think about the situation from the per-
 pain  depression spective of the other person
 jealousy  misery  Pray or meditate
 guilt  happiness  Think of a funny story
 anger  grief  Try to communicate and resolve the situa-
 joy  passion tion peacefully
 confusion  rage
 annoyance  regret Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 disappointment  laughter
 Why can certain emotions be harmful if they are
not dealt with properly?
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 What are some suggestions of methods that you
 Can you tell which emotion is being expressed? should NOT use to deal with emotions?
 What is the clearest signal? (i.e. body, voice, fa-
cial expression) What is Love?
Topic: Emotional Health, Peer Relations, Responsible
Managing Emotions Gallery Walk Behavior
Topic: Emotional Health Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To explore and think about dif-
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
ferent kinds of love and the qualities students look
from this activity?): To share and discuss different
for in friends, family and partners.
ways of managing potentially harmful feelings.
Number of Students: 5-30
Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: 13-20
Age Range of Students: 10 and up
Time Required: 1 hour
Time Required: 45 minutes - 1 hour
Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Mark-
Materials: Five or six large pieces of paper, Markers
ers/chalk
(one for each paper), Tape; Optional: Blackboard/
whiteboard/flipchart
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
1) Ask everyone to divide into pairs.
1) Brainstorm with the class a list of different emo- 2) Ask each pair to describe to each other three
tions (you can put these on the board if you have qualities that they show to a close brother, or sis-
one). ter, or friend whom the particularly love.
2) Have the students tell you which emotions they 3) Then have them share three qualities that they
think could be potentially harmful or lead to risky expect from the same brother, sister or friend.
behavior. 4) After about 10 minutes or so, call them back to
3) Have the students narrow it down to five or six the larger group.
harmful emotions that may need to be managed. 5) Ask the class to share their thoughts and ideas.
4) Write each of these emotions at the top of each 6) If there is a general agreement, move on, but if
piece of large paper. not, discuss the differences.
5) Tape the papers up on the wall around the room. 7) Tell the class to get back into their pairs.
6) Tell the students to brainstorm different ideas of 8) Tell the pairs to take turns telling each other
how to manage these behaviors. three qualities which they would show to a part-
7) Now tell the students to get up and walk around ner whom they love.
the room to each paper. 9) Then have them tell three qualities which they
8) At each paper they must put down an idea of how expect from a partner who loves them.
to manage that behavior. 10) Again, call everyone back into the larger group.
9) Try to encourage them to come up with different 11) Ask them to share their ideas.
answers than their peers (creativity is good!). 12) If there are some clear differences in the quali-
10) After everyone has looked at all the papers and ties of love described between partners and those
put down their comments, have a different vol- described for sisters, brothers or friends, point
unteer read off the comments on each paper. these out.
11) Discuss with the class what they think about the 13) Ask them to define these differences more clear-
suggestions given. Are they good suggestions? Are ly. Encourage them to try to explain why these
there any you disagree with? Are there any sug- differences exist.
gestions you think you could use in your life? Can 14) Ask them to get back into pairs again.
you think of sample situations? 15) This time, have the pairs tell each other five
Example: Anger qualities they would want in a partner in a rela-
tionship. What would their ideal partner be like?
 Count to ten
16) After they are finished, have them get into a larg-
 Walk away and come back to the situation
er group and give out qualities they thought of.
later
17) You can write these down on the board.

75
18) Then have the class think quietly about the per- 9) Give more time for younger students who may be
son they are involved with, like or have a crush a bit shy.
on. Ask them to think if this person fits the quali-
ties they put down. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
19) Explain to the students that it’s important to think
about these qualities, especially since sometimes  After listening to how different people would feel
young people get “swept of their feet”. It is im- in situations, what could you do to help make
portant to think these things through before mak- people feel good?
ing any important decisions.  Are there any feelings that people said that you
would also feel? Any different feelings?
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 Why do you think it is important to think about Feelings are Fragile


different kinds of love?
Topic: Emotional Health
 Why do you think it is important to know what to
look for in a partner/friend? Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To think of different ways stu-
 Has the idea of love changed throughout history?
dents can express negative emotions without hurting
How?
others.
Number of Students: 10-30
I’d Feel… Age Range of Students: 10-17
Time Required: 45 minutes – 1 hour
Topic: Emotional Health
Materials: Poster board or large paper, Markers,
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Chalk/markers
from this activity?): To help students practice ex-
Optional: Colored pens/pencils/markers, Magazines,
pressing their feelings in different situations.
Glue, Scissors
Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: 15 and under
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Time Required: 20 – 30 minutes
Materials: Cards or small pieces of paper, Pen, Bag 1) Ask the class to brainstorm different ways of ex-
or box pressing negative feelings without hurting some-
one else
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 2) Examples could be:

1) Write out different “I would feel..” statements  leave the situation


on cards or small pieces of paper.  changing the subject or conversation
2) Ideas are:  talking to an adult about the problem
 If my friend hit me, I’d feel...  talking to another good friend about the
 If my friend asked to share my book, I’d problem (without putting the other person
feel... down)
 If my friend asked me over for dinner, I’d 4) Write these ideas on the board.
feel... 5) Now ask the class to get into groups of four or five.
 If my friend offered me medicine, I’d 6) Give each group a poster board or large piece of
feel... paper and some markers.
 If my friend took me to the movies, I’d 7) Tell the students that they are now to choose their
feel... top four ideas that are written on the board as a
 If my friend called me bad names, I’d group. Give them about five minutes for this.
feel...
8) After they have chosen, tell them to list the posi-
 If my friend stole something from me, I’d
tives and negatives of each choice. Give them
feel...
about ten minutes for this.
 If my friend said nice things to me, I’d
9) When they are finished, tell them to illustrate
feel...
their choices and then list the negatives and posi-
 If my friend taught me a game, I’d feel...
tives next to the drawing. Give them about 15 to
 If my friend asked me to do something bad
20 minutes for this.
I’d feel...
10) After everyone is done, have each group present
4) Put the cards or small pieces of paper in a bag or
their posters to the group.
box.
11) If you have room, hang the posters up as remind-
5) Tell the class that when called on, they must
ers to the students.
come up to the bag or box, chose a card/piece of
paper and read the statement to the class.
6) After they read the statement, they must finish it Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
with a feeling they would feel.
 Can you think of any real life situations that you
7) Call on students to come up and choose cards.
have used these methods?
8) Be sure to encourage openness and discourage any
 Can you think of any real life situations where
laughing or making fun of people. Students should
you should have used these methods?
feel comfortable saying what they would feel.

76
Decision
Making

77
78
Steps in Making a Good Decision Agree or Disagree?
 Stop Topic: Opinions, Decision Making
 Take some “time out” Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
 Define the problem from this activity?): To encourage classroom partici-
 Think about the situation pation and discussion.
 Seek advice from others Number of Students: 10-30
 Listen to the advice given Age Range of Students: 14-17
 Pray/meditate/think deeply Time Required: 15 – 20 minutes
 Consider family values and personal values Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Chairs,
 Consider cultural practices and religious beliefs Desks
 Consider all of the options or alternatives avail-
able Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 Imagine the consequences and possible outcomes
of each option 1) Arrange five chairs or desks in a row, leaving sev-
 Consider the best alternatives eral feet in between them to form four separate
 Make the decision areas along a line (see diagram on next page).
 Act on the decision 2) These chairs represent positions ranging from
 Accept responsibility for your actions strongly agree to strongly disagree.
3) Explain to the class that you will read several
value-related statements for which they are to
Four Corners respond by walking to the area that represents
their position on the statements.
Topic: Opinions 4) After each statement, allow the students to ex-
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain plain their reasons for choosing their opinion and
from this activity?): To help students form opinions debate the options (make sure this is student
about health Topics, help them express and explain lead, but you may have to begin by encouraging
their opinion to the group, and to help them answer discussion).
questions about their opinion. 5) This can be used for any Topic: or to review a past
Number of Students: 10-30 lesson.
Age Range of Students: All ages
Time Required: 15 – 20 minutes Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Materials: A room with four corners, Four sheets of
paper with four letters (A,B,C,D)  What are the main differences between facts/in-
formation and opinions?
 From your responses, which were supported by
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
personal opinions and which were supported by
1) Put each letter in a different corner. information and facts?
2) Have all the students stand in the middle of the  When confronting problems in the community,
classroom at the start. why is it important to gain as much knowledge
3) Give the group question/scenario and give four relating to the problem?
options. Make sure you tailor the questions to the
age group you are dealing with. Diagram of Chair Set-up
4) Assign each corner one of the options (for exam-
ple: what is your favorite color? Go to corner A if Making Decisions
it is blue, corner B if it is green, corner C if it is Topic: Decision Making
yellow, corner D if it is red). Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
5) After each option is given, have students go to from this activity?): To discuss how decisions are
the corner of their choice. made, to discuss good/bad decision making and to
6) At each corner ask the students to explain why practice making good decisions.
they picked that corner. Number of Students: 5-30
7) Give other students a chance to ask questions Age Range of Students: All ages
about why someone picked that corner.
Time Required: 30 minutes
Materials: Prepared decision making scenarios for
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: small group work
 You could later discuss how to respect other’s
opinions and the difference between a discussion Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
and an argument. This can also be done before
the activity. Laying down rules before the activity 1) Define “decision”: a choice between two or more
begins is a good idea if you suspect an argument things or actions.
might arise. 2) We begin each day with decisions. There are
some steps to follow in order to make a decision

79
3) Talk about the importance in learning how to 7) Vote and decide whose party the class would like
make a wise decision and how to carry out those to have.
decisions. Talk about the importance of this skill 8) Have the party if you would like!
for becoming a mature adult.
4) Have group members discuss the different steps Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
in making a decision.
 What is the problem?  What was the hardest part of planning the party?
 What are some possible solutions?  What were the most difficult decisions you and
 Where can we obtain information? your group had to make?
 What are our choices?  What other factors did you think of while planning?
 What will each choice cost us (in time,
money, energy)?
 What are our limitations (time, effort, Decision Making Scenarios
personal resources)?
 What will the consequences of each choice Topic: Decision Making
be? Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
 What will you do? from this activity?): To practice good decision making
 How will you do it? in real life situations.
 Was it a good decision? Why? Why not? Number of Students: 6-30
6) Divide class into groups. Age Range of Students: 14 – 17
7) Give groups different scenarios and have them Time Required: 15 – 20 minutes
write down the process to making a decision re-
Materials: Flipchart paper/large blank paper for
garding that scenario.
each group, Markers, Decision making scenario cards,
8) Have groups present their decisions to the class.
Steps in making a good decision handout; Optional:
Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 Why is it important to make good decisions? Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):


 How can bad decisions affect people around 1) Divide the participants into small groups of 4 or 5.
you?
2) Give each group a card with one decision making
 What can you do if you make a bad decision and scenario on it.
you realize it?
3) Give each group flipchart paper or a large piece
of blank paper and markers.
Planning a Party 4) The groups should do the following:
 Discuss the situation
Topic: Decision Making  List the steps that the people should take
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain from in trying to reach their decision
this activity?): To learn how to make group decisions.  Finally, as a group, discuss and make a de-
Number of Students: 5-30 cision for the scenario on their card
Age Range of Students: All ages  On the top of the flipchart paper/large
blank paper, write the steps to making a
Time Required: 30 minutes
good decision, what decision the group
Materials: Pen/pencils, Paper; Optional: Blackboard/ would make for the scenario, and the rea-
whiteboard/flipchart, Poster board, Colored mark- sons for their final decision
ers/pens/pencils 5) Have each group present to the class.

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:


1) Divide the class into groups of four or five.  What happens if you skip some of the steps to
2) Give each group paper or poster board. making a good decision?
3) Tell the groups to plan a party for the class.  What are some examples of bad decisions?
4) Decisions to be made are:
 When (date and time)? Decision Making Scenario Cards (cut into cards)
 Where?
 Who will be invited? You are a 14 year old male student. You are walking
 What will you do? home one day from school with a friend. On the way
 Will there be snacks? If so, what snacks? your friend sees another friend of his smoking and
 Who will be responsible for each job? tells you to come with him and hang out. You friend
 How much will it cost? takes a cigarette and tells you that they make him
 Did you follow any steps in making these relax. He offers you one and tells you they are really
decisions? What steps? “cool”. What will you do?
5) They can make a creative poster advertising their
party if you have time/resources.
You are a 17 year old girl that has just finished school.
6) Have each group present their party idea to the
It is now summer and you are taking a holiday by the
class.
sea with three of your friends. Your friend Nino tells

80
you that there is a good disco that is for university 3) Give the groups 30 minutes to discuss the scenario,
students, but she knows a boy who could get you the decision making steps and design a role play.
all in. You have heard that this club is known to be 4) Have each group perform in for the class.
frequently visited by the police and sometimes there 5) Ask the following questions:
are a lot of drugs. What will you do?  Do we all agree with the decision that was
made? Why or why not?
You are a 24 year old boy who is attending a wedding  Does anyone think the situation should
supra with your friends. One of your friends has a car have ended differently? How?
and drove you to the wedding. He is supposed to give  What values were at work to arrive at
you a ride back. You decide you do not want to drink, their decision?
but your friend who has the car is “bolumde-ing” ev- 6) Point out that decision making is not always easy.
ery glass of wine. When it is time to go home, it is 7) Personal values play a large part in the decisions
obvious he is drunk, but he says he is okay to drive. we make, and if we go against those values, it
What do you do? can lead to feelings of guilt and confusion.

You are a 18 year old boy who is having a birthday. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Before the party, your friend says he has a surprise
for you. He blindfolds you and drives you somewhere.  What can make decisions hard to make? What can
When he takes off the blindfold, you realize he has make decisions easier to make?
taken you to a whore house. He then tells you he will  What are personal values? How do they play a
pay for two hours. You are not comfortable with this role in our every day lives?
and have heard about many diseases that are spread
through these houses. What will you do?
Role Play Cards

You are a 20 year old girl who has had a boyfriend for A month before exams, Jaba tells Mamuka he has
a long time. He wants to get married very quickly, some important information for him if he promises
but you would like to go to university and get your to keep it a secret. Mamuka is curious and agrees.
degree before marriage. He is putting a lot of pres- Jaba says he knows how to get a copy of the history
sure on you every day and your application is due exam in advance. His brother has a friend who has a
soon. What do you do? friend who works in the Ministry of Education. This
person is selling examination papers secretly. Jaba
You are a 14 year old girl and you are walking in says two classmates have already bought papers. He
Tbilisi with a friend. While you are walking, you see wants Mamuka to buy one too. Mamuka feels fright-
a man with dark skin pass by. Your friend starts to ened and angry. He does not believe in cheating. He
laugh point and say mean things about the man. You thinks Jaba and the others should be reported to the
think that this is not a good thing to do and you can teacher, but he promised to keep it a secret. Now he
see that the man’s feelings are hurt. He has a large doesn’t know what to do.
backpack on and looks like he is a visitor. What do
you do?  Decide what Mamuka is going to do. Then create
a role play acting out the situation and showing
You are a 21 year old boy who is at a friend’s supra. the reactions of all of Mamuka’s friends to his de-
Your friend has just gotten into a really good school cision.
in London. Everybody is drinking a lot, but you don’t
want to become drunk. You have to get up early for A doctor has a patient whom she knows well. The
your job and you know that a lot of alcohol can be patient was ill and the doctor thought he might have
very dangerous. Your friend’s dad is pressuring you by HIV. She sent him for blood test, which came back
saying that if you loved your friend, you would drink positive. The doctor knows the patient has several
more. What will you do? girlfriends and advised him to tell them so they could
protect themselves. The patient became angry and
told her to mind her own business. His girlfriends
Just Between Us must not find out.
Topic: Decision Making
 The doctor worries a lot about this. She knows
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain from
doctors should not discuss their patients illnesses,
this activity?): To practice making good decisions.
but she knows her information could save people’s
Number of Students: 5-30 lives. She decides to break the rule of confiden-
Age Range of Students: 12-17 tiality and inform the girlfriends. The patient is
Time Required: 1 hour very angry and takes the doctor to court because
Materials: Role Play Cards she has broken her oath of confidentiality.

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):  Act out the court case. Present the patient’s case
and then allow the girlfriends to take the stand.
1) Divide the class into four groups. Appoint someone as judge. Do you find he doctor
2) Give two groups one scenario card the other two guilty of breaking her professional code of confi-
the other one. dentiality? Take a group vote on the verdict.

81
Visualizing the Future He was a loveable person with a very happy nature.
Time spent with him was always wonderful although
Topic: Decision Making, Self-Awareness he never seemed very serious about his work…
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To help students think about de- * Note: You can change this to focus on males if you
cisions and how these decisions change the future. would like.
Number of Students: 10-30
Age Range of Students: 12–17
Our Own Life Story
Time Required: 30 minutes
Materials: “Nino Shapes Her Future” story (for the Topic: Decision Making
teacher), Paper (for each group), Pens/pencils Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To discuss future goals and deci-
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): sions/steps to be taken to achieve these goals.
Number of Students: 5-30
1) Explain to the group the importance of visualiz- Age Range of Students: 10–20
ing their future goals and using these hopes and
Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes
dreams to avoid unhealthy behavior.
Materials: Paper (for each person), Pens/pencils,
2) Have the students sit and listen as you read the
Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Markers/chalk
story about Nino.
3) Tell the students they must now complete Nino’s
life story. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
4) Divide the class into groups of 4 or 5.
1) Tell your students to close their eyes and imagine
5) Give each group a piece of paper and a pen/pen- what they think their future will be like. What are
cil and tell them to brainstorm an ending as a their goals? Their plans? Who would they like to be?
group and write it on the paper.
2) Now ask them to write down what they think
6) Encourage creativity! their future would be like next year:
7) Give the groups at least 10 minutes for this.  Who will you be living with?
8) After everyone has finished, ask each group to  Who will your friends be?
share their ending.  Will you have a sweetheart?
9) After each story, ask the class the following ques-  Will you still be in school? If so, where?
tions about the ending: Studying what?
 Did her life fulfill her expectations?  What will you do in your spare time?
 Did her life fulfill her family and friend’s  Will you drink? Smoke? Do drugs?
expectations? 3) Give the students at least 5 -10 minutes to write.
 Was this just a dream story? 4) Then tell the students to write about what they
 Did she keep control of her life? think their life will be like in 5 years (ask the
 How did Nino’s life story change because same questions as above?).
of the changes she made? 5) Now have the students think about what their life
10) Discuss as a group what they learned about how will be like in 10 years (or in their late 20’s):
decisions can affect the future.  Will you be married?
 Will you have children?
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:  Where will you live? With whom?
 Where will you be working? What kind of
 What goals do you have for you future? job will you have? Will you have a job?
 What types of choices will affect your future  Will you have a car?
goals?  Will you smoke? Drink? Do drugs?
 Will you have been in a car accident? Will
Nino Shapes Her Future any of your friends?
6) Finally, have your students imagine when they
When Nino was born, the stars seemed to shine more have children that are their age:
brightly than ever before. She had such intelligence,  What will they be like?
sensitivity, and beauty that surely her life would be  What kind of expectations will you have
charmed. for them?
 What kind of fears will you have for them?
At thirteen years old, Nino went to a good secondary
7) Have some students share their futures.
school. Her parents felt she should be given the best
8) Tell them to take their papers home and reflect
possible education to prepare her for the rest of her
on what they wrote.
life. Nino shone at everything. She was so kind and
so loved by all of her friends that no one could feel
jealous of her success. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
At nineteen years old, when Nino had just completed
 What are the steps/decisions/goals undertaken
her second year at university studying to become an
to achieve these gals and plans?
engineer, she met a sweetheart.

82
 What are the steps/decisions already undertak- I will also ask for my friends’ encourage-
en? Are these decisions moving you towards your ment”
goals, or away from them?  What is my plan of action? “First, I will
create a study schedule for myself. Then I
will be sure to pay attention in all my les-
Your Goals sons. Finally, I must buy a exam book and
a pen to take the exam”
Topic: Decision Making, Self-Awareness
 Completion Date: When will I be finished
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain with this goal? “The exams are being held
from this activity?): To understand the difference in two weeks, so I will be finished on ____
between short and long term goals and to help plan ____” (write a date)
goals for the future. 5) Have students share their goals and discuss
Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: All ages WHAT ARE MY GOALS?
Time Required: 45 minutes – 1 hour
Materials: Goals worksheet (for each student), Black-
board/whiteboard/flipchart (markers/chalk), Pens/ Short-Term Goal Long-Term Goal
pencils

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) On the board write the terms “short-term goal”


and “long-term goal” Benefits in Reaching My Benefits in Reaching My
2) Brainstorm with the class on possible definitions Goal Goal
for these terms
3) Have the classes think of examples for both short
and long term goals:
Short-term: A project that can be completed
within six months
 I am going to clean my house What might stand in my What might stand in my
 I am going to pass my exams in two way? way?
months
 I am going to knit a scarf for my friend
Long-term: A project that can be completed
in a year or more
 I am going to go to University to become
a doctor What do I need to learn What do I need to learn
 I am going to have three children who will or do? or do?
attend good schools
 I am going to remodel my entire house
4) Give each student a copy of the goals worksheet
and explain each part they must complete using
a sample goal
 Identify your goals: Write one short-term Who will encourage me? Who will encourage me?
and one long-term goal. Suggest “Pass my
exams” as an example of a short term
goal. What about a long term goal?
 What are some of the benefits of reaching
my goal? In our example, “I will make my
parents happy and have good scores so I
can go on to university” Plans of action – Steps I Plans of action – Steps I
 What stands between me and my goal? will take will take
“If I do not like to study or do not study
enough, this could be an obstacle to pass-
ing my exams” or “If I have to help my
mother/father with their work, it could be
hard for me to study for my exams”
 What do I need to learn or do? “I need to Completion Date Completion Date
learn my math and English to do well on
the exam. I also need to bring my exam
book to class”
 Who will encourage me? “I know that my
mother and my teacher want me to do
well, so I will ask them to help me study
and check me to see if I am studying well.

83
Testing the Waters Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: 10 and under
Topic: Decision Making, Responsible Behavior Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain from Materials: Paper (for each student), Colored pens/
this activity?): To discuss different types of reactions to pencils/markers, Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart,
different situations and discussing if they are risky or not. Chalk/markers; Optional: Tape
Number of Students: 10-30
Age Range of Students: 15–17 Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Time Required: 30 minutes
Materials: Four signs: Plunger, Wader, Tester and Delayer, 1) Ask the students how they learned what is right
Tape, Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Markers/chalk and wrong
2) Most likely they will say their parents and not
much more, so make suggestions on other people
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
who help them decide what is right and wrong.
1) Appoint each corner of the room a number. Examples could be:
2) Tell the students to imagine that they went to the  Teachers
lake and it was a hot day, but the water was very  Another relative
cold. What would you do?  A friend’s parents
 A friend
3) Tell them to go to corners:
 An older sibling
 If you would run and jump right in
 Priest/pastor or religious leader
 If you would go into the water slowly and
 Another community leader/member
get your body used to the water
3) Make a list on the board.
 If you would dip a toe into the water to
see how cold it was before you got in 4) Explain that we don’t always have to make deci-
 If you would stand on the beach and look sions on our own and that these people often help
around to consider what you will do next us with hard decisions and can act as “advisors”.
5) After they have gone to their corners, give each 5) Let them take a few minutes to look at the list
corner their appropriate sign: and think about the “advisors” in their life.
 Plunger 6) Give each student a piece of paper and some
 Wader markers/pens.
 Tester 7) Tell the students to draw a picture of their great-
 Delayer est advisor.
6) Have the groups consider how this relates to real 8) Under the picture they must write a short para-
life situations. graph explaining why they are a good advisor and
7) Give each group paper and pens and tell them to how their advisor helps them.
write down the positives and negatives of being 9) This can be difficult for some children. Make sure
in that corner. you give them at least 15 minutes for this part of
8) While they are writing make a chart on the board the activity.
with four columns, one for each corner. 10) Have a few students (or all if you have time) share
9) After each group is has finished, have them share their picture and read their paragraph about their
their list. advisor.
10) In each column, write the positives and negatives
for each corner. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
11) After every group has read their list, have the
class look at the board for a minute.  What are qualities that make a person a good ad-
12) Ask them to think about where they are and visor?
where they would like to be.  Do you think your advisors will change when you
13) Tell the class if they would like to change their get older?
corner they can do so.  Do you think your advisors have advisors? Who are
14) Ask each group why they are at that corner and they??
how they think it affects their decisions in life.
Just in Time!
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Topic: Decision Making
 What are the similarities of your approach to cold Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
water and decision-making in general? Are they from this activity?): To practice situations where
similar or are they different? changing a decision is a positive thing.
Number of Students: 10-30
Advisors Age Range of Students: 12–17
Time Required: 45 minutes – 1 hour
Topic: Decision Making Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Mark-
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain ers/chalk; Optional: Scratch paper, Pens/pencils
from this activity?): To talk about people who help us
make decisions.

84
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 2) Brainstorm possible definitions and write them on
the board.
1) Ask your students to close their eyes. 3) Ask for examples of bad habits and write them on
2) Tell them to think of a time when they changed the board. Some examples can be:
their mind and it had good consequences.  Watching too much TV
3) Give them a few minutes to think silently.  Not doing your homework
4) If you have scratch paper and pens/pencils, ask  Eating too many sweets
the students to write down their ideas then write  Talking in class
down a few examples on the board. If you don’t  Biting your fingernails
have such materials, ask for examples and write  Chewing on pencils and/or pens
them on the board.  Not covering your mouth when you sneeze
5) A few ideas they might have: 4) Explain that people usually don’t change their
 Wanting a toy or object, deciding not to behavior until they realize that bad things hap-
buy one and finding out later that it wasn’t pen because of bad habits.
fun anyways 5) Ask the class to split into groups of four or five.
 Wanting to yell at a friend for a mistake 6) Tell the groups that they must chose a bad habit
they made, deciding not to and finding from the board and come up with a short skit
out later that they didn’t actually make about that bad habit.
a mistake 7) In the skit they must answer the following questions:
 Deciding that taking the marshutka at night  What is the bad habit? (act it out)
was dangerous, deciding to stay another  Why it is bad?
night and take the morning marshutka and  What does the bad habit do?
finding out later that there was a drunk driv-  How do you stop this bad habit?
ing accident that night near your house 8) Give at least 10 – 15 minutes to prepare the skits.
6) After you have a few examples on the board, split 9) After everyone has finished, have the groups
the class into groups for four or five. present their skits.
7) Ask the class to come up with a short skit demonstrat- 10) After each skit, discuss the questions presented above.
ing a time when changing your mind is a good idea.
8) Give the groups at least 10 - 15 minutes to pre-
pare a skit. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
9) After everyone is finished, ask each group to per-  What bad habits do you have? (have them write in
form their skit. a journal or on a piece of paper)
10) After each skit, ask the students a few questions:  Why is it bad?
 What was the original decision made?
 What can you do to stop these bad habits?
 How was the decision changed?
 Why do you think bad habits start?
 Why was it changed?
 What happened after the decision was  Are their good habits? What are some examples?
changed?
 What could have/would have happened if Who’s in Charge?
the person did not change his/her decision?
11) Summarize the activity. Everyday, your parents and teachers help you make
decisions. You make many important decisions for
yourself, too! As you get older and smarter, you will
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
make more decisions for yourself. On the list below,
 What are steps you can take to make good decisions? circle who makes the decision with you.
 Who are people you can go to for advice about
making a decision? Who decides:
My favorite color? me teacher parent
Good Decision for Bad Habits When I go to bed? me teacher parent
What I study in school? me teacher parent
Topic: Decision Making
What I have for dinner? me teacher parent
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To demonstrate bad habits and What grade I get in English? me teacher parent
discuss ways to change bad habits. Who I sit with at school? me teacher parent
Number of Students: 10-30 Who my friends are? me teacher parent
Age Range of Students: 15 and under What my favorite game is? me teacher parent
Time Required: 45 minutes – 1 hour If I should help a friend? me teacher parent
Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Mark-
If I go to school? me teacher parent
ers/chalk; Optional: Scratch paper, Pens/pencils
What medicines I take? me teacher parent

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): If I’m nice to someone? me teacher parent


Where I sit in class? me teacher parent
1) Ask you students to define a “bad habit”.
Name .................. Date ..................

85
What is a decision? 4. A book I like is .................................... .

A decision is when there are different things you can I decided to read that book because .......... .
do and you pick one of them. You make decisions
every day.
5. My favorite game to play is ..................... .
Some decisions are easy, like choosing which book to I decided to play that game because ......... .
read. Some decisions are hard, like deciding the best
birthday present to get for a friend! Here are some
things you probably decide for yourself. Write in your 6. I share ........................... with my friends.
decisions and why you made each decision.
I decided to share that with my friends be-
cause ............................................... .
1. When I got dressed for school, I put on . ..... .
I decided to wear this because ................ .
7. What is a decision you made today? ...........
Why did you decide to do that? .................
2. For breakfast, I had .............................. .
I decided to eat that because .................. .
Name .................. Date ..................

3. On my way to school I talked to ............... .


I decided to talk to them because . ........... .

86
Peer Pressure

87
88
Wellness Cookies  Self-determination is a value that many
people find important.
Topic: Peer Pressure  A value is a principle or an idea that peo-
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain ple think is important.
from this activity?): To show students the effects of  Self-determination is a feeling that leads
peer pressure and different ways people react to it. to freedom of a person’s ideas.
Number of Students: 5-30  Self-determination means that you don’t
have to follow the crowd and that you can
Age Range of Students: 12-17
go your own way.
Time Required: 30 minutes  Self-determination gives you more self-
Materials: Cookies (enough for all the class plus confidence.
maybe some extras), Prepared instruction cards; Op-  Self-determination allows for more self-
tional: Blackboard/whiteboard/flip chart respect

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 1) Choose Silly Sally, and Self-Determined Sam.
2) Choose five students to pretend that they are
1) Prepare instruction cards before class. smoking.
2) Divide the class into groups of five. 3) Have Silly Sally approach the group of smokers.
3) Give each student one of the prepared instruction 4) Have the smokers tell her how great cigarette
cards. Tell them they must not show it to anyone smoking is and try to get her to smoke a ciga-
else in the group. The five cards must read: #1, rette.
2, and 3 - Take one cookie, eat it slowly, and then 5) Have them tell her some reasons to start smok-
try to persuade everyone else in the group; #4 – ing: cool, tastes good, gives a good feeling...
Wait two minutes, then take a cookie; #5 – Don’t
6) Have her mull it over out loud: the pros and the
take a cookie no matter what.
cons.
4) Let them work it out for five minutes, then stop.
7) Have her fall into the trap of peer pressure and
5) Ask the class about what happened in their groups: start smoking.
 Ask person #5: How did you feel being 8) Have Self-determined Sam do the same thing as
pressured to do something you were told Sally, but he will say no to smoking.
not to do?
9) Repeat this several times so that everybody gets
 Ask person #4: How did you feel about giv-
a chance to try at least one part.
ing in?
 Ask person #5: How did you feel when the 10) You can switch the roles from Silly Sally to Silly
person gave in? Sam to be more gender nuetral.
 Ask persons #1,#2,#3: How did you feel 11) Afterwards, have students get into small groups
persuading others? of four.
 Ask all: Who makes your decisions? 12) Have them brainstorm about what they saw.
6) Let each group discuss answers with the class. 13) Have them write in their journals about what
they saw and what would be the best response.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 You can add all sorts of subjects to this Topic:.
For example, attach it to doing drugs, smoking,  Peer pressure and ways to counteract it. Situ-
or just general decision making. Peer pressure ations that students find themselves in that in-
can be used in many different ways volve peer pressure.

Self-Determination Role Play and Peer Pressure Skits


Journal Write Topic: Peer Pressure
Topic: Self-determination, Peer Pressure Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To show visually different peer
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
pressure situations and different solutions
from this activity?): To learn about self-determina-
tion and peer pressure. Number of Students: 15-30
Number of Students: 10-30 Age Range of Students: 10-17
Age Range of Students: 14-17 Time Required: 30 minutes
Time Required: 1 hour Materials: Optional: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart,
Role cards
Materials: Pens, Journals; Optional: Role play cards

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):


Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
1) Explain to the group what peer pressure is and
Define self-determination:
how it can be both bad and good.
Self-determination= (n.) Determination by oneself
2) Have the class come up with different scenarios
or itself, without outside influence. (found at www.
where peer pressure is used or situations they
dictionary.com)
have seen where peer pressure has played a part.

89
3) Divide the class into groups of four or five. Objective – Don’t eat any candy.
4) Give each group a Topic: (you can have role cards
Role 4: You have a bag of candy. Get everybody
prepared if you like).
in your group to eat the candy. Slowly eat the
5) Tell the groups they must create a skit on that candy while you persuade the others to eat
Topic: and present it to the class. some too.
6) Example Topics are: smoking a cigarette, doing
drugs, stealing, cheating on a test, not studying, Objective – Get everyone to eat the candy.
wearing stylish clothing, not eating/eating too
much food, doing something dangerous, disobey- 3) Before beginning, make sure that the students
ing your parents, etc. understand their tasks and that they must do
7) You can also use examples of “good” peer pres- exactly what the role card says. Also make sure
sure. Examples are: stopping a bad habit, listen- they know they are not allowed to let the others
ing to a teacher, participating in a sport or other in the group know what is on their card.
healthy activity, etc. 4) Give the student with card number four the bag
8) Have the groups present their skits. of candy and have each group begin.
9) Leave room for discussion afterwards. 5) Move between groups and facilitate when neces-
sary.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: 6) After ten minutes stop the group and discuss
(suggested questions below).
 What were the situations in each skit?
 Have you seen these in real life? Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 Any real life examples?
 What can you do to counteract peer pressure?  What happened in your group? Who had the most
 What are the differences between peer pressure difficult job? Why?
and peer support? How can you tell the difference?  How did it feel to be pressured by the group
to eat candy? Was it difficult to think of reason
why you didn’t want the candy? Was it more dif-
Peer Pressure Simulation ficult to refuse when you were the only one who
wouldn’t eat the candy? How did it feel to pres-
Topic: Peer pressure sure others? How did you feel after you gave in
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain and began eating the candy? What real life situ-
from this activity?): To demonstrate the group dy- ation did this activity illustrate? Can you think of
namics involved in peer pressure. a time when your friends put the same kind of
Number of Students: 4-30 pressure on you?
Age Range of Students: 13-17
Time Required: 30 minutes Peer Pressure and the Media
Materials: One role card per student, One bag of
M&M’s (or other similar candy) per group of four stu- Topic: Peer pressure, Consumer Health
dents and extras for “non-eaters” Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To increase students awareness
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): of peer pressure in the media.
Number of Students: 10-30
1) Divide the class into groups of four. Age Range of Students: 12-17
2) Each group is given four role play cards. Time Required: 45 minutes
The role cards should read: Materials: A variety of magazines, Pen and paper for
Role 1: Someone playing this game has candy and each group.
will try to get you to eat some. You immedi-
ately agree to eat the candy and try to get Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
others to eat it
1) Describe and discuss what peer pressure is.
Objective – try to persuade others to eat the
2) Divide the class into groups of four or five.
candy
3) Ask the students to look through the magazines
Role 2: Someone has candy, and will try to get and find examples of magazines that use the con-
you to eat some. Don’t eat any candy at first. cept of peer pressure to sell products.
Give a reason why you don’t want any. Finally, 4) Ask the group to answer the following questions:
give in and start eating. Then get others to  What are they trying to sell?
eat them.  Who is being targeted by this ad? (Who are
Objective – Persuade others to eat the candy. they selling it to?)
 Does this ad tell the truth? Why or why
Role 3: Someone in your group has candy and not?
will try to get you to eat some. Don’t eat the  Is this ad convincing? Why or why not?
candy, no matter what anyone says to you.  How does the ad use peer pressure to sell
If you do not eat any, you will get your own the product or service?
after the game.

90
5) Give the groups about 15 minutes to complete 12) Discuss the activity after it is finished.
the questions.
6) After they are done have each group present Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
their findings to the class.
7) Leave time for discussion.  Ask the students: How did it feel to be alone at
the front of the room? If you moved, why did you
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: move? How did you feel after you moved? Was
it difficult to argue your position when you were
Ask students: alone? If you didn’t move, why didn’t you move?
 On whom do advertisers use peer pressure tech- How did it feel to be in the group trying to change
niques? the volunteer’s mind? How did you feel when you
were successful in changing his/her mind?
 How can consumers protect themselves against
such advertisements?
Ranking Peer Pressure
Holding Your Ground Topic: Peer pressure
Topic: Peer pressure, Decision Making Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To help students analyze their
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
choices
from this activity?): To demonstrate how difficult it
can be to take a stand on an issue and stick with it. Number of Students: 15-30
Number of Students: 10-30 Age Range of Students: 12-17
Age Range of Students: 12-17 Time Required: 30 minutes
Time Required: 30-45 minutes Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart
Materials: Large cards number 1-10
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 1) List behaviors that are likely to involve peer pres-
sure on the blackboard (for example: smoking,
1) Lay the numbered cards on the floor (or tape
doing drugs, drugs, sex, cheating in school, bul-
them on the walls) in order from 1 to 10 with
lying others, wearing cosmetics, wearing certain
space in between each one.
cloths, not doing well at school, etc).
2) The words “Strongly Agree” should be written
2) You can also have your students list the behav-
next to number one, and the words “Strongly Dis-
iors.
agree” should be written next to number ten.
3) Make sure there are ten behaviors ranging in neg-
3) Ask one student to come to the front of the room.
ativity.
4) Give him/her a controversial statement from the
4) Ask students to rank the behaviors from 1 – 10,
list below (or your own).
with one being the easiest to resist and 10 being
Suggested ideas: the most difficult.
 Our school should/should not have uniforms. 5) As a group, discuss the factors that influenced
 A woman can do any job in the workplace their rankings (for example, legal versus illegal,
that a man can. the frequency with which they observe the be-
 It should be illegal for anyone younger havior, the behavior of their friends, previous ex-
than 21 to drink alcohol. perience, the influence of a particular person, a
 It should be illegal for anyone younger past experience that has influenced them, etc.).
than 18 to smoke. 6) Have the class form groups based on their rank-
 It is a waste of time to vote. ings of the behaviors (for example, one group will
 Music by artists such as Metalica or Lek- be students who ranked smoking as the most dif-
seni is not art, it is crude and obscene. ficult behavior to resist).
5) Ask him or her to stand by the number that rep- 7) Ask the groups to discuss why it is difficult for
resents how he/she feels about the statement (1 them and make a list of reasons not to engage in
meaning strongly agrees and 10 meaning strongly the behavior and techniques to successfully resist
disagrees). peer pressure.
6) Now it is the task of the other students to try to
convince the student to change his or her position
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
on the Topic: (to change number).
7) They can use any means necessary to try to per-  What are some ways you could avoid peer pres-
suade the student. sure?
8) All students should try to change the person’s  Can you think of examples of bad peer pressure
mind even if they agree with the student. you have seen? Good peer pressure?
9) If the student agrees with a statement made by  Why do you think peers pressure other peers into
the students on the opposing side of the issue, doing “bad” things?
he/she will move to another number.
10) Limit the time up front to 7 minutes.
11) Repeat this several times (don’t try to get every-
one in the class, it will talk too long).

91
Peer Pressure Role Plays The Best Response Game
Topic: Peer pressure Topic: Peer Pressure
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To practice responding to dif- from this activity?): To identify the typical ways peo-
ficult situations ple use to pressure others, finding responses to those
Number of Students: 10-30 pressures.
Age Range of Students: 12-17 Number of Students:15-30
Time Required: 45 minutes Age Range of Students: 10 and up
Materials: Cards with situations on them Time Required: 45 min – 1 hour
Materials: Slips of paper, Pen/pencil, Watch or clock
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): with a second hand, Paper; Optional: Blackboard/
whiteboard/flipchart, Markers/chalk, Prize for the
1) Divide the class into small groups (4-5). winning team
2) Give each group one of the situations below.
3) Have students prepare skits to illustrate the situ- Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
ation and their response (this should take about
15-20 minutes). 1) Choose three or five judges and break the rest of
 You have been invited to a party, but you the class into groups of 4 or 5.
know that your parents will not let you go. 2) Tell the class that you’ll read common lines given
Your friends are encouraging you to lie to to pressure others into something.
your parents and tell them that you are 3) Teams have 2 minutes to come up with the best re-
going to the library. What do you do? sponse to the line and write it on a slip of paper.
 Some of your friends stole a copy of next 4) After two minutes, someone will collect all the
week’s big English test. They plan to use it papers.
to cheat, and they have offered a copy to 5) Read them all aloud to the class and give them to
you. What do you do? the judges.
 There is a group of cool kids at your school. 6) The judges have 1 minute to judge whose the
They like you, but they say that your best best was and announce the winner.
friend is a loser. They say that you should 7) Give two points to the winning team and zero to
stop talking to your best friend and hang the rest of the teams.
out with them instead. What do you do?
8) Continue this for the rest of the lines (you can
 You are at a party and it is time to leave.
vary the number by the number of people you
The person who drove you there has been
have or how much time you would like to take).
drinking wine all night and is drunk. Your
9) After you have read all the lines, count the points.
friends say it is no big deal and they get in
The team with the most points wins.
the car, but you are afraid it is not safe to
ride with a drunk driver. What do you do? Example Lines:
 You are leaving school and you see the di-  Everybody is doing it
rector’s car. Your friend asks you to watch  If you truly love me, you will do it
for passers-by while she writes on the side  I know you want to, you’re just afraid
of the car. What do you do?  Don’t you trust me?
 You and your best friend meet some cool  Cigarettes aren’t addictive the first time
kids in the park. Suddenly, someone pulls you try them
out a pack of cigarettes. Everyone else,  I’ve only have a few drinks, I’m okay to
including your best friend, takes a ciga- drive
rette. They want you to take one too, but  If you were my real friend you’d do it.
you don’t want to. What do you do?  You’ve done this before, so what’s the
 You go to a party with friends, and as soon problem?
as you get there, you see that everyone is  If you don’t drink with me I won’t be your
smoking marijuana. What do you do? friend
 Several kids you know are planning to play  If you don’t, someone else will!
a cruel practical joke on someone and  Practice makes perfect.
they want you to help. What do you do?  Nothing bad happens if you just try a little
 You friend really wants to experiment with bit.
marijuana, but she doesn’t want to smoke  You don’t think I’m stupid do you?
it alone – she wants you to try it with her.  But I love you. Don’t you love me?
She assures you that it will be safe. What  Nothing will go wrong, don’t worry.
do you do?  Aren’t you curious?

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 Discuss each scenario with the class and ask them  Is it easy to use these responses in real life? Why
what they thought of it and if they would do any- or why not?
thing different.  What sort of situations would these lines be
used?

92
Peer Pressure Role Plays #2 not want to get into the car. He tells his friend
that someone who is not drunk should not
Topic: Peer Pressure drive, but the friend insists that he can drive
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain very well. Perform a role play on what this
from this activity?): To examine common peer pres- boy should do.
sure situations, come up with strategies in dealing 2) A group of secondary school students are at a
with peer pressure, and find strategies students are dance. They are dancing and having a really
comfortable using. good time together. One of the students takes
Number of Students: 10-30 out some alcohol from under his or her jacket.
Age Range of Students: 10 and up He or she starts drinking and tries to get the
Time Required: 1 hour others to drink, too. He or she says that there
Materials: Role play cards is more to drink outside and tries to pressure
others to join him or her in drinking. Some
of the students agree. Show how the other(s)
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): could handle this pressure situation.
1) Create cards with role plays on them pertaining 3) Some friends are chatting outside. One of
to various peer pressure situations (see attached their friends comes up to them and joins
role play sheet). them. After a few minutes, this person takes
2) Divide the class into small groups. out some marijuana and lights it up. He or
3) Give each group a role play card. she asks the others to join him or her. They
4) The groups should meet and talk about the peer all resist for a while, but then some of the
pressure situation and come up with a realistic group also smoke. One refuses to smoke. Now,
reaction or response for the problem. the group pressures this person to join them.
Show what the person should do to resist this
5) The group should then create a role play showing
peer pressure.
the situation and how the young person resists
peer pressure. 4) A group friends are hanging out near the mar-
6) After each role play, process the situation and re- ket. They are talking about how board they
sponses with the entire class. are. They really wish they had something to
do. One of them suggests that they go to the
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: grocery store and steal some chocolate. Some
of the friends agree – excited to do something
 Was it realistic? on this boring day! As the groups walk to the
 Would the resistance demonstrated actually work store, one of them is really afraid and does
in the situation? not want to participate in stealing from the
store. Create a role play showing what this
 Is this a common situation in our community?
person might do to resist the peer pressure.

Peer Pressure Role Play Cards 5) A group of young men are talking about wom-
en. They are talking also about how they like
1) A boy goes to a supra with a group of his going to the prostitutes’ house and brag to
friends. The supra was very far into the moun- each other about having sex. They are teasing
tains, so his friend drove them in his car. At one young man about the fact that he has not
the supra, his friend with the car drank a lot been to the prostitute and has not had sex.
of wine. When they walk to the car after the They tell him that he must go with them next
supra, his friend is stumbling and is obviously time to become “a real man”. The boy does
drunk. His friend gets into the car and all of not feel comfortable with going. Create a role
the other friends also get in. The boy knows play showing how this boy could handle this
that it is very unsafe to drive drunk and does situation assertively.

93
94
Saying No

95
96
How to Say No Examples:
 Would you like more soup?
Topic: Peer Pressure, Saying No  Would you like some candy?
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain  Would you like another slice of cake?
from this activity?): To have students practice strate- No thanks grandma
gies for saying no.
4) Teach the kids to gracefully decline food and not
Number of Students: 10-30
make negative verbal or non-verbal comments
Age Range of Students: 12-17 (such as sticking their finger in their mouth with
Time Required: 45 minutes a gagging motion).
Materials: Slips of paper, 2 Containers, Blackboard 5) Also teach them how to politely respond to ques-
tions such as “You don’t like my cooking?”
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 6) You can expand and give them different cultural
situations (you are guest, it’s a birthday supra,
1) Ask students to write a scenario in which they you have a guest over, etc.).
would feel pressured to behave in a certain way
on a slip of paper. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
2) Put all the slips of paper in a container at the
front of the room.  Is it difficult for you to refuse food? Why or why not?
3) Tell the students to brainstorm a list on the black-  In what situations is it the more difficult to refuse
board of different ways to say no (for example, food? Why?
being direct, giving a reason, being funny, chang-  Do people pressure you to eat food a lot?
ing the subject, making an excuse, physically  Do you ever eat more than you wanted to be-
leaving the room/place, putting it off until later, cause someone asked you to?
finding a friend to support you, etc.).  How do you feel when are pressured to eat some-
4) Write each of these strategies on slips of paper thing you don’t want?
and put them in another container.  How does this relate to other pressures (ciga-
5) Have a volunteer come to the front of the room rettes, drinking, etc.)?
and choose a situation and a strategy. This stu-
dent can choose 2 to 4 other students to help act
out the situation. Saying “No” Nicely
6) The volunteer will use the strategy on the slip of
paper to escape from the difficult situation. Topic: Saying No
7) Leave time for discussion at the end. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): Develop students’ refusal skills.
Number of Students: 5-30
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Age Range of Students: Any age
 What strategies were most effective? Ineffec- Time Required: 20-25 minutes
tive? Materials: None
 Are certain strategies more effective for certain
scenarios?
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 What strategies would you be most comfortable
using? 1) Tell the students that sometimes you need to
say no when someone makes a suggestion, offers
something or asks you to do something for them.
Refusing Food Politely Of course, saying just “no” can be rude. Here
Topic: Saying No are some of the most common ways to say “no”
nicely (without being rude).
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To develop students’ refusal
skills.  Would you like to see a film tonight?
 I’m afraid I can’t go out tonight. I’ve got a
Number of Students: 5-30
test tomorrow.
Age Range of Students: All ages
Time Required: 10-15 minutes  Why don’t we have some Chinese food?
Materials: Optional: Pictures of food or actual food  Sorry, but I don’t particularly like Chinese
food.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 How about taking a nice walk?
1) Prepare short dialogues about being offered and  I’d really rather not take a walk this af-
refusing food. ternoon.
2) Have students practice them in pairs.
3) The dialogues should simulate being pressured to  Would you like to come to the museum
eat a lot of food, unhealthy food or food that is with us?
not wanted.  Thank you, but it’s not my idea of fun.

97
 Let’s go for a drive. gizing, be direct and succinct. For example:
 Sorry, I’m really not fond of driving for the if you are asked to join someone for lunch,
fun of it. and you don’t want to, simply say “No, thank
you”.
 Why don’t you stay the night? The reflecting “no”
 That’s very kind of you, but I have to get
home. Here you acknowledge the content and feeling
of the request, then add the assertive refusal
2) When someone makes an offer, it is polite to first at the end. For example, “I know you want to
thank that person and then say no. talk to me about talking the annual depart-
ment lunch, but I can’t do lunch today”.
3) You can often offer an excuse for not wanting to
do something The reasoned “no”
4) You don’t have to justify your response of the re-
Give a brief and genuine reason for the re-
quest is unreasonable. You can just say “no thank
fusal without opening up further negotiation.
you”.
For example “I can’t have lunch with you be-
5) Have your students work in pairs to practice of-
cause I have a report that needs to be finished
fering and refusing each other politely.
tomorrow”.
The rain check “no”
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
A way of saying “no” to a specific request
 Have you ever had to say no to a friend? Did you without giving a definite “no”. It’s a prelude
use these methods? to negotiation, not a rejection of the request.
 How can you use these same methods for refusing Only use it if you genuinely want to meet the
something dangerous? request. For example “I can’t have lunch with
you today, but I could make it sometime next
week”.
Ways to Refuse
The enquiring “no”
Topic: Saying No
A way to find out more about a request, to see
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
if it’s something you want to do. For example
from this activity?): Children learn that sometimes
“I can’t have lunch today, but is there any-
we have to say “no” to our friends and that they
thing else you would like to talk to me about,
can say no and still be cool. They also learn that it is
other than the new proposal?”
alright to refuse to smoke.
Number of Students: 5-30 The broken record
Age Range of Students: 8-17 This can be used when someone continues to
Time Required: Varies make a request after you have politely de-
Materials: None clined. Repeat the simple statement of re-
fusal again and again with no explanation. For
example “No I can’t have lunch with you” (Oh
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
please, it won’t take long) “No, I can’t have
1) Tell your students about 6 ways to say “no” and lunch with you” (OH come on, I’ll pay) “No, I
mean it (by Lynn Battle): can’t have lunch with you”.
It is not until we can say “no” that our “yes” 2) Ask students to prepare dialogues of their own
means “yes” and our “no” means “no”. Say- and present them to the class.
ing “yes” when you would rather say “no”
gives you stress, which can cause physical Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
symptoms, such as headaches, shoulder ten-
sion and disturbed sleep. Some people who  What were the easiest ways to say no? The most
find saying “no” difficult are confusing rejec- difficult?
tion of a request with personal rejection of  When would you most likely use each refusal?
the person making the request. Saying “no”  Have you ever been in a situation where someone
doesn’t mean that you don’t like a person, made a request you didn’t want to do?
just that you are refusing their current re-  How did you react when the person make the re-
quest, and vice versa. When saying “no”, be quest?
honest, calm and polite. It will help you main-  Can you use these ways of saying no in more seri-
tain control, and avoid escalating the situa- ous situations? How?
tion or alienating the other person. People
are happier to accept an honest “no” than be
faced with indecision and a delayed refusal. Ways to Refuse Substance Abuse
How do you say “no” and mean it? Topic: Saying no
The direct “no” Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To look critically at the kinds of
When someone asks you to do something you
negative peer pressures they are under at this age,
don’t want to do, just say “no”. No apolo-

98
to recognize some of the ways which they internalize 9) What are the benefits of knowing how to say
peer pressure, to learn bout the harmful consequenc- “no”?
es of alcohol and other drug use, to see how innocent
10) Someone said that when you’re under the
actions can often lead to serious consequences, and
influence of alcohol, the alcohol starts doing
to learn some ways to resist negative peer pressure.
your thinking for you. What did he mean by
Number of Students: 5-30 that? Do you agree? Why or why not?
Age Range of Students: 8-17
11) Someone said that alcohol makes you say and
Time Required: Varies
do things you wouldn’t if you were sober.
Materials: optional: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart
Do you think that’s true? If it is true, what’s
wrong with it? Have you ever seen that hap-
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): pen to anyone before?

1) Lead a discussion on ways to overcome peer pres- 12) Someone said that when you’re under the in-
sure fluence of alcohol, you’re a hazard to your-
self and others. What did he mean by that?
Discussion Prompts Do you agree? Have you ever known anyone to
Saying “no” to your friends can be very hard get hurt, or to hurt someone else when intoxi-
sometimes. You may be afraid of what they’ll cated?
think if you don’t go along with them. Here 13) Do you think movies and television make alco-
are some good ways to say “no” and still be hol use look attractive or unattractive? Does
cool: that influence you in any way? Do you agree
 Say what the problem is (that’s mean, with the way the portray drinking? What
that’s illegal, etc) changes would you make?
 Say that its’ not cool to do that
 Say what the consequences are 14) Do you know anybody who has ever benefited
 Suggest something else to do instead from smoking, drinking alcohol, or using other
 If your friends insist on doing it anyways, drugs?
leave. But leave the door open for them to
change their minds and join you.
Saying No to Alcohol
Sometimes you can make it easier on your-
self by preparing. Here are things you can do & Other Drugs
ahead of time:
Topic: Saying No
 Think ahead and try to anticipate possible Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
problems from this activity?): To provide students with a sys-
 Think about your friends’ characteristics tem for saying no to friends who want to do some-
and what they do that you don’t like thing unhealthy
 Decide in advance what you intend to you
Number of Students: 5-25
 Think of some good methods to handle
certain problems, or how to avoid prob- Age Range of Students: 10-17
lems all together Time Required: 1–1.5 hours
Discussion Questions Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart

1) Agree or disagree: it’s better to go along with


the crowd than to make your own choices. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
What do you agree or disagree?
1) Write a list of common excuses on the board.
2) What is peer pressure? What does it have to 2) Have students determine their weakness.
do with making choices? 3) Ask them to think of other excuses that aren’t in
3) In what ways has peer pressure changed as the list and analyze those as well.
you’ve gotten older? Excuses
4) Does peer pressure sometimes affect the way  Just one (or, a little won’t hurt)
you or your friends make choices? How?  I can control myself, so this once won’t
matter
5) One made the point that peer pressure is  Everybody’s doing it
nothing unless you fall into it, and you can  I don’t want to be left out
choose not to do that. Do you agree with him?  I deserve this, just this once
Why or why not?  I feel stressed out. This will help me relax
6) How do you decide whether or not it’s okay to  If I don’t do this, they’ll think I am a…
follow the majority? When is it okay? When is  If I don’t do this, they might not like me
it not okay?  If I don’t do this, they might get mad at
me
7) How does it make you feel when you do  I’m too young for this to hurt me
something that you know you shouldn’t have 4) Help the class make a list of positive thoughts
done? they can review to increase their sense of self-
8) What makes it hard to say “no” to a friend? worth and help them to say “no” when needed

99
5) Make a list and hang it on the wall as a constant Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
reminder
6) Make up several hypothetical situations and have  What situations where the most difficult? Why?
the kids do role plays in which they practice say-  What methods of saying no did you use?
ing “NO”  What methods of saying no worked the best?
Examples: Didn’t work at all?
 Have you been in any similar situations? What did
 Your friends want you to lie to your par-
you do?
ents about where you are going because if
they knew they wouldn’t let you go.
 Several of your friends are planning to
cheat on a big test and they want you to
be part of it.

100
Peer
Mediation
and
Conflict
Management

101
102
Mediation – What is it? ball is run over by a car and ruined. This is
Giorgi’s only ball and gets very angry. He will
Topic: Character Building, Mediation not talk to Vasha.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 2) Lali invited Nino to her birthday supra. Nino’s
from this activity?): To learn how to resolve conflicts other friend Dali also invited her to a supra on
by use of a third party and generate understanding of the same night. Nino is trying to decide and
teamwork and problem solving both Lali and Dali are angry that she is think-
Number of Students: 5-30 ing about going to the other’s supra.
Age Range of Students: 12-17
3) Tamari is always last to be picked for any
Time Required: 90 minutes games that her friends play. One of her
Materials: Cards with different scenarios that might friends, Nana, seems to talk the rest of her
happen at school (see below) friends into picking Tamari last. Tamari is very
sad and doesn’t know why Nana would be un-
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): kind to her.
4) Jaba loves khachapuri and just bought a
1) Brainstorm about what mediation is and when
new piece from the café. Another boy, Giga,
it can be used (for example: two students have
bumps into Jaba and Jaba drops his khachapu-
been hassling each other for a month, calling
ri on the ground. Jaba gets very angry and hits
each other names and spreading rumors. The
Giga.
situation has escalated to the point where it is
disruptive for teachers and other students. A 5) Taco has liked a boy, Anri, for a long time. She
teacher refers them to the mediation coordina- has been to shy to tell him, or anybody else.
tor who asks them both in and asks if they want One day, Taco hears that her friend Julieta
to try mediation. They both agree and a meeting likes Anri and Anri likes her back. Taco is very
is scheduled.). hurt and won’t talk to Julieta. Julieta doesn’t
know why.
Mediation: attempt to make two opponents 6) Bacho has been very unkind to Luka for sev-
agree eral years. Bacho’s father has been fighting
with Luka’s father for a long time, tells his
Mediator or Mediation Coordinator: a person
son that Luka is a bad boy. One day Bacho and
who tries to help two opponents agree
Luka get into a fight and Luka breaks Bacho’s
nose.
2) Define mediation. Mediation is: a voluntary pro-
cess where a neutral third party helps the dis-
putants (those in conflict) discuss their problems Conflict Management Match
rationally, share their beliefs, feelings and con-
cerns, come to a better understanding of each Topic: Conflict Management
other, and develop their own solution to their Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
problem. It brings two people (or groups) to- from this activity?): Identify personal management
gether in a safe and structured environment, and styles and develop awareness of strategies used with
helps them stay focused to find the solution that each conflict management style.
meets their needs. Number of Students: 4-30
3) Divide the class into groups of 4 or 5. Age Range of Students: 10-17
4) Have each group choose a card with a scenario at Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes
random.
Materials: Handouts of names and descriptions (one
5) Have the groups act out that scenario in a short for each group); Optional: Blackboard/whiteboard/
skit about how to solve that scenario with media- flipchart
tion.
6) Leave time for discussion after each skit and talk
about the scenario with the class and how each Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
group solved the problem with mediation, and
1) Divide the class into groups of 4 or 5.
other possible ways to solve it with mediation.
2) Give each group a handout (or write it all on the
board).
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: 3) Have the group match the personal management
styles with the description.
 Can you think of situations in your life where a
4) When each group is done go over the answers as
mediator would have helped you?
a class.
 Can you think of a time where you have used
someone as a mediator?
 What are the characteristics of a good mediator? Shark – Competing – assertive and uncoopera-
tive
Example Scenario Cards Teddy Bear – Accommodating – unassertive
and cooperative
1) Giorgi kicks his friend Vasha’s soccer ball into
the street during a game of soccer and the

103
Turtle – Avoiding – unassertive and uncoopera-  When people of equal stature are equally
tive committed.
 To reach temporary settlement on com-
Owl – Collaborating – both assertive and coop-
plex issues.
erative
 To reach expedient solutions on important
Fox – Compromising – intermediate in both as- issues.
sertiveness and cooperativeness  As a back-up mode when competition and
collaboration doesn’t work.
Descriptions:
Owl – When to use collaboration:
- An individual pursues his or her own concerns
 When other’s lives are involved.
at others’ expense. This is a power oriented
 When you don’t want to have full respon-
mode in which one uses whatever power
sibility.
seems appropriate to win ones own position
 When there is a high level of trust.
- This is the opposite of competing – an individ-  When you want to gain commitment from
ual neglects his/her own concerns to satisfy others.
the concerns of the other person. There is an  When you need to work through hard feel-
element of self-sacrifice in this mode ings, animosity, etc.
 The best decisions are made by collabora-
- When a person does not pursue only his/her tion!
own concerns or those of the other person and
instead both persons work together to find a Turtle – When to use avoiding behavior:
solution that will fully satisfy their concerns.  When the stakes aren’t that high and you
It includes identifying the underlying concerns don’t have anything to lose – “when the
of the two individuals and finding an alterna- issue is trivial”.
tive which meets both sets of concerns.  When you don’t have time to deal with it.
 When the context isn’t suitable to ad-
- The objective of compromise is to find some dress the issue – “it isn’t the right time
expedient, mutually acceptable solution or place”.
which partially satisfies both parties. It fall  When more important issues are pressing.
sin the middle group between competing and  When you see no chance of getting your
accommodating. Compromise gives up more concerns met.
than competing, but is less that accommodat-  When you would have to deal with an an-
ing. gry, hot-headed person.
 When you are unprepared, taken by sur-
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: prise and you need time to think an col-
lect information.
 This should be used in conjunction with other  When you are too emotionally involved
conflict management activities and need to step back so others around
you can solve the conflict more success-
fully.
Conflict Management - Teddy Bear – When to use accommodating behav-
Brainstorming ior:

Topic: Character building, Conflict Management  When the issue as important to you as it is
to the other person.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
 When you discover that you are wrong.
from this activity?): To identify personal manage-
 When continued competition would be
ment style(s) and develop awareness of strategies
detrimental – “you know you can’t win.”
used with each conflict management style
 When preserving harmony without disrup-
Number of Students: 4-30 tion is most important.
Age Range of Students: 10-17 Shark – When to use competitive behavior:
Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes
 When you know you are right.
Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Pens/  When you need a quick decision.
pencils, Paper  When you meet an aggressive person and
you and you need to stand up for your own
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): rights.

1) Divide the class into groups of four or five and


give each group paper and pens/pencils. Peer Mediation
2) Using the personal management styles in the last
Topic: Character Building, Mediation
activity (shark, teddy bear etc.), have the groups
brainstorm when each style would be beneficial Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
to use. Examples are: from this activity?): To have students identify sources
of conflict in their school and techniques for mediat-
Fox – When to use compromise: ing such situations
 When the goals are moderately important Number of Students:4-30
and not worth the use of more assertive Age Range of Students: 10-17
modes.

104
Time Required: 45 min – 1 hour Questions
Materials: Prepared dispute examples  What are some common ways people deal
with conflict in their lives? (avoid the
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): problem, holding in your feelings until you
explode, ignoring people, confronting oth-
1) Brainstorm as a class about the sources of conflict ers aggressively, complaining about people
in your schools. behind their backs, venting to someone
2) Ask these questions: else, expressing frustration physically-
 Who is a peer? such as punching a wall, etc.)
 What is mediation?  How do you find a release for your anger?
 What are the most common conflicts at (playing sports, listening to music, writing
your school? Are they physical or verbal, out their feelings, playing and writing mu-
what are they about, between whom, sic, talking to an objective person, etc.)
etc.? 2) After you finish brainstorming do the activity
 What are some good rules for a peer media- 3) Put the words “I feel,” “when,” and “because”
tion session? (i.e. they’re not allowed to get on the blackboard as a visual cue to students.
out of their seats, no cursing, raising their 4) Starting with yourself, go around the class and
voices, or physical contact with each other, ask each student to express an “I” message of
each person must have uninterrupted time to their own about a problem in their lives.
tell their side of the story, anything said in the 5) If a student has trouble thinking of one, present
mediation session is completely confidential) a situation to them, such as a friend who has just
3) Divide the class into groups of four: two to role-play cancelled plans with them to spend time with her
a dispute, one to mediate and one to observe. boyfriend.
4) Assign a dispute to each group for them to act out Example : I feel sad when my friend does
(examples: One student has heard that another not call me when she says she will because it
student has been spreading rumors about them makes me think she does not like me.
through the school gossip. A student confronts a
friend after discovering that this friend ahs been
secretly dating his/her ex-girlfriend/boyfriend). Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
5) The two in conflict act out their problem and then
 Have you ever had strong feelings in a conflict,
the mediator uses mediation techniques/rules to
but did not express them to the other person?
bring them to a peaceful resolution.
Why/why not?
6) The observer leads a discussion about what hap-
 What happens when you try to hide feelings from
pened, how well the problem was solved, and
others? From yourself?
how things might have been done differently.
 Why is expressing feelings helpful during a conflict?
7) Have them discuss their feelings about each
stage, then switch roles.
8) After groups have completed the assigned role Peer Relations
play, direct students to suggest other confronta-
tions to role play and choose one to complete an Topic: Peer relations, Community
additional role play. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): For the students to discuss and
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: understand how “cliques” at their school can cause
problems
 Talk to the class about the role plays and ask Number of Students: 5-30
for any questions, comments, or suggestions for Age Range of Students: 10-17
change (adding on to what the group said).
Time Required: 45 minutes – 1 hour
Materials: One index card (or piece of paper) for
Conflict Resolution each student

Topic: Conflict Management


Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): For students to identify the ways 1) Lead the students in a discussion on the types,
they deal with conflict and to release their anger causes and affects of “cliques” at their school
Number of Students: 5-30 through a series of questions:
Age Range of Students: 10-17 Questions
Time Required: 45 minutes – 1 hour
Talk about the existence of “cliques” and
Materials: None social hierarchies in their school. How can
“cliques” cause problems for teens?
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):  Unified school events like dances don’t
work because of vastly different music
1) Brainstorm as a class. Provide questions about styles and tastes.
how to deal with conflicts with friends and family  Students feel they have to avoid other stu-
and how they would feel in certain situations. dents.

105
 Students feel they don’t have the same 5) They should read the situation, discuss it, and re-
rights as others – for example, being de- port back to the group:
nied a space at the bathroom mirror or  What might be the effect of this behavior
water fountain. on the whole group?
 Students who don’t fit into a particular  What are strategies for dealing with this
group can end up feeling very lonely and behavior
alienated. 6) Have all the groups report back.
Are there clearly drawn lines between 7) Discuss each situation and possible ways to ap-
“cliques” at your school? What can you say proach the problem.
about them? (try to get students to talk as 8) Come to an agreement with the group about how
honestly as they can – they might be afraid to to handle the issue.
talk about other people). 9) After all the groups have presented, ask everyone
What are the advantages to being in a to help summarize the strategies.
“clique”, or mostly unchangeable group of 10) Write them on the board so that you can refer to
friends? What are the disadvantages? them later. Some ideas might be:
 Create “ground rules” for the group during
How are different students stereotyped in the first session and refer to them when
school? there is a problem.
Ask students to give examples of how the  If here are disruptions, politely remind
media, especially TV, creates stereotypes the group that there is a task or problem
about teens, such as “fat people are the class to solve and a time limit.
clowns”, “athletes are the stupid bullies.”  Talk privately to the person causing the
problem. Try to find out what is at the
2) Pass out index cards (or paper) to the class.
root of the problem. Review the basic
3) Ask the students to anonymously write down the group rules and how the person’s behavior
one thing they would like other students to know is negatively affecting the group. Request
about them. his or her support and cooperation for the
4) Collect the cards and read them to the class, next time the group meets.
then discuss the findings: for instance if several  Respond to those who interrupt by saying,
students mentioned the same thing. “Excuse me. Just a reminder that every-
5) Point out that even if students are very different one in the group has a right to speak with-
they can still have something in common. out being interrupted.” Or “Excuse me,
please let ….. finish before speaking.”
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:  If the behavior is so disturbing that it can-
not be ignored, address it in the group.
 Do you feel as if you have been stereotyped? Criticize what is being said or done (not
 Do you ever feel like part of a clique? the person responsible for the disruption).
 Do you ever feel left out of certain cliques? Point out how the behavior blocks the
groups from functioning well.
 At the end of a group session, lead a dis-
Dealing With Problems in Groups cussion about how the group is doing. Try
to do this in such a way that feelings are
Topic: Conflict management, Teamwork not hurt.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 11) Brainstorm a list of suggested rules. Some sugges-
from this activity?): Students will list potential prob- tions are:
lems that might occur in a group and identify strate-  Everyone will be given an opportunity to
gies to cope with problems that arise in groups. talk.
Number of Students: 10-30  Everyone will participate fully and freely.
Age Range of Students: 10 and up  Everyone has a right to “pass” (to decide
Time Required: 1 hour not to discuss something personal).
 Only one person talks at a time, no inter-
Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Mark-
rupting others.
ers or chalk, Problem scenario cards (next page)
 No insults or negative comments.
 Keep on the Topic:, no side discussions or
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): other Topics.
 Be on time, maintain punctuality.
1) Before the class prepare the scenarios on sepa-  “What you hear stays here”. Information
rate cards. revealed in the session should be confi-
2) Introduce the Topic: to your class. Explain that dential.
they are going to do a short exercise to look at
the kinds of problems that might come up in
Problem Scenario Cards
small group discussions and ways to deal with
those problems  The small group has been together for a few days
3) Split the class into groups or pairs. now and it is quite clear that Giorgi dominates
4) Give each group/pair a problem card. the others. He talks most of the time and when
others say something, he does not pay attention.

106
 Natia has been very quiet during the first group Age Range of Students: All ages
meeting. However, suddenly she becomes very Time Required: 10-15 minutes
critical of the other group members. She makes Materials: None
rude remarks to one person in particular but also
objects to opinions expressed by the rest of the
group Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 Giga is a little older than the others in the group.
1) Ask participants to form two lines, facing each
He tells people in his group what to do and how
other.
to do it. No one has objected to what he is doing,
2) Each participant touches palms with the partici-
but you can tell they are not happy about the
pant facing him or her in the other line.
situation.
3) Call one line “Line One” and the other “Line
 Tea often interrupts others in the group. She also
Two”.
puts others down by calling their ideas stupid or
dumb. The rest of the group is getting angry with 4) Ask all the participants in Line One to start push-
her because of her behavior. ing against the person in Line Two, using only
their palms.
 Lasha is not really interested in the group meet-
ings. When he attends, he acts bored and does 5) People in Line Two can respond in any way they
not contribute. At other times, he tires to talk like.
to someone in the group about something com- 6) After 30 seconds or so, ask everyone to stop and
pletely off the Topic:. If others do not join him, to change roles.
he becomes loud and disruptive. 7) This time Line Two members should push against
 The boys in the group always talk first, answer Line One members and Line One members will
questions first, and dominate the discussions. The respond any way they like.
girls always seem to wait for the boys to speak 8) After another 30 seconds, ask everyone to sit
first – even if they obviously know the answers. down in a big circle.
9) Ask people how they felt doing this exercise.
10) Did they respond by pushing back or by giving in
Hand Push or what?
Topic: Conflict Resolution 11) How does this exercise relate to real life experi-
ences or conflicts?
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To demonstrate different meth-
ods of conflict resolution and how people react to Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
each other.
 (Suggested above)
Number of Students: 6-30

107
108
General Health,
First Aid and
Safety

109
110
Healthy Living Mobile  Hand the mobiles in the classroom, or tell them
to hang it in their room to remind them of what a
Topic: General Health healthy lifestyle is
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain from
this activity?): To help students be aware of healthy Suggested Mobile Shapes
lifestyles and what goes into living a healthy life.
Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: 8-15
Time Required: 1 hour
Materials: Sticks/coat hangers (two sticks or one
coat hanger), Yarn or string, Thick paper, Markers,
Scissors (one for each group), Pens, Something to
make a hole in the paper; Optional: Wire coat hang-
ers (work better, but expensive), Hole punch, Black-
board/whiteboard/flipchart, Other decorations to
make it pretty

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Ask the class what they think is a healthy life-


style.
2) Ask the class what things they think go into living
a healthy life (you may use a blackboard/white-
board/flipchart to write the class’ ideas on).
3) Divide the class into groups of 4-5.
4) Tell each group to brainstorm a list of things that
go into living a healthy life (encourage them to
be specific). This should take approximately ten
minutes.
5) Give each group two sheets of thick paper and a
pair of scissors.
6) Tell the groups to cut out a heart and write every-
one’s names in the group on the heart.
7) Then tell the groups to choose six of the parts of a
healthy life from their list (give them 10 minutes).
8) Tell the groups they must cut out different shapes
(they can be all one shape or all different shapes,
its up to them) and write the six parts they chose
on the shapes (give them 6-10 minutes). If you
have enough time you can have them decorate
Defining Health
the shapes. Topic: General health
9) Give each group two sticks or coat hanger, seven
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
pieces of string/yarn, and instruct them to put a
from this activity?): Students will be able to under-
hole at the top of each shape, tie a string onto it
stand that health is made up of four main categories
and tie it to the stick/coat hanger (give them 10
and give examples from each category
minutes for this).
Number of Students: 5-30
10) After each group has completed their mobile,
have them present what they have to the class. Age Range of Students: 10 – 17
11) Ask each group what they put on their mobile, Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes
why they put it on (did they chose the most im- Materials: Poster or blackboard divided into 4 parts,
portant according to the lesson, what they see as Pictures of various activities, foods, people, symbols,
important in their life, etc), and why each one is etc. Colored pencils, Half sheets of white paper
a part of a healthy life.
12) Allow for questions from the class and discussion Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
time at the end
13) Review what a healthy lifestyle is and why it is 1) Divide the poster/blackboard into four sections
important and label the four sections of the poster/board:
physical, psychological, social, spiritual.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: 2) Warm up: pass out pieces of paper to students
and have them draw a “healthy person” (the can
 List activities that the class does that attributes work in pairs). Encourage them to think about
to a healthy lifestyle where a healthy person would be and what they
 Ask the class to list at least five things they could would be doing.
add to their lives to be more healthy 3) Share pictures and have them explain why the
 Keep a healthy lifestyle journal person is healthy.

111
4) Reveal poster/board and introduce the four cat- of children can do to prevent disease or take care
egories of health, citing examples from the pic- of someone with the problem.
tures drawn by the students. Example: Cavities: one student can brush
5) Distribute pictures (or have them draw their own) his/her teeth after eating, rinse out his/her
and have the class try to determine which category mouth or massage his gums, eat an apple, eat
each picture goes in. Some pictures go in more than plenty of dairy
one category. This shows health is interrelated
6) Have each group present them to the class.
6) Examples of what would be included in each
group:
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Physical
 exercise  Have the students take some of the actions they
 diet have listed/drawn.
 rest  Hang the posters in the school/community.
 nutrition
Psychological
Sickness and Accidents
 emotion
 identity Topic: General Health
 feelings Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain from
 confidence this activity?): Students will be able to understand com-
Social mon health problems and common accidents.
 friendships Number of Students: 10-50
 family Age Range of Students: 6-15
 relationships Time Required: 1 hour
 school
Materials: First aid kit (band-aids, sling, etc), Flipchart
Spiritual
 faith Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 purpose
 prayer, meditation 1) Divide the class into groups of three or four.
 morality ethics 2) Assign each group a sickness or an accident (cold,
fever, diarrhea, headache, tooth ache, stomach-
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: ache, cuts, burns, broken bones etc).
3) Give five minutes to think of a quick role play.
 Have each student share an example of one thing 4) Have each group perform in front of the class.
they do that is healthy and one thing they do that
5) Have the whole class ask, “What’s the matter?”
is unhealthy.
6) The role play says “I have a stomachache” or
whatever illness they are demonstrating.
Action Health Posters 7) Have students decide if they should go to the
health center, doctor or hospital.
Topic: General Health, Community 8) Have the students use the first aid kit or come
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain up with their own pretend medicine to help the
from this activity?): Students will be able to list people in the role play.
health problems and describe actions they can take 9) The class can be divided into two parts, one play-
to solve and/or prevent them. ing the doctor, and one being the patient.
Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: 10 – 17 Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Time Required: 50 – 60 minutes
Materials: Pens, Paint or markers, Poster board or paper  What were the problems you came up with?
 What were the solutions?
 Who do you call if it is a serious problem?
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 How would you get to a hospital?
1) Divide the class into groups of 4 or 5  What would be your actions during an emergency?
2) Each group will be responsible for a health prob-
lem (for example, colds, diarrhea, HIV/AIDS etc)
Age, Weight and Measurement
3) Brainstorm heath problems the students know
about. Ask them about what they think their fam- Topic: General Health
ilies have had in the past year. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
4) Assign each group a health problem and tell them from this activity?): Students will be able to state
they are to make a poster about the problem their ages, measure, and state their weights as well
5) They should include a picture of what a person as measure and state their heights
with the problem looks like, what a child can do Number of Students: 10-50
to help prevent the disease or how to take care
Age Range of Students: 6-17
of someone with the problem, and what a group
Time Required: 1 hour

112
Materials: Centimeter stick or tape, Scale, Paper, butcher paper. The group would then draw the
Pens/pencils various organs where they belong.

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

1) Have each student tell his/her age and write it  Ask students what they think each organ does.
down on their piece of paper.  Ask students why they think each organ is important.
2) Weigh each student and have the student write it down.  Explain the function and importance of each or-
3) Measure each student and have the student write gan to the class.
it down in centimeters.  For older students you can talk about what things
4) Ask the students their ages. hurt each organ (smoking hurts lungs etc).
5) Have two or three students come up to the front
of the room. Body Organ Sheet
6) Ask their ages. Who is older?
7) Ask the students their weights. Who weighs more?
(be sensitive on this one)
8) Ask the students their heights. Who is taller, tallest?
9) Make age, height and weight graphs for the classroom.

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 Discuss how students can keep track of their


height on a large board at home.
 Keep a growth chart in the classroom and check
height every couple of months.
 Discuss how weight doesn’t necessarily mean
your fat (muscle weighs more than fat!).
 Discuss how being skinny doesn’t necessarily
mean you are healthy.

Human Body
Topic: General Health
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): Students will identify the loca-
tion of the body’s major organs.
Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: 5-15
Time Required: 1 hour Healthy Bones
Materials: Body organ sheet, Flipchart paper, Glue,
Topic: General Health
scissors and crayons/markers
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): Students will identify two ways
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): to build and maintain strong, healthy bones.
1) Before the lesson, draw an outline of a large body Number of Students: 10-30
on flipchart paper. Age Range of Students: 10 – 17
2) Make copies of the body organ sheets for each Time Required: 45 minutes
student so that each student will have a small Materials: Flipchart paper, A rusty nut and bolt, A
outline of a body and each organ. non-rusty nut and bolt; Optional: A visual of the skel-
3) You can cut out the organs before class if there etal system (or hand outs)
are no scissors available to the class.
4) Divide the students into cooperative groups of four. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
5) Use the flipchart to discuss the proper location of
each organ. 1) Before the class, draw a refrigerator on the flip-
6) Students can then cut out and paste each organ chart paper and draw various foods inside the re-
in the appropriate location on their personal body frigerator.
outline. Group members should help each other 2) Compare a rusty nut and bolt to what might hap-
with the placement. pen to a person’s bones when they age.
7) Students may color the puzzle for display. 3) While discussing the skeletal system, use the two
8) A possible variation for this lesson would be to sets of nuts and bolts to illustrate the importance
have student groups draw full-size body outlines of exercise to your bones, especially joints.
of each other (or of one member of the group) on 4) Have a volunteer try to undo the rusty nut from its bolt.

113
5) Explain that this rust has built up over time from What is Your
little use. The joints between our bones can also
become weak from inactivity. A rusty bolt like this
Desirable Weight Range?
will probably break off rather than turn out of the Topic: Adult health, general health
nut as it should. So too, the bones in our body have
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
a greater chance of becoming brittle and breaking
from this activity?): Students will be able to state
without sufficient exercise over the years.
their current weight, height, and desirable weight
6) Use the clean nut and bolt with a second volunteer.
range for optimal health
7) Allow the class to see how easily the nut comes
Number of Students: 1-25
unscrewed. Explain that, like this well-oiled nut
and bolt assembly, properly maintained bones Age Range of Students: Adults
will serve a body well throughout a lifetime. Time Required: 1 hour
8) Ask students to name different types of exercise Materials: Yard/meter stick, Scale, Weight range
that they may do on a regular basis. chart, Paper strip marked off in centimeters for mea-
9) Explain that another important element in build- suring wrist; Optional: Calculator, Paper to record
ing and maintaining strong, healthy bones is diet. personal information
Calcium is an important mineral that our bodies
need for proper growth and health. Our bones are Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
made of calcium just as our teeth are.
10) Ask if anyone knows which food group is filled 1) Try to make sure the group is comfortable with
with foods rich in calcium (dairy). each other before this activity (try a fun ice
11) Ask what some dairy foods are (milk, yogurt, breaker). Explain what the lesson will be about.
cheese, curds, ice cream). 2) Weigh each person, without shoes and/or heavy
12) Have students (one at a time) come to the flip- sweaters.
chart paper and circle the foods in the refrigera- 3) Have students write down the information on
tor that are rich in calcium. their paper (optional).
4) Measure height in feet and inches without shoes
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: (have students record – optional).
5) Determine what size body a person has. This is
 Do you know any other foods that aren’t dairy done by dividing their height in centimeter by
products that have calcium? their wrist circumference in centimeters. Wrist
 Remind students that if you exercise the muscles measure should be taken just past the wrist bone,
around the bone and joints, the muscles and hand side.
joints won’t have to take so much wear and tear 6) Have students record this information (optional).
7) Compare the ratio to the following chart to de-
Bone Chart and Information termine body frame size.

Sex Small Medium Large

Men >10.4 9.6-10.4 >9.6

Women >10.9 9.9-10.9 >9.9

8) Use the three measurements to find the desirable


weight range on the chart.

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 Discuss healthy weight and risk factors to being


over/under weight.
 You could discuss diabetes after this lesson.
 Talk about ways to bring down/up your weight in
a healthy way.

Men

Height Small Medium Large

1.55 m 55.79-58.51 57.15-61.69 60.33-65.77


1.57 m 56.70-59.42 58.06-62.60 61.23-67.13
1.60 m 57.61-60.33 58.97-63.50 62.14-68.49
1.63 m 58.51-61.23 59.87-64.86 63.05-70.31
1.65 m 59.42-62.14 60.78-66.22 63.69-72.12
1.68 m 60.33-63.50 62.14-67.59 65.32-73.94
1.70 m 61.23-64.86 63.50-68.95 66.68-75.75

114
1.73 m 62.14-66.22 64.86-70.31 68.04-79.38 8) Try to make it uneven, taking one or none from
one and all five from another.
1.75 m 63.05-67.59 66.22-71.67 69.40-79.38
9) Have the members process what they lost and ask
1.79 m 63.96-68.95 67.59-73.03 70.76-81.19
them some questions:
1.80 m 65.32-70.31 68.95-74.84 72.12-83.01  How did they feel about the injustice of
1.83 m 66.68-72.12 70.31-76.66 73.94-84.82 the selection process?
1.85 m 68.04-73.94 72.12-78.47 75.75-87.09  How did you feel when your rights were
taken away?
1.88 m 69.40-75.75 73.48-80.29 77.56-89.36
1.90 m 71.21-77.56 75.30-82.55 79.83-91.63
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

Women  What are human rights?


 What are human rights of your country?
Height Small Medium Large  Do human rights change because of culture? If so,
how?
1.45 m 44.91-48.99 48.08-53.52 52.16-58.06
 What would you do if your human rights were
1.47 m 45.36-49.90 48.99-54.43 53.07-59.42
taken away from you?
1.50 m 45.81-58.99 49.90-55.79 53.98-60.78
 Do you think it is acceptable to have rights re-
1.52 m 46.72-52.16 50.80-57.15 54.88-62.14 stricted? Why or why not?
1.55 m 47.63-53.52 52.16-58.51 56.70-63.50  What rights should never be taken away, no mat-
1.58 m 48.99-54.88 53.52-59.87 58.06-65.32 ter what the circumstances?
1.60 m 50.35-56.25 54.88-61.23 59.42-67.13
1.63 m 51.71-57.61 56.25-62.60 60.78-68.95 First Aid Rescue Relay
1.68 m 54.43-60.33 58.97-65.32 63.50-72.57
Topic: First Aid, Safety
1.70 m 55.79-61.69 60.33-66.68 64.86-74.39
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
1.73 m 57.15-63.05 61.69-68.04 66.22-75.75
from this activity?): Students will be able to demon-
1.75 m 58.51-64.41 63.05-69.40 67.59-77.11 strate first aid techniques and explain when to use
1.78 m 59.87-65.77 64.41-70.76 68.95-78.47 them.
1.80 m 61.23-67.13 65.77-71.12 70.31-79.83 Number of Students: 10-30
Age Range of Students: All ages
Time Required: 1–1.5 hours
Losing Our Rights (Human Rights)
Materials: Local first aid equipment: Pillows, Rags,
Topic: General Health, Emotional Health, Character Blankets, Strips of cloth, Signs, labeling each sta-
Building tion, Directions for each station, Someone with prior
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain knowledge of first aid!
from this activity?): To discover what human rights
are and their importance, as well as the personal Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
meanings they have for each student.
Number of Students: 10-30 1) Demonstrate and explain all techniques.
Age Range of Students: 15 and up 2) Divide students into teams of 4 to 5.
3) Have the teams practice on each other.
Time Required: 30 - 40 minutes
4) Have students find their own materials once they
Materials: Slips of paper, Blackboard/whiteboard/
have divided into groups or provide materials
flipchart; Optional: Handout of international rights
ahead of time.
5) One person on each team is the patient.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 6) The others on the team carry out the relay, going
from station to station.
1) Ask the class what the term “human rights”
means to them. 7) Designate station locations ahead of time – they
should be at least 15 feet apart.
2) Ask students what human rights do they have?
8) The station sequence is as follows:
3) Brainstorm with the class what they consider to
 Station One – Team member 1 carries the
be basic human rights for all people regardless of
patient to Station 2 using the fireman
race, sex, religion, sexual orientation or health
carry
status? (Some of these Topics might be excluded
 Station Two – Team member 2 applies a
if the class is not ready to discuss such touchy
triangle splint, then team members 1 &
Topics).
2 carry the patient to Station 3 using the
4) Give each participant five small pieces of paper.
two person carry
5) Have students write down five rights that are im-  Station Three – Team member 3 creates
portant to them, one on each piece of paper. an arm sling, then team members 1, 2 &
6) Have students hold up the papers like a hand of 3 carry the patient to Station 3 using the
cards. three person carry
7) Walk around the room and randomly take away  Station Four – Team member 4 applies a
slips of paper. pressure dressing to the patient’s arm.

115
Team members 1,2,3 and 4 roll the patient 12) Allow class to make any constructive comments
onto a blanket to the finish line about their plan.
9) The first team to complete all the tasks correctly
and cross the finish line wins. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:  What is a possible fire escape plan for your
school/work?
 Talk about which situations to use these tech-  Encourage your students to discuss their fire es-
niques (have them give examples). cape plan with their family members.

Home Fire Escape Plan Example Fire Escape Plan

Topic: Safety, Fire Safety


Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To have students design their
own fire escape plan for their home
Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: All ages
Time Required: 1 hour
Materials: Large piece of paper or poster board,
Markers/pens, Rulers, Example fire escape plan of
your own house; Optional: Prepared list of things to
consider for the plan

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Ask students if they have ever seen or heard of a


house fire.
2) Ask students if they can think of any ways these
fires start.
3) Explain to students that fires are deadly and un- First things first
less you know a good plan ahead of time, you may Decide right now what situations you are willing to
panic and get stuck. help in and which you are not.
4) Introduce the idea of a fire escape plan.
5) Show the class an example of your house’s fire
Communicable diseases:
escape plan.
6) Hand each student a large piece of paper.  Air-Borne disease, such as the flue and
7) Explain to students that they must make a fire common cold
escape plan for their own house.  Blood-Borne disease, such as HIV and Hep-
8) Tell them a few things to consider: atitis B; These are transmitted through
 Where are all the exits of the house? body fluids, most commonly blood. Latex
 Where are all the bedrooms? Which floor gloves can help to protect your hands, but
are they on? you can still become infected through mu-
 Where are the possible sources of a house cus membranes such as eyes and mouth.
fire? (Remember that electrical outlets
can be a source too!) EMERGENCY ACTION STEPS
 Where is the bathroom? Sources of water?
Is there a bathtub? (explain that getting in 1) Check the Scene
a bath full of water may be a last resort)  Is the scene safe for you?
 If the fire is between you and the door, is  What happened?
there another way to get out?  How many victims are there?
 Can the windows open from your room?  Can bystanders help?
Can you reach the ground without getting  Do not move victims unless necessary.
hurt? 2) Check the Victim. Is the victim conscious or un-
 Do you need any additional items for your conscious? Tap the victim on the shoulder and
plan (for example, a fire ladder in your shout “Are you OK?”
room) 3) If the victim is UNCONSCIOUS shout for help and
 Where will your family meet after they get have someone call an ambulance. Make sure to
out? (explain that accounting for everyone point to someone in particular or no one will take
is very important) the responsibility.
10) Have students take their poster home and make a  The exact location or address of the emer-
fire plan for their house. gency?
11) Have them bring them to the next class and show  Phone number calling from?
them.  What happened?

116
 How many need help?  Caused by the immune system ‘jumping at
 Condition of the victim? shadows” (mistaking a harmless thing for
 What is being done? danger)
 Caller should hang up last  Can be caused by a number of things
 Check for sever bleeding (check person Solutions: Give antihistamine right away to
from head to toe) help slow/stop the process. Loosen clothes.
 Four things to check (Known in English as
the ABCs) Bleeding
A - Airway  Causes may be a simple scratch to a deep
1) Check to see if airway is clear internal problem.
 Remember that the amount of bleeding
B - Breathing does not always mean a bad injury.
1) Look, listen, and feel for breathing for about
Solutions:
5 seconds.
2) If victim is not breathing or you can’t tell, po- - Elevate the injury above the heart (if
sition on back while supporting the head and no suspected bone break)
neck. - Use pressure.
3) Tilt head back and lift chin to open airway. - Use many dressings. Layer, Layer, Lay-
For child or infant, do not tilt the head back er. If one layer gets soaked, apply an-
as far. other.
4) Look, listen, and feel for breathing for about - Wash hands immediately afterward.
5 seconds. Breaks & sprains
5) Give 2 slow breaths if not breathing.  Causes include broken bones, tendons
C - Circulation (connect bone to muscle) or ligaments
(connect bone to bone) torn or stretched
1) Check for pulse for about 5 to 10 seconds:
or a combination of the two.
2) Adult or Child - At the side of the neck (Car-
 Bones can heal completely and become
diac)
stronger than ever after a break. Tendons
3) Infant- Inside upper arm between shoulder and
and ligaments never fully heal.
elbow
4) Continue with rescue breathing or CPR or con- Solutions: Splinting (only when it is necessary
trol bleeding as necessary. to move the victim.)
5) If victim is CONSCIOUS, CHECK for conditions Burns
that need care or become life threatening.
6) Talk to victim and bystanders  Caused by a combination of excessive heat
1. Introduce yourself. for an excessive time.
2. Get permission to give care.  The sun takes an hour or more, a frying
3. Ask the following, questions: pan only a second.
 What happened? Solutions:
 Do you have allergies? - Stop the burning. Cool the burn imme-
 Are you taking any medications? diately for up to 10 minutes under cold
 Do you have any pain? running water. Never use ice.
B. CHECK victim from head to toe. - Apply a clean, absorbent, loose dressing.
 Victim should not move any part that - Don’t touch it.
hurts. - Never pop a burn blister
 Look for a medical alert tag on the victims Cold (frostbite)
wrist or neck.  Causes differ depending on the symp-
 Look for changes in the victim’s breath- toms.
ing.  Frostbite is caused by the body shutting
 Notice how the skin looks and feels. down blood flow to an extremity and let-
 Look over the body: ting it freeze.
- Examine the scalp, face, ears, nose, Solutions:
and mouth.
- Check the shoulders, chest, and abdo- - If it happened fast, heat quickly, if
men. freezing was slow, heat slow.
- Check fingers, hands, and arms - Never rub frostbite
- Check hips and legs. - Warm frostbitten parts in warm (50 C)
water
C. CALL the hospital if the victim needs medical - Apply soft bandages to frostbitten ar-
care. eas when dry
D. If there are no signs of injury, have the victim Hypothermia
rest until ready to stand.  Hypothermia is the entire body failing to
deal with cold temperatures.
Common Problems and Solutions  It can be very dangerous
Solutions:
Allergies - Remove wet cloths
- Move the victim to a warm place

117
- Put on warm cloths! Blankets - If victim is conscious, give 4 oz. of cool
- Be gentle; never apply direct heat water to drink every 15 minutes.
(heating pad, etc.) to the skin. - Call hospital if patient looses con-
sciousness.
- Keep victim lying down and continue
Heat to cool
 Caused by the body being unable to deal - Place ice or cold packs on victim~ s
with the hot environment. There are two wrists, ankles, ground, in each armpit
kinds of heat problems. and on neck.
 Heat exhaustion - Signals: Headache, nau- - Check Breathing and pulse.
sea, dizziness heavy sweating, dilated pu- Shock
pils
 Caused by the body trying to bring blood
 Heat stroke - Signals: Read, hot, or dry
pressure up while loosing the blood vol-
skin, changes in consciousness, rapid,
ume to do so.
weak pulse, rapid, shallow breathing
 Caused by serious trauma
Solutions:  Can be very dangerous
- Get victim out of the heat. Solutions:
- Place victim on back with feet elevat-
- Lay the victim down.
ed.
- Keep the victim as calm and comfort-
- Loosen tight clothing.
able as possible.
- Remove sweat-soaked clothing
- Baby the victim.
- Apply cool, wet cloths to skin.
- Elevate lower extremities above the heart.
- Fan the victim
- Continually check pulse and breathing.

118
General
Hygiene

119
120
Communicable Diseases Answers to Questions

Topic: General Hygiene 1. She drank from her brother’s glass, sneezed on
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain her family, wiped her runny nose with her hand,
from this activity?): Students will identify five behav- stuck her finger in her mouth, did not wash her
iors that help spread communicable diseases. hands before lunch and shared her lunch.
2. her brother, her entire family, her classmates at
Number of Students:
school and especially those who ate with her
Age Range of Students:
3. Natia did not get enough sleep.
Time Required: 20-30 minutes
Materials: Copies of the story, Blackboard/white-
Modified from “Primary Health & Safety Curricu-
board/flipchart; Optional: Copies of questions
lum” by Max Fischer

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):


Hygiene Musical Chairs
Story: Natia was slow getting up this morn-
ing. The night before, she stayed up past her Topic: General Hygiene
bedtime, and now she was still very tired. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
She was so sleepy that she didn’t even no- from this activity?): Students will have fun while
tice that she had drunk kampoti (juice) out learning ways to keep from passing germs.
of her brother’s glass; neither did he. How- Number of Students: 10-30
ever, when Natia sneezed without covering Age Range of Students: 17 and under (if in a silly mood)
her mouth, everyone at the breakfast table Time Required: 10-15 minutes
had harsh words for her. She felt bad, but she
Materials: Chairs (one for each student minus one)
had been day-dreaming about being back in
her bed. While on her way to school, Natia’s
nose began to run as it had for the last two Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
days. She wiped her hand across her nose and
sniffed in deeply. She remembered that today 1) Make a large circle with chairs, one less chair
the speaker from the zoo was coming to her than the number of students.
class with some special animals. Natia was 2) This is very similar to regular “musical chairs”,
excited about this. The speaker from the zoo except with no music.
brought a small monkey for the students to in- 3) Have students walk in a circle around the chairs.
spect. Natia was so interested in the monkey 4) The teacher calls out the following actions:
and the speaker’s talk, she didn’t realize she  Wash your hands
had her little pinky finger in her mouth the  Wash your face
entire time. When lunch time came, Natia  Wash your hair
was so hungry. She didn’t wash her hands be-  Take a shower
cause she wanted to be the first in line. She  Brush your teeth
traded her khachapuri for her friend’s sausage  Wash your clothes
and bread. (Each friend had already taken  Anything else that is considered good hy-
one bite.) Again at lunch, Natia wiped her giene
runny nose with the back of her hand. She be- 5) When the action is called, the students do the
gan to cough. She wasn’t feeling very well. action while walking around the chairs.
6) When the teacher calls out “dirty”, the students
Questions must run and find a chair to sit on the student
left standing becomes the leader calling out the
1) Name five things that Natia did that might have actions.
passed her germs to someone else.
2) Who else might have gotten sick because of the Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
germs Natia was spreading?
3) What was one thing Natia probably didn’t get  Discuss why these actions are important and
enough of to help her stay well? when you should do each of them. Do some of
them together right there at school.
The habits that should be reinforced are: not sharing
another’s eating or drinking utensils; not sneezing/ Stay Away Flies!
coughing upon others without covering your mouth;
using tissue to blow one’s nose; regular hand wash- Topic: General Hygiene
ing; and keeping one’s hands out of one’s mouth. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Read the dilemma aloud to the class and have each from this activity?): Students will be able to explain
student follow along silently. After reading the story, how flies spread germs and disease.
try to answer the questions either individually or as a Number of Students: 5-15
class. Discuss each answer.
Age Range of Students 7-17
Time Required: 45 min.
Materials: Clay/potato/cork, Toothpicks, Paper

121
Bright paint, Container for bright paint (cut off bot- Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
tle), Picture of plate of real food
1) This is very health specific. You may want to dis-
cuss/teach the basics of diarrhea and dehydra-
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
tion before this activity.
1) Model a fake fly out of clay/potato/cork, tooth- 2) Draw a face on the container.
picks, and paper wings (see next page for dia- 3) Make a hole in the container’s bottom (there
gram). – You may want to let your students all should already by one in the top).
create their own flies. 4) Plug the hole, and fill the container with water.
2) Fill a container with bright paint. This represents a healthy body
3) Explain to the students that the paint is feces, dirt 5) Pull out the plug to show what happens during
or germs and the plate of food is their dinner. diarrhea.
4) Have each student dip the fly in the paint and 6) Discuss what happens when there isn’t enough
walk it on the food. water in the body.
5) After each student has done this the paint should 7) Explain that diarrhea is water leaking out of your
be visible. body, just like water leaking out of the hole in
6) Ask the students if they would like to eat feces or the bottle.
garbage. 8) Follow with a discussion of diarrhea and why liv-
7) If the paint represents feces or garbage, would ing things need water to live and be healthy.
they eat the food with the paint all over it?. 9) Emphasize that every child needs a glass of water
8) Relate this to how flies carry diarrhea and how for every loose stool passed by drawing a line on
covering food is more of a prevention. the container.
10) Fill the container with water to the line then let
one cup of water out.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
11) Explain this is what happens when a loose stool is
 Discuss how students can keep their food clean at passed (does the body have enough water? What
home and other places. must you do to make the body healthy again?).
12) Plug the container again and refill the one cup to
explain this is what is needed to make the body
healthy again.

* You can also show this by squeezing an orange out


and explaining that a normal orange is a healthy body
and a squeezed orange is a body after diarrhea

* You also can demonstrate the importance of water


to the body by watering one plant while not watering
the other

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 Discuss ways in which you can get diarrhea.


 Think about what will happen if your body gets
no water.

Water Belly Keeping Water Safe


Topic: General Hygiene Topic: General Hygiene, General Health
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): Students will be able to explain from this activity?): Students will be able to explain
the importance of water for the body, the dangers of how water can be contaminated by bacteria and be
diarrhea and demonstrate how to avoid diarrhea and able to show three or more ways to keep water clean
dehydration. and safe at home or at school.
Number of Students: 5-30 Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: All ages Age Range of Students: All ages
Time Required: 20 minutes Time Required: 20 minutes
Materials: Container (plastic bag, hollowed out Materials: White powder (or something that won’t
gourd, cup, water bottle or anything that holds wa- dissolve in water), Large water storage container,
ter and can represent a person), Instrument to make Water scoop, Drinking cup
a hole in the container, Water, Water scoop or cup for
pouring, Plug for hole in the container, Marker Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Explain that the powder represents feces and germs.

122
2) Sprinkle the powder in two or three areas on the 2) Place the contaminated slice into one of the zip-
ground near the large water. loc bags.
3) Place the drinking cup and water scoop on the 3) Before sealing it, add two tablespoon of water to
ground. Be sure there is some powder next to the the bag.
cup and the scoop. 4) Mark the bag unwashed (damp food encourages
4) Walk through the powder and approach the large the growth of mold).
container to fetch some drinking water. 5) At this point, thoroughly wash your hands (pref-
5) Get plenty of powder on your feet and into the erably using anti-bacterial soap). Whether this is
scoop and drinking cup. a teacher led demonstration or a group activity,
6) Dip the scoop into the barrel and pour the water it would be timely to do this around lunch time.
into the cup. 6) Remove the slice of bread, taking care to avoid
7) Ask who would like to drink the water and why or contact with the contaminated surfaces.
why not. 7) Place directly into the second sandwich bag.
8) Discuss where the germs came from, what is 8) Once again add two tablespoons of water. Mark as
wrong with drinking the powdered water and “washed”.
ways to prevent this problem (keep water cov- 9) Ask the class “What is the only difference be-
ered, keep the dipper off the ground, use a dip- tween these two bags?”
per with a handle, never let the dipper float in 10) Place both bags in a relatively warm, dark area
the tub, keep the area surrounding the water for the next three to four days.
clean, wash hands before using the water, wash 11) To demonstrate the importance of washing hands,
the drinking cup before using the water, wash the remove the two bags for inspection by the stu-
drinking cup before using it, clean out the tub dents.
weekly, etc.).
12) The washed bag should have little to no mold on
9) Ask for their input before lecturing them on these it, while the unwashed bag should hold an array
sanitation tips. of molds. Different colors of mold may even have
taken root.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: 13) Discuss what helped the mold grow on the once
slice of bread (the existence of mold spores,
 Have the group examine the water supply at darkness, moisture).
school or in the village/city and have them come 14) Ask, “Where did the spores come from?” (off of
up with ideas for solving any problems found. the dirty hands and surfaces).
15) Explain that the water represents our body’s per-
Touch Contamination spiration (liquid waste that comes through our
skin). Germs and dirt can collect more easily on
Topic: General Hygiene, General Health the surface of our skin if the perspiration is not
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain removed through regular and careful washing.
from this activity?): Students will discover important 16) Explain to the class, “Did you know that you had
reason for washing their hands on a regular basis. picked up that many germs on your hands during
Number of Students: 5-30 just a normal day of touching things?”
Age Range of Students: All ages 17) Have students take out a piece of paper and list
all the things they have touched since the last
Time Required: 1 hour (plus days for the mold to
time they washed their hands (the list probably
grow)
won’t be complete, but it will get them thinking
Materials: Loaf of bread (don’t touch it with your about the frequency with which they handle ob-
bare hands), Two zip-loc sandwich bags, Water, Mea- jects without washing hands).
suring tablespoon, Anti-bacterial hand soap, Marker 18) Close with a final question: “How can we en-
sure that germs and dirt do not invade our bod-
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): ies?” (Wash our bodies and hands regularly and
throughout the day).
Mold is grown from spores. Spores are tiny bodies
that settle on damp food, swell, and reproduce. Dif-
ferent molds have different spores which produce Women’s Beauty Day Lesson
varying colors. The very air we breathe is rich in
numerous dust and mold spores. Our body’s natu- Topic: General Hygiene
ral defenses, such as nose hairs and earwax, work Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
to trap such airborne invaders. However, students from this activity?): To promote general hygiene to
need to realize that they can decrease the amount women (teeth, hair, skin).
ingested by washing their hands regularly. Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: All ages
1) Two to four days in advance of the lesson, remove Time Required: 1 hour
a slice of bread from a fresh loaf. With this first Materials: Big poster paper or blackboard, Slips of
slice your hands should NOT be clean (they should paper (colored is best), Pen
represent hands that are rarely washed, ask some
students to do the same on the same piece).

123
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 2) Put Vaseline or vegetable oil on the hands of all
the students.
1) Make slips of paper that have health “clues” (col- 3) Put coffee crystals or dirt on the hands of a few
ored are better). The slips should have the fol- students.
lowing clues: 4) Explain that the coffee represents germs that can
For beautiful teeth make you sick.
 rinse mouth with water 5) Have the dirty students shake hands with the
 brush three times a day others, and those students shake hands with yet
 calcium is good (dairy) other students.
 sugar is damaging 6) Discuss how germs pass from contact.
 crunchy fruits and veggies help 7) Next have some of the students wash their hands
 floss with water only, and some students wash with
 coffee and tea stain them (cigarettes too) soap and water.
For beautiful skin 8) Discuss why using soap is better than using water
 wash with mild soap or just water only.
 moisturize with crème
 drink water to flush toxins Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 exercise (pumps blood, thus brings nutri-
ents to the skin)  Is there soap available at your school/work?
 sun in moderation (Vitamin D)  How many times do you touch objects throughout
For beautiful hair the day?
 How many times do you think you should wash
 massage scalp (massage is also good for
your hands?
skin, so this can be discussed)
 thinning can be caused by stress  When are the most important times to wash
 protein is good for it (meat or mention hands?
pro-v shampoo)
 mayonnaise, eggs and beer are helpful Dehydration Drink
2) Divide the group into teams (also works individu-
ally). Topic: General Health
3) Spread the slips of paper face down on the ta- Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
ble. from this activity?): To show students how to make a
4) Have a team pick a paper and read it aloud. drink to hydrate themselves.
5) Let them decide which category the “clue” ap- Number of Students: 5-30
plies (hair, skin, or teeth). Age Range of Students: All ages
6) The other team or participants can debate. Time Required: 10-15 minutes
7) The teacher asks for a final answer and also for a
Materials: Liter of water, Salt, Sugar; Optional: Small
defense of that answer.
cups for students
8) The teacher tells the correct answer and the
slip of paper is taped to a big poster divided into
three categories (or board). Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
9) Explain the most “magic” ingredient for all three
1) Explain to the students the importance of keeping
categories: WATER!.
hydrated (what happens if we don’t have enough
10) Put water picture up and explain that water re- water, how many days can we live without wa-
places lost fluid, flushes toxins and is an essential ter?).
part of all body tissue (we are over 80% water!)
2) Explain symptoms of dehydration (headache, diz-
Have them guess what percent.
ziness, dry mouth, etc).
3) Show students how to make a dehydration drink
Shake My Hand in case of emergencies (when they are experienc-
ing extreme dehydration).
Topic: General Hygiene 4) Have a liter of water in a bottle or other safe
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain container.
from this activity?): To stress the importance of 5) Add 2 pinches of salt.
washing hands and to have fun! 6) Add 2 small handfuls of sugar.
Number of Students: 5-30 7) Mix well.
Age Range of Students: All ages 8) Have students all try some of the water (you can
Time Required: 10-15 minutes use small cups).
Materials: Vaseline or vegetable oil, Coffee crystals 9) Have students write down the recipe and bring
or dirt, A place to wash hands home.

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

1) Explain to students that everyone’s skin has natu-  When would be a time when you would need to
ral oils. use this drink?

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The Spread of Lice Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

Topic: General Hygiene  What are ways to prevent flies from bringing dis-
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain ease?
from this activity?): To demonstrate how lice can  What can we do to stop the spread of germs from
spread from one child to another. flies?
Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: All ages Sickness Attack
Time Required: 15-20 minutes
Materials: Clay, cork, potato, Toothpicks, White pow- Topic: General Health, General Hygiene
der; Optional: Combs, Hats Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): Students will be able to explain
how colds and fevers can be transmitted quickly
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Number of Students: 5-30
1) Make a model louse by using clay, cork or potato Age Range of Students: 8-15
and toothpicks. Time Required: 20-30 minutes
2) Explain to students what lice are and how easily Materials: Bag, Piece of paper for every student
they can spread.
3) Dip the model lice into white powder. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
4) Dance the model around the students’ head to
demonstrate how it spreads eggs. 1) Mark only one piece of paper in the bag “sick”.
5) Discuss how lice jump from one head to another. Leave the others blank.
6) Have the model dance around combs and hats 2) Each student draws one slip of paper. They can’t
(make sure you get a lot of powder on them). tell others what is written on the paper.
7) Use the combs and hats on the students to dem- 3) Explain that the person with the sick paper with
onstrate how it can spread by using other peo- spread the disease by winking at others during
ple’s combs and hats. the game. This person must be in the inner circle
during the game.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: 4) Players form and inner and outer circle, the cir-
cles walk in opposite directions.
 Can lice spread easily? 5) The “sick” person begins winking trying not to be
 Where are you most likely to get lice? noticed.
 What are some things you can do to prevent 6) When someone is winked at he/she falls down
lice? onto the floor and moves out of the way, trying to
 What do lice do to you? touch others when falling.
 What can you do to get ride of lice? 7) Whoever is touched must fall and get “sick” too.
8) This illustrates contagious spread of disease.

Fly Tag * Note: This can be used to express specific diseases.


Topic: General Hygiene If you use it for HIV/AIDS be sure to emphasize that
this is an analogy… don’t let your students think that
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
touching a person with HIV/AIDS will give him/her
from this activity?): To demonstrate to students how
the disease
flies can carry disease.
Number of Students: 10-30
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Age Range of Students: 6-17
Time Required: 10-15 minutes  Discuss types of diseases that are contagious. Ex-
Materials: Large space to run around in plain and have the students think of examples of
the ways contagious diseases can be spread, by
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): physical contact, contact with body fluids direct-
ly or on objects, by sneezing and coughing.
1) Choose one student to be “it”.  Discuss how long it took for everyone to get sick
2) Explain to the students that the “it” student rep- in the game, and that real diseases can spread
resents a fly carrying germs. that quickly and easily too. Have students suggest
3) Tell the students that the fly will chase everyone ways to prevent catching contagious diseases.
and to try to get away from the fly.
4) If the fly tags a person, that person must sit down Don’t Sneeze at Me!
and count to 100 because he/she can become
“sick”. Topic: General Hygiene
5) Vary this activity by having all tagged students be Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
“it” at the same time as the original fly. from this activity?): Students will be able to explain
6) This shows how quickly germs can spread. how coughing and sneezing spread germs and how
two ways to prevent this.
Number of Students: 5-30

125
Age Range of Students: 5-15 7) Ask the students how they can prevent spreading
Time Required: 20 minutes the germs this way (wash their hands before eat-
Materials: Spray bottle, Water ing, after going to the bathroom etc, and cover-
ing their mouth/nose when they sneeze or cough
and washing their hands afterwards).
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Fill the spray bottle with water. * Note: This can be a fun activity when the weather is
2) Hold it up to your face, facing away from you. hot. Students will enjoy a nice cool spray!
3) Pretend to sneeze or cough.
4) While you’re doing this, spray the bottle either Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
on the board or on the kids (might be fun on a hot
day).  What kind of diseases can be transmitted this
way?
5) Discuss how sneezing and coughing can spread
germs.  Suggest coughing or sneezing into your sleeve if
you can’t wash your hands right away
6) Explain that the water represents germs, which
make you sick.

126
Dental Health

127
128
Dirty Teeth Experiment  Bread  Beef
 Candy  Juice
Topic: Dental Health  Chicken  Cake
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain  Carrots  Tangerines
from this activity?): To demonstrate the importance  Soup  Lettuce
of brushing teeth and avoiding eating bad foods (also  Chocolate  Cheese
to discuss what are good and bad foods for teeth).  Coke  Apples
Number of Students: 10-30  Celery  Yogurt
Age Range of Students: 10-17  Beets
Time Required: 1 hour
Materials: Handout with mixed bad and good foods, Tooth Decay Experiment
Hard boiled eggs (one for each group), Spoons (one
for each group), Plastic cups (one for each group), Topic: Dental Health
Dark colored soda (like coke), Toothbrushes (you can Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
have students bring their own), Toothpaste from this activity?): Students will learn about what
causes tooth decay.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Number of Students: 10-30
Age Range of Students: 10-17
1) Ask students if they have ever been to a dentist.
Time Required: 1 hour at beginning and 10 min every
Ask them “What do dentists do?” and “Why do we
day for several days (or another hour after several
go to a dentist?”
days)
2) Hold up the hard boiled egg. Tell them that the
Materials: Paper plates (or regular plates), Crackers
egg represents their teeth now, nice and white.
3) Hold up the dark colored soda. Tell them the soda Clear containers/jars for each group, Vinegar, Egg
represents bad food for your teeth. for each group, Paper with drawing of egg, Pencils,
Jar labels, Tape; Optional: Worksheet with parts of
4) Ask students what they think are bad and good
the tooth, Mirrors
foods for their teeth.
5) Divide the class into groups of three or four.
6) Give each student a plastic cup with dark colored Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
soda, a spoon and a hardboiled egg (be careful
1) Give each student a plate and a cracker.
with the eggs!).
2) Have them chew the cracker, spit it out and ob-
7) Tell each student to put the egg into the cup of
serve what they see, talk about it as a class.
soda and put it aside (maybe have them put it in
a part of the room away from the desks so they 3) Give each student another cracker and put vin-
don’t fool with it). egar on the cracker.
8) Hand out worksheet with bad and good foods on 4) Ask students what they see.
it. Have students circle the good foods. Check 5) Explain that saliva has acids much like the vin-
and discuss answers. egar that dissolves the food.
9) Have students bring back their cups and check 6) Divide the class into groups of three or four.
on their egg to see what color it is (it should be 7) Give each group a paper with an egg drawing, a
brown). clear jar/container and an egg.
10) Ask students what happened to their egg. 8) Explain that the egg shell is made up of calcium
11) Tell students this is like what happens to your similar to the enamel on teeth.
teeth when you eat bad food. 9) Have the students carefully put the egg in the
12) Give each group a toothbrush or toothpaste (or jar/container.
have them bring their own) and tell them to brush 10) Pour a little bit of vinegar into the jar, enough to
their egg. cover half the egg.
13) Explain them the right way to brush their teeth 11) Have group label their containers and put them
(in small circles, many times, etc.). aside.
14) Explain how many times a day you should brush 12) The next week (or several consecutive days), have
your teeth. the groups check on their egg and note changes in
15) Ask the students these questions: What did the their egg drawing (if there are holes, have them
egg look like before it was in the soda? What did draw the holes).
it look like after it was in soda? What did the egg 13) Have groups also take notes on the changes of
look like after you brushed it? How many times their egg.
a day do you think you should brush your teeth? 14) Discuss how this is what happens to our teeth if
Why is brushing teeth important? we don’t take care of them and brush them twice
a day.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 Ask students how many times they brush their
teeth, maybe talk about cavities, talk about long  Before or after the activity you could go over with
term effects of not brushing teeth well. your class the parts of the teeth and have the stu-
 Good or Bad Foods? dents label them on a worksheet. You could also
have each student look at their own teeth with

129
a mirror and make observations and take notes. Good and Bad Foods
Explain that back molars are more at risk because
of grinding food and gum chewing. Topic: Dental Health
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Our Egg from this activity?): Students will be able to identify
foods that destroy their teeth and gums.
Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: 5-15
Time Required: 20 minutes
Materials: Pictures of food (healthy and unhealthy)

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Explain to students that some foods are bad for


their teeth and some are good.
2) Tell students what bad foods do and what good
foods do.
3) Hold up various pictures of foods.
4) Have the students say if they are “good” or “bad”
foods for teeth.
5) Discuss any answers they aren’t sure about.
6) Ask the students what kinds of food are good for
their teeth (vegetables, fruits, water).
7) If they have trouble generalizing, show them a
pile of good food pictures.
8) Maybe even put all fruits together.
9) Follow up by brushing your teeth with the stu-
dents after lunch.
Toothpaste Recipe 10) Have students select only good foods to eat that
day.
Topic: Dental Health
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
from this activity?): To show students how to make
their own toothpaste.  The lesson can also lead into a lesson about food
Number of Students: 5-30 groups.
Age Range of Students: All ages  What foods do you eat regularly that are good for
your teeth?
Time Required: 10-15 minutes
 What foods do you eat regularly that are bad for
Materials: Camphor (or mint) for taste, Bicarbonate
your teeth?
soda, Salt, Toothbrushes for students (have them
bring their own)
Brush Your Teeth Song
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Topic: Dental Health
1) Explain to students the importance of using Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
toothpaste (like soap for teeth). from this activity?): To learn a song in English about
2) Explain that sometimes toothpaste isn’t available brushing your teeth.
or expensive, but you can still make your own Number of Students: 5-30
toothpaste. Age Range of Students: 5-15
3) Mix together: Time Required: 5-15 minutes
 1 part camphor (or mint) to taste Materials: Optional: Printed lyrics
 1 part bicarbonate soda
 2 parts salt
4) Wet the toothbrush (first demonstrate), dip and Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
brush away.
1) Sing this fun song to the tune of “Row, row, row
5) Have students make their own and use. your boat”

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Brush, Brush, Brush Your Teeth


 What are the benefits of brushing your teeth?
 How many times should you brush a day? Brush, brush, brush your teeth
 What happens if you don’t brush your teeth? Brush them twice a day
 What are the best ways to brush your teeth (cir- Brush them up and brush them down
cular motion)? They’ll stay clean that way!

130
2) You can make this harder by doing it in rounds! Teeth Brushing Experiment
3) You can also do the actions with the singing.
4) Have older students teach it to younger ones or Topic: Dental Health
perform for younger ones. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To list different methods for
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: cleaning teeth, explain the importance of brushing
teeth three times a day, and when to brush their
 Talk about why you need to brush twice a day. teeth (after meals).
 Talk about what happens when you don’t brush- Number of Students: 10-30
ing well. Age Range of Students: 8-17
 Show students how to properly brush their Time Required: 50-60 minutes
teeth. Materials: Chocolate or other sticky and dark colored
sweets (9 or 10 candies), Flashlight, 2-3 bottles of
drinking water, Fibrous food (apple, etc), At least
Teeth and Gums Game one toothbrush, Toothpaste, 4 drinking cups (one
Topic: Dental Health for each volunteer student), soap for hand washing
before the experiment, paper, colored markers or
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
crayons
from this activity?): To explain that healthy gums hold
teeth in place, brushing teeth protects the teeth and
gums, and that sweets and junk food destroy teeth. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Number of Students: 16-30
1) Select four student volunteers who have clean
Age Range of Students: 5-12
teeth and as few cavities as possible.
Time Required: 20-30 minutes 2) Break the remaining students into four groups,
Materials: None one group for each volunteer.
3) Students in the group must shine the flashlight
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): into their volunteer’s mouth and draw a picture
of what they see.
1) Have students line up in teams of eight to ten. 4) Label the picture in Georgian “before eating
2) Tell them they represent teeth. sweets.”
3) Tell the students to join hands. When they hold 5) After the drawing, have all four volunteers stand
hands their arms and hands are just like gums up front and let all the students file by and look
protecting the teeth and holding them in place. into their mouths. Tell them to remember what
4) Choose one student to represent a toothbrush. they see.
He/she must protect the teeth and gums. 6) Each of the volunteers now must eat two sticky,
5) Choose one student to be the candy. He/she dark colored sweets. The sweets need to be vis-
wants to break through the gums and destroy the ible on teeth after eating.
teeth. 7) Students in each group shine the flashlight into
6) Play the game with the candy student trying to the volunteer’s mouth and again draw what they
break through the arms of the healthy (in a nice see. Label in Georgian “after eating sweets.”
way) gums. 8) Again, line up the students to look into all the
7) The toothbrush student tries to stop the candy volunteers’ mouths and remember what they see
from doing this. 9) Assign each of the four volunteers to clean his/
8) If the candy succeeds in breaking the gum line, her mouth differently: Student 1) does nothing,
then he/she can grab on of the teeth at the break student 2) rinses his/her mouth with water, stu-
and be another candy. dent 3) brushes his/her teeth and gums, student
9) Both candies now try to break through the gums. 4) eats apple (or other fibrous food).
10) Stop the game as the toothbrush brushes away 10) The teacher guides students through guessing
that candy or as the gums break. Ask the students whose mouth will be the cleanest and why (do
what they represent and what their actions rep- not give answers!).
resent. 11) Students in each group examine their volunteer’s
mouth and draw it. Label the picture in Georgian
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: with the action the volunteer took after eating
the candy. Line up to look in all the volunteers
 Review the functions of teeth and gums. mouths again.
 Demonstrate how candy destroys teeth with an- 12) Have each group present their pictures and dis-
other activity or review this concept. cuss whose mouth was cleanest, second cleanest
 Follow up the game with brushing teeth after and so on.
lunch that day. 13) Explain why even eating fibrous foods and rinsing
 Have students take some responsibility for dai- with water are better than nothing.
ly tooth brushing. They might select people to 14) Put the pictures up in the classroom and encour-
check their teeth after brushing, someone to lead age students to brush their teeth.
the daily brushing, etc.

131
Teeth Brushing Relay 3) Have the student look at the word and draw it on
the board.
Topic: Dental Health 4) The other students must guess the word he/she is
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain drawing.
from this activity?): To learn to brush teeth correctly. 5) Divide the class into two teams.
Number of Students: 6-30 6) Have two students come up to the board.
Age Range of Students: 6-15 7) Which team guesses first gets a point.
Time Required: 20 minutes 8) Play several rounds until everyone gets a
Materials: Blackboard, Toothbrush for all students chance.
(have them bring their own), Demonstration set of 9) Whoever has the most points, wins!
teeth (cow jaw bone works well) and toothbrush; Op-
tional: Prize for winning team Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):  Use this activity at the end of a dental lecture.

1) Divide into teams of no more than six.


What Acid Does to Teeth
2) The first person from each team goes to the front
facing his team. Topic: Dental health
3) He/she shows the first step of teeth brushing (top Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
teeth, outside). from this activity?): To show students what acid,
4) The teacher watches and assigns points to each acidic foods and/or saliva (mild acid) will do to
team: 1 point for brushing in the correct loca- teeth.
tion, 1 point for brushing correctly (rotating the Number of Students: 5-30
brush at the gum line, holding brush at a 45 de-
Age Range of Students: 7-17
gree angle).
Time Required: 30 minutes in class, three days of
5) Write the points on the board.
waiting
6) Repeat for each person on the team (top teeth,
Materials: Teeth from an animal (cow, sheep, etc),
inside; bottom teeth, outside; bottom teeth, in-
Chicken bones (if there is no teeth), Soda (like coke),
side; molars; tongue).
ugar water, Milk, Water, Salt water, 5 clear cups or
7) Keep points along the way and be sure to point
jars, Paper, Pens, Tape
out what is correct and incorrect about each stu-
dent’s technique, or ask the students to tell you.
8) The team with the most points wins. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Pour the soda, sugar water, milk, water and salt


Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: water into the five separate clear cups or jars.
2) Label each one with a piece of paper taped on
 Discuss why it is important to brush teeth, when
the cup/jar.
to brush them and what would happen if students
never brushed and all their teeth feel out. 3) Divide the class into groups of five.
 How would they talk? Eat? Look? Fell? (if they’re 4) Give each group a tooth (or chicken bone) and
hungry and malnourished from not eating?) have them draw and take notes of their tooth.
 Have each student write down something that 5) Put each groups tooth into one of the cups. Have
will help him/her remember to brush his/her the groups label their cup
teeth after every meal and before bed. 6) Put the cups aside for three days.
7) After three days have the students get into five
groups.
Dental Pictionary 8) Have each group take a cup and draw and make
notes about what they see.
Topic: Dental Health
9) Have each group present their observations to
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain the class.
from this activity?): To have students familiar with 10) Discuss what happened with the class. Which
dental vocabulary. tooth looked the worse? Which tooth looked the
Number of Students: 5-30 best? What liquid was the worst for teeth? Which
Age Range of Students: 10-17 was the best? What does this tell you about acid
Time Required: 20 minutes and what it does to teeth?
Materials: Slips of paper, Blackboard; Optional: Priz-
es for winning team Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):  Explain that brushing can fight what acid does to
teeth.
1) Write on slips of a paper different dental vocabu-  Show how to brush the right way.
lary words.  Explain that not brushing can make your teeth
2) Have students come to the board and choose a look like the teeth in the worst cups.
slip of paper at random.

132
Growing Oral Bacteria 5) Label the toothpicks with white tape and a pen.
6) Put the toothpicks in the gelatin.
Topic: Dental Health 7) Cover and seal the cups/plates with plastic and
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain tape.
from this activity?): To show how germs can grow in 8) Set aside for three days.
your mouth and the importance of brushing. 9) After three days have students (or groups) draw
Number of Students: 5-30 and take notes.
Age Range of Students: 7-17 10) Have them share with the class what they found.
Time Required: 30 minutes in class, a couple days of 11) Discuss how this relates to the bacteria in your
waiting mouth.
Materials: Gelatin, Toothpicks, White tape (to write 12) Use a control gelatin as something to compare
on), Plastic to cover gelatin with, Tape, Plates or to.
plastic cups for each student
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 What did you see in your cup/plate?
1) Experiment at home to work out any problems  If that’s the same bacteria in your mouth, what
before you do this in class. do you think happens when you don’t brush your
2) Give each student a toothpick and tell them to teeth?
clean their teeth with it.  Would you like to see what you saw in the gelatin
3) Give each student a cup with gelatin in it (you in your mouth? Why or why not?
can also do this in groups if you don’t have a lot  Discuss disease that can happen when there is too
of materials). much bacteria in your mouth
4) Have them wipe their toothpicks in the gelatin.

133
134
Nutrition
and
Consumer
Health

135
136
The Food Pyramid Materials: Food labels (brought by you or by students,
should be enough for several for each student), Pens,
Paper

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Go over the six basic dietary requirements for


maintaining a healthy diet: Carbohydrates, pro-
tein, fat, vitamins, mineral, water.
2) Explain how much of each category is too little or
too much to eat.
3) Give each student several food labels.
4) Explain to the students what each part of the la-
bel means. Explain to the students about portions
and recommended daily amounts.
5) Have students record all the ingredients on the
label.
6) Have students then record the other information
(what of the six requirements does it have? What
extras does it carry? How much?).
7) Have students compare/contrast what is in
Serving Sizes the label compared to what the recommended
amounts for each category are.
Meat: 8) Discuss with the class which foods were the
 1 egg healthiest and which were the least healthy.
 1 cup of cooked meat Why?

Milk/Dairy: Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:


 1 cup milk
 Discuss what kind of labeling was used to attract
 Matchbox size piece of cheese
the customer. What were they trying to empha-
 1 cup yogurt
size? Was there any nutrition value that the box
was trying to sell (example: low in fat, low in
Fruit: sodium, high in vitamins, etc.) Were there any
 ½ cup jam foods that surprised the students and were more
 1 apple or less healthy than they thought?
 1 cup juice
 ½ cup berries
Grocery Store Field Trip
Vegetables: Topic: Nutrition, Consumer Health/Awareness
 ½ cup carrots Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
 1 cup cabbage from this activity?): To learn how to shop responsibly
 1 big scoop beans at a grocery store (get the food they need without
 ½ cup cucumber spending a lot).
Number of Students: 5-30
Bread: Age Range of Students: 10-17
 ½ potato Time Required: 2 hours and 30 min follow up the
 ½ cup macaroni next day (plus time allowed for transportation to
 ½ cup rice the store)
 ½ piece of cake Materials: One teacher for every group of five stu-
 ½ potato pie (paroshkey) dents, Transportation to store, Shopping List, Pen/
 1 slice bread pencil; Optional: Camera (pictures are fun), Calcula-
 1 biscuit tors, Flip chart paper, Markers

Food Labels Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) The week before doing this activity, be sure to


Topic: Nutrition, Consumer Health
inform your students what you will be doing. Lo-
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
cate an appropriate store and also make sure to
from this activity?): To help students read and recog-
talk to the store owner to inform them about this
nize food labels so they can make healthy decisions
activity.
when buying food.
2) Divide the class into groups of three to five.
Number of Students: 10-30
Age Range of Students: 10-17
Time Required: 1 hour

137
3) Give each student a list of groceries they must 3) Explain to everyone why vegetables are impor-
find out about (try to make each list different), a tant: high in vitamins, fiber, what happens to the
pencil, paper, and calculator (optional). body when you don’t eat enough).
4) Tell students that in their groups they much 4) Introduce the food pyramid (you should have a
find this information about each item: different poster with the food pyramid prepared, but don’t
brands/options, prices of each, ingredients (if write down specific foods, just the categories).
available), quantity of each item and how much 5) Explain each group and what the nutrients are in
they would need to feed a family of four (they get each group.
to decide on this, see what they come up with). 6) Give a definition of what a balanced diet is: a
5) Have students turn in their lists and information diet that has enough but not too much from each
at the end of the time and go back to school. group of the food pyramid.
6) For the next class prepare questions for the stu- 7) Divide the class into groups of four.
dents about the information the students found 8) Explain that each group must make a food pyra-
7) At the next class hand back the information gath- mid and draw and label different foods within
ered by each group and let them have ten min- each category of the food pyramid (for example,
utes to discuss and recap what they found (per- fish, beans, chicken and beef all go into the
haps the questions you provided). mean/protein area). Students can put any foods
8) Have each group present their trip to the class. they can think of into the appropriate categories
9) You can also have them write down their list and 9) Give the students a poster board and markers and
make a poster to present to the class about what give them at least 10-20 minutes to complete the
items they were able to buy. task.
10) Another option is to tell the students to make a 10) After everyone is done, have each group present
shopping list that meets the food group require- their chart to the class.
ments for a family of four with only a certain 11) Leave time for discussion after each group’s
amount of money. Challenge the students to presentation. Were there any foods put into the
make decision about which foods are the healthi- wrong categories? Did some foods cover more
est to buy on a low budget than one category?

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 Discuss what problems the students came up  Expand on why vegetables are important accord-
with while trying to write down the information. ing to the age of the class. You could also expand
Talk about what kinds of foods are more expen- on a healthy diet and explain further what hap-
sive and what are cheaper (candies and sweets pens when you do not have a healthy diet. You can
are more expensive than flour and eggs, for ex- explain the connection between healthy eating
ample). Which brands cost the most? How did and athletic performance. You can give examples
the size compared to the price? Is it more dif- of diseases or other negative effects that occur
ficult to eat healthy food when on a low budget? when you do not eat healthy foods. Be creative;
What kinds of foods seemed like a good deal but apply it to the student’s real lives! Discuss which
weren’t very healthy? categories most of your diet should consist of.
Are there some foods that the students eat more
of than they should? Encourage the students to
Food Pyramid Posters discuss their own dietary habits
Topic: Nutrition
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Balanced Meal
from this activity?): To introduce the food pyramid
and the concept of a balanced diet. Topic: Nutrition
Number of Students: 10-30 Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Age Range of Students: 10-17 from this activity?): To teach students the concept of
Time Required: 1 hour a “balanced meal.
Materials: Poster board (or flipchart paper) for each Number of Students: 5-30
group of four, Colored makers or pencils, A prepared Age Range of Students: 10-17
example of a food pyramid (with categories, not the Time Required: 1 hour
foods themselves); Optional: Blackboard/flipchart/ Materials: Drawings of food (or magazine cut outs),
whiteboard, Magazine pictures of food (enough for Plastic bags, Paper to take notes, Pencils, The food
several foods in each category for each group), Glue, pyramid (found at beginning of the chapter); Option-
Rulers al: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Ask the class what their favorite food is (you can 1) Prepare your drawings (or magazine cut outs) of
write these down on the board if you have one). food. Sort the pictures into “meals”. Each meal
2) Take a small poll as to who likes vegetables in the can consist of an assortment of food. Some meals
class (you can also write this on the board). should be balanced and others not. Then sort
each meal into plastic bags. Each bag contain-

138
ing either the pictures of a balanced meal or an 6) Give each group at least 5 different “pieces of
unbalanced one. food.”
2) Start off by asking the students what their favor- 7) Tell the groups to decide as a group which foods
ite meal is. fall under which category from the pyramid (this
3) Explain the six food groups and show students the may take longer with younger children).
food pyramid. 8) After all the groups are done, have the groups
4) Introduced the idea of a balanced meal: a meal tape their foods into their respective categories
that has enough and not too much of each food on the large food pyramid.
group. 9) Afterwards, have a discussion about the choices
5) Divide the class into groups of 4-5. the groups made in categorizing their foods.
6) Give each group a bag with a one meal inside it. 10) Ask the class if they disagree with any of the
7) Tell students to decide if it is or is not a balanced placements.
meal. 11) Discuss as a class.
8) Ask them to keep track on paper how much food
from each category is in the meal. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
9) When everyone is done, ask them to present what
they have and why they think it is or is not a bal-  Discuss with your class the specific nutrients of
anced meal. each food and what it does to your body.
10) Discuss each groups answer as a class.  Discuss problems that may arise if the food pyra-
11) Ask the class how what they could add or take mid is ignored.
away from the unbalanced meal to make it more  Ask them to create a meal or supra that includes
balanced. the recommended daily allowance of food from
12) Discuss the meals as a class. Are some meals each category.
“more balanced” than others?
Food Journal
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Topic: Nutrition
 Discuss easy ways to make a balanced meal. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
 Ask students to bring each part of a balanced from this activity?): To teach students to monitor
meal and have a meal as a class. their food intake and about the importance of a bal-
 Discuss more about benefits of a balanced meal. anced diet.
 Discuss what could happen if you don’t have bal- Number of Students: 5-30
anced meal. Age Range of Students: 10-17
 Ask students to keep a journal of the meals they Time Required: 1 week outside class, 30 min in-class
eat at home: Which ones are balanced? What
Materials: Food chart in test booklet or notebook, Pen-
could they do to make the ones that are unbal-
cils; Optional: Blackboard, Pre-made food pyramid
anced more balanced? Encourage your students
to share this information with their families.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

Food Pyramid Foods 1) Ask the students what they usually have for each
meal.
Topic: Nutrition 2) Introduce the concept of a balanced meal using
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain the recommended daily servings from the food
from this activity?): To learn to group foods by nutri- pyramid.
tional value. 3) Instruct the students to keep track of what
Number of Students: 10-30 they eat for each meal in a food journal for one
Age Range of Students: 8 – 15 week.
Time Required: 30 min – 1 hour 4) At the next lesson review what a balanced meal
Materials: A large food pyramid poster (or drawn on a is.
blackboard), Paper, Pens, Tape, Pictures of food (you 5) Ask the students to look at their list.
can draw them yourself or cut them out of maga- 6) Divide the class into groups of 4-5.
zines); Optional: Sticky notes 7) As a group have the groups answer these ques-
tions about their lists:
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):  What meals were balanced?
 What meals were not balanced?
1) Prepare pieces of paper with different pictures of  What do you think was your more balanced
food (at least 5 for each group). meal? Your most unbalanced meal?
2) Introduce food groups and the food pyramid to  What could you add to make your meals
the class. more balanced?
3) Describe each food group and its nutritional val-  What could you eat less of to make your
ue. meals more balanced?
8) Discuss the answers as a class.
4) Explain the nutrients that each food has.
5) Split the class into groups of 4-5.

139
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: 14) The students will then write each definition with
2 examples in their notebooks.
 Have them design a meal plan using their journals
and the concept of a balanced meal.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 Talk about how balanced meals change with age/
weight etc.  Have the class get into groups and give them pic-
 The class could also do this activity again for a tures of food. According to the definitions, have
longer period of time and this time try to eat them place the foods into the correct categories.
more balanced meals. Afterwards you can review
if any changes were seen during the periods of
eating balanced meals. Did they feel healthier? Newspaper/Magazine Menu
More alert? Less hungry?
Topic: Nutrition, Decision Making
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Food Pyramid Dictionary Look-up from this activity?): To have students create their
own healthy menu.
Topic: Nutrition
Number of Students: 5-30
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Age Range of Students: 10-17
from this activity?): To familiarize students with the
six food groups and to introduce the food pyramid. Time Required: 1 hour
Number of Students: 10-30 Materials: Newspapers or magazines with food ad-
vertisements, Poster board/flipchart or large paper,
Age Range of Students: 7 – 13
Markers, Glue, Scissors; Optional: Colored markers,
Time Required: 1 hour Other decorative things
Materials: Dictionaries (one for each group), Poster
of Food Pyramid, Blackboard/flipchart/whiteboard,
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Pen, Notebooks, Several food products (maybe 4 or
5); Optional: More food products, Pictures of food 1) Discuss the concept of food affecting the body
(“you are what you eat”). Ask students if they
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): think this is true and what this means.
2) Ask the students what they think junk food is and
1) Hold up a candy bar and an apple and ask stu- why some foods are considered junk food.
dents which do they think is better and healthier 3) Ask the students what they think are healthy
for their bodies. foods to eat.
2) Ask the students if they ever think about what 4) Divide class into groups of four or five students.
they are putting in their bodies before they eat
5) Give each group newspapers and magazines that
something.
have food advertisements in them, scissors, glue,
3) Explain that in order to be healthy children they markers and a poster board.
should be eating more of certain foods and less of
6) Tell the groups that they must search through
others.
the paper and cut out pictures of healthy food.
4) List the six categories shown on the food pyramid Then they must create a menu for a healthy food
(5 food groups: grains, protein, dairy, fruits, vegeta- restaurant with the pictures they found (give the
bles; and sweets/fats -- use sparingly) on the board. students at least 20 minutes for this).
5) Divide the class into groups of five. 7) Tell each group they must come up with a com-
6) Give each group a dictionary. mercial for their restaurant (give them 10-15
7) Assign each group one of the categories from the minutes for this).
food pyramid. 8) After the groups are done have them present
8) Ask groups to get a dictionary and look up each their commercial to the class.
food group. The definitions of the food groups 9) After each group has presented, ask them ques-
will then be put on the board. tions like: Why did you chose those foods? What
9) Provide many examples of foods in each food makes those foods healthy? Do you eat these
group and explain why they are in that food foods at home? Do you see these foods at a res-
group. taurant? Encourage each group to ask questions.
10) Display the food pyramid poster in the front of 10) Ask the class: Would you go to this restaurant?
the room. Would people buy healthy food? What would you
11) Explain to the class the purpose of the food pyr- order?
amid and tell how many servings of each food 11) Review healthy foods quickly as a recap.
should be eaten.
12) Hold up more examples and ask what food groups Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
they should be in, either asking if they are in a
certain group or asking what group they should be  Go to a real restaurant and ask for their menu.
in and why. (For example: hold up bread and ask if Ask students to list the healthy foods and the not
it is in the protein group and why or why not.) healthy foods available. Have them report back
13) Restate the definitions of the food groups and ask to you in class. Encourage your students to keep
the children what they think should be added to a food journal and track their food choices for a
the definition and why. week.

140
Hunger Quilt Food Pyramid Booklet
Topic: Nutrition, Community, Hunger Awareness, Art Topic: Nutrition
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To bring awareness to the prob- from this activity?): To learn about the food pyramid.
lem of hunger. Number of Students: 5-30
Number of Students: 15-30 Age Range of Students: 8 – 15
Age Range of Students: 10-17 Time Required: 1 hour
Time Required: 1 hour Materials: Small note paper, Construction paper or
Materials: Paper squares (3x3), Colored pens/pen- other colored paper, Something to make holes with,
cils, Snacks, chocolate etc, An example quilt square Yarn, Scissors, Glue, Food Pyramid poster or sheets,
on paper, Glue, Large piece of paper (maybe sev- Magazines/newspapers with food in it, Pens; Option-
eral); Optional: Hunger statistics in Georgia; Other al: Ribbon, Card stock paper, Colored makers, Food
mediums (glitter, stickers, etc) pyramids to cut and paste

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Hand to each student selection of snacks or choc- 1) Introduce the food pyramid and the six food
olate and tell them they MUST not eat it. groups in it.
2) Open up your own snack or candy bar and start to 2) Explain how many servings and what kind of food
eat it in front of them. goes into each food group.
3) Remind students not to eat anything. 3) Give each student a piece of colored paper or
4) After a couple minutes tell the students they are construction paper, six pieces of notebook paper,
allowed to eat their snacks. and a long piece of yarn.
5) Ask the students what it felt like to want food 4) Hand out the scissors, glue and magazines/news-
and see someone else having it. papers.
6) Explain how much worse it is for people who go 5) Tell the students to fold the colored paper in half.
hungry everyday. 6) Tell the students to put the six pages into the
7) If possible, give information about local and na- folded paper to make a small booklet.
tional hunger issues. 7) Tell the students to poke two holes on the folded
8) Discuss with class what they think of hunger, how age, through all the paper.
they think they can help and why they think it is 8) Have them pull the yarn through and tie it so they
a problem. are all connected.
9) Give each student a square of paper and colored 9) Tell the students to head each page of the note-
pens/pencils. book paper with a food group.
10) Tell the students that they must create a square 10) Have the students draw (or glue on cut out ver-
for a “hunger quilt”. Tell them they can draw any- sions of) the food pyramid on the front page.
thing or use words to express anything describing 11) Tell students to cut out pictures of food from the
the problem of hunger. magazines/newspapers and paste them in the
11) Give them example Topics such as: hungry chil- appropriate category (remind them to ask you if
dren, what hunger does, why people go hungry, why they aren’t sure).
hunger is bad, what we can do to help, what hungry 12) This should take about 20 – 30 minutes for them
people need, etc. to complete.
12) Give them at least 20 minutes to complete this 13) Tell them they should bring them home and share
task. them with their family.
13) After they are done, show kids how to make their 14) They can color and decorate them more if they
paper like cloth: crumple up the paper over and have time.
over again, rub it against the desk and rub it to-
gether until it’s soft (be careful not to rip it!).
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
14) When each student is done have them hand in
their squares.  Have students compare their booklets with each
15) Glue/tape squares together or glue squares to a other and discuss the foods they most often each.
very large piece of paper to make a quilt! Hang it Have your students use this booklet to record in
on your classroom wall to remind students of the each category which foods they eat during a few
issue. days. Then they can go back and see if certain cat-
egories aren’t being met the way they should be.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 Have parents come in to look at the work, display


Name That Food!
it at school or community center. Have a hunger Topic: Nutrition, English
drive and collect food to give to people in need.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Encourage your students to come up with ways
from this activity?): A fun way to practice the food
they can combat hunger in their town.
groups and which foods belong in them
Number of Students: 5-30

141
Age Range of Students: 10-17 from each of the groups on the Food Pyramid (they
Time Required: 10-15 minutes should have at least 20 minutes for this).
Materials: Pens, Paper 9) When all the groups are finish, have each group
present their restaurant.
10) Discuss the restaurants afterwards. If possible
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
hang the menus around the room.
1) Explain the 6 food groups and give some examples
of what foods are in each group. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
2) Pick one category from the six food groups.
3) Pick any letter from the alphabet (probably best  Discuss the properties of each healthy food and
to choose a commonly used one). what it does to your body. Go out to a real restau-
rant and see if they can identify the foods that
4) Tell students they have one minute to write down
are healthiest. Plan a “healthy food” party and
as many foods in that group that starts with that
buy only healthy snacks. Have students practice
letter. For example: “grains and B” students may
cooking a healthy meal.
write – bread, bagels, brownies, buttermilk pan-
cakes, baguette, and so on.
5) After one minute is up have the students count Healthy Food Cookbook
the items on their lists.
6) Who ever has the most items on their list wins Topic: Nutrition
that round. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
7) You can also play this in groups, which might be from this activity?): To learn about healthy foods.
more fun. Number of Students: 10-30
Age Range of Students: 10-17
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Time Required: 30 minutes (students also do work
at home)
 Talk more about the food pyramid. Play Piction- Materials: Pens, Paper, Copying ability, Construc-
ary, but only with foods from one food group. Or tion paper/colored paper, Stapler/staples; Optional:
play where a food is drawn and the team must Computer to type out recipes
shout out what group it belongs to.

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):


Healthy Food Menu
1) At the end of a class discuss what makes foods healthy.
Topic: Nutrition, Art, Team Building 2) Ask students what their favorite healthy foods are.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain from 3) Tell students that they must find a recipe for a
this activity?): To learn about healthy food choices and healthy food and write it at home.
making balanced meal choices from local menus 4) Tell the students to inform you of what meals
Number of Students: 5-30 they will be writing the recipes for so you don’t
Age Range of Students: 10-17 have any duplicates. (You may want to give them
Time Required: 1 hour a couple days to figure it out and then tell you).
Materials: Menus, Paper, Pens, Markers; Optional: 5) Have the students bring in their recipes nicely
Colored pens/pencils, Food Pyramid visual written.
6) They must include why the food is healthy at the
bottom! For older students you can have them
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): write down the nutrients.
1) Read several menus from local restaurants (you 7) You can also ask them to illustrate around the
will have to either get the menus or write them recipe.
down if they don’t have one you can take) or 8) Collect the recipes from the students.
make up your own menus. 9) Make copies of all the recipes for each student.
2) Ask the students whether those meals sounded 10) Use the construction paper to make a colorful
healthy, why and why not? cover.
3) Divide the class into groups of three students. 11) Staple together (very easy) to make a book.
4) Discuss with the students the food pyramid and 12) Give each student a book.
each of its categories. 13) Students can also make them for friends and fam-
5) Discuss with class a few ideas of healthy foods ily.
they might want to see on a menu when they go 14) You can type out the recipes before you copy
out to eat. them if possible.
6) Tell each group of students to come up with a
creative name for their restaurant (Give them a Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
few minutes for this.
7) Tell the students that they must design the cover  Have students cook their food at home and bring
of a menu for their own restaurant. to class for a healthy food supra!
8) Tell the students that they must come up with at
least two meals and/or desserts that include items

142
Food Pyramid Matching Game Number of Students: 15-30
Age Range of Students: 14-17
Topic: Nutrition Time Required: 1 hour (plus 10-15 minutes in previ-
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain ous class)
from this activity?): To get students familiar with the Materials: Plastic bags, Markers, Knives, Pens, Paper;
food pyramids and which foods go in which category. Optional: Plates, Posters, Salad dressing/dips, Black-
Number of Students: 10-30 board/whiteboard/flipchart
Age Range of Students: 8-17
Time Required: 30 minutes Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Materials: Envelops, 2 sets of Index cards/slips of pa-
per (marked so as to distinguish them from each oth- 1) Divide the class into groups of four or five.
er i.e. different colors), Pens, Makers, Blackboard/ 2) Several days prior to the party the students must
whiteboard/flipchart, 2 paper or plastic bags, Tape choose one group member to bring each type of
vegetable or different plant part. Plant parts are:
flowers (such as broccoli, cauliflower), fruit (to-
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
mato, cucumber, peppers, peas, etc.), leaf (let-
1) Draw the food pyramid on the chalkboard, label- tuce, cabbage, spinach, greens), stem (celery,
ing each space with the proper food group name chives, or sprouts), or root/bulb (carrot, onion,
and the number of servings needed each day from garlic, radish, etc.). Remind the “fruit” bringers
each group. that their food should be vegetables that are the
2) Tape an empty envelope onto each area of the fruit of the plant (bananas, peaches, etc. are not
pyramid. appropriate).
3) Take your two groups of index cards. From the 3) Everyone brings their vegetables. Each student’s
first group, on each index card, write a food item. contribution is put in a bag with their name on it.
Repeat these on the second set of cards (each set 4) Classify each item first, by having everyone who
of cards should contain the same list of foods). brought a bulb/root bring it to the table and dis-
4) Put each set of index cards into 2 separate paper cuss characteristics of a root/bulb, determine
bags and place the paper bags in front of the room. if all items fit this category. Do the same with
each plant section (stems, leaves, flowers, and
5) Divide the class into 2 teams.
fruits).
6) Line up each team in single file.
5) Ask the students to develop a different way to
7) When you say go the first person in each line goes classify the vegetables. They should consult as
to the paper bag and draws an index card with a a group and decide what new characteristic will
name of a food. He/she then should go up to the be used as a basis for grouping the “veggies”.
chalkboard and sticks the card into the correspond- Groups then share their system of classification
ing envelope in one of the food groups. Once the with the class and demonstrate by regrouping the
first person is done, the second person in line does vegetables (size, color, shape, weight, taste, tex-
the same thing. This should continue until one team ture, peeled or unpeeled, etc.).
uses all their index cards. This team then earns 15
6) Each student then takes their veggie and pre-
points. The other team earns 10 points.
pares it.
8) Check the envelopes to be sure that the foods
7) Everyone shares with the class and you have your
were placed in the correct food group. Each team
veggie party!
should get 2 points for each properly placed food
item (this is why the two sets of cards must be
different). But an incorrectly placed card will re- Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
sult in the team losing 2 points.
9) While doing this you should be reviewing the infor-  Talk about what the students grow in their gar-
mation about each food group with the students. dens or at school and classify the plants. Do this
activity but with all parts of the food pyramid
(i.e. have different groups bring in foods from
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: different parts of the food pyramid and then have
your party with even more food!)
 Discuss the importance of the food groups and what
they do to your body. Keep this chart and use it
again later, but this time have the students write Snack Selection
on cards what they ate for lunch or dinner and then
put the foods into the different groups. See which Topic: Nutrition, Decision Making
groups have the most cards. Does it match the rec- Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
ommended daily servings for each group? from this activity?): To help students practice mak-
ing decisions, to learn to make decisions about nutri-
tious snacks.
Veggie Party
Number of Students: 5-30
Topic: Nutrition, Cooking Age Range of Students: All ages
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Time Required: 15 - 30 minutes
from this activity?): To learn about vegetables and Materials: Pictures of various foods
healthy snacks.

143
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

1) Arrange a group of food pictures on the table.  How difficult is it for the leader to organize and
2) Have each member select a nutritious snack. monitor the groups?
3) Have each person tell why they selected that par-  What is the purpose of not allowing any talking
ticular snack. in this activity?
4) Ask the following questions:  How did everyone communicate without using words?
 What were some of your choices?
 What did your snack choice contribute to
your health? (vitamins, calcium, energy
Vitamin A Game
etc) Topic: Nutrition
 Was it a good decision?
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
 Did you decide on your snack because a
from this activity?): Students will be able to identify
friend liked it or because you did?
vitamin A rich foods and rank local foods based on
5) Next have each student select five food that they
their Vitamin A content.
might keep at home for snacks.
Number of Students: 10-30
6) Have each student tell why he/she chose these
foods. Age Range of Students: 8-17
Time Required: 30 minutes
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Materials: Blackboard or paper to keep score, Pic-
tures of various foods (drawn or cut out)
 How do you think your mother/father chooses the
food they make for your family each day? Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 What is a balanced meal?
 What is a balanced diet? 1) Cut out pictures of food from magazines or news-
papers.
2) Before class look up the Vitamin A content of
The Food Game each food you have cut in a resource manual, and
write the number on the back of a picture of each
Topic: Nutrition, Communication food. All foods should contain some vitamin A. In-
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain clude foods that vary in Vitamin A content (both
from this activity?): To practice the six food groups good and poor sources of Vitamin A). Or rank the
and to promote communication and teamwork. foods using a 1-10 scale with foods highest in Vi-
Number of Students: 10-30 tamin A receiving a 10. Write these numbers on
Age Range of Students: 8-17 the back of the pictures instead.
Time Required: 15-20 minutes 3) Place all the food card pictures side up.
Materials: Pens, Paper, Prepared cards with food 4) Divide the class into teams of five.
names on them 5) Explain that the cards contain foods with Vita-
min A, though not all of the foods have the same
amount of vitamin A. Tell them that each food
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
card has the amount of vitamin A written on the
1) Prepare cards or pieces of paper with food names back. Show them a few examples.
written on them. 6) The first team starts by selecting the one food
2) Write the 6 categories of the food pyramid on 6 card they think represents the best sources of Vi-
pieces of paper (one on each). Hang these papers tamin A. After the pick up the card, they should
in different parts of the room. turn it over to see the number. Award the team
3) Assign a leader for each round of the game. this amount of points.
4) The leader gives each person a food card randomly. 7) The teams take turns picking cards which they
think represent the best source of Vitamin A
5) Students are not allowed to show each other their
among the cards left until all the cards are cho-
cards or to speak.
sen. A different team member should pick the
6) Students must try to form six food groups accord- card each time.
ing to their food card (there might not be any in
8) The team with the highest score wins.
one group, but that’s okay).
9) After the game is over, have the students rank all
7) To form these groups, students must mime the
the food cards in order of the highest to lowest
food on their card to the other students and they
Vitamin A content.
should guess which food group it belongs to.
When the students have guessed where they go,
the student stands near the sign with the food Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
group category that corresponds to the food on
their card.  Discuss which foods are locally available and how
they are typically eaten.
8) The leader monitors so no one speaks.
 Encourage students to eat Vitamin A rich foods
9) After they have formed their groups, the leader
with oils and fats for better absorption.
has each groups say the food names in it aloud to
see if they are correct.  Discuss what Vitamin A does to the body and why
it is important.
10) After each round, change the leader.

144
Nutrition Musical Chairs 2) Put all the pictures face down into the numbered
sections (one in each box) on the poster. Mix up
Topic: Nutrition the pairs.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 3) Divide all of the students into two or three
from this activity?): To classify foods into the six food teams.
groups. 4) Play concentration. The first team selects two
Number of Students: 10-15 pocket numbers. The teacher reveals the pic-
Age Range of Students: 6-17 tures in these two boxes for 10 seconds and re-
turns them to the pockets face down.
Time Required: 30 minutes
5) Students should try to remember which pictures
Materials: Chairs for each students (minus one); Op-
are in which boxes.
tional: Pictures of food
6) Teams alternately select pairs of pictures. They
can repeat boxes if they want.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 7) The object is to get a match (i.e. a healthy eye
and a dry eye with bitot’s spots).
1) Assign a food to each student (and if possible give
8) If one team picks a match, the pair remains in
them each a picture of the food which has been
the boxes, picture side out. Award the team one
assigned to them). Each food should distinctly
point for this (optional: the team must state
belong to one food group.
the micro nutrient deficiency causing the health
2) Have the students make a circle with their chairs
problem in this pair for an extra point. Another
with one of the students standing in the middle.
point is awarded for naming a food rich in this
3) Have the student in the middle call out the name micro nutrient).
of one food group.
9) Stop when all the pairs are matched.
4) The students assigned a food in that food group
10) Make a chart listing the micro nutrients, symp-
get up and switch seats quickly.
toms of their deficiencies, and two or three foods
5) The student who sits down last does not get a seat. which can help prevent the micro nutrient defi-
He/she ends up being the next person in the middle. ciency.
6) Repeat this several times.
7) Students can hold up pictures of the food they
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
are assigned to help them better understand.
 Have students check each other for these various
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: health problems, weighting and measuring them-
selves, looking at eyes and fingernails etc.
 Emphasize that a good, healthy meal contains all  Then have each student write down what he or
the food groups. she will eat to solve his/her health problem.
 Have the students list the food groups in their
meals at home.
List of Micro-Nutrients and Deficiencies
 Have students build a meal with all five food
groups in it.
Deficiency / treatment
Symptom
/ cause
Nutritional Concentration
Bitot’s spots - foamy vitamin A
Topic: Nutrition patches on conjunctiva
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Blurred vision vitamins B2, B6, panto-
from this activity?): To identify symptoms of various
thenic acid
nutrition-related health problems and list the nutri-
ent that treats each problem. Bulging eyes vitamin E, nicotinamide,
Number of Students: 10-30 iodine
Age Range of Students: 7-17 Color-blindness vitamin A
Time Required: 30 minutes
Conjunctivitis vitamins A, B2, C (B6,
Materials: 1 pair of pictures for each health prob-
zinc)
lem, Picture of the health problem, Picture of some-
one without the health problem, Poster with enough Dark spots in front of the vitamins B6, C, zinc (liver
numbered sections/boxes to hold all the picture eyes problems)
cards; Optional: Tape
Dry, hard eyeballs (xe- vitamin A
rophthalmia)
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Itching, burning, watery, vitamin B2
1) Create pictures to describe the health prob- sandy eyes
lems that are associated with vitamin deficien- Blisters vitamin E
cies. Choose the ones that are most pertinent to
your age group and region. Each pair of pictures Brown discoloration vitamin B12
should include an image of health and an image around small joints
representing a symptom of deficiency.

145
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Deficiency / treatment
Symptom
/ cause 1) After a brief discussion of the five food groups,
show the students how eating from the five
Keratosis, horny, goose- vitamin A internally & good groups helps fight disease and makes them
pimple-like skin externally strong.
Lemon-yellow skin vitamin B12 2) Pass out cards with the individual food groups
– fat/oils, carbohydrates, protein, vegetables/
Oily skin, white-heads vitamin B2 fruits, and dairy.
Prickly-heat rash vitamin C 3) Draw a line on the ground. The teacher’s side of
the rope represents sickness.
Red-brown or dark-red Manganese 4) Tell the students you are Mr. Sickness. If they get
spots pulled across the line, it shows they are sick and
Rosacea (redness of part vitamin B2 weak.
of face) 5) Pick a small student (one you can beat in a one-
on-one tug of war).
Coarse, brittle hair Zinc
6) Tell the other kids “This student has not eaten
Dandruff vitamins B2, B6, zinc, yet” Ask the student how he/she feels “Are you
magnesium, biotin hungry? Tired? Sick?”
7) Play tug of war and easily beat the student.
Dry hair vitamin A, zinc
8) Tell the students that eating correctly from the
Hangnails vitamin C, folic acid, food groups builds a stronger body. The student
proteins should call out all five food groups one by one.
Nails opaque, white zinc, vitamin B6 9) The students with the five food group cards
spots/bands join the student and play tug of war against the
teacher.
Oily hair vitamin B2 10) This time the students should kick your butt and
Cracked lips & corners of vitamins B2, B6, folic acid show you that eating right; eating from all the
the mouth (cheilosis) five food groups, makes you strong and helps you
prevent sickness.
Distended, purplish-blue vitamin B2 (circulation
veins under the tongue poor, congested)
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Halitosis (bad breath) vitamin B6, zinc,
magnesium, propolis,  Classify foods into the five food groups.
chlorophyll (cleansing,  Ask students what they ate that day or the pre-
intestinal sanitation) vious day. Did they eat food from all five food
Mouth ulcers, canker folic acid, vitamin B6, groups?
zinc (alkalize, allergy  Analyze a meal one of the students ate recently.
test)  Plan example meals which supply all five food
Purplish or magenta vitamin B2
groups.
tongue or lips, also veins
under the tongue
Food Pyramid Lesson
Tongue red at tip or niacin (vitamin B6)
edges; severe deficiency: Topic: Nutrition
whole tongue scarlet red, Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
sore from this activity?): To become familiar with the
Tongue shiny, smooth, vitamin B12, folic acid food pyramid. To identify those food groups which
beefy; early sign: straw- you need to obtain the majority of their daily nutri-
berry-red tip/sides tional needs. To identify the food group from which
you need the least amount of daily servings.
White patches on tongue vitamin B2 and other B
Number of Students:
vitamins (allergy)
Age Range of Students: 6-17
Time Required: 30 minutes
Nutrition Tug-o-War Materials: A poster of the food pyramid, Pictures of
normal meals, Pictures of various foods (representing
Topic: Nutrition all the food groups in the pyramid), Four different
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain colors of markers
from this activity?): To explain why you must eat
food from all five food groups every day.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Number of Students: 10-15
Age Range of Students: 5 – 13 1) Show the food pyramid to the class. Explain
Time Required: 20 minutes that our food needs are similar to a food pyra-
Materials: Rope for tug of war, Five word cards (one mid (ask the class if a pyramid can balance on
for each group) its tip). On a daily basis, we need more of cer-

146
tain types of foods than of others. In fact, with 4) Tell the students to show and talk about what
some food types we need very little. If you relied they drew to the class.
too much on the foods at the top of the pyramid, 5) Talk about serving size and describe the appropri-
your health would “tip” or have a good chance of ate serving sides for different parts of the food
letting you down just as the pyramid falls down pyramid. Ask them how they know that they have
stood on its top. eaten the “right” amount of food. Talk about
2) Explain the food groups. Give examples and the the importance of serving sizes in maintaining a
approximate number of daily servings required healthy diet.
(note: the number of servings may vary depend- 6) Spread out the slips of paper with the foods that
ing on individual requirements of age, size and you’ve already prepared.
amount of activity). 7) Explain to the class that one side is the correct
3) Outline each level of the pyramid with a different serving size and the other is not.
colored marker. This is vital in helping younger 8) One at a time or in teams, have the students de-
students make a transfer from a concrete idea to cide which is the correct serving size and which
the abstract food pyramid. category it fits into on the food pyramid.
4) Display the food pictures one at a time to the
class. Ask students where on the pyramid each
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
would fit. Some may fit in two categories.
5) Show the class pictures of normal meals (have  Ask the students what they eat in a typical day.
handouts prepared before).  Have them keep a food diary for one day and
6) Then have the students tape these pictures to the bring it to class to discuss.
food pyramid.  Explain how the contents of food also affect
7) Discuss whether this normal meal provides a bal- health.
anced meal. What is lacking?  Reveal the vitamin/mineral chart and explain
that these foods are rich in vitamins and minerals
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: are best for overall health.
 Have them make a healthy menu.
 Have students analyze their last meal and discuss
what they can add/subtract to make it more bal-
anced. Food Dominos
 Have students play foods into an empty food
pyramid. Topic: Nutrition
 Name all the food groups listen on the food pyra- Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
mid and give the suggested number of servings. from this activity?): To identify and match foods from
 Name your favorite food in each of the food the same food groups.
groups. Number of Students: 5-30
 From which food group should you eat the most? Age Range of Students: 9-15
 From which food group should you eat the least? Time Required: 30 minutes
Why? Materials: The “Food Dominoes” sheets (for each
group of students); Optional: Scissors, Laminator
(for greater durability)
Serving Sizes
Topic: Nutrition Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
1) Before class cut out the dominoes. If they are
from this activity?): To be able to tell how much of a
older and have scissors, they can do this on their
serving is too much and what is too little
own. (You can laminate if you have the ability to
Number of Students: 5-30 do so.)
Age Range of Students: 6-17 2) Divide the class into group of 3 or 4. This game is
Time Required: 30 minutes played like regular dominos.
Materials: Pens/pencils, Paper, Slips of paper, Hand- 3) Each domino has two set parts, each part repre-
out showing serving sizes for common foods (found at senting a separate food group. Five dominos are
the beginning of the chapter) doubles in which foods of the same food group
appear on both sides. The double “multi-food”
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): domino is always put aside as the starter for the
game. The remaining dominoes are shuffled or
1) Before the class, draw a picture or write down missed and turned facedown.
foods on both sides of the pieces of paper (the 4) Each player picks out five dominoes and turns
serving sizes for common foods can be found on them face up in front of him/her.
the corresponding handout). On one side write 5) After the double multi-food domino has been
the correct daily serving. On the other side write placed in the center of the player area, the first
an incorrect amount. player may place one of his/her dominoes to one
2) Pass out blank paper to the students. end of the double domino if the picture matches.
3) Ask them to draw their favorite foods on the pa-
per.

147
6) The second player may try to match the double 10) A double is always played crosswise to the end it
domino or the food end on the other end of the matches. This creates two directions in which the
second domino played. dominoes may be played.
7) The play continues with the third and fourth players. 11) If a player cannot make a match, he/she must
8) Only one domino can be played at each turn. draw from the remaining facedown dominoes un-
9) Dominos are played lengthwise instead of at right til he/she is able to play. If he/she draws the last
angles. The only exception to this rule is in the remaining domino and is still unable to play, he/
case of doubles (both ends represent the same she must pass and try again on the next turn.
food group) where right angles are permitted. 12) The first player to use all his/her dominos wins. Or,
if no further plays can be made. The player with
the least number of dominos left wins the game.

Dominos (please write the food group in Georgian on the other side)

148
149
Awareness of Fat Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

Topic: Nutrition  Discuss a recent meal or everyday foods to decide


Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain what is fatty and if they need to cut back on any
from this activity?): To identify foods with excessive of those foods. Ask the students what foods they
amounts of fat, learning about combating obesity didn’t think were fatty but are.
and its associated ills by recognizing the common
foods that contribute to obesity. Nutrition Bingo
Number of Students: 5-20
Age Range of Students: 12-17 Topic: Nutrition
Time Required: 1 hour Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Materials: A pat of butter, A roll of wax paper, Cop- from this activity?): To practice general knowledge
ies of the food collage worksheet, An assortment of nutrition and have fun!
of fatty and non-fatty foods (salami, mayonnaise, Number of Students: 5-30
khachapuri, apple, orange), Facial tissues; Optional: Age Range of Students: 6-17
Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart Time Required: 20 minutes
Materials: Bingo cards, Pieces of paper or other bingo
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): markers

1) Make a copy of the food collage worksheet for


Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
each student.
2) Bring in food items or ask class to bring them. 1) Make bingo sheets for each student by putting nu-
3) Explain to the students that fat is required in our trition vocabulary words into a grid.
daily lives in very limited amounts. Too much fat 2) Call out the definition of each word.
can lead to excessive weight gain and, over a pro- 3) Have students find the word on their sheet and
longed period of time, to a number of diseases put a marker on it.
due to being overweight (heart disease being on
4) Make sure you keep track of which definitions you read.
of the most common). Very often we can recog-
5) When someone gets a line across, down or diago-
nize fatty foods just by their feel and texture.
nal, they must call BINGO.
Usually fatty foods will leave clues about what
they are made from. Explain to students that 6) Have the student read off all the words in the line.
these clues can be used to search out fatty foods 7) If he/she is right, they are the winner.
before we eat too much. 8) You can play this game many times and with any
4) Display the various food samples so that all the kind of words.
students can easily observe them. Suggested vocabulary:
5) While holding each food individually, ask the class  vitamins
to raise their hands if they feel the food is consid-  minerals
ered fatty, record the survey results on the board  protein
(if available).  grow
6) Tear off a sheet of wax paper.  energy
7) Drag one end of the butter across the wax paper.  habit
8) Have the students observe the butter leaves a  fat (the substance)
greasy trail on the wax paper. You may have one  carbohydrates
or two students touch the butter trail to verify  salt
the fact (students wipe off their greasy fingers
with the tissue). Discuss the point that butter is
made up totally of fat.
Peanut Butter Recipe
9) Have students work as “grease detectives” in Topic: Nutrition, Cooking
teams of two or four.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
10) Equip teams with a sheet wax paper, tissues and from this activity?): To learn to make peanut butter
small portions of assorted food items. (a yummy and healthy snack).
11) Allow the teams to investigate the potential trail
Number of Students: 1-30
of grease for each food, recording their results.
Age Range of Students: All ages
12) When you are done with research, compare the
results with the initial class survey. Time Required: 20 minutes
13) You may manage this activity as a demonstration Materials: 1 lb. unshelled peanuts, ½ cup margarine
depending on the level of students. or oil , Mortar (or something to grind peanuts in),
Salt; Optional: Bread, Plates, Spoons, Butter knives,
14) Distribute copies of the worksheet and have stu-
Jelly, Celery
dents mark an X on all foods they believe to be
fatty. Use the results of this activity and prior
knowledge to help them make judgments. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Get out all the ingredients for your peanut butter.


2) Explain the nutritional value of peanut butter
(protein!).

150
Food Collage Worksheet

151
3) Explain that it is a fun and popular American food. Materials: Pens/pencils, Paper; Optional: Black-
4) Put the 1 lb. of unshelled peanuts and ½ cup of board/whiteboard/flipchart, Poster board, Colored
margarine or oil into a mortar. markers/pens/pencils
5) Crush the peanuts and margarine/oil until smooth.
6) Add a little salt for taste (you can also add sugar). Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
7) You can give each student a taste with a spoon
(different spoons) and either put it on bread, cel- 1) Divide the class into groups of three or four.
ery, or make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. 2) Give each group paper and a pen (or poster board).
3) Have each group plan one day’s menu for a family
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: member.
4) Have them consider the steps of making a good
 Do you like peanut butter? decision in their decision making about the menu.
 What food group does peanut butter belong to? 5) Here are example steps:
 What other American foods would you like to try?  What is the problem?
 Why is protein important?  What are some solutions?
 Where can we get information?
 What are our choices?
Food Group Envelopes  What will each choice cost us (in time,
money, energy)?
Topic: Nutrition, Decision Making  What are our limitations (time, effort,
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain personal resources)?
from this activity?): For students to practice their  What will the consequences of each choice be?
knowledge about food groups.  What will you do?
Number of Students: 5-30  How will you do it?
Age Range of Students: 7-17  Was it a good decision? Why? Why not?
Time Required: 20 minutes 7) Have each group present their menus to the
class.
Materials: Five envelopes, Pens, Paper
8) Discuss the following:
 What foods were chosen?
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):  Are there foods chosen from each food
group?
1) Ask the students what the food groups are.  Why did you choose these foods?
2) Write the names of each food group on a separate  Are here a variety of colors, textures?
envelope.  How much might it cost?
3) Hand out paper to each student.  Was it a good decision? Why or why not?
4) Have each student draw a different food (tell 9) You can also have the students illustrate their
them to be creative). Try not to have them re- menus if you have the time and resources.
peat foods too much.
5) When they are done tell them to think about Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
what food group they belong to.
6) Have each student come up, on at a time, and  What other things can you use the same decision
put their food into the envelop they think their making steps on in your daily life?
food belongs to.
7) Open each envelope and show the foods to the class.
8) Ask the students if it is correct or not – if it isn’t, Health Advertisements
ask where it belongs.
Topic: Consumer Awareness/Health
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: from this activity?): To analyze health advertise-
ments to determine how they attract buyers and
 Why are the food groups important to know about?
what students should be aware of.
 Ask the students which food groups they eat from
Number of Students: 10-30
the most.
Age Range of Students: 13-17
 Discuss the reasons for having different daily
servings for different groups. Time Required: 1 hr
Materials: Several health ads for magazines or news-
papers, Questions worksheet, Pencils, Chalkboard/
Menu Planning whiteboard/flip chart

Topic: Nutrition, Decision Making


Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To plan a nutrition meal based 1) Talk about different methods advertisers use to
on good decision making. get people to buy their product (creating a need/
Number of Students: 5-30 desire, working on different emotions).
Age Range of Students: 8 – 17 2) Divide into groups of three or four.
Time Required: 20 minutes

152
3) Give each group several advertisements and each 7) Ask students how this changes their ideas of ad-
student a question worksheet. vertisements they see and what they gained from
4) Explain that they must look at each add and fill the lesson.
out the work sheet (answer the questions)
5) After everyone is done have them present their Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
advertisements and results to the class.
6) Have the class discuss what they found if they  Ask students how they would advertise such prod-
have any opinions that differ and/or are the ucts, if they would change anything etc.
same.

Student Worksheet

Questions to Evaluate Consumer Health Advertisements

1. What product is being sold? ...............................................................................................


.................................................................................................................................

2. What is the purpose of the ad? ...........................................................................................


.................................................................................................................................

3. Who should buy this product? ............................................................................................


.................................................................................................................................

4. What psychological approach is used to increase sales of this product, i.e., heighten emotions like fear or
love, satisfy present needs, promise quick cure or results, create a need or desire? ...........................
.................................................................................................................................

5. How reliable is the source of the ad for health information? .......................................................


.................................................................................................................................

6. Which statements about the product are true? . ......................................................................


.................................................................................................................................

7. What important information is missing? ................................................................................


.................................................................................................................................

8. What are the product ingredients? ......................................................................................


.................................................................................................................................

9. What are the health benefits of the product, if any? .................................................................


.................................................................................................................................

10. Are there any negative or side effects for consumers to consider? ................................................
.................................................................................................................................

11. What is the credibility of the product manufacturer? ................................................................


.................................................................................................................................

12. How were the product’s features enhanced to improve its appeal to you (e.g., use of an attractive spokes-
person or athlete, make-up, food styling, special photographic techniques)? ...................................
.................................................................................................................................

13. How would you change the advertisement to benefit consumers? .................................................
.................................................................................................................................

153
Advertisement Methods TV Talk
Topic: Consumer Health/Awareness Topic: Consumer Awareness
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To make students aware of meth- from this activity?): To make a commercial for a
ods used by advertisements. healthy product and demonstrate reasons why the
Number of Students: 10-30 product is healthy.
Age Range of Students: 13-17 Number of Students: 5-30
Time Required: 1hr Age Range of Students: 15 and under
Materials: Magazine ads (at least two for each group), Time Required: 45 minutes – 1 hour
Worksheet, Pens/pencils, Blackboard/whiteboard/ Materials: Large cardboard box, Wire coat hanger
flipchart, Example ad; Optional: Flipchart paper, and/or tinfoil, Scissors, Markers; Optional: Paint,
Markers Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Chalk/markers

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

1) Students are given a vocabulary of relevant terms 1) Before class or with your class on another day,
- basic message, visual image, medium, catchy make a fake TV set with a cardboard box and
words, testimonial, bandwagon, positive appeal, coat hangers and/or tinfoil. You can paint it if
negative appeal, product character, product slo- you want.
gan, product comparison, and repetition. 2) Make sure that the front and the back is cut out.
2) Make sure they understand the terms (use an ex- 3) During class, ask students to come up with a list
ample ad and as a class point out the techniques of healthy products.
use). 4) Write them on the board if you have one avail-
3) Divide class into groups of three or four. able.
4) Give each group several magazine advertise- 5) Tell the students to divide into pairs.
ments. 6) Ask the pairs to choose on of the healthy products
5) Have the group talk about the advertisements thought of by the class.
and fill out the work sheet about the advertise- 7) They must create a small commercial advertising
ment. that healthy product.
6) Have each group present their findings to the 8) In the commercial they must cover the following:
class.  What is the product?
7) Discuss each group’s findings as a class.  What kind of product is it?
 What do you use it for?
Magazine Ads  Why is it a healthy product?
 Why would someone want to buy this
Name: ................................................... product?
Date: .................................................... 9) Give the pairs at least 10 – 15 minutes to create
their commercial.
Teacher: . ............................................... 10) After everyone is finished, have each pair come to the
Brand Name and Product:............................. “TV” and perform their commercial to the class.
11) After each commercial, ask the class the same
Medium: ................................................. questions the commercial was supposed to answer.
Basic Message: .........................................
Visual Image: ........................................... Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

Catchy Words: ..........................................  How often do you see commercials for healthy
products? Why do you think that is?
Technique Used and Why: ............................
Technique Used and Why: ............................
Warning! Dangerous Products!
Technique Used and Why: ............................
Topic: Decision Making, Substance Abuse
Persuasion Rating (1 - 5):.............................
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
(1 = Yawn. 5 = I’m sold on this product!) from this activity?): To look at warning labels on dan-
gerous products.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: 15 and under
 Talk about the negative and positive effects of Time Required: 30 – 35 minutes in class, several days
these types of approaches to advertising. Dis- out of class
cuss television commercials and apply the same Materials: Poster board/large paper for each group
terms. + one, Markers, Notebook, Pen/pencil, Blackboard/
whiteboard/flipchart, Chalk/markers; Optional:
Magazines, Scissors, Glue, Paper

154
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 3) Give each group poster board/large paper and
markers.
1) Previous to this activity, ask students to find 4) Assign each group a product or product category.
three “warning labels” on household products. 5) Tell the groups to make an advertisement for
Have them write down what the labels say and their product, advertising all the reasons one
bring them to class. may need that product.
2) Warning labels can be found on cigarettes, alco- 6) Give the groups about 15 minutes for this.
hol, cleaning supplies, medicine etc.
7) After everyone has finished, have groups present
3) Before class make a poster with the word “WARN- their product and try to “sell” it to the class.
ING” in large letters.
8) After each presentation, ask the class questions
4) Ask the students to read their warning labels. about the advertisement:
5) Write examples of warning labels on the board.  Was it “eye catching”?
6) Ask the class why these products have warning  Were people in the advertisement enjoy-
labels. ing the product?
7) Ask the class if warning labels are a good idea. Why  What were the reasons for using this product?
or why not? Write down their reason on the board.  Are they any other reasons you can think of?
8) Ask the class if there are any other products that  Was everything in the advertisement true?
don’t have warning labels that should have them 9) If you have room, tape the posters on the walls
(be creative!).
9) Split the class into groups of 4 or 5. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
10) Give each group poster board/large paper and
markers.  What are some differences between advertise-
11) Tell the students they must now think of a prod- ments for healthy and unhealthy products?
uct that needs a warning label and make a warn-  Do advertisements for unhealthy products tell
ing label for that product (cannot be a product the truth? Why or why not?
that already has a warning label).
12) Give them 10 – 15 minutes.
13) Have the groups present their warning labels to
Smart Shopper Sweep
the class. Topic: Consumer Health, Decision Making
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: from this activity?): To discuss the difference be-
tween healthy and unhealthy products and decide
 Do you think warning labels say enough? Why or which products belong in which group.
why not?
Number of Students: 5-30
 What products do you think need the most warn-
Age Range of Students: 8- 13
ing labels? Why?
Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes
Materials: Two signs – Healthy and Unhealthy, Empty
Advertiser for the Day product packages (as many as you can collect); Op-
tional: 2 baskets/boxes, Blackboard/whiteboard/
Topic: Consumer Health, Decision Making flipchart, Chalk/markers
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To discuss making decisions to
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
use good products by creating advertisements for
healthy products. 1) A week before the class, ask students to collect
Number of Students: 10-30 as many empty packages of different products as
Age Range of Students: 15 and under they can and bring them to the next class. Differ-
Time Required: 45 minutes - 1 hour ent products may include:
Materials: Poster board/large paper (for each group),  Food cans
Markers, Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Chalk/  Detergent
markers; Optional: Tape  Cigarette packages
 Shampoo
 Candy wrappers
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 Milk containers
 Juice boxes
1) Ask your students to think of healthy products
 Cereal boxes
and write their suggestions on the board. Exam-
 Tomato paste jars
ples might be:
 Cookie boxes
 Health foods or snacks
 Soda bottles
 Exercising equipment
 Water bottles
 Educational toys
2) Ask the students to bring their packages up to the
 Books
front of the room and put them on a table.
 Clothing
 Vacations 3) Ask students what the difference between a
2) Divide the class into groups of 4 or 5. healthy and an unhealthy product.
4) If you have a board, write these ideas down.

155
5) Bring out two signs, “healthy” and “unhealthy” advertiser wants their money. Most of the time,
and put them on another table at different ends advertisers offer good products. Sometimes, the
(if you have baskets or boxes, put those on each products are unhealthy or bad.
side of the table). 2) Ask the students to get into pairs.
6) Ask students to come up one at a time and place 3) Lay out piles of old magazines around the room.
a product in the place they think it belongs. 4) Have students cut out magazine advertisements.
7) There may be some tricky ones (like detergent or (e.g. food, medicine, toys, clothing, cigarettes,
other cleaning materials), so let there be room alcohol, etc.)
for debate. 5) After everyone has finished, tell them to bring their
8) When all the products are placed, ask the class if advertisements to the front of the classroom.
they agree with where they are. 6) Tell the class they are going to judge the adver-
9) Discuss any disagreements. tisements.
10) Review the difference between healthy and un- 7) Hold the advertisements up for everyone to see
healthy products. and have the class vote on whether an item is
healthy or unhealthy.
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: 8) Have two students at the chalkboard keep a count
of advertisements in each group.
 Why would you want to choose healthy products 9) You can also come up with your own categories to in-
and not unhealthy products? spire discussion. (e.g. Necessities vs. Luxuries, etc.)
 What kind of harm could unhealthy products do? 10) You could also discuss particular advertisements
 What are the positives of healthy products? in more detail. For example:
 Could some products be both healthy and unhealthy?  Does the ad tell the whole truth about the
product?
 Could the product hurt your health in any
Ad Court way?
 Does the ad tell any bad things about the
Topic: Consumer Awareness, Decision Making product?
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To raise awareness about differ-
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
ent types of healthy and unhealthy products adver-
tised in magazines.  Do you think there should be laws about what ad-
Number of Students: 5-30 vertisements can and cannot say?
Age Range of Students: 10 and under  What type of people do you think these ads try
Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes to reach?
Materials: Magazines, Scissors, Blackboard/white-  Why do you think they try to reach this type of
board/flipchart, Chalk/markers audience?
 Are there also positive ways you can use adver-
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): tisements? What are some examples?

1) Explain to your students that advertisements on


TV and signs in magazines are there because the

156
Fitness

157
158
Cardiovascular Fitness Plan inducing the heart to beat harder and faster; doctors
recommend people exercise at least 3 times a week
Topic: Fitness for 20 minutes at minimum each time.”
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 4) Divide the class into groups of three or four and
from this activity?): To demonstrate the importance have them brainstorm different ideas for cardio-
of cardiovascular activity to children and to help vascular exercise regimens (check on them to
them design their own fitness plan. make sure they are correct).
Number of Students: 10-30 5) Have each group record their ideas on a piece of
Age Range of Students: 10-17 flip chart paper.
Time Required: 1– 2 hours 6) When they are done, have each group present
their ideas to the class.
Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Markers,
7) Hand out week-by-week schedule sheets.
Flip-chart paper, Scratch paper for each group, Day-
by-day weekly schedule guides, An example schedule 8) Have the students choose one of the activities for
their daily schedule.
9) Encourage the students to organize themselves to
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): participate in group activities, like soccer.
1) Talk to students about their favorite sportsmen and 10) Encourage the students to take home the sched-
how exercise plays an important role (5-10 minutes). ules and follow them.
2) Introduce the concept of “cardiovascular activ-
ity” and explain the benefits. For example: Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 It increases muscular strength.
 It increases endurance.  Have the students return with their schedules af-
 It clarifies your mental processes. ter a few weeks with checkmarks for every time
 It improves your quality of life. they were able to do the daily activity. Discuss in
 It can even extend your life. class the ease/difficulty of making the activity a
3) As a group, define and discuss cardiovascular activity. part of their daily schedule. Adjust if necessary.
“It is exercise that strengthens the heart by regularly

Weekly Schedule

Day Monday Tuesday Wednessay Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

Week 5

Week 6

159
Strengthening Your Heart 2) Divide the students into groups of 4-5.
3) Put each group at a station:
Topic: Fitness  Jumping jacks – Station 1
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain from  Running in place – Station2
this activity?): To learn to take your own pulse, explain  Hopping on one leg – Station 3
how exercise strengthens the heart, and understand  Push ups – Station 4
that smoking and laziness weaken the heart.  Sit-ups – Station 5
Number of Students: 10-50 4) Go through each station and demonstrate the ac-
Age Range of Students: All ages tivity.
Time Required: 30 minutes 5) Instruct the students to do an activity at for one
minute and then switch stations.
Materials: Prior knowledge of how to take a pulse
6) Continue rotating until everyone has gone through
all of the stations.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 7) After each exercise, the students should monitor
and record their pulse rate.
1) Teach the students how to take their pulse, feel-
8) Explain that the heart pumps blood throughout
ing for the carotid artery or radial pulse. This will
the body. When a person takes their pulse, it is
take some time. Demonstrate how to find it.
the pumping of the blood that they are feeling.
2) Once the students can feel their pulse, ask them
A person can exercise their heart by engaging in
if their heart beat is fast or slow. You can also ask
cardiovascular activity. A quickening pulse is evi-
them to count the beats per second. Explain to
dence of the heart working hard.
them that their heartbeat is at a normal resting
9) You should stretch before and after this activity.
rate, so it should be steady.
3) Explain that the heart is a muscle so when stu-
dents exercise their heart, it becomes stronger. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
4) Explain that their hearts are as big as their fists
 What kind of activities can you do at home to make
and pump blood through their bodies. Discuss the
your heart stronger? At school? After school?
importance of a strong heart.
5) Have the students open and close their fists to
represent their hearts, clenching slowly at first, Types of Exercise
then increasingly faster to simulate the heart
when exercising. Topic: Fitness
6) Have the students exercise (doing jumping jacks, Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
run in place, etc) then take their pulses again. from this activity?): To describe different types of
7) Have them model their hearts with their fists exercise and how they help the body.
again. They should be clenching their fists fairly Number of Students: 10-30
quickly now. Age Range of Students: All ages
8) Now have the students model what happens after Time Required: 45 minutes – 1 hour
smoking and laziness by making a weak fist and
Materials: Poster, Markers, Slips of paper; Optional:
opening and closing it very, very quickly. Com-
Blackboard/flipchart/whiteboard, Tape
ment that the stronger the heart is, the less and
slower it has to work.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: 1) Divide the poster (before class) into different
sections, each section representing the three
 Have students come up with exercise and activity
types of exercise: cardio, strength building, and
that helps make the heart strong.
flexibility.
 Talk about heart disease with older students.
2) Ask the students to give examples of each type
of exercise from daily life (sweeping, carrying
Exercise Circuit Training water, pulling weeds, laundry, etc) Act out the
dialing activities to enforce your point.
Topic: Fitness Cardio – relates to the heart and the pulse, ex-
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain ercise regimen meant to strengthen the heart
from this activity?): To be able to complete all ex- and endurance
ercise circuit activities, take your own pulse, and
explain that exercise strengthens the heart and the Strength building – Muscles put on the bones. If
leg, arm and stomach muscles. this action is repeated, the body adds miner-
als where the bone is pulled and that part of
Number of Students: 10-30
the body is strengthened
Age Range of Students: All ages
Time Required: 1 hour Flexibility – the ability to move, to stretch and
to relax
Materials: Prior knowledge of how to take a pulse
3) Have the students find their pulse. Demonstrate
the effects of cardio exercise by doing twenty
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
jumping jacks and then feeling the pulse again.
1) Teach the students how to take their pulses.

160
4) Explain the reasons behind soreness. This “pain”  should be done at least 3-4 times/week
is often associated with coming down with a (cardio)
cold.  brings oxygen and blood to all parts of the
5) Cut small strips of paper that describe the ben- body (cardio)
efits of exercise and lay them face down on the  lack of this kind of exercise weakens the
table. heart (cardio)
6) Divide the papers between the students at ran-  takes waste away more quickly (cardio)
dom.  strengthens bones (strength-building)
7) Have the students apply them to the appropriate  examples are lifting and carrying (strength-
section of the poster. Examples: building)
 strengthens the heart and lungs (cardio)  can aid in digestion (cardio)
 increases energy (cardio)  prevents pain (flexibility)
 helps you sleep better (cardio)  reduces stiffness and pain (flexibility)
 burns fat (cardio)  increases range of motion (flexibility)
 prevents illness and disease (cardio)  helps with balance and coordination (flex-
 makes you stronger (strength-building) ibility)
 helps you feel happier/decreases stress  part of cooling down and warming up
(cardio) (flexibility)

161
162
Gender Issues

163
164
Gender Picture Codes  Power
 Cooking
and Role Plays  Love
Topic: Gender Roles  Sports
 Active in church
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
 Religion
from this activity?): To learn and discuss what gender
 Strength
roles are and what are the gender roles in Georgia.
 Pregnancy
Number of Students: 10-30  Money
Age Range of Students: 12 and up  Work
Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes  Breast feeding
Materials: Two cards “Female” and “Male”, Tape,  Violence
Gender Cards (see next page), Optional: Box/jar,  Beauty
Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Markers/chalk  Doctor
 Nurse
 Control
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 Serving others
 Working the garden
1) Make two large cards, “Female” and “Male” before
 Chopping firewood
class. Tape them on opposite walls of the classroom.
 Raising the children
2) Make at least one “gender card” for each student.
 Powerless or helpless
You can have more than that if you would like.
 Driving a vehicle
3) If you have a board, put the phrase “Gender Roles”  Digging graves
down and ask the class to define this term.  Caring for the sick
4) If you do not have a board, discuss the meaning of  Earning money
“gender roles”.  Wearing long hair
5) Give each student at least one gender card.  Smoking
6) Tell them that when you say go, they must put  Drinking alcohol
their card on the wall they think it belongs on, AS  Owning a home
FAST AS THEY CAN!!!  Living alone
7) You can either have them tape the cards up, or  Taking care of animals
just put them in a box or pile.  Politics
8) After everyone has their card in place, ask them
to sit back down.
Gender vs. Sex
9) Read the cards on each side.
10) Ask the group if they agree on all the cards and Topic: Gender Issues
their placing. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
11) Allow this to spark debate among the class. from this activity?): To learn the difference between
12) You can change the cards if everyone agrees. “gender” and “sex”.
13) The discussion may take a long time. You may al- Number of Students: 5-30
low any amount of time you would like. If they Age Range of Students: 12 and up
are having a hard time talking about it, try to
Time Required: 30-45 minutes
ask additional questions like “Do you know any
friends or family members who don’t fit the roles Materials: Two signs “Female” and “Male”, Gender
given to each sex?” cards (at least one for each student), Blackboard/
whiteboard/flipchart, Markers/chalk; Optional: Pre-
made definition of sex and gender (saves time)
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 What is a gender stereotype? Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):


 Can you think of any gender stereotypes in Georgia?
1) Before class, tape the three signs, “Female”,
 Are these stereotypes negative or positive?
“Male” and “Both” on opposite walls in the class-
 Why do you think gender roles are made? room, with “Both” on the middle wall.
 Can you think of how gender roles differ in dif- 2) Talk briefly about the term “gender roles” with
ferent cultures? the class.
3) Give each student at least one “gender card”.
Gender Card Suggestions 4) Tell the students that they must read their card and
decide whether it belongs under “Male”, “Female”
 Leadership or in the middle if it’s both, depending on if they
 Education are physically or biologically able to do the task.
 Building a house
5) Make sure they are clear on what physical and
 Intelligence
biological capabilities are before you start.
 Family decisions
 Weak 6) When you say “go” they should put their card
 Stealing where they think it belongs.
 Decision making 7) It may look like this:
 Authority Female: pregnancy, breast feeding

165
Male: strength, facial hair 10) After each role play, lead a discussion on the gen-
der issues portrayed in the role play.
Both: marriage, education, leadership
11) Hold up the picture for the whole group to see.
8) After everyone is done, have the students sit 12) Deal with any issues not covered by the group.
back down.
9) Based on the exercise, ask the group to process
what “sex” and “gender” means. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
10) What are the differences between the two terms?  What did you think of the ideas discussed today?
11) Write the definitions of “sex” and “gender” on  Do you think there is anything in the culture that
the board (or produce pre-made definitions). needs to be changed to produce healthier lives?
12) Emphasize that gender is something influenced  What would you change?
by culture and other outside influences, and sex
 Can it be changed? How?
is something that is biological.

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Gender and Culture: Ideal Images


and Personal Destroyers
 Do girls communicate differently than boys?
 Are girls able to make decisions as much as boys? Topic: Gender Roles, Community Awareness, Self-
 How does this relate to gender roles? Awareness
 How are relationships different for boys and girls? Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
 Are consequences different for boys and girls? from this activity?): To list the “ideal images” of gen-
 How do Georgian gender roles differ from those der for their society and identify ways in which those
in other countries? stereotypes can be limiting or used to pressure a per-
son into behaving a certain way.
Number of Students: 10-30
Gender Picture Role Plays Age Range of Students: 12 and up
Topic: Gender Issues Time Required: 1 hour
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Mak-
from this activity?): To describe some gender issues ers/chalk; Optional: Paper, Pens/paper
in the community, their consequences, and identify
possible alternatives to traditional gender roles. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Number of Students: 10-30
Age Range of Students: 12 and up 1) Ask the class to break up into small groups of 4 or 5.
2) Tell them they are to discuss what they think is the
Time Required: 1 hour
“ideal image” of each sex in their community.
Materials: Gender pictures (one for each group),
3) They can write down their ideas on a piece of paper.
Paper/pens/pencils; Optional: Props for role plays,
Magazines, Scissors 4) After about five or ten minutes, bring the groups
back together and have them tell the rest of the
class what they came up with.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): 5) Write down the ideas on the board.
1) Before the class, prepare pictures of a scene with 6) Allow discussion.
various gender stereotypes. You can either draw 7) Ask the class to go back to their groups.
this or cut pictures out of a magazine. 8) This time have them discuss how easy it is to live
2) For added time or creativity, you can have stu- up to the expectations of their community.
dents look through magazines themselves to look 9) After about five or ten minutes, have them return
for a scene. to the class.
3) Divide the class into groups of four or five (mix 10) Discuss as a class and write down their ideas on
the genders if you can). the board.
4) Give each group a gender picture. 11) Point on the gaps between expectations and reality.
5) Tell the groups that they must identify the gender 12) Explain that these ideals can sometimes become
issues at work in the picture as a group. personal destroyers. For example, the idea that
6) Tell the groups to discuss the situation together: women must stay at home may discourage them
what are the differences in the roles of men and from going to university and starting a career.
women in the scene? What might be some of the 13) Have the group now think about how some of the
consequences of these roles? What is positive ideals can be personal destroyers.
about them? For whom? Negative? For whom? 14) Have them get into their groups again and write
7) Tell the groups they must now develop a role play down their ideas.
based on the situation depicted in the picture. 15) Discuss as a class.
They must act out exactly what is happening in
the picture, or basically bring the image to life. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
8) Give the groups at least 10 or 15 minutes to de-
velop their role play.  Ask the class to state one ideal image they want
9) After they are done, have them perform for the to strive for, and another they consider a per-
whole class. sonal destroyer.

166
Gender Stereotype Pictures 7) After they are done, have the groups switch with
each other, so that now those who drew a woman
Topic: Gender Issues have a man picture and those who drew a man
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain have a woman picture.
from this activity?): To examine Georgian gender 8) Tell the groups they must now label all of the
stereotypes, discuss exceptions to those stereotypes stereotypes they find in the picture.
and to identify negative stereotypes that may need 9) This can take a long time, so be sure to monitor
to be changed. and encourage them not to go into too much de-
Number of Students: 6-30 tail.
Age Range of Students: 12 and up 10) After everyone is done, have each group present
Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes their picture.
11) Write down their ideas on the board as they pres-
Materials: Large paper or flipchart paper for each
ent.
group, Makers/pens/colored pencils, Tape, Black-
board/whiteboard/flipchart, Makers/chalk 12) After everyone is done presenting, ask the class
to read the list on the board.
13) Ask them to think about what are negative and
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): positive stereotypes.
1) Write down the term “gender stereotype” on the 14) After a few minutes of thinking, ask them to
board. share their ideas.
2) Discuss with the class possible definitions. 15) Circle those they see as negative and put a star
next to those they think are positive
3) Divide the class into groups of 3 or for (make sure
there is an even amount of groups). 16) Leave room for discussion.
4) Give each group a large piece of paper and mak- 17) After you are done, ask the class to tell you why
ers/pens/colored pencils. they think the negative ones are negative.
5) Tell half the groups they must draw the stereo- 18) Have them get into groups and write down ideas
typical Georgian male, and another group to on how to change three of the negative stereo-
draw a stereotypical female (if you have a good types.
number of boys and girls, divide them according 19) Have everyone share and discuss their ideas with
to sex and have the boys draw a women and the the group.
girls draw a man. Also, be sure to have them draw
someone their age. If they older, have them draw Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
an older person, if they are teens, a teenager.
6) Tell the groups that they must also include as  Are there common gender stereotypes within dif-
many stereotypes they can think of in the pic- ferent cultures? Give some examples.
ture.

167
168
Smoking and
Substance Abuse

169
170
Smoking Advertisement Methods Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

Topic: Smoking, Consumer Awareness 1) Divide into groups of four or five.


Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 2) Give each group a large piece of paper, marker,
from this activity?): To help students recognize meth- pencil, ruler and list of statistics.
ods used by cigarette companies to bring in buyers, 3) Show example graph and explain how to chart the
to help students analyze advertisements and find information.
faults in the advertisements (cigarettes don’t make 4) Have each group make a graph of the statistics
you beautiful). they have (you can also give each group differ-
Number of Students: 5-30 ent statistics, or make pie charts or other charts
Age Range of Students: 9-17 instead).
5) Give each group 20-30 minutes to complete the
Time Required: 30 min
task.
Materials: Several cigarette advertisements , Black-
6) After they are finished, have the groups tape
board/whiteboard/flipchart, Markers/chalk
their graphs to the wall.
7) Have each group explain their graph and tell what
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): their graph shows.
8) Have a brief discussion about what the charts ad-
1) Divide groups into four or five with large groups.
dress and what it means to them.
2) Give each group copy of cigarette advertisement
9) You can also have the charts posted in the school
and sheet with questions: Is the ad colorful? What
halls or club room so others can see.
is pictured in the ad? What age would like this ad?
What do you think the ad is saying? What do you
think the ad is trying to say about cigarettes? Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
3) Give students 10 – 15 minutes to discuss the ques-
tions and write down answers.  You can have different graphs and compare infor-
mation, trying to relate the two parts of informa-
4) Have each group present their advertisement and
tion (more smoking leads to more lung cancer, or
the answers to the questions – write them down
more deaths)
on the board.
 You can work with your group to make one big
5) After each presentation have group add any thoughts
chart to display in school or club
they have, any disagreements or agreements.
6) After all the presentations, talk about what cigarettes
are known to do (bad breath, lung cancer, death, Anti-Smoking Posters
bad teeth, etc) and write them on the board.
7) Discuss if the advertisements match the facts Topic: Smoking
about cigarettes. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To help students express what
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: they think about smoking and its affects.
Number of Students: 5-30
 Regulations on advertisements Age Range of Students: 6 – 17
 Who advertisements are targeting and who they Time Required: 1 hour
should target Materials: Poster board (or large paper), Mark-
 Where advertisements are, how many they are ers/crayons/colored pencils, Pencils, Pens, Rulers,
compared to other advertisements Example poster; Optional: Glitter, Glue, Stickers,
 Why would advertisements want to target the Yarn, Other decorative materials (use your creative
young? side!!!)

Smoking Graphs Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):

Topic: Smoking 1) Divide into groups of 3 or 4.


Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 2) Have a five minute discussion and ask for adjec-
from this activity?): To learn and analyze smoking tives or images they think of when they think of
statistics, turn numbers into a visual product, bring smoking and its effects.
awareness to smoking problems. 3) Give each group a poster board, markers, crayons
Number of Students: 5-30 or colored pencils, pencils, ruler.
Age Range of Students: 10-17 4) Show an example poster (maybe one done in the
states, one that you have come across that you
Time Required: 1 hour
like, or even your own).
Materials: Statistics on smokers and age in Georgia 5) Allow the rest of the time period (except for 10
or other statistics (in number form), Large pieces of minutes at the end) to create a poster express-
paper for each group, Rulers for each group, Pencils, ing their thoughts on smoking and the effects it
Pens, Markers for each group (one black, one red), has (on people and in their lives). Emphasize that
Tape, Example chart; Optional: Glitter, Glue, Stick- the posters should express to children why not to
ers, Colored markers/pencils or crayons, Yarn, Other smoke.
decorative materials to make the graphs pretty (use
your creative side!!!)

171
6) After the groups are done, have each group make Ways to Say “No”
a small presentation of the poster.
7) You can hang posters in the school or have them
The Polite Way -
take them home if you would like.
 Do you want a cigarette?
 No thank you. I don’t smoke
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Be Funny -
 Compare/contrast posters to cigarette advertise-
 Do you want a cigarette?
ments.
 Yeah right, I’d rather shove a basketball
 Discuss how images affect views (for older
up my nose
group).
 Maybe have a poster contest in your community Show Your Knowledge -
(you can also expand this to other substances and
 Just try a drag and see what you think
Topics, such as drugs, alcohol or HIV/AIDS).
 No thanks. I don’t want to. Just thinking
about breathing in 40 chemicals makes me
Puppet Role Play sick. It isn’t my idea of a good time.

Topic: Smoking, How to Say “No” Echo Technique


Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain  Do you want a smoke?
from this activity?): To have students practice situa-  No thanks.
tions where they will encounter smoking offers and  Come on!
how to say no.  No thanks.
Number of Students: 10-30  You aren’t afraid are you?
 No thanks
Age Range of Students: 10 – 17
Time Required: 1 – 1.5 hours Leave
Materials: Paper with people cut outs (one for each  Check it out. I’ve got some smokes. Want
child), Markers/colored pencils/crayons, Sticks (one one?
for each child), Tape, Scissors, Blackboard/white-  No thanks, I have to go now.
board/flipchart, List of “ways to say no” (one for
each child), List of situations and way to say no(one Too Busy
for each group); Optional: Yarn (for hair), Glitter,  Check out. I’ve got some smokes. Want
Other decorative materials one?
 (continue what you were doing, or quietly
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): leave) You can also say, “I’m busy”

1) Hand out “ways to say no” paper. Strength in Numbers


2) Explain each way to the class.  Make friends who have the same opinion
3) Divide into groups of 4-5. as you. It’s a lot easier to say “no” when
4) Give each group a list of situations and a way to you have friends who agree with you.
say no, people cut outs (one for each member),
sticks (one for each member), makers/colored Smoking Lungs
pencils/crayons, scissors and tape.
5) Explain to groups how to make their puppet. Topic: Smoking
6) Explain to groups to read their situation and to Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
practice acting out the situation and the way to from this activity?): To show kids the effects of smok-
say no with their puppets. ing on the lungs.
7) Allow 30 minutes to decorate and practice with Number of Students: 5-30
their puppet (make sure they stay on task and Age Range of Students: 10 – 17
don’t spend all time on the puppets).
Time Required: 30 min
8) Have each group present and act out the situa-
tion/way to say no to the class. Materials: Empty plastic litter bottle, Cigarette,
Clay/a lot of gum, Nail/knife, Picture of lungs
9) Have the class try to guess which way to say no
the group used.
10) Have a brief discussion on the ways to say no af- Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
terwards.
1) Briefly discuss how the lungs work.
2) Have everyone stand back a bit (maybe put on a
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: scientist act, like Bill Nye the Science Guy or a
mad scientist).
 Have students pick their favorite way to say no.
3) Fill bottle partway with water (two inches).
 Discuss the advantages/disadvantages of each
way to say no. 4) Cut a hole at the top of the bottle.
 Ask if anyone has used any of the ways to say no. 5) Put a cigarette in the mouth of the bottle, and
stick it there with gum or clay.
 Have students come up with their own situa-
tions.

172
6) Light the cigarette and pump the bottle like Smoking Surveys
lungs.
7) Wait until big amount smoke builds up. Topic: Smoking, Community
8) Ask the class what is happening. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
9) Explain that’s how smoke gets into lungs. from this activity?): To bring awareness to smoking
10) Watch water to see if the color turns. problems in the community.
11) Have students smell the bottle (ew!). Number of Students: 5-30
12) Ask what students think about it and what they Age Range of Students: 14 -25
think it says about what smoking does to your Time Required: 30 minutes in class
lungs. Materials: Smoking statistics, Paper, Pen, Questions;
Optional: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 What other organs does smoking affect?
 Predict what lungs will look like after years of 1) Before class, look up smoking statistics for the
smoking world or in other countries.
 Show pictures of lungs after many years of smok- 2) Talk about some smoking statistics in the world or
ing and compare them with pictures of healthy other countries.
lungs 3) Ask students how many people they think smoke
 Explain cancer in their village/city.
4) Tell students to conduct a smoking survey in their
Example Smoking Lungs community.
5) Make sure to tell them to reassure the survey is
Step One: anonymous, and to be sensitive.
6) The next class, have the students calculate all
the results.
7) Ask them what they think this information
means.
8) Ask them if they can think of any community
project or action that would affect the greatest
number of people.
List of Suggested Questions
 Sex (male or female)
 Age
 Do you smoke?
 When did you start smoking?
 Why did you start smoking?
 Do you want to quit? Why/why not?
 Do you think smoking is healthy?
 Did you know that smoking can cause can-
cer and other diseases?
Step Two:  Do your friends smoke?
 Do other people in your family smoke?

Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

 Have students come up with a community action


plan to decrease the number of people smoking

Ways to Refuse a Cigarette


Topic: Saying No, Smoking
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To develop students’ refusal
skills.
Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: 10-17
Time Required: 15-30 minutes
Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart; Op-
tional: Markers, Flipchart paper, Handout with ways
to say no

173
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): stresses and pressures make people smoke and how
to counter those pressures.
1) Explain to the students that peer pressure and pres- Number of Students: 5-30
sure to do unhealthy things are heard to cope with.
Age Range of Students: 8-17
2) Show them all ways to say no (you can write this
Time Required: 30 minutes
on the board or hand out a paper).
Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Pen/
marker/chalk
Ways to Say “No”

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):


The Polite Way -
 Do you want a cigarette? 1) Brainstorm with kids and make a list of reasons
 No thank you. I don’t smoke why people smoke. There are many reasons why
people smoke such as stress, peer pressure, and
Be Funny - the desire to lose weight.
 Do you want a cigarette? 2) Once you have done this, counter each reason. That
 Yeah right, I’d rather shove a basketball is, explain why the reason is not such a good reason.
up my nose Various reasons and counter-reasons are as follows:
 People smoke because it makes them look
Show Your Knowledge - fashionable. (“If you smoke your teeth
 Just try a drag and see what you think will eventually turn yellow and no one
 No thanks. I don’t want to. Just thinking will want to kiss you. That’s not fashion-
about breathing in 40 chemicals makes me able!”)
sick. It isn’t my idea of a good time.  People smoke because it relaxes them.
(“Smoking makes it harder to breathe.
Echo Technique This can only add to stress. Also, smoking
 Do you want a smoke? causes cancer. That will certainly add to
 No thanks. stress!”)
 Come on!  People smoke because of peer-pressure
 No thanks. from friends and TV. (“Arm yourself with
 You aren’t afraid are you? facts so that you can explain to your friends
 No thanks why smoking is bad for your health. Also,
anyone who is really your friend won’t
Leave want you to do something that isn’t good
 Check it out. I’ve got some smokes. Want one? for you.”)
 No thanks, I have to go now. 3) Explain to kids that smoking is expensive. If a per-
son smokes a 300amd pack a day of cigarettes,
Too Busy they will spend about $200 in a year. You can go
 Check out. I’ve got some smokes. Want one? to and from Russia for that kind of money.
 (continue what you were doing, or quietly
leave) You can also say, “I’m busy” Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

Strength in Numbers  What are some ways you could help your friends
 Make friends who have the same opinion stop smoking?
as you. It’s a lot easier to say “no” when  Should there be new laws to help kids not to
you have friends who agree with you. smoke? If so, what laws would you want to see?

3) Take to students and start by having one try to


Cigarette Tar
persuade the other to smoke.
4) Replace smoking with other relevant issues (drink- Topic: Smoking
ing, stealing, cheating, fighting) Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
5) Have kids who are watching critique the role plays from this activity?): To recognize tar as the sticky,
and identify what worked well and what didn’t. brown, poisonous substance found in cigarettes.
Make sure every student gets a chance to say “no”. Number of Students: 5-30
Age Range of Students: 8-17
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Time Required: 30 minutes
 Have students come up with there own ways to Materials: An empty squeeze bottle, Two cotton balls,
say no if they can. Cigarette (filter less, if possible), Book of matches or
lighter, A lid from a jar

Why Smoking is Risky Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):


Topic: Smoking 1) Before class - Cut the opening in the nozzle of the
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain squeeze bottle large enough to snugly insert the
from this activity?): To understand what kinds of end of the cigarette.

174
2) Unscrew the top and stretch the cotton ball
across the top and around the threads like a fil-
ter. Secure the cotton ball by screwing the cap
back on the bottle.
3) Insert the (filter) end of the cigarette into the
opening of the bottle’s nozzle.
4) After discussing the hazards of smoking with the
class, show the class a clean cotton ball. Explain
that the cotton ball will represent the healthy tis-
sue of a non-smoker’s lungs. Allow the students
to handle, observe, and pass around the cotton
ball.
5) While the cotton ball is being passed around,
bring out the “smoker’s lung” device. Explain
that this will represent a smoker. The cotton ball
inside is the lungs. The smoker will smoke one
cigarette, and then the class will have the op-
Tarred Lungs
portunity to observe the damage to the lungs.
Topic: Smoking
6) Light the cigarette. (Do this demonstration near
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
an open window.) Squeeze and release the bottle
from this activity?): To show students what tar does
in a methodical fashion to draw air into the ciga-
to lungs.
rette and thus “smoke” it. Use the jar lid as a
makeshift ashtray. Number of Students: 5-30
7) After the cigarette has been “smoked” to within Age Range of Students: All ages
about an inch of the bottle nozzle’s opening, put Time Required: 30 minutes
the cigarette out. Allow the remnants of smoke Materials: Cotton balls, Plastic bag, Rubber band,
to escape out the window. Straw
8) Allow students to gather around for purposes of
observation. Unscrew the bottles’ nozzle and re- Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
move the cotton ball (alias “lung tissue”).
9) Ask the students, “How is this cotton ball differ- 1) Put wet cotton balls into a plastic bag and tie it
ent from the other cotton ball that we passed off with a rubber band.
around earlier?” (It has a brown color.) “What do 2) Put a straw through the rubber banded opening in
you think this brown substance is?” (tar) “What the top of the bag. The bag represents the lungs;
damage might tar cause in your lungs?” (lung can- the cotton balls represent the inside of the lungs;
cer, coughing, makes breathing difficult) and the straw represents the throat.
10) Allow students to personally inspect the stained 3) Blow smoke into the bag (or have a teacher do it)
cotton ball. in from of the students what color is the cotton
now? Since the cotton balls represent the inside
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: of the lungs, how does smoking affect the inside
of the lungs?
 A person who smokes about a pack of cigarettes 4) Discuss the negatives of smoking.
a day ingests nearly a quart of tar into his/her 5) Note: the bag cannot have any holes in it except
lungs during the course of a year. (If possible, where the straw enters.
bring a quart sized container into the classroom
to demonstrate.)
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

Diagram of Cigarette Tar Project  Discuss the cost of cigarettes and alcohol, and
brainstorm what else could be bought.

175
Drug Facts

WHAT IS A DRUG?

Here are some common characteristics of a drug.


1. potential for dependence
2. withdrawal symptoms if ceased
3. most develop tolerance
4. altered biological, mental, and behavioral effects
5. adverse health effects
6. sometimes illegal
7. unregulated, and may have dangerous chemicals in them
8. often common and easy to obtain

WHY PEOPLE USE DRUGS:

 peer pressure, desire to be like others, initiation into groups


 escape for troubles
 cannot stop, develop addiction or dependence
 trying to stay awake
 social customs, spiritual tradition
 genetic disposition
 self medication- of mental illness, other problems
 people always use drugs because they believe they get something out of it

COMMON DRUGS

CAFFEINE:

Caffeine is commonly found in coffee, tea, and chocolate. Caffeine is a type of stimulant, in other
words, in increases the heart rate, respiration, the autonomic system, and makes one feel like they
have more energy and are more awake. In small amounts and over short periods of time caffeine does
not have harmful effects, but over many years of drinking coffee it can have considerable health ef-
fects. A normal cup of filtered coffee has from 60 to 90 milligrams of caffeine. Despite its everyday
use by so many people, it is a true drug, therefore it can lead withdrawal symptoms if one suddenly
stops drinking coffee. This is usually noticed with as few as 1 to 3 or more cups per day. Commonly
people experience headaches, sleepiness, and irritability. With higher intake of caffeine, severe
headaches can occur and may persist for up to a week, along with the other symptoms.
Other potential health effects of caffeine and coffee are:
 liver damage
 stomach damage because coffee has a lot of acid
 discoloration of teeth
 dehydration, because coffee speeds up the digestive system and is a diuretic (increased
urine output), thus drinking a lot of coffee and working outside on a hot day is not a good
idea.
 Poor sleep/insomnia
 heart disease due to prolonged increased and unnatural activity
 for men only, the potential of impotence and decreased sperm count
Why do people WANT to drink coffee?”
 keeps them awake
 some people say, “I don’t wake up till I have my first cup of coffee.”
 tastes good
 tradition
 everyone else does it, why not?

176
How much is too much coffee?

As little as 1 to 3 cups of coffee can lead to withdraw symptoms like headaches and poor sleep.
Herbal tea, fresh fruit juice, healthy diet and exercise are great substitutes (naturally leads to in-
crease of energy).

NICOTINE:

Nicotine comes from tobacco. Tobacco originated in America and was only discovered about 400 years
ago. It was used by the Native America People only for spiritual purposes and was considered a very
special and powerful plant. When the Europeans began using the plant, they did not practice the
same caution as the Native Americans and quickly became addicted to it, and realizing they had a
potentially very profitable product, they began to export it to Europe. Now, hundreds of millions of
people are smoking and a global health is being seriously affected.
Cigarettes are about the only form people are exposed to the drug nicotine. Nicotine is, like caf-
feine, a stimulant. The heart rate in increased, loss of appetite, and a sense of relaxation or release
of tension may briefly be felt, until the desire for another cigarette is felt. The harmful effects of
cigarettes have been well documented by scientists for years. Many people think smoking is just a
habit and that they can stop any time they want. In truth, most people can not stop even if they want
to. About 70% to 80 % of people who smoke and have tried to stop, return to smoking in one year. So,
if you are thinking about smoking, you better real it is something you will probably be doing for the
rest of your life, whether you like it or not.

Why do people smoke?

 peer pressure, desire to look cool, or be liberal, free


 family does it
 cannot stop
 they think it helps with stress
 think it helps with weight reduction
 other reasons

Harmful effects caused by chronic cigarette smoking:

 bronchitis, pneumonia and worsened asthma chronic coughing and wheezing


 decreased lung capacity (more effort to breath same amount of air as normal, harder to
do strenuous work)
 lung cancer, and increase incidence of other cancers
 heart disease and strokes
 birth defects in children (if smoking while pregnant of possible exposure by mother to
second hand smoke)
 physical and psychological dependence
 decreased physical fitness
 decreased life span
 discoloration of hands and teeth
 for men, linked to impotence

Effects on non-smokers from second hand smoke can include:

 increased respiratory illnesses to babies up to 18 months of age


 increased chance for middle ear problems in children
 increase coughing and wheezing, worsened asthma in children
 low birth weights and lower survival rates in newborn babies due to smoking during preg-
nancy
 increased rates for cancer if chronically exposed to second hard smoke

Even Cigarettes without nicotine are a health concern because tobacco producers often use hundreds
of chemicals which interact with one another and actually form radiation. If you go to a home where
people smoke, you can take a GIGERCOU7NTER, and it will indicate above average RADIATION in a
person’s home. Imagine what this can do to your self and your children over many years

177
Alternatives to cigarettes?

 Here are some things to say to “friends” who want you to smoke:
 remind them that being athletic and smoking do not go together
 tell friends that its “cooler” to live longer and not have to hack up brown stuff every morn-
ing or get emphysema
 tell friends that dying early or getting lung cancer is not the best way to demonstrate how
to be a “man”
 tell girlfriends that truly free women do not get addicted to cigarettes

ALCOHOL

Description: Alcohol is the by-product of fermentation. It has been used by people for many thou-
sands of years. The first known beverage intentionally made for alcohol was Mead, or Honey Wine.
For thousands of years alcohol was more difficult to produce and was usually used for official func-
tions and especially religious rituals. As alcohol become easier to produce, more and more people
began to drink it and more problems began to arise. Only in the last century have doctors and scien-
tists understood the serious health problems associated with alcohol. Some ethnic groups have had
exposure to alcohol for thousands of years and their bodies can handle it better, but for other groups
it is fairly new and can affect them very severely.

Why do people drink?

1. Tradition, family does it


2. Peer pressure, expected to
3. Trying to feel good
4. “Denial of problems”
5. Depression, other mental health problems
6. Genetic disposition towards it
7. Others

Alcohol effects on the body include:

 slowing down the activity of the central nervous system


 slower reaction, loss of control over action, erratic behavior
 impaired thinking and judgment
 staggering, disorientation, moodiness, slurred speech, double vision
 vomiting and incontinence
 Unconsciousness, death due to respiratory paralysis
 Cancer of the mouth, esophagus or stomach, due to irritating effect of liquor
 Heart disease- enlarged heart, congestive heart failure
 Liver damage- cirrhosis, alcoholic hepatitis, cancer of the liver
 Ulcers and gastritis
 Damage to adrenal and pituitary glands
 Tolerance, physical and psychological dependence
 Birth defects due to alcohol consumption during pregnancy
 Other Problems
 Can stimulate depression, and mask mental health problems
 Can cause violence, increasing aggression
 Can cause depression, uncontrollable crying
 Maybe seen as shameful activity
 Could become a Problem Drinker or Alcohol Abuser, or Alcohol Dependent (see below)

Alcoholism:

Alcoholism is a disease characterized by the uncontrolled use of alcohol. The causes of alcoholism
may be a combination of genetic, environment, cultural, and psychological factors. ANYONE can be-
come an alcoholic, and alcoholics can recover from the disease but are never cured (in other words,
relapse will always be a risk). It is a serious disease which kills millions of people every year.

178
Possible symptoms of alcoholism:

 greater tolerance
 personality changes
 obvious uncontrolled drinking
 blackouts (cannot remember what happened to them)
 preoccupation with alcohol, drinking alone, shakes, malnutrition, high blood pressure
 depression
 broken blood vessels on nose, appears larger, broken engorged blood vessels in throat,
some alcoholics die when the blood vessels break and they drown in their own blood.

What are Alternatives to Alcohol?

 Spend more time with friends who do not drink.


 Coffee, teas, if you have to.
 If you must drink, drink beverages with less alcohol in them, like beer and wine, but re-
member they have the same potential for health problems and addiction.
 Drinking and being athletic do not go together

Drug Dependence (usually for more serious drugs): Possible signs

Biological-

1. Poor health, injuries


2. Malnutrition and dehydration
3. Restlessness, reflex action, insomnia, or increased sleep and torpor
4. Pin point or dilated pupils
5. Needle marks on arms
6. Development of common drug related disease, such as Hepatitis and AIDS

Behavioral-

1. Drunkenness, drowsiness, irrational behavior, over talkative, or overly silent


2. Overly isolative or socially withdrawn
3. Sharp reduction in school performance
4. Difficulty maintaining job, or other activities
5. Engaging in anti-social behavior such as; theft, violence, drug dealing, and maybe
6. Resulting in prison term
7. Changes in peer groups, friends
8. Daily life revolves around obtaining more drugs, other needs, even food may become secondary
9. Possession of drug paraphernalia, such as needles, pipes, etc.

Mental-

1. obsession on getting more of the drug, getting “high” again


2. personality changes, moodiness, overly aggressive or passive
3. poor judgment, irrational ideas and schemes, ignoring reality

Withdrawal symptoms if drug activity stops-

 excessive sleep
 increased heart rate, poor sleep, sweating, panting
 hallucinations, feeling like skin crawling
 increased blood pressure, stress on body
 headaches
 craving for more
 depression, anxiety, desperation, suicidal feelings or actions
 violent behavior

179
Alcohol Intoxication Simulations What is a drug?
Topic: Alcohol Topic: Drugs
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To understand the loss of coordi- from this activity?): To educate primarily about po-
nation and bodily control associated with drinking. tential harmful effects of common drugs in their envi-
Number of Students: 5-30 ronment. The main emphasis is primarily on caffeine,
Age Range of Students: All ages nicotine, and alcohol, and secondarily about cannabis,
cocaine, hallucinogens, narcotics and inhalants.
Time Required: 30 minutes
Number of Students: 5-30
Materials: None
Age Range of Students: 13-18
Time Required: 1 hour
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Materials: Poster board, larger paper, Several sets of
1) Have students divide into small groups. colored markers and/or crayons, Paper, Pens/pencils
2) One student volunteers first.
3) Student must extent arms out, away from body, Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
parallel to shoulders. With one hand at a time,
they must touch their nose. Have them notice 1) Start with a warm-up activity. A good idea might
how easy it was. be to go around the room and have each student
4) Now, blind fold student. talk about a time they saw either on TV or in their
own personal life, someone using drugs. How did
5) Student must spin around many times. Have some
it make them feel? Were they worried for the
other students present in a circle around spinning
person? Did drugs look interesting? How did the
person to protect them from falling.
person act once they got high?
6) After a minute or two, stop.
2) Presentation: What is a drug?
7) With blind fold on, student must repeat nose
3) Ask class first, and begin to make a list of what char-
touching exercise.
acteristics a drug has. How might someone on drugs
8) Have them note how much more difficult it is.
feel? What kind of drugs have you heard about?
4) Use given information to supplement the discussion.
Another Option 5) Ask class what they think about drug use. Are
they perceived as a group of people/individuals
1) Have student walk in straight line.
who need special medical treatment? Are they
2) Student spins rapidly for at least 30 seconds, sick? Why do they think that person uses drugs?
with students protecting them
3) Then, student must try to walk in a straight line,
with feet placed in a line, end to end. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
4) Have students note, before and after.  Small group drawing about why people use drugs:
Form class into small groups of 4-5 students. Ask
Yet Another Option students to draw and write about why they be-
lieve people use drugs. Have discussion.
1) Have students write with non-dominant hand.
2) Have them note how difficult it is.
Tell a Friend About It
Other ideas: Topic: Drugs, Alcohol, Community
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Simulate how seriously drinking can affect behaviors
from this activity?): To write a factual message about
by having students: -
staying drug and alcohol free.
 Talk with their mouths full of marsh mal-
lows (or other food). Number of Students: 10-50
 Run through a maze with one eye covered Age Range of Students: 10 and up
 Write with their non-dominate hand Time Required: 30 minutes – 1 hour
Materials: Paper or cardboard, Crayons, Pencils,
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Pens, Markers

 How does alcohol seriously affect a person’s be- Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
havior? Why would someone not be as coordi-
nated if they are under the influence of alcohol? 1) Talk to the students about the effects of drugs
Why would this be a problem? Can a person safely and alcohol.
drive a car if they have been drinking? Can they 2) Ask the students to write a letter to someone
do other activities safely? about this. This person can be someone they
want to stop using drugs and alcohol or a younger
sibling they want to warn about the effects of
drugs and alcohol.
3) Have students draw a picture about drugs and alco-
hol and write a message about drugs and alcohol.

180
4) When they are finished with the picture, have Alcohol and Drug Use Role Play
them turn the paper over and address it to the
person of their choice. Topic: Substance Abuse
5) Deliver it or mail it. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To think about and act out why
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: people chose to drink and/or do drugs.
Number of Students: 10-30
 Alter this activity by making a bulletin board or Age Range of Students: 13 and up
having a drawing contest for awareness. It may Time Required: 45 minutes – 1 hour
help to take a health worker along to explain the
Materials: Role play story (one for each group)
effects of drugs and alcohol

Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):


Caffeine
1) Have a discussion with the class why they think
Topic: Drugs people start doing drugs or drinking alcohol.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 2) Split the class into groups of 4 to 5.
from this activity?): To identify the effects of caf- 3) Give each group a role play card.
feine on the human body. 4) Tell the groups they must act out this role play
Number of Students: 5-30 the way they think it would happen.
Age Range of Students: All ages 5) Here is the story:
Time Required: 45 minutes Lasha’s Story
Materials: Several rubber balls or squeeze toys, Paste
pictures of food on a flipchart (a mixture of both caffeine Lasha, a fifteen year old boy, has been arrest-
filled foods/drinks and non-caffeinated foods/drinks) ed for breaking into a house and stealing a
television. He was drinking and smoking with
a gang of friends and they decided they need-
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): ed more money for their alcohol and drugs.
They made a plan to rob a house and sell the
1) Distribute the squeeze toys (or balls) to a select group
television to get more money for their alcohol
of students. (The teacher should have one also.)
and drugs. The police came after the boys,
2) The teacher should explain that the student’s but only Lasha got caught.
hands and the squeeze toys will represent their
hearts and the beating action. “Let’s see if we Act out the scene and then have one person
can get our hearts started. IN, OUT. (Squeeze play a famous reporter on the TV. This charac-
toy and release.) IN, OUT.” ter will interview Lasha, the fifteen year old
3) Continue by showing how the heart reacts while the boy arrested for housebreaking. Lasha will an-
body is in various situations. “While we’re resting, our swer the questions. Use your knowledge about
hearts will bean in an even, relaxed way – IN, OUT; IN, why people do drugs and alcohol in your role
OUT; IN, OUT. (Have students emulate this with their play.
squeeze toys.) The heart is not working too hard. Some sample questions:
However, when we’re playing hard, our hearts will
 “Lasha, you are such a young man and now
be pumping much faster in order to supply our bodies
you will probably go to jail. Why did you
with oxygen—IN-OUT, IN-OUT, IN-OUT!” (Squeeze and
break into the house in the first place?
release the toy more rapidly.) Explain to the class,
 “Why did you start drinking and smok-
“It’s natural for your heart rate to increase when you
ing?”
exercise hard. It’s also natural for it to increase if
 “How did the alcohol and drugs make you
you become nervous, worried or embarrassed. (More
feel?”
blood is being pumped through they body to relieve
 “Where did you buy the alcohol and
the stress upon it.) Light colored skin makes this in-
drugs?”
ternal process more visible. If you are resting and not
 “Where did you get the money for it?”
nervous or embarrassed, do you think your heart rate
should be slow or fast?” (slow)
4) “The caffeine in certain foods makes our hearts 6) Let the groups have at least 10 minutes to play
pump faster even when we’re at rest—IN-OUT, their role play.
IN-OUT, IN-OUT! Do you think that’s a healthy 7) Have each group perform the role play.
condition for our hearts?” (no) 8) After everyone is done, ask the class what were
5) Have the students mark an X on the flipchart foods some of the answers given by Lasha and why they
they believe to contain caffeine (chocolate, tea, think he was doing drugs and drinking.
cola, coffee).
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 What kind of person do you think Lasha was?
 What kind of products do you drink/eat contain caffeine?  Why do you think Lasha was using drugs and get-
 What are substitutes for product you drink/eat ting into trouble?
containing caffeine?
 Is caffeine addictive? Why or why not?

181
182
Sexual

Education

183
184
How to Decide about Sex (and make Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
your decision stick)  Agree or disagree: If you are not having sex there
is something wrong with you?
Topic: Sexual Education, Decision Making
 Boys: How do you feel you have to act when with
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain a girl so she thinks you’re a man? Girls: How do
from this activity?): To help make decisions about ini- you feel you have to act when with a boy so he
tiating in sexual activity. thinks you are a woman?
Number of Students: 5-30  When it comes to sex, whose responsibility is it to
Age Range of Students: 15-17 set the limits? Why?
Time Required: 1.5 hours (or two class periods)  Some people think that you haven’t become a
Materials: Information brochures on sex, HIV/AIDS, man/woman until you’ve had sex. Do you agree?
STI’s, contraceptives, UNAIDS, UNDP statistics; Op- Why or why not?
tional: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart  What are some of the emotional risks of having
sex? Physical?
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):  How can you tell when you’re being pressured?
 Is it ever acceptable to pressure another person
1) Tell your students that if you aren’t already, you prob- into having sex with you? Why or why not? Explain.
ably will be making decisions about whether or not
you will engage in sexual activity sometime soon.
2) Tell them it will be one of the most important STI Group Research
decisions in their lives.
Topic: Sexual Education
3) Here are some things you can do to help you make
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
your decision:
from this activity?): To have students learn more
 Seek information from reliable sources.
about STIs and actively look into the consequences
 Talk to people about your feelings, espe-
and how they are contracted.
cially your family.
 Understand all the consequences (physical Number of Students: 5-30
as well as emotional). Age Range of Students: 15-25
 Think about what you will do if you be- Time Required: 45 minutes - 1 hour
come pregnant. Materials: STI resources (text book/internet/brochures),
 Learn about STIs and HIV/AIDS and how to Pen, Paper; Optional: Blackboard, Poster board, Markers
protect yourself.
 Think about what you want in life.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 Think about the person’s pluses and mi-
nuses and if you really want to have sex 1) Introduce STIs (sexually transmitted infection) to
with them. the class.
 Think about your values.
2) Have them guess what that means then give the
 Don’t rush to have sex if you aren’t ready
definition.
– if someone rushes you, then that person
3) Have the class list as many sexually transmitted
is not the person to have sex with!
infections as they can think of.
4) Ask students, what else can you think of that you
need to know before acting on the decision to 4) Add onto the list any major ones they forgot.
have sex? 5) Then break the class into groups of and have
5) Ask students, once you’ve made the choice, how do them research each disease.
you stick to your limits? Here are some suggestions: 6) Their research should include:
 Know before hand what you do and don’t  How do you get it?
want to do.  What are the symptoms?
 Stop things when you start to feel uncom-  What are the effects? (long and short term)
fortable. Never push someone else to do  What is the treatment(s)?
anything they don’t feel comfortable with.  Can it be cured?
 Clearly state your feelings. 7) Have students present their findings to the class
 Point out the consequences. (you can have them create informational posters
 Suggest something else to do. to present to the class as well).
6) List as many good reasons as possible for not hav-
ing sex at this age. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
7) Imagine that you are on a date and your boy/
girlfriend is trying to pressure you into having  Does your knowledge of STI’s change your opinion
sex. What are some of things he or she might say of when to have sex? How?
(make a list)? What are good ways to respond to  How at risk do you feel for getting STIs? Do the
these things? statistics change your mind?
8) Imagine that someone you really like wants to  Would you feel comfortable asking your partner
have sex with you, but you don’t feel ready for it. to get tested? Why or why not?
Brainstorm ways to say no. Role-play situations.  What are good ways to ask your partner to get
tested without hurting his/her feelings?

185
Condom Time Bomb correctly put the condom on it, come back to
their team mates and tag the next person who
Topic: Sexual Education also goes up and repeats the process.
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain 4) When all members of one team have correctly
from this activity?): To get students comfortable with put condoms on the models, that team wins.
handling condoms and show how strong they can be.
Number of Students: 5-30 Another variation:
Age Range of Students: 15 and up
Time Required: 30 minutes 1) Write all of the steps for putting on a condom on
individual cards.
Materials: 5-10 condoms, Slips of paper with one
2) Mix up each set of cards so that they are no longer
questions about condoms written on each slip, Music
in order, and give one set of cards to each team.
(small radio, tape player etc)
3) When you say ‘Go!’ the teams have to race each
other to see which team will put the steps in or-
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): der the fastest.
4) The team that gets all the steps in the correct
1) Before the session, write one question on a slip of
order first wins the races.
paper; fold the paper very small and put it inside
one of the condoms; blow up the condom and tie
it like a balloon. Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
2) Do this for however many condoms you would like
in the game.  Do you think everyone who uses condoms knows
how to use them?
3) Have your participants stand in a circle. Hand one
of the ‘balloons’ to a participant.  What happens if you use a condom incorrectly?
4) Explain that you will play some music. Partici-  Why are condoms important?
pants should pass the ‘balloon’ around the circle  Who do you think should learn to use condoms?
any way they like-handing it to the person next to Boys? Girls? Both?
them, batting it into the air to the next person,
dancing with it, and so on.
STI Match
5) When the music stops (when you turn it off), who-
ever is holding the condom balloon must break it, Topic: Sexual Education
take out the question, and answer it. Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
6) After discussing the correct answer, start the mu- from this activity?): To learn about different STIs.
sic and the entire process again. Number of Students: 5-30
7) When the participants find it difficult to break the
Age Range of Students: 17 and up
condom, make sure you point out how strong it is.
Time Required: 45 minutes
Suggested Questions:
Materials: Cards, Signs with different STI names,
 Are condoms 100 percent effective? Tape; Optional: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart
 How many times should you use one condom?
 How should a condom look before it is put on?
 Where can you find free condoms? Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 Why is it so important to use condoms?
1) Remember this Topic: is SENSITIVE! Do NOT do
this unless you are sure your class will be okay
Condom Races and comfortable with discussing this Topic:.
2) Before class make signs with names of STIs.
Topic: Sexual Education 3) Tape up the signs around the classroom on the
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain walls.
from this activity?): To practice what students have 4) Write the proper names next to the scientific
learned about using condoms. names.
Number of Students: 10-30 5) Write the symptoms on cards before class.
Age Range of Students: 15 and up 6) Divide the class into groups of how ever many
Time Required: 15 – 30 minutes STIs are on the wall.
Materials: Banana (or model), Bunch of condoms for 7) Assign each group to an STI.
each team 8) Throw the cards on the floor.
9) Explain that each group must find their symptoms
and tape them under the sign.
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
10) When everyone is finished, go over the answers
1) This may be difficult to do seriously with your with the class and correct any mistakes.
students. Make sure they are mature enough to 11) Discuss.
handle such an activity.
2) Form teams. Each team gets one demonstration
model/banana and a bunch of condoms.
3) The teams stand in line, and when you say, ‘Go!’,
each team must go one-by-one up to the model,

186
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Syphilis
 Painless sore on the penis or vagina
 Where do people in Georgia go to get treated  Sore appears 10 to 90 days after exposure
for STIs? Which of these places is the best to get  Non-itching rash on body (palms and
treated? Why? soles)
 Are people afraid to seek treatment for STIs? Why?  Hair loss, fever, and chills
 Why is it important to get treated early for STIs?  Possible death if untreated
Why is it important that your partners get treated?  Possible death or bone deformation in
 How can we tell that they have been expose to an STD newborn if mother is not treated early in
without blaming them or getting hurt ourselves? pregnancy

Herpes Simplex
4 Common STIs and Symptoms  No cure, treatment is medicine called
Gonorrhea Acyclovir
 Yellow-green or white discharge from the  Small painful blisters on genitals or
penis or vagina mouth
 Burning sensation or urination  Symptoms may recur when under stress
 Symptoms usually 2 to 14 days after ex-  Viral infection
posure  Severe neurological damage or death to
 Possibly no symptoms newborns if exposed in birth canal
 Possible swelling in the area of the tes-
ticles Cancroids
 Possible sterility if untreated  Painful sore on penis or vagina
 Possible blindness in newborns if not  Sore appears 3 to 5 days after exposure
treated with drops in eyes  Inflammation of lymph gland on the side
 Greatest risk factor for HIV transmission

187
188
HIV/AIDS

189
190
The Loss Exercise 10) Now, ask participants to describe in one word
or phrase the emotions they are feeling. Write
Topic: HIV/AIDS the words on a blank board or flip chart. Keep
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain brainstorming until all of the possible ideas are
from this activity?): To gain an understanding of the exhausted. Your list may include: sadness, grief,
feelings of loss involved when someone contracts feeling like killing myself, hopeless, alone, miser-
HIV/AIDS. able, depressed, angry, blaming others, no rea-
Number of Students: 5-30 son to continue.
11) Ask participants to take a look at the list that
Age Range of Students: 14 and up
you have created. Ask them to imagine how these
Time Required: 30 minutes feelings might relate to testing positive for HIV/
Materials: Pens/paper (everyone) AIDS. Discuss the links between this exercise and
testing positive. Remind the group that they have
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): placed themselves in the position of a person liv-
ing with HI V/AIDS and allowed themselves to ex-
1) Ask participants to completely clear their desks perience the very powerful emotions that such a
of everything except a sheet of paper and a pen person might be living with every day.
or pencil. Tell them to number I to 5 on their
papers. Explain that you are going to read five Statements
statements, and they will respond to those state-
ments on their papers.
1. Imagine that something terrible happens that
2) It is very important to emphasize that no one else causes you to lose the material possession
in the room will see their papers: they will not that you love most. Either a theft occurs or
be collected. They will not be used at any later a loss of some kind that takes this thing away
time: the papers are their own personal property. from you completely. You will never again see
Do this exercise slowly and seriously. Participants the thing listed on #1. Take your pen or pencil
should feel the full impact of this discussion. and cross out #1 now.
3) One by one, read off the statements and tell the
participants to write their responses on their papers. 2. Imagine that an accident or other unfortunate
Reinforce that it will not be shared with others. occurrence causes you to lose the part of your
4) Write down the name of the personal possession body that you are proudest of. This part of
that you love the most. Maybe it is your house, or a your body is gone, and you will never have
special item your grandmother gave you, or a book, it again as long as you live. Cross out #2 now
or anything else. What one thing that you own with your pen or pencil.
means the most to you? Write that thing on #1. 3. Imagine that this same accident or unfortu-
5) Write down the part of your body that you are nate occurrence makes it impossible for you
most proud of. Perhaps you really love your eyes, to do your favorite activity ever again. You
or you are very proud of your hair, or you enjoy will never again, in your entire life, be able
your ears the most because they help you listen to do the activity you wrote on #3. Cross out
to music, or you love your voice because it helps #3 with your pen or pencil now.
you to sing. Write down the one part of your body
that you are most proud of on #2. 4. Imagine that because of all of the above situ-
ations, your secret has been exposed. Every-
6) Write down the name of the activity you most en-
one now knows what you wrote on #4. It has
joy doing. Maybe it is going to a religious event,
become public knowledge: everyone in the
or playing football, or dancing, or any other ac-
school, town, church, and community knows
tivity. What do you most enjoy doing in the whole
about what you wrote on #4. Circle #4 with
world? Write that activity on #3.
your pen or pencil now.
7) Write down one secret or very confidential thing
about yourself that no one else in the world or 5. Lastly, because of all of these changes (losing
only one other person knows about. Every one of your possession, losing your body part, not be-
us has some secret or very private thing that he ing able to do your favorite activity, and every-
or she does not want others to know about. Write one knowing your secret), the person that you
that personal, private piece of information down love most in the world leaves you forever. You
on #4. (Remind the group that no one will see this will never again see this person that you love
sheet but themselves.) and who is your most important source of sup-
8) Lastly, write down the name of the person whose port. Cross out #5 with your pen or pencil now.
love and support means the most to you in the
world. After everyone has finished, explain that
you will now go through the list again. As you go The True/False Game
through each statement, they should imagine
Topic: HIV/AIDS
that they are living through what you are saying.
Read the Statements Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
9) Allow a few silent moments for the participants from this activity?): For a workshop or discussion
to truly feel what you have just said. People are leader to be able to identify to the level of aware-
usually a bit upset and uncomfortable at this ness of their participants while at the same time dis-
point. Give them some time to think about this. seminating accurate HIV/AIDS information.
Number of Students: 5-30

191
Age Range of Students: 14-18 The Epidemic Game
Time Required: 30 minutes
Materials: Markers, Cardboard/paper Topic: HIV/AIDS
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To understand of how HIV/AIDS
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
is passed from one person to another.
1) Print the words ‘True’ and ‘False’ in large letters Number of Students: 5-30
on two sheets of paper. Hang the papers opposite Age Range of Students: 14-18
walls. Time Required: 30 minutes
2) Clear an open area between the two signs. Materials: Small cards
3) Ask participants to gather in the center of an open
area. The facilitator reads a statement, and the
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
participants run to whichever sign they think is cor-
rect. If they think the statement is true, they run to 1) Suppose there are 12 people playing the game.
‘True,’ if they think it is false, they run to ‘False’. Make 12 small cards: Three will have a red ‘X’
If they are undecided, or think it can be both true on the card; four will have a ‘C’ on the card; the
and false, they should remain in the middle. other five will have black spots.
4) Ask the participants, in turn, to explain or de- 2) Every participant should receive one card. They
fend why they are at the side they chose. It is are not to look at their cards. They should keep
good to ask for explanations from one side, then their cards folded in their hands. Tell the par-
the other, as groups will tend to begin a debate ticipants that they should move around the room
about the correct answer. Only after everyone and greet three people. They should simply greet
who wants to has spoken should the facilitator them and remember whom they greeted. They
give the correct answer more info should not look at anyone’s card.
5) Emphasize good communication skills and con- 3) After the greetings, ask everyone to sit down.
flict resolution by suggesting that each side ‘re- Now, have everyone look at their card. On a flip
flect back’ the points of the opposing side before chart, put a red X. Ask everyone who has a red
stating their own opinions. X to stand. Inform the group that these people
6) Everyone comes back to the center and the game have HIV. Ask the group to take a good look at the
begins again with another question. people standing. Anyone who greeted the people
 Someone with a sexually transmitted disease should also stand up. These people are also in-
has a higher risk of becoming HIV infected. fected. Now, tell everyone to take a good look at
 The condom has small holes in it which everyone standing.
HIV can pass through. 4) Anyone who has greeted those standing must stand
 HIV can be spread by mosquitoes. up. All those standing are infected with HIV. Contin-
 A baby born to an HIV positive mother will ue with this until just about everyone is standing.
also get HIV. 5) Put a ‘C’ on the flip chart. Ask if anyone has this
 You can tell that someone has HIV by look- symbol on his or her card. Tell these people that
ing at them. they can sit down. Tell the group that these peo-
 It is safer to wear two condoms instead of ple have used a condom. They are not infected.
just one. Everyone can now sit down.
 By having more sex, you can ejaculate more
6) Ask the group what we learn from this game. Put their
sperms and HIV will get out of the body.
answers on the flip chart. Possible answers will be:
 Married women are less likely to catch HI
 HIV can be transmitted very quickly and easily.
V/AIDS than unmarried women.
 You cannot tell if someone has HIV.
 If a man uses condoms for more than two
 Using a condom can reduce your risk of HIV.
years, he can become infertile.
 Having contact with one person is the
 A person with TB who also has weight loss
same as having contact with all the part-
is infected with HIV.
ners of that person.
 If a person looks healthy, then he or she
does not have AIDS. Ask the people with the red ‘X’ how they felt to dis-
 You may get HIV by drinking from the same cover they were HIV positive. Ask the people with
glass that a person with AIDS has used. the ‘C’ how it felt not be infected at all and to sit
 Petroleum jelly is a good lubricant to use down. It is important to emphasize that this is a sym-
with a condom. bolic exercise. People cannot transmit HIV by simply
 It is safe to have sex just once without a greeting each other. They would have to have sex
condom. (or other contact with bodily fluid). Also, be careful
 You may get HIV by eating food prepared that this exercise does not set a tone of ‘blaming the
by someone who has HIV or AIDS. victim.’ Lastly, ask the group how they could have
 A person can have a negative test for HIV avoided infection in this game. For example:
and still have HIV. They could have refused to play (Abstinence).They
 You can get HIV from a dog bite. could have insisted on seeing their partners’ cards
 Only men can receive free condoms. (Testing). They could have only greeted one partner
 HIV is the virus that causes AIDS. (Risk Reduction: Being Faithful). Remind the group
 There is a new drug in America that can that they must check the card before being faithful
cure AIDS. with that partner (Testing).

192
Facts and Myths About HIV/AIDS Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

Topic: HIV/AIDS  Do you believe HIV/AIDS has affected our com-


Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain munity? Why or why not? What evidence do you
from this activity?): To be able to recognize the seri- see of the effects of AIDS in our community? What
ousness of HIV/AIDS in your community. other things have you heard about HIV/AIDS in
our community that you think might be untrue?
Number of Students: 10-30
Do you think that everyone who has had HIV/AIDS
Age Range of Students: 15 and up knows that he/she has it? Why or why not? Have
Time Required: 2 hours you ever heard someone say that they have heard
Materials: Tape, Signs blacked on the wall with the of a cure for AIDS? Why do you think someone
words “true” and “false”, Bowl with pieces of paper might say that if there is no cure? Why do you
in it think young girls are infected more often than
boys? Which or our life-skills can help protect you
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions): from HIV/AIDS? What can we do to help our com-
munity fight HIV/AIDS?
1) Before the class, write on the slips of paper true
and false statements about HIV/AIDS.
The Immune System Match
2) Examples:
True Topic: General health, HIV/AIDS
 While Africa has been more affected by HIV/ Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
AIDS than any other part of the world, HIV/ from this activity?): To describe the functions of at
AIDS rates are rising in many other regions, least five components of the immune system.
including Eastern Europe/Central Asia. Number of Students: 5-30
 Although many people do not have ac- Age Range of Students: All ages
cess to expensive drugs to treat HIV/AIDS, Time Required: 30 – 45 minutes
there are medicines that can slow down
Materials: Handout: Your Immune System, Paper,
the disease (not cure).
Pens/pencils; Optional: Question handout
 In Georgia, over 800 cases of HIV/AIDS
have been confirmed, while hundreds
more may go undiagnosed Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
 There is still no cure for HIV/AIDS.
 Although HIV/AIDS transmission is a risk 1) Before the class make a copy of the handout for
for everyone, women and girls are more each group. Write a description of each cell’s func-
vulnerable to HIV/AIDS infections than tion on separate pieces of paper. You should have a
men and boys. set of drawings and descriptions for each group.
 The amount of food we have to eat can be  The macrophage: Macro = big, Phage =
related to the number of people who have eater. The Big Eater. This cell east the
AIDS in our community. invaders or germs (called antigens) and
sends a signal to the captain of your im-
False
mune system that an invader is present
 AIDS is a disease that is only found in Africa. and that the immune system army needs
 Since everyone who has AIDS dies, it is to respond.
better not to know you have it.  The T4 Helper Cell (CD4): Captain of your
 HIV/AIDS was a disease invented in Russia immune system. If receives the message
to use for bio warfare. form the macrophage when an invader
 People in the U.S. have access to medicine (antigen) is present and orders two more
that can cure them of HIV/AIDS. cells (the B cell and the T8 killer cell) to
 No one has HIV/AIDS in Georgia. search for, and destroy, the invader. The
 Priests in Georgia have cured HIV/AIDS. T4 Helper Cell is also the cell that HIV
 HIV/AIDS is a disease that only affects pros- attacks and destroys. T cells are called
titutes, drug users and/or homosexuals. “T” because they mature in the thymus
 It has recently been proven that HIV does gland.
not cause AIDS.  The B Cell: Like a factory. It identifies the
3) Divide a flipchart/board into two sections and la- shape of the invader (antigen) and makes
bel them “true” and “false”. “antibodies” (like keys) which fit the an-
4) Have each student come up and pick a statement tigen. These antibodies can recognize
out of the bowl. immediately future antigens of this kind
5) Have them read the statement and then tape it and stop them from making you sick in the
under either “true” or “false”. future.
6) After each student has put up a statement and you  The T8 (CD8)or Cytotoxic or Killer Cell:
have used all the statements, read each one aloud to Also called by the T4 Helper Cell to attack
the class and have the class decide if it is correct. the invader and kill it directly.
7) After the exercise is over, go over the correct an- 8) Give out the handout “Your Immune System” to
swers (some might be surprising!). the class.
9) Go over the handout.
10) Go over the four different cells.

193
11) Divide the class into groups of 4 or 5. Materials: Handout “Immune System Drawings”,
12) Give each group a set of drawings and descrip- Poster board/flipchart paper for each group, Mark-
tions (mixed up). ers, Tape/Glue
13) Tell the groups that they must match the descrip-
tion with the drawings. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
14) After each group has finished, ask each group to
share what the got for a different answers. 1) Make sure the class already knows about, or go
15) When the group gives an answer, have the class over briefly the job of each kind of white cell.
tell you if they got anything different. If they did, 2) Explain to the group what HIV/AIDS does to the
discuss why. immune system.
16) Give the real answers and discuss.  When HIV enters the system, it is eaten
by the macrophage, but when it gets to
the T4 Cell it invades that cell, the Cap-
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
tain, and takes it over, later killing it. A
 Why is your immune system important? T4 Helper cell damaged by HIV Does not
effectively call out the other forces to
 What happens if your immune system is not work-
attack the invader, giving HIV a greater
ing properly?
chance to take over more T4 Cells and
 What kind of things helps keep your immune sys-
multiply the amount of HIV in the body.
tem healthy?
The amount of HIV in the body is called
the “viral load”.
Your Immune System  When enough T4 Helper Cells are de-
stroyed, all kinds of other invaders (an-
1) What is our immune system? tigens), like tuberculosis (TB) germs, can
 The immune system is the body’s way of enter without being stopped by the Cap-
fighting disease. It is very complex and has tain. When the viral load has risen and the
more parts that we can discuss today. Un- antibody level has dropped, a person gets
derstanding some basic facts about the im- sick with AIDS.
mune system, however, can help us learn 3) Divide the class into groups of 4 or 5.
both how to prevent disease and how to 4) Give each group a handout of the drawings,
help slow down disease progression if we marker and flipchart paper.
are already infected.
5) Tell them they must make a poster to demonstrate
2) Our blood cells are labeled by what two colors? to the class the steps that HIV takes to hurt the
 White and red immune system using the drawings and markers.
3) What is the major function of red cells? 6) Have each group present it to the class once they
 Red cells, called erythrocytes, carry oxy- are done.
gen through our system and carry away
carbon dioxide.
4) What is the major function of white blood cells? Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
 White blood cells, called leukocytes, are
 What would happen if a castle lost all of its walls?
our immune cells. Your immune system is
Would it be easier/more difficult for someone un-
made up of white cells that protect you
invited to come in?
from diseases.
 How can we keep our immune system healthy?
5) What is an antigen?
 An antigen is a foreign invader or germ
that enters our system. It can be a virus, HIV/AIDS and the Immune System
bacteria, fungus, protozoa, and so forth.
– Role Play
6) What is an antibody?
 An antibody is a response to an invading Topic: HIV/AIDS
antigen. Antibodies are produced by B Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
cells. They work like “keys”, fighting the from this activity?): To demonstrate how HIV invades
shape of the antigen “locks”. When an an- the body and affects the immune system.
tigen enters the system again, it is recog-
Number of Students: 6-30
nized and attacked by antibodies.
Age Range of Students: 15 and up
Time Required: 10-15 minutes
How HIV/AIDS Affect the Immune Sys- Materials: Handout “Immune System Drawings”; Op-
tem - Poster tional: Scissors

Topic: HIV/AIDS
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
from this activity?): To learn about how HIV/AIDS af- 1) Make sure you have a copy of the handout for
fects the immune system. each class member.
Number of Students: 5-30 2) Give the handout to the class and make sure they
Age Range of Students: 15 and up all know what the role is for each white blood cell
Time Required: 30-45 minutes

194
3) Explain to the class what happens when HIV en- 6) Divide class into groups of six.
ters the body: 7) Have each group member chose one of the cells
 When HIV enters the system, it is eaten to be.
by the macrophage, but when it gets to 8) Have the groups go over a role play as to how HIV
the T4 Cell it invades that cell, the Cap- affects each of the cells.
tain, and takes it over, later killing it. A 9) In front of the class, have each member intro-
T4 Helper cell damaged by HIV Does not duce themselves, holding up their pictures and
effectively call out the other forces to explaining what they do.
attack the invader, giving HIV a greater 10) Then have the groups demonstrate to the class
chance to take over more T4 Cells and what happens when HIV enters the body.
multiply the amount of HIV in the body.
11) After all the groups are done, review and dis-
The amount of HIV in the body is called
cuss.
the “viral load”.
 When enough T4 Helper Cells are de-
stroyed, all kinds of other invaders (an- Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:
tigens), like tuberculosis (TB) germs, can
enter without being stopped by the Cap-  Why is our immune system important?
tain. When the viral load has risen and the  What are ways we can keep our immune system
antibody level has dropped, a person gets healthy?
sick with AIDS.

Your Immune System

195
The Elephants and Lions Game Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics:

Topic: HIV/AIDS  How does this change your perspective of HIV/AIDS?


Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain  How will you tell others this information?
from this activity?): To learn and demonstrate how
HIV affects the immune system. How HIV/AIDS is Transmitted
Number of Students: 15-30
Age Range of Students: 15 and up Topic: HIV/AIDS
Time Required: 15-30 minutes Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Materials: Optional: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart from this activity?): To learn different ways HIV/AIDS
is transmitted.
Number of Students: 5-30
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Age Range of Students: 17 and up
1) Ask for one volunteer in the class. Time Required: 30 min – 1 hour
2) Have the volunteer stand in front of the class. Materials: Blackboard/whiteboard/flipchart, Cards
This person is the baby elephant. for each member (see next page), Tape and marker;
3) Ask for six more volunteers. These volunteers are Optional: Pens, Paper
the adult elephants. Their job is to protect the
baby elephant. Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
4) Have the adult elephants join hands and form a
circle around the baby elephant. 1) Before the class make cards for each student with
5) To show the importance of their job, you should try to activities that can and cannot transmit HIV.
pretend to hit the baby elephant. The adult elephants 2) Explain to the class that HIV can only be trans-
should quickly close ranks to avoid the attack. mitted in very specific ways. First you need to be
6) The adults should stand very close to the baby in direct contact with an infected person’s body
elephant. fluids. Then you must have a portal of entry for
7) Ask for four or five more volunteers. These peo- HIV to enter your body. These can be a cut, sore
ple are the lions. Their job will be to attack the or opening on the skin, or soft tissue called “mu-
baby elephant – they should try to jab, hit, kick, cous membrane” located in the vagina, tip of the
and punch (nicely) – whatever they can do to hurt penis, anus, mouth, eyes or nose. (Be sure that
the baby elephant. your audience is ready to talk about these areas
8) When you say “go”, the lions should try to attack of the body. If not, maybe just say a definition of
the baby elephant. Let this go on for a few sec- “mucous membrane” and only allude to the parts
onds, until the baby elephant is at least closely that are touchy to discuss).
touched by the lions. 3) On the board divide the board into two sections,
9) Now, ask the following questions: one side for the fluids that can transmit HIV and
 What is the baby elephant? What does the one side for the fluids that can.
baby elephant represent? – the human 4) Ask the class which fluids they think can/cannot
body/health transmit HIV
 What are the adult elephants? – the immune 5) Write their answers on the board
system, they protect the body from disease 6) Go over each one and tell them if they are cor-
 What are the lions? – the lions are diseases, rect or not
illness and infections attacking the body Fluids that DO transmit HIV
12) Give each of the lions a disease name (tuberculo-
sis, malaria, diarrhea, cholera, bird flu etc).  blood
 breast milk
13) Ask them if they were able to kill the body (baby
 semen and/or vaginal fluid
elephant)? Answer should be no.
14) Tell the class that you are HIV and say “Suppose I Fluids that DO NOT transmit HIV
attack the immune system?”  Saliva
15) Touch all but two of the adult elephants and have  Tears
them sit down.  Sweat
16) Ask the class, “Do you think the baby elephant 7) Go over some common ways HIV is transmitted:
will be protected from the lions?” needles, intercourse
17) Tell the lions to attack on the word “go”. 8) Go around and tape an activity card to the back
18) The lions can easily get to the baby elephant this of each person in the class
time. 9) Have members go around and ask “yes” or “no”
19) Summarize the idea HIV has killed the immune questions to try to guess what their activity is
system. The lack of the immune system has made 10) Once they have guessed their activity, have them
it possible for other diseases to actually kill the tape it on their front and continue to assist oth-
person rather than just make them sick. ers by answering “yes” or “no” questions.
20) Ask the class, “Does HIV kill the person?” The an- 11) When everyone has guessed, divide the board
swer is NO! The diseases kill the person. into two sections, “Can Transmit HIV” and “Can-
21) Ask for the difference between HIV and AIDS. not Transmit HIV”
12) Have the members tape their activity in the cor-
rect column and discuss.

196
Suggested Follow-Up Discussion Topics: Disease Progression – Diagram/Time
 Does this change your perspective of people with Topic: HIV/AIDS
HIV/AIDS? How? Purpose of Activity (What should the students gain
Activities that CAN Transmit HIV from this activity?): To demonstrate how HIV/AIDS
 Vaginal sex progresses.
 Direct blood transfusion of untested blood Number of Students: 5-30
 Sharing needles Age Range of Students: 17 and up
 Contact with blood of an infected person Time Required: 1 hour
 Breastfeeding
Materials: Hand out “Disease Progression” for each
 Mother to infant during delivery
group or person, Markers, Flipchart paper/poster
 Mother to infant during pregnancy
board, Cards with symptoms (one set per group); Op-
 Exchange of blood
tional: Pens/Pencils, Paper
 Contact with semen
 Contact with vaginal fluids
Activities (Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions):
Activities That CANNOT Tran