Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 118

ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON

TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG


ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

Organizing Committee
Patron
Mr. Narendra Nahata
(Chairman, B. R. Nahata Smiriti Sansthan)
Advisors
Dr. V.B.Gupta
Director, B.R. Nahata College of Pharmacy
Mrs. Sheeja E. Jarald
Principal, B.R. Nahata College of Pharmacy
Coordinators
Prof. Anurekha Jain
Head, Dept.of Pharm. Analysis
Mr. Edwin Jarald
Head, Dept. of Pharmacognosy
Registration Committee
Mr. Sanjay Jain
Ms. Deepika Maliwal
Scientific & Proceedings
Mr. Emmanuel Toppo
Mr. Vishal Soni
Mrs. Priyanka Soni.
Hospitality
Mr. Alankar Shrivastava
Media & Web
Mr. Rajesh Garg
Mr. Praveen Bhargava

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 2
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

Chairman’s message

It is heartening to note that B. R. Nahata College of Pharmacy is going to organize National

Seminar on “Technological & Regulatory Aspects of Herbal Drug Analysis”. The seminar provides

opportunity for sharing knowledge in the area of herbal drug and allied segments.

I send my greeting and best wishes to local organizing committee and all the participants for a

grand success for the seminar and also the deliberations. I also extend my best wishes for all the

academic lectures and the warm scientific sessions.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 3
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

Director’s Message

Analysis and Regulation are extremely interdependent: whereas, it is mostly the

Analysis, which becomes the basis, and the modus-operendi, of Regulation.

Because of the complexity of the natural materials, even to date, their analysis hasn’t

become streamlined, and so, the regulation. There could have not been anymore

‘relevant’ theme for a national seminar being hosted at this ‘Center of Relevance and

Excellence’ of TIFAC established by DST as a consequence of the Technology

Vision 2020 under the Mission India 2020.

I wish the seminar to be a hot thought provoking event, igniting the minds of

participants.

Dr V B Gupta

Coordinator, TIFAC-CORE in Green Pharmacy

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 4
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

Principal’s Message

First and foremost I appreciate and congratulate Pharmaceutical Analysis and Pharmacognosy
Departments for coming up with such an interesting seminar. Such types of seminars/discussions
are the need of the day. Being a Pharmacognosist I wish to put my view on technological aspects
of herbal drug analysis. Herbs are an integral part of nature and herbal medicine is based upon the
premise that plants contain natural substance that can promote health and alleviate diseases. Their
increasing use in recent years is clear evidence of public interest in having alternatives to
conventional medicine. Scientists have proven to humanity, the effective use of herbal medicine
but some pitfalls are there because of the lack of interest shown by the manufacturers towards the
quality control measures of herbals. This may be due to the cost to be invested towards the
evaluation of herbal medicines by all means. When the quality control methods are lacking,
research should be undertaken by both industry and government to identify, certify and quantify the
active ingredients and to recommend optimum doses of medicinal herbs. In technological aspects,
pharmacokinetic methods, bioavailability studies and clinical phase III trials should be applied in
pharmacological research of new herbal drugs. Only the knowledge of herbal pharmacokinetics
can provide valuable information to practitioners in prescribing herbs safely & effectively. If we
follow this, no doubts would be created in the statement, “herbal medicines are safe”. Heartfelt
wishes to Organizing Committee.
Mrs. Sheeja Edwin, M. Pharm, (PhD), IDCRCT
Principal

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 5
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

From the Desk of the Coordinator


WHO estimate that 80% world population still prefers herbal formulations as its major source of medication. The overall use of
synthetic drugs has resulted in higher incidence of adverse drug reaction; hence mankind is going back to nature for safer
remedies. Henceforth, it should ensured that only standard, safe efficacious commercial formulations based on medicinal plants
are available to the patients, there is need to have effective regulation, regulatory setup and screening process. Perhaps, Quality
Control of herbs and formulations is a major problem, which affects the efficacy and reproducibility of results in formulation.
Scientifically validated and technological standardized herbal medicine will play important role in future advancement in health
care. There is need to ensure the quality of medicinal plants products by using modern control techniques and applying suitable
standards, if India wants to emerge as a major player in global herbal products based medicine. This national seminar is
successful attempt to provide platform for learning, sharing of rich experience and expertise & discussions about the latetest
technology and area of regulation used in industry for the herbals. The intention was to create pool of trained experts for the
developing a quality herbals. The seminar supported by National medicinal plant board project and TIFAC-Core in green
Pharmacy. Over 250 delegates from academia and industry have participated. The seminar organized in series of session by the
leading experts and technocrats from the industry and academia with the intention of creating a better understanding of analytical
procedure, documentation protocol, and identification technology of herbal is concerned. The Eminent personalities like Dr. D. C.
Jain, R&D head IPCA laboratories, Ratlam Miss Ina Jain Research Associate Cadila Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Mr. Rajiv Sharma
Alembic Pharmaceutical, Dr. Mansingh Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Deshbandhu College, University of Delhi, Mr. Vikas Vohra,
as Asst. Manager, Marketing with Waters associated as a speaker with us and so is our success. Endless efforts of our organizing
committee, expert guidance of our Director, Dr. V. B.Gupta and the overall highly co-operative and encouraging environment
provided by our Chairman of B.R.Nahata Smriti Sansthan, Shri Narendra Nahata that we could achieve this height and today
assembled in this seminar

To conclude I wish success to this grand show of national seminar on technological and regulatory aspects of herbal drug analysis

With regards
Prof.Anurekha Jain
Co-ordinator.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 6
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

Coordinators Message

Herbal medicines are becoming more and more popular nowadays. Among the entire flora, 35,000 to 70,000
species have been used for medicinal purposes. According to estimates, 80% of World’s population relies primarily
on traditional medicines for their primary health care needs. The expanded use of herbal medicines has led to
concerns relating to its safety, quality and effectiveness. Consistent quality can only be assured, if starting material,
intermediates and the final products are well defined. Setting specifications through standardization is the key in
herbal drug analysis. Reports states that, there are about 7000 firms in the small-scale sector manufacturing
traditional medicines with or without standardization. Herbal industries like Himalaya, Zandu, Dabur, Hamdard,
Maharishi, etc. and modern sector pharmas, namely Ranbaxy, Lupin, Allembic, etc. are standardizing their herbal
formulations by chromatography techniques like TLC/HPLC finger printing, etc. Further according to the report,
none of the pharma has standardized herbal medicines using active compounds as markers linked with
confirmation of bioactivity of herbal drugs in experimental animal models. WHO, with Drug Regulatory Authorities,
has developed guidelines for the assessment of herbal medicine and they are, quality assessment (crude plant
material, plant preparation, finished product), stability (shelf life), safety assessment (documentation of safety based
on experience or/and; toxicology studies) and efficacy assessment (documented evidence of traditional use or/and;
activity determination). No formulations in the market would fully satisfy the guidelines mentioned by WHO. Merely
determining the quantity of marker is not going to help in the process of standardization. The marker selected
should correlate to the bioactivity of the herbal drug. Even in this case the activity of the supporting constituents
should be taken in to consideration. Keeping these facts in mind, we have coordinated this seminar, so that let
every one come to know about the exact position of technological and regulatory aspects of herbal drug analysis.

Prof. Edwin Jarald, M. Pharm, (PhD), SMP, IDCRCT,


Co-ordinator
ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 7
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

SEMINAR PROCEEDINGS

9:00 - 9:30 am Registration

Inaugural function 9:30 – 10:00 am

Technical Session-I 10:00 – 12:00 pm

12:00 – 12:15 pm Tea break

Technical Session-II 12:15 – 01:00 pm

1:00 – 2:00 pm Lunch

Technical Session-III 02:00 – 03:00 pm

Technical Session-IV 03:00 – 04:00 pm

Poster presentation 04:00 – 05:00 pm

Valedictory 05:00 – 05:30 pm


ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 8
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

List of Abstracts
TITLE PAGE
NO.
FINGERPRINTING OF HERBAL DRUGS USING ADVANCED
14
BIOANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES
HANDY, ECONOMIC, FASCINATING SCIENCE: SURVISMETER, FOR
QUALITY ASSURANCE OF HERBAL AND PHARMACEUTICALS 15
FORMULATIONS
EFFICACY AND SAFETY STUDIES OF FENNEL 16
DETERMINATION OF QUERCETIN BY HPTLC IN CALENDULA OFFICINALIS
17
EXTRACT
CARDIOPROTECTIVE EFFECT OF METHANOLIC PASSIFLORA NEPALENSIS
FLOWER POWDER AGAINST ISCHEMIA REPERFUSION-INDUCED 18
MYOCARDIAL INJURY EX VIVO
ELUCIDATION OF EFFECTIVITY OF ANTIBACTERIALS FROM ROSA INDICA
THROUGH IN VITRO AND IN SITU FIELD TRIALS IN RICE AGAINST 19
XANTHOMONAS ORYZAE PV. ORYZAE
PHARMACOGNOSTICAL STANDARDIZATION OF COMMIPHORA BERRYI
20
ENGL. (WIGHT & ARN) BY USING WHO-GENEVA PROCEDURE
ADVANCES IN BIOANALYTICAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR SMALL MOLECULE
21
AND PEPTIDE DRUGS
DEVLOPMENT OF AQUEOUS POLYMERIC DISPERSIONS: A REVIEW 22
TOXICOLOGICAL PROFILE AND ANTI-ARTHRITIC ACTIVITY ON CRUDE
ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF COMMIPHORA PUBESCENS (WIGHT & ARN) BY 23
USING WISTAR RATS
QC OF HERBAL WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO STANDARZATION
24
PARAMETERS: AN OVERVIEW
SOLID LIPID NANOPARTICLES (SLNS) SUITABLE COLLOIDAL CARRIERS
25
FOR TOPICAL DELIVERY
POLICIES AND REGULATIONS REGARDING NATURAL DRUGS 26
PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE EFFICACY, STABILITY AND QUALITY
27
CONTROL OF HERBAL DRUGS PREPARATIONS
GREEN HOUSE EFFECT AND GLOBAL WARMING: EFFECTS ON CROP
28
PRODUCTIVITY
OZONE LAYER DEPLETION: A MAJOR PROBLEM FOR HUMAN AND
29
PLANTS
GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE (GMP) FOR HERBAL MEDICINE 30
ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 9
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

PHYTOMEDICINE 31
QUALITY CONTROLS OF HERBAL DRUGS: A PRESENT SCENARIO 32
REGULATORY CHALLENGES OF INDIAN HERBAL MEDICINE 33
LEPIDIUM SATIVUM L.: A REVIEW ON ITS FOLK USE, PHYTOCHEMICAL
34
AND PHARMACOLOGICAL PROFILE
NANOTECHNOLOGY AND BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER 35
NANOMATERIALS: AN EMERGING SCIENCE FOR THE FABRICATION OF
36
PHARMACEUTICAL DOSAGE FORMS
HATCH-WAXMAN BASICS AND MARKET EXCLUSIVITIES 37
ADVANCES IN BIOANALYTICAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR SMALL MOLECULE
38
AND PEPTIDE DRUGS
DETECTION OF MICROBIAL LIMIT IN HERBAL PRODUCTS: AN
39
OVERVIEW
SAFETY, EFFICACY AND QUALITY CONTROL GUIDELINES OF HERBAL
40
MEDICINES
REGULATION OF HERBAL MEDICINES IN THE SOUTH-EAST ASIA
41
REGION
NEED OF STANDARDIZATION FOR HERBAL MEDICINES 42
A REVIEW ON QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION OF AMINO ACIDS IN
43
PHARMACEUTICAL FORMULATIONS
PREVENTION OF AFLATOXIN CONTAMINATION IN HERBAL MEDICINAL
44
PLANTS
USE OF CURCUMA LONGA ROOT EXTRACT AS AN INDICATOR IN ACID –
45
BASE TITRATIONS
PHARMACOLOGICAL & PHYTOCHEMICAL REVIEW ON ABRUS
46
PRECATORIUS
BETA VULGARIS L.: PHYTOCHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS, TRADITIONAL
47
USES AND PHARMACOLOGICAL PROPERTIES: A REVIEW
APPLICATION OF FACTORIAL DESIGN IN PHARMACEUTICAL ANALYSIS 48
NEED FOR COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DIFFERENT EXTRACTION
TECHNIQUES ON THE BASIS OF PHYTOCHEMICAL AND 49
PHARMACOLOGICAL STUDY OF VITEX NEGUNDO LINN
IN VITRO ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF COCCINIA GRANDIS LEAVES AND
50
FRUITS
EFFECT OF PUNICA GRANATUM LINN SEED EXTRACT IN GASTRIC
51
ULCER IN DIABETIC RATS
HATCH WAXMAN ACT: THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS FOR
52
MARKETING OF GENERIC DRUGS

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 10
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

PHYTOSOMES: A NOVEL CARRIER FOR HERBAL MEDICINES 53


NEPHROPROTECTIVE ACTIVITY OF EMBELIA RIBES FRUITS IN DRUG
54
INDUCED NEPHROTOXICITY CISPLATIN IN MICE
AN OVERVIEW: INTERNATIONAL REGULATIONS FOR HERBAL DRUGS 55
DATURA STRAMONIUM: A REVIEW ON ITS PHYTOCHEMISTRY AND
56
PHARMACOLOGICAL PROFILE
PHARMACOVIGILANCE STUDY: A REVIEW 57
COMPARATIVE ANATOMICAL STUDY OF LEAF OF JAAL (SALVADORA
58
OLEOIDES) AND CHOTA JAAL (SALVADORA PERSICA)
A REVIEW ON ENICOSTEMMA LITTORALE 59
DNA MARKERS: AS A NEW PHARMACOGNOSTIC TOOL IN HERBAL DRUG
60
TECHNOLOGY
ANTI-DIABETIC EFFECT OF PUNICA GRANATUM IN EXPERIMENTAL
61
ANIMAL MODEL
GESTATIONAL DIABETES 62
FLOATING MICROSPHERES: A NOVEL APPROACH FOR DELIVERING
63
DRUG WITH POOR BIOAVAILABILITY & SHORT HALF LIFE
ESTIMATION OF 3- ACETYL-11-KETO- Β -BOSWELLIC ACID IN A
MARKETED HERBAL PRODUCT RHEUMAX (HERBAJULES RUMATIS) 64
USING HPTLC
GREEN TEA – AN HERBAL DRUG 65
A REVIEW: INTERACTION OF THE VARIOUS SPICES WITH COMMONLY
66
USED MEDICINES
ANTIDIABETIC ACTIVITY OF MADHUMEHA CHURNA IN ALLOXAN
67
INDUCED DIABETIC RAT
EFFECT OF MOMORDICA CHARANTIA ON BIOPHYSICAL AND
BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS OF WOUND HEALING IN EXPERIMENTALLY 68
INDUCED DIABETES IN RATS
MODEL DESIGN FOR DRYING OF CRUDE DRUGS 69
ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF LEAVES OF JASMINUM PUBESCENS 70
DRYING – AN ESSENTIAL STEPS FOR PRESERVATION OF MEDICINAL
71
PLANTS
TRANSFEROSOME : A PROMISING TOOL FOR TRANSDERMAL DRUG
72
DELIVERY
IN VITRO AND IN VIVO ANTIOXIDANT POTENTIAL OF ALCOHOLIC
73
EXTRACT OF AMORPHOPHALLUS CAMPANULATUS ROXB. TUBERS
CHROMATOGRAPHY 74
EVALUATION OF AQUEOUS EXTRACT OF HEART WOOD OF CEDRUS 75

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 11
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

DEODARA FOR ANTIDIABETIC ACTIVITY AND ITS EFFECT ON HEPATIC


ENZYMES OF GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN DIABETIC RATS
AYURVEDIC & HOMEOPATHIC APPROACH FOR SWINE FLU 76
REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUGS 77
DENDRIMER : A REVIEW 78
JUGLANS REGIA HEALS THE WOUND IN DIABETIC RATS 79
PHARMACOGNOSTIC AND PRELIMINARY PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDIES
80
ON PONGAMIA PINNATA LINN. LEAVES
PLANT REVIEW: PAPAVER SOMNIFERUM 81
NEW SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC METHOD FOR ESTIMATION OF
GATIFLOXACIN IN TABLETS USING N, N- DI METHYL UREA AS 82
HYDROTROPIC AGENT
ANTI DIABETIC POTENTIAL OF JUGLANS REGIA LINN. FRUITS 83
ANTIDIARRHOEAL ACTIVITY GUIDED FRACTIONATION OF ROOTS OF
PLUMBAGO ZEYLANICA AND IDENTIFICATION OF LEAD MOLECULE 84
RESPONSIBLE FOR ACTIVITY
GELUCIRE: A VERSATILE EXCIPIENT IN DRUG RESEARCH 85
LIQUID FILLED HARD GELATIN CAPSULES - A TECHNOLOGY COMES OF
86
AGE
PLGA NANOPARTICLES FOR TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY 87
NOVEL APPROACHES FOR INTRANASAL TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY: AN
88
OVERVIEW
RP-HPLC ESTIMATION OF CILASTAZOL IN TABLET DOSAGE FORMS 89
ANTI-HYGROSCOPIC EFFECT OF DEXTRANS IN HERBAL FORMULATIONS 90
A REVIEW ON IN VIVO STUDIES FOR RESPIRATORY ALLERGY 91
LIBS DEVICE FOR MULTI-ELEMENTAL IN SITU MEASUREMENTS 92
FEATURE OF REGULATORY AFFAIRS FOR CLINICAL TRIAL 93
HEPATOPROTECTIVE ACTIVITY OF CALTROPIS PROCERA (AIT) R.
94
BR.
AYURVEDIC AEROSOLS “ A BRIGHT HOPE FOR RESPIRATORY
95
DISORDERS
ANTIMICROBIAL INVESTIGATION OF AN AYURVEDIC FORMULATION:
96
SRNGYADI CHURNA USING DISK DIFFUSION METHOD
MICRO WAVE ASSISTED EXTRACTION: A REVIEW 97
HPTLC BASED METHOD FOR QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATION OF
98
STIGMASTEROL IN PURE PHYTOSTEROL
A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON CONVENTIONAL EXTRACTION METHODS
99
FOR BRAHMI AND EVALUATION OF ITS ANTI-STRESS ACTIVITY USING

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 12
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ELEVATED PLUS MAZE MODEL


SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF
100
THIAZOLIDINE BASED SYDNONE
TRADITIONAL MEDICINES FOR THE TREATMENT OF (HIV / AIDS): A
101
REVIEW
ANTI-ULCER AND ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF DHC-1, AN HERBAL
102
FORMULATION
ASSESSMENT OF SAFETY OF HERBAL MEDICINES 103
ENZYMES IN HERBAL MEDICINES 104
HERBAL BIOENHANCERS: A REVIEW 105
COMPARATIVE STUDY ON DIURETIC ACTIVITY OF FEW MEDICINAL
106
PLANTS IN INDIVIDUAL FORM AND IN COMBINATION FORM
MODERN NMR SPECTROSCOPY TECHNIQUES 107
NEPHROPROTECTIVE ACTIVITY OF EMBELIA RIBES FRUITS IN DRUG
108
INDUCED NEPHROTOXICITY IN RATS
BURN WOUND HEALING PROPERTY OF EMBELIN ISOLATED FROM THE
109
ETHANOL EXTRACT OF FRUIT OF EMBELIA RIBES
TOXIC CONTAMINANTS IN HERBAL MEDICINES: A BIG TROUBLESOME 110
QUINOXALINE DERIVATIVES: POTENTIAL ANTIMICROBIAL AND CNS ACTIVE AGENTS 111
NEUTRACEUTICALS: AN ALTERNATIVE TO MODERN MEDICINES 112
AN ETHICAL ASPECT OF TRADITIONAL HERBAL MEDICINE RESEARCH
113
AND WORLD HEALTH
ALTERNATIVES TO ANIMAL EXPERIMENTATION 114
RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF TEA ENIGMA ON 300 HUMAN SUBJECTS OF
115
BUNDLEKHAND REGION
WOUND HEALING POTENTIAL OF TULSI (OCIMUM SANCTUM LINN.)
116
OINTMENT IN CUTANEOUS WOUND MODEL
ANTICONVULSANT AND ANALGESIC EFFECTS OF ALANGIUM
117
SALVIFOLIUM LINN. SEED EXTRACTS IN MICE
EFFECT OF FRUIT PULP OF FERONIA ELEPHANTUM ON CARBON
118
TETRACHLORIDE INDUCED HEPATIC DAMAGE IN ALBINO RATS

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 13
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

Fingerprinting of Herbal Drugs using Advanced Bioanalytical Techniques


Dr. Bhaswat S. Chakraborty
Sr. Vice President, R&D, Cadila Pharmaceuticals Ltd.

ABSTRACT
Ayurvedic medicines are important part of alternative traditional medicines practice mainly in Southeast Asia.
The origin of ayurvedic medicine, which is mainly herbal medicine, dates back to about 1200 – 500 BC as
evidence by its original compendia basis – Atharvaveda, Charaka Samhita and Sushruta Samhita. About 2000
herb species are mentioned in literature, which offer holistic treatment (from cure to symptom management) to
almost all diseases of even modern times. A CDIR compendium of Indian medical plants includes a
comprehensive research on most of these drugs. We shall discuss characterization of herbal drugs, in general,
using advance Bioanalytical techniques such as fingerprinting by LC MS and microarrays.

Development of herbal drugs and their characterization pose several challenges especially those of correct
identification, quality control and evidences of safety and efficacy that would be acceptable to contemporary
regulatory agencies. Chromatography or genetic fingerprinting (wholesome but unique characterization of these
herbs) offers a substantial solution to these challenges. Fingerprinting covers identity, consistency, authenticity
and in some cases even quantitative measurements of fingerprinted constituents. Hyphenated chromatographic
approaches (GC-MS, LC-MS or LC-MS-MS) have demonstrated great performance in terms of stability of
retention time, selectivity, sensitivity, resolution and precision. For example, Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha)
has been fingerprinted using electrospray LC-MS both qualitatively and quantitatively by regional CSIR
laboratories. Several glycowithanolides and withanolides have been characterized such that specifications for
both qualitative and quantitative quality control of Ashwagandha can be achieved from such analyses. Similarly
chromatograms, total iron current graphs and MS-MS-Spectra have been used chemometrically to characterize
Ginseng varieties used in Shenmai injection.

Herbal drugs can modulate several targets (systems, end organs, receptors, etc.) simultaneously in the body.
Inverted to understand better the molecular mechanism of herbal drug action, analyses of gene expression
seems obviously necessary. DNA microarrays provide high throughput analyses of multiple genes, which are
involved either in the expression of diseases or in diagnosis, prognosis, regulation of their biomarkers and even
cure of those diseases. Examples will be given on the practical application of DNA microarrays in efficacy studies
and genomics of phytochemicals.
ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 14
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

HANDY, ECONOMIC, FASCINATING SCIENCE: SURVISMETER, FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE OF HERBAL AND
PHARMACEUTICALS FORMULATIONS
Man Singh
Chemistry Research Lab, Deshbandhu College, University of Delhi, New Delhi-110019
Email: mansingh50@hotmail.com
ABSTRACT
Herbal science is emerging as safe, cost effective and easily procurable potential source of medicinal products. For centuries, Chinese and Egyptians
developed innumerable herbals for curing diseases and even used as supplements. For example, from time immemorial, a purest carbon procured by
combustion of mustard oil through capillary action on cellulose, a natural fiber, as wick is in use to decorate eyes. The purest carbon is a best and
safe adsorbent to cleanse eyes. Hydrology is natural science of water for herbs growth by capillary action. Thin layer, gel permeation and paper
chromatography depend on capillary action now Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) is in use for better chromatographs as bit of a fluorescent
manganese-activated Zn2SiO4, is used with adsorbent for better visualization of spots under 254 nm UV light with a fluoresce of green light where a
sample spots quench the fluorescence. Many manifestations like frost flowers or ice flowers in freezing weather condition with expansion of water in
plant sap in stem on frozen and thin cracks along a length of the stem. More water draws in the cracks via capillary action and on accumulation form a
petal. Similar manifestations occur when herbal products are used either as medicine or spreading on surfaces. Especially, in case of oil, lubricant,
paint, polish, food, beverage, cosmetic, biosolvents, drugs and pharmacy, polymer, nanomaterials and many others, the surface tension and viscosity
are potential indicators. Chemical formulations [CF] and quality assurance [QA] of blood, plasma, serum, proteins, electrolytes, emulsions, gel-sols
and colloids are assessed efficiently. The QA of engine oil, POP-persistent organic pollutants, IOP-inflammable organic pollutants and VOC-volatile
organic compounds. Efficiency of Inkjet printing, fumigation, pesticides, dry cleaning is highly sensitive to surface tension and viscosity indicators.
Survismeter is developed for Surface tension, interfacial tension, wetting coefficients, molecular surface area, viscosity and friccohesity together for
CF and QA. It has Singapore (no 126089) and Indian (232429) patents and calibrated (no. 06070582/1.01/C-0395) with NPL, Delhi. It is fast-track for
CF and QA of toothpaste, inks, soap and detergents, oils, printing, dyeing, dry cleaning. Handling and sample loading are simple with no hazards and
no discharge of fumes. The friccohesity estimates a range of dipole moment. Saves washing reagents, chromic acid and acetone by 90%, research
on syrups, sol-gels, medicinal tablets, coolants, dry-cleaning, atomizing mixtures-pesticides, spraying agents, disinfectants, cosmetics insecticides
and pesticides do require minimum surface tension for critical mass ratios. The surface excess concentration (Ѓ) with γ = -2.303 RT (Ѓ) log (c) enables
CMC study. Cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) as additive of thermoplastic and thermosetting solvents for
coating, control viscosity in cosmetics, pharmaceutical and electrophoresis. The effect of viscosity (1-500 cps) and surface tension on ethanol and
salicylic acid adsorption with 0-1.5% methylcellulose has been effective. The survismeter is boon for hydrolysis, fuel designing, food and nutrition,
separation technology, Calendaring, diffusion, intermixing, supramolecular, molecular radii study, purity of materials, detection of functional groups,
shear of molecule, Newtonian and Non- Newtonian liquids, antiwrinkle creams, facial creams, sunburn, emulsions, lotions, bio-fluids, syrup, shampoo.
The studies made with survismeter on several natural products will be focused

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 15
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

EFFICACY AND SAFETY STUDIES OF FENNEL


Chanchal Garg1, S. A. Khan1, S. H. Ansari1, Munish Garg2
1Faculty of Pharmacy, Jamia Hamdard, Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi-110003, INDIA.
2Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Maharshi Dayanand University,
Rohtak-124001, Haryana, INDIA.

ABSTRACT

The quality criteria for herbal drugs are based on a clear scientific definition of the raw material.
Even though global herbal resources have a great potential as natural drugs and are of great
commercial importance, they are very often procured and processed without any scientific
evaluation, and launched onto the market without any mandatory safety and toxicology studies. On
that basis, an attempt was made on efficacy and safety studies of a well known herbal drug
Foeniculum vulgare by evaluation of toxicological parameters like heavy metals and pesticide
residues. Additional standardisation parameters like, physical constants, ash content, solvent
residues to prove identity and purity were also carried out. Results obtained during this experiment
revealed that heavy metals and pesticidal residues were variable but found within the prescribed
limits. Standardisation parameters were variable in two samples under consideration which may be
due to different geographical conditions. Hence, there is an urgent need for mandatory evaluation
of these parameters in every crude drug before further processing to ensure safety and efficacy of
Indian medicinal plants and better acceptance at International platform.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 16
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

DETERMINATION OF QUERCETIN BY HPTLC IN CALENDULA OFFICINALIS EXTRACT


Guno Sindhu Chakraborthy, Prashant M. Ghorpade
SVKM’s, NMiMS University, SPTM, Shirpur Campus, Shirpur, Maharashtra 425405

ABSTRACT

Calendula officinalis Linn (Asteraceae), commonly known as English garden marigold or pot marigold is an aromatic
annual herb, which is used in Traditional System of Medicine to treat various diseases. The reported main
constituents are flavonoids, glycosides and saponins. This plant is a native of Southern Europe and is used as
diuretic, diaphoretic, stimulant and also possesses spermicidal activity. This plant is also used because of varied
sources of biological activities like anti-inflammatory, antitumour, antispasmodic. From literature it was found that the
quantification of marker compound was not exploited from this plant. It is considered to contain Quercetin which was
confirmed by Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) and by qualitative test. Thus it was quantified using High
Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC) a sensitive method for development of marker compounds. The
method was carried out on a precoated TLC aluminum plates with silica gel 60 GF as stationary phase. The solvent
system was Chloroform: Methanol (9.5: 0.5) with Rf value of 0.43. Quantitative analysis was carried out in the
absorbance at 366 nm. The linearity regression analysis for the calibration showed r = 0.6548 and 0.999 with respect
to height and area in the concentration range of 0.5-5.0 g per spot. Thus the proposed HPTLC method provides a
faster and cost effective quality control for the routine analysis of Quercetin in extracts containing Calendula
officinalis.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 17
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

CARDIOPROTECTIVE EFFECT OF METHANOLIC PASSIFLORA NEPALENSIS FLOWER POWDER AGAINST


ISCHEMIA REPERFUSION-INDUCED MYOCARDIAL INJURY EX VIVO
Patel S.S., Verma N.K., Verma S., Gauthaman K.
Department of Pharmacology, Himalayan Pharmacy Institute, Majhitar, East Sikkim-737136, India; Phone: 91 3592
246462, e-mail: sitasharan.ss@gmail.com
ABSTRACT
The genus Passiflora consists of 500 species which are mostly found in warm and tropical regions. One of species of this genus
named as Passiflora nepalensis Wall (Passion flower family; Passifloraceae) is more popular in Eastern India. Passiflora
nepalensis is used in folklore medicine for treatment of hypertension and inflammation. Hence the present studies were
designed to isolate the lead molecule from methanolic extract of Passiflora nepalensis flower powder (MEPNF) and to evaluate
the effect of MEPNF against ischemia reperfusion (IR) induced myocardial injury in mice ex-vivo. Compound ‘A’ was isolated
from the methanolic extract and confirmed as flavonol glycoside by confirmatory tests. Its molecular formula was established as
C16H12O5 .CH4 by Mass spectrometry (m/z 446 [M+3], base peak). Its 1H-NMR data were almost super-imposable to the signals
due to the presence of CH3 proton (β-shift, at δH 0.83-0.845). The 13C-NMR data clearly showed the presence of aromatic group
(δC 76-77). The IR spectral data clearly showed –C=C- ring stretching at 1604.83 cm-1, -C-CO-C- coupled stretching & bending
at 1165.04 cm-1 and –OH out of plane bending at 922 cm-1. The compound ‘A’ showed the maximum absorbance at 270 nm
in UV-Spectroscopy. Its HPLC data were super-imposed to the standard Vitexin in Phenomenex column (25 x 2.0 mm I.D.), at
270 nm. The detail spectroscopic analysis revealed that the compound ‘A’ having vitexin type nucleus and named as
“SSPSVKG”. Beside the mice were administered with MEPNF (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg) once daily intraperitoneally for 30 days.
At the end of treatment period, mice hearts were perfused according to the Langendorff method (ML870B2-Langendorff setup
connected to 8/30 Lab chart-Powerlab data acquisition system, ADInstrument, Australia) and subjected to a global 15 min
ischemia and 60 min reperfusion either untreated or treated with MEPNF. Myocardial IR significantly increased the levels of thio-
barbituric acid reactive substances and reduced the levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in
mice heart as compared to control, which was altered significantly in MEPNF treated mice, suggesting that MEPNF protect mice
heart from IR injury. Levels of SGOT, LDH, and hemodynamic parameters (MAP, HR, and LVEDP) also revealed that MEPNF
protect mice heart from IR injury. Histological evaluation (all hematoxylin and eosin, X400) showed that myocardial IR increased,
whereas MEPNF decreased leukocyte infiltration and focal cardiac necrosis. Therefore further studies may carry out to prove the
potential of this plant. The present study will help the industry to produce herbal drugs with fewer side effects, which are
affordable and more effective in the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 18
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ELUCIDATION OF EFFECTIVITY OF ANTIBACTERIALS FROM ROSA INDICA THROUGH IN VITRO AND IN


SITU FIELD TRIALS IN RICE AGAINST XANTHOMONAS ORYZAE PV. ORYZAE

SANDEEP ACHARYA # and R.C.SRIVASTAVA


Plant Physiology and Biochemistry Research Laboratory,
Department of Botany, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar,
West Tripura-799130 India
# E-mail: <organicsandeep@yahoo.com>

ABSTRACT

To introduce a novel and potential antibacterial for sustainable agriculture through out the world and to study the
effectivity in broad sprectrum range, the in vitro, in vivo and in situ observations are taken simultaneously in two
successsive seasons in Tripura state (India) to evaluate the effectivity of the plant crude drug.In this study,
bactericidal activity of different organic extracts of Rose (Rosa indica L.) leaves were evaluated against
phytopathogenic bacteria Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. It was found that the ethanolic extracts are proved to be
potential bactericidal among all other organic extracts and the Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was found to
be 625 ug/ml and Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) recorded was 1.25 mg/ml. Time-kill assay revealed that
ethanolic extract (4mg/ml) killed XOO bacteria within 18 hours. Column chromatography and TLC results indicated a
high degree of phenolic compounds present within the extract. The compound was found to be Gallic acid.
In vivo and in situ observations showed absence of epidermal and vascular cell deformity even at
concentrations higher than MBC, advocating the greenery and safety of Rose leaf extracts having Gallic acid in
agricultural use.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 19
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

PHARMACOGNOSTICAL STANDARDIZATION OF COMMIPHORA BERRYI ENGL. (WIGHT & ARN) BY USING


WHO-GENEVA PROCEDURE
P. Rajesh, P. Selvamani1, S. Latha1, A. Saraswathy2, V. Rajesh Kannan
Department of Microbiology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli-620024
1Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Anna University, Tiruchirapplli-620024
2Captain Srinivasa Murthy Drug Research Institute for Ayurvedha and Siddha, Arumbakkam, Chennai-600107.

ABSTRACT

The present study was performed to evaluate the various pharmacognostical procedure in the bark of Commiphora
berryi Engl., (Burseraceae) The various pharmacognostical parameters were carried out as per WHO guidelines
Geneva procedure i.e., bitterness, fineness, microscopical sections, loss on drying, water and alcoholic extractive
values, water insoluble ash, acid soluble ash, total ash, swelling index, foaming index, heavy metal analysis,
phytochemical analysis and toxicity studies (acute and subacute toxicity). The study was extended with analyzed the
chemical compounds identification in the ethanolic extract i.e., GC-MS, HPLC and HPTLC were carried out in the
analytical session. The presence of various phytoconstituents such as glycosides, reducing sugars, flavonoids, resin,
gums, mucilages, saponins, starch and terpenoids is evidenced. The results showed that acid insoluble ash (1.43 %),
total ash (8.96 %), soluble ash water (0.92 %), water extractive (12.76 %), alcohol extractive (9.99 %), foaming index
(<100), loss on drying (8.31 %), swelling index (3.33 %), toxicity (nil). The study was concluded with the plant has
standardized as per the World Health Organization procedures and without any toxic profile. The result of the
pharmacognostical standardization of this plant serves as a reference piece and helps in future identification and
authentication of this plant specimen. This may concluded that the plant C. berryi has potential property by the
standardization and it can be included in the normal flora of the plant kingdom.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 20
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ADVANCES IN BIOANALYTICAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR SMALL MOLECULE AND PEPTIDE DRUGS


Maliwal DEEPIKA *1, Patidar VIDYASAGAR2
1. B.R.Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mhow-Neemuch Road 458001 Mandsaur (M.P.)
2. School of Pharmacy IPS Academy, Rajendra Nagar, 452003 Indore (M.P.)India.
* Corresponding author. E-mail: diyampharm@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

This presentation will demonstrate two technologies developed and being used world-wide to more efficiently discover
new pharmaceutical remedies. High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is a new
technology for ion separation at atmospheric pressure. This review introduces the reader to FAIMS, covering topics
ranging from the fundamentals and extraction of physical parameters from the raw data, to applications of FAIMS
extending from homeland security to environmental analysis to proteomics. This review is also launching point for
further exploration of Laser Diode Thermal Desorption (LDTD) technology, consisting of a semi-conductor based laser
diode, allows scientists to rapidly analyze compounds.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 21
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

DEVLOPMENT OF AQUEOUS POLYMERIC DISPERSIONS: A REVIEW


Mehta Naveen, Gupta Mahesh Kumar1, Jain Anurekha
B.R.Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M.P.) 458001
1 Kota College of Pharmacy, Kota, Raj.

ABSTRACT

Water soluble polymers are always being in good demand because of their certain advantages over organic solvents
with respect to ecological, toxicological and manufacturing safety concerns, including Pollution, Explosion hazards,
Risk of operators, High cost of organic solvents, solvent toxicity and many more.
The objective of the present review is to provide the essentials information’s regarding the development of aqueous
Polymeric dispersions (APD) of water insoluble polymers like Ethylcellulose, Cellulose Acetate Phtalate, Cellulose
Acetate Propionate, Cellulose Acetate Butyrate, Polyvinyl Acetate Phthalate etc. using different technologies such as
emulsification, nanoprecipitaton etc. for different purposes like film coating with the intention of conferring benefits
and properties to the dosage form over the uncoated variety, Formulation of sustained/controlled drug delivery
systems and many more.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 22
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

TOXICOLOGICAL PROFILE AND ANTI-ARTHRITIC ACTIVITY ON CRUDE ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF


COMMIPHORA PUBESCENS (WIGHT & ARN) BY USING WISTAR RATS
T.M. Chandra Sekar1, P. Rajesh, V. Rajesh Kannan P. Selvamani1, S. Latha1
Department of Microbiology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli-620024
1Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Anna University, Tiruchirapplli-620024

ABSTRACT

The present study was performed to evaluate the various toxicological evaluations and anti-arthritic activity in crude
ethanolic extract of the leaves of Commiphora pubescens (Family: Burseraceae). The toxicity study was evaluated by
using different methodology such as acute, sub-acute and chronic toxicity and Wistar albino rats (in-vivo), the study
was followed by OECD guidelines and various analyses were done in hematological and biochemical parameters. As
well as the fresh plant was checked with heavy metal analysis. The heavy metal (arsenic, cadmium, lead and
mercury) analysis was carried out by in-vitro method and the anti-arthritic activity by in-vivo method. The arthritic
activity was performed in Fruends adjuvant induced model by using Wistar rats. The study was analysed with crude
EECP (100 & 300 mg/kg/i.p.,) and paw volume, hematological, X-ray analysis and bone histopathology were
analyzed. From the evaluation the toxicity studies showed no toxic observation by parameters from the acute and
sub-acute toxicity studies. The toxic substances were showed very minimal quantity in the fresh leaves (arsenic (0.46
ppm), cadmium (0.04 ppm), lead (not detected), mercury (0.05 ppm)). In anti-arthritic activity showed that paw volume
was showed that (55.79% & 66.45%) inhibition and also the X-ray, bone histopathological and hematological
parameters showed that maximum inhibition of arthritic activity. These inhibitions were statistically significant
(p<0.001). From these results indicate that EECP is a bioactive agent and having significant results in anti-arthritic
and action by inhibition of the exudation, and leukocytes recruitment into the inflamed tissues and bone regeneration
calcium deposition.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 23
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

QC OF HERBAL WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO STANDARZATION PARAMETERS: AN OVERVIEW


Sumeet Dwivedi and Raghvendra Dubey
Chordia Institute of Pharmacy, Indore, M.P-India
E.mail: sumeet_dwivedi2002@yahoo.com, Mob. 09893478497

ABSTRACT

Crude drug is any naturally occurring, unrefined substance derived from organic or inorganic sources such as plant,
animal, bacteria, organs or whole organisms intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or
prevention of disease in man or other animals. Quality control of herbal medicines is a tedious and difficult job. Herbal
medicines differ from that of the conventional drugs and so some innovative methods are coming into being for the
sake of quality assessment of herbal drugs. The present paper deals with the quality control of the crude drugs which
will focus its quality and purity with special reference to standardization parameters. Various standardization
parameters including HPTLC, HPLC, GC-MS, LC-MS have been documented and are elaborated in the present
paper.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 24
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

SOLID LIPID NANOPARTICLES (SLNs) SUITABLE COLLOIDAL CARRIERS FOR TOPICAL DELIVERY
Ajay Kumar*, Koshy MK, Randhir Gupta
Faculty of Pharmacy, Babu Banarasi Das National Institute of Technology and Management, Lucknow (UP), India,
PIN 227 105
Email: ajay_prajapati94@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Nanotechnology encompasses the production and application of physical, chemical, and biological systems at scale
ranging from individual atoms or molecules to submicron dimensions, as well as the integration of the resulting
nanostructures into larger systems. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are submicron colloidal carriers (50-1000 nm)
which are composed of physiological lipid, dispersed in water or in an aqueous surfactant solution. SLNs are
developed as an alternative carrier system to emulsions, liposomes, and polymeric nanoparticles. SLNs have been
reported in various application routes like: parenteral, oral, rectal, ophthalmic and topical. Stratum corneum is the
main barrier in the percutaneous absorption of topically applied drugs. SLNs have high affinity to the stratum
corneum, and therefore an enhanced bioavailability of the encapsulated material to the skin is achieved. SLNs
enhance the penetration and transport of active substances particularly lipophilic agents like Miconazole nitrate,
Isotretinoin etc. and thus intensify the concentration of these agents in the skin. Distinct advantages of SLNs are their
solid state of the particle matrix, the ability to protect chemically labile ingredients against chemical decomposition
and the possibility to modulate drug release. Sustained release becomes important with actives that are irritating at
high concentrations, to supply the skin over a prolonged period of time with a drug and to reduce systemic absorption.
This review is aimed at highlighting the use of SLNs as topical drug delivery system for the overall improvement in the
penetration of drugs into the skin thereby increasing treatment efficiency and reduction in the side effects when
compared to conventional topical formulations.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 25
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

POLICIES AND REGULATIONS REGARDING NATURAL DRUGS


L.N.Patidar1 ,V.Saini1 , D. Kapoor1, M.Singhal2
1Maharishi Arvind College of Pharmacy, Ambabari, Jaipur, Rajasthan
2Jaipur National University, Jagatpura, Jaipur, Rajasthan

ABSTRACT

It is a widely held myth that modern drugs are dangerous foreign chemicals with side effects, while herbals are natural, gentle
and safe. The reality is that some herbs can be dangerous and can bring about severe diseases and even lead to death. Unlike
conventional drugs, herbal products are not regulated for purity and potency and this could cause adverse effects and can even
lead to drug interactions. There are fewer studies on herbal medicines than on conventional drugs, mainly because, unlike
synthetic chemicals, herbs cannot be patented, so there is little money to be made by funding such research.
It is important that consumers are made aware of interactions herbs might have with other drugs they are taking. Unfortunately
this information is not available with herbals. Herbals are also frequently adulterated with prescription drugs. In certain countries,
herbal products used for diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease are normally treated as drugs, and
hence regulated by legislation. However, in most countries, such legislation does not exist and in fact, most botanical products
are marketed as dietary supplements. Herbal products categorized as nutritional or dietary supplements are not regulated. In
many countries these medicines are not required to pass any regulatory analysis to be sold as health food supplements.
It is obvious that the herbal industry needs to follow strict guidelines and that regulations are needed. The food and drug
administration’s that regulate prescription drugs only review a herbal product if the item is suspected of being harmful or if the
label contains a medical claim. Even though research is being done, it is very limited and only a few herbal drugs have been
studied adequately by well-controlled clinical trials. Even though evidence should always be presented to support claims of
products, most herbs are still marketed with little or no research. To be registered as drugs, these products need to be tested to
prove their safety and clinical efficacy. However, so far, few programs have been established to study the safety and efficacy of
herbal medicines as originally proposed in the WHO guidelines for the assessment of herbal medicines. The future of herbal
drugs is overshadowed by the pervading lack of regulatory control.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 26
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE EFFICACY, STABILITY AND QUALITY CONTROL OF HERBAL DRUGS
PREPARATIONS
L.N.Patidar1 ,V.Saini1 , D. Kapoor1, M.Singhal2
1Maharishi Arvind College of Pharmacy, Ambabari, Jaipur, Rajasthan
2Jaipur National University, Jagatpura, Jaipur, Rajasthan

ABSTRACT

The number of reports of patients experiencing depressing health consequences caused by the use of herbal
medicines has improved in recent years. Investigation and studies have exposed a variety of reasons for such
nuisance. One of the major causes of reported undesirable events is directly linked to the poor quality of herbal
medicines, including raw medicinal plant materials. It has therefore been recognized that inadequate attention has
been paid to the quality assurance and control of herbal medicines.
Quality control directly impacts the wellbeing and efficacy of herbal medicinal products. The execution of good
agricultural and collection practises for medicinal plants is only the first step in quality assurance, on which the safety
and efficacy of herbal medicinal products directly depend, and also plays a significant role in the fortification of natural
resources of medicinal plants for sustainable use.
It is well recognized that intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including species differences, organ specificity, diurnal and
seasonal variation, environment, field collection and cultivation methods, contamination, substitution, adulteration,
and processing and manufacturing practises significantly affect botanical quality.
According to the World health Organization the botanical identity, scientific name (genus, species, subspecies/variety,
author, and family) of each medicinal plant under cultivation should be verified and recorded. If available, the local
and English common names should also be recorded. Other relevant information, such as the cultivar name, ecotype,
chemotype, or phenotype, may also be provided, as appropriate.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 27
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

GREEN HOUSE EFFECT AND GLOBAL WARMING: EFFECTS ON CROP PRODUCTIVITY


Manmohan singhal1, Devesh kapoor2, Vipin saini2, Yashwant1, Gupta V. 1
1School of Pharmaceutical Science, Jaipur National University, Jaipur
2Maharishi Arvind College of Pharmacy, Ambabari Jaipur

ABSTRACT

The green house is made up of roof and walls of transparent glass, through which sunlight enters and warms up the
plants and soil inside. It is mainly constructed in cold regions to grow plants, flowers and vegetables which otherwise
would not survive in the open atmosphere. A naturally occurring blanket of green house gases (mainly methane,
Nitrous oxide, water vapors, Chlorofluorocarbons and carbon dioxide) absorb some of the solar radiation and help
warm the planet to a comfortable livable temperature. Under the global warming, Green house effect is rapidly
emerging as an important environmental issue. Carbon dioxide is main gas responsible for about 50% of heat
retained by atmospheric gases and for about half of the green house effect. The average facade temperature of the
globe has augmented more than 1 degree Fahrenheit since 1900 and the speed of warming has been almost three
folds the century long average since 1970. This increase in earth’s average temperature is called Global warming.
After an industrial revolution, various human activities are changing the character and composition of the atmosphere.
Atmospheric concentrations of Carbon dioxide have increased by nearly 30%. And methane concentrations have
more than doubled. A major consequence of global warming is the rise in sea level. A rise in sea level can have a
serious negative impact on human settlements, loss of biodiversity, tourism, agriculture and wetlands. The predicted
global warming will lower overall world crop productivity.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 28
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

\
OZONE LAYER DEPLETION: A MAJOR PROBLEM FOR HUMAN AND PLANTS
Manmohan singhal1, Devesh kapoor2, Vipin saini2, Ranjan B.1
1School of Pharmaceutical Science, Jaipur National University, Jaipur
2Maharishi Arvind College of Pharmacy, Ambabari Jaipur

ABSTRACT

Ozone layer depletion is global environmental problem which demands a ‘do or die’ approach – to overcome it.
Unless the protective ozone layer is protected from depletion, more and more harmful UV radiations from sun will
enter into biosphere and may prove fatal to most life forms in the biosphere. The ozone layer absorbs 97-99% of the
sun's high frequency ultraviolet light , light which is potentially damaging to life on earth. Every 1% decrease in the
earths ozone shield is projected to increases the amount of UV light exposure to the lower atmosphere by 2%.
Methane, Nitrous oxide, methyl bromide, Chlorofluorocarbons etc enhance ozone layer depletion. Among which
Chlorofluorocarbons is the main culprit. Severe depletion of the Antarctic ozone layer was first observed in the early
1980s. The international response embodied in the Montreal Protocol. Today 191 countries worldwide have signed
the Montreal Protocol which is widely regarded as the most successful Multinational Environmental Agreement ever
reached to date. In humans the increased UV radiation increases the incidence of sunburn, cataract, ageing of skin,
skin cancer and it weakens immune system, leading to increased cases of infectious diseases. Many micro-
Phytoplankton and zooplanktons may die because of increased exposure to UV radiations. As UV radiation affects
the crops and plants, they cause a reduced rate of photosynthesis, decrease in vegetation and food production.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 29
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE (GMP) FOR HERBAL MEDICINE

D. Kapoor1, V.Saini1, L.N.Patidar1, M.Singhal2


1Maharishi Arvind College of Pharmacy, Ambabari, Jaipur, Rajasthan
2Jaipur National University, Jagatpura, Jaipur, Rajasthan

ABSTRACT

In India there are about 10 000 licensed pharmacies of ISM and herbal medicines producing medicines. With the
increase in commercialization, some unprincipled manufacturing practices have crept in to this profession, resulting in
the use of shortcuts to replace certain tedious and essential processes, poor and inaccurate labelling and several
other poor manufacturing practices. These have all necessitated the preface of statutory Good Manufacturing
Practices (GMPs) for all ISM drug-manufacturing industries. The Government of India came up with guidelines for the
adoption of GMP standards by June 2002, and the details of the provision of GMP for Ayurveda, Siddha, and Unani
drugs are provided in the Drugs and Cosmetics Amendment Rules, 2000. GMPs are prescribed to ensure that raw
materials used in the manufacturer of drugs are authentic, of prescribed quality, and free from contamination;
manufacturing processes are as has been prescribed to maintain the standards adequate quality control measures
are adopted; and manufactured drugs that are released for sale are of acceptable quality.
In addition to these guidelines, it is also essential that at the factory in which the medicines are prepared there must
be adequate space for receiving and storing raw materials, processing/manufacturing activities, a quality control
section, storage of finished goods, and a proper office for record maintenance including storage of rejected
drugs/goods.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 30
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

PHYTOMEDICINE
D. Kapoor1, V.Saini1, L.N.Patidar1, M.Singhal2
1Maharishi Arvind College of Pharmacy, Ambabari, Jaipur, Rajasthan
2Jaipur National University, Jagatpura, Jaipur, Rajasthan

ABSTRACT

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), phytomedicine is defined as herbal preparations produced by
subjecting plant materials to extraction, fractionation, purification, concentration or other physical or biological
processes. These preparations may be produced for immediate consumption or as the basis for other herbal
products. Such plant products may contain recipient or inert ingredients, in addition to the active ingredients.
Furthermore, the first generations of plant medicine were undemanding botanical materials employed in more or less
crude form. These medicines such as Cinchona, Opium, Belladonna and Aloe were selected based on empirical proof
as gathered by traditional practitioners. The second-generation phytopharmaceutical agents were pure molecules
whose compounds differ from the synthetic therapeutic agent only in their origin, for example taxol from Taxus sp.,
quinine from Cinchona and reserpine from Rauvolfia sp. In the development of third generation of plant medicine, the
formulation is based on well-controlled double-blind clinical and toxicological studies with phytomedicine to improve
the quality, efficacy, stability and the safety of the preparations. Phytomedicine has played a key role in world health
care with about 80% of world depending on it. Phytomedicine has demonstrated its contribution to the reduction of
excessive mortality, morbidity and disability due to diseases such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, sickle-cell
anemia, diabetes, mental disorders and microbial infections. Phytomedicines are now very popular in developing
countries with knowledge about the safety, efficacy and quality assurance of botanical medicine.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 31
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

QUALITY CONTROLS OF HERBAL DRUGS: A PRESENT SCENARIO


V.Saini1, D.Kapoor1, L.N.Patidar1,M.M.Kumawat1,M.Singhal2
1Maharishi Arvind College of Pharmacy, Ambabari, Jaipur, Rajasthan
2Jaipur National University, Jagatpura, Jaipur, Rajasthan

ABSTRACT

Quality control for efficiency and safety of herbal products is of vital importance. Quality can be defined as the status of a drug
that is determined by uniqueness, purity, content and other chemical, substantial or biological properties or by the manufacturing
processes. Quality control is a term that refers to processes concerned in maintaining the quality and validity of a manufactured
product. For the quality control of a customary medicine, the traditional methods are procured and studied and credentials and
the traditional information about the identity and quality evaluation are interpreted in terms of modern assessment. In general, all
medicines, whether they are of synthetic or of plant origin should fulfill the basic requirements of being effectual and safe, and
this can be achieved by appropriate quality control/quality assurance. Natural products in medicine constitute a vast array of
“raw materials,” making clear definitions important. Quality criteria are based on clear scientific definitions of the raw material.
The term “herbal drugs” denotes plants or plant parts that have been converted into phytopharmaceuticals by means of simple
processes involving harvesting, drying, and storage. Hence they are capable of variation. This variability is also caused by
differences in growth, geographical location, and time of harvesting. A practical addition to the definition is also to include other
crude products derived from plants, which no longer show any organic structure, such as essential oils, fatty oils, resins and
gums. The quality controls of herbal crude drugs and their bioconstituents is of intervening consequence in justifying their
acceptability in modern system of medicines. One of the major troubles faced by users in industry is non-availability of inflexible
quality control profiles for herbal raw materials and their formulations. With the initiation of new analytical techniques and
sophisticated instrumental technology, it is now possible to suggest a practicable quality assurance profile for crude drugs or its
bioactive constituents. Owing to the medicinal properties attributed to a crude drug, it is necessary to retain its quality and purity
in commercial market. Due to the advancement of the chemical knowledge of crude drugs, at present evaluation also includes
methods of estimating active constituents present in the crude drug in addition to its morphological and microscopic analysis.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 32
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

REGULATORY CHALLENGES OF INDIAN HERBAL MEDICINE


V.Saini1, D. Kapoor1, L.N.Patidar1, M.Singhal2 ,M.M.Kumawat1
1Maharishi Arvind College of Pharmacy, Ambabari, Jaipur, Rajasthan
2Jaipur National University, Jagatpura, Jaipur, Rajasthan

ABSTRACT

Overall the incidence of serious adverse reactions is significantly lower with most herbal medicines when compared
with pharmaceutically derived drugs. However, the need still exists to more closely keep an eye on practitioners and
formulators of any traditional medicine, including those of Indian origin, so that unethical practices are reduced.
For most herbal products, authentication is difficult if not impossible after processing has occurred. In traditional
medicines that are geared up in India and exported, the chore of ensuring safety is even more knotty since the
incorporation of certain levels of potentially toxic herbs or heavy metals may not be considered harmful in the country
of origin. Some Chinese and Indian Ayurvedic medicines have been redundant by US, Canada and other countries on
the grounds that they contain high levels of potentially toxic elements, including heavy metals.
In the view of above problem, the authorized body for traditional medicine “Ayush” has adopted strict guidelines for all
herbal medicines (Unani, Ayurveda, and Siddha) to be exported from India. Ayush has made it mandatory for all ISM
medicines to be exported to meet the international standards for contamination including heavy metals in 2005.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 33
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

LEPIDIUM SATIVUM L.: A REVIEW ON ITS FOLK USE, PHYTOCHEMICAL AND PHARMACOLOGICAL
PROFILE
Jain Sarika*, Soni Priyanka, Soni Vishal
Department of Herbal Drug Research
B.R. Nahata College of Pharmacy and Research Centre
Mhow Neemuch Road, Mandsaur 458 001, India

ABSTRACT

Lepidium sativum L. (LS) is a shrub belonging to Brassicaceae family commonly known as Asalia, had long history of
traditional medicinal uses in the Morocco.The seeds has been known since ancient times for its curative properties &
has been utilized for treatment of various aliments.Traditionally, seeds of LS are recommended for anti-diarrhoeal
properties, as tonic galactogogue, aphrodisiac, in blood & skin disease, in abdomen pain, in inflammation & in organ
disease. A wide range of phytochemicals including carotene, glucosinolates,Vit C,Vit B,cardiac steroids, fixed oil,
volatile oil,mucilage,iron,pantothenic acid have been isolated from this species. Extract & metabolites from this plant
have been found to possess pharmacological activity. Particular attention has been given to its hepatoprotective,
antihypertensive, antidiabetic and in cancer. The present review is therefore, an effort to give a detail survey of the
literature on its pharmacognosy, phytochemistry, traditional & pharmacological uses.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 34
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

NANOTECHNOLOGY AND BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER


Hamid Safi bohra*; Kratika Daniel; Vivek Daniel
Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy

ABSTRACT

Delivery of drugs to brain is still a major challenge.Successful delivery across the blood brain barrier has only been
achieved in some cases for example pro drugs;alternative approach is delivery to the brain by using nanoparticles
.Nanotechnology is expected to bring revolutionary changes in the field of life sciences including drug delivery
,diagnostics,neutraceuticals and production of biomaterials.the review focuses on preparation of nanoparticles
,polymer used,mechanism of nanoparticle mediated drug transfer across blood brain barrier and application of
nanoparticles as biomarkers.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 35
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

NANOMATERIALS: AN EMERGING SCIENCE FOR THE FABRICATION OF PHARMACEUTICAL DOSAGE


FORMS
PATIDAR K.*1, JAIN R.1, SONI M.1& SONI P.2

*1. Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy, Mandsaur 458001, Madhya Pradesh, India.


2. B.R.Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur, 458001, Madhya Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT

Nanomaterials are seen as a key technology for the 21st Century, and much is expected of them in terms of innovation and
economic growth. They could open the way to many radically new applications, which would form the basis of innovative
products. In this context, Nanopolymers with different structures, shapes, and functional forms have recently been prepared
using several techniques. Nanopolymers are the most promising basic building blocks for mounting complex and simple
hierarchical nanosystems. The applications of nanopolymers are extremely broad and polymer-based nanotechnologies are fast
emerging. As nanomaterials are still in their infancy, both public research institutes and private businesses could play a vital role
in the process. A wide variety of products containing nanomaterials are being investigated for possible drug applications and
these nanopharmaceuticals are likely to have potential applications as drug delivery systems potentially include polymeric
biodegradable nanoparticles, inorganic nanoparticles, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, nanocrystals such as quantum dots for
diagnostic applications and imaging, and magnetic nanoparticles such as iron oxide for Magnetic Resonance Imaging
(MRI).They have some potential advantages include 1) the possibility for targeted therapy which could minimize drug usage or
decrease the frequency of drug use, while enhancing the safety profile , the possibilities for the use of novel dosage forms to
enhance patient compliance or for controlled or sustained drug release, the ability to develop multifunctional particles that can
target, image and treat disease,protection of associated drugs from enzymatic and chemical degradation, and enhanced
bioavailability due to larger surface areas associated with smaller particles, which may also afford the drug delivery system
access to less accessible sites .Among a plethora of nanomaterials designed and synthesized for biomedical applications,
carbon nanotube (CNT), gold nanorods (GNRs), and iron oxide (Fe3O4) owing to their unique features have been demonstrated
to be employed for localized hyperthermia treatment for cancer therapy i.e. chitosan-incorporated nanomaterials can be
conjugated with biomolecular moiety to specifically target cancer cell lines. The interaction of nanostructured biomaterials with
malignant cells it was further applied to determine the optimal operation time for thermal destruction of cancer cells.
ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 36
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

HATCH-WAXMAN BASICS AND MARKET EXCLUSIVITIES


Sumit Kumar Triphathi, Amit Maru, B.P. Nagori
Lachoo Memorial College of Sci. & Tech. (Pharmacy Wing), Jodhpur
Email: sumittriphati30@gamil.com
ABSTRACT
Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act of 1984 (“Hatch-Waxman”)
 Patent term restoration (partial) to compensate innovators for pre-market approval regulatory delay
 Process to approve duplicates of approved drugs that rely on safety and efficacy studies by innovator
 Complex scheme of patent information and patent certifications
 Regulatory exclusivities for new chemical entities, new clinical investigations and first ANDA patent challenger
Exclusivities
 Patent Term Exclusivity
 Market Exclusivity
As per sections 505(c)(3)(E), 505(j)(5)(F) and 505(j)(5)(B)(iv) of the US FDCA:
Market Exclusivity/ Data Exclusivity
Data exclusivity refers to a practice whereby, for a fixed period of time, DRA do not allow the registration files of the originator to
be used to register a therapeutically equivalent generic version of that medicine. Data exclusivity prevents DRAs from registering
generic versions of a medicine during a limited period unless the generic manufacture independently carries out its own tests
showing the safety and efficacy of the medicine.
Types of Non-Patent Exclusivities (Market Exclusivities) in the US
 NCE - New Chemical Entities (5 years)
 Label Exclusivity (3 years)
 ODE - Orphan Drugs (7 years)
 Pediatric Exclusivity (6 months)
 Generic Exclusivity (180 days)
 Animal Product Exclusivity (3 or 5 years)
Conclusion
Due to this act people get the drug at affordable price. It enhances the generic drug contribution in market. (In 1980 it was 20 %
& it would be 60 % in 1996.)

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 37
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ADVANCES IN BIOANALYTICAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR SMALL MOLECULE AND PEPTIDE DRUGS


Maliwal Deepika *1, Patidar Vidyasagar2
1. B.R.Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mhow-Neemuch Road 458001 Mandsaur (M.P.)
2. School of Pharmacy IPS Academy, Rajendra Nagar, 452003 Indore (M.P.)India.
* Corresponding author. E-mail: diyampharm@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

This presentation will demonstrate two technologies developed and being used world-wide to more efficiently discover
new pharmaceutical remedies. High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is a new
technology for ion separation at atmospheric pressure. This review introduces the reader to FAIMS, covering topics
ranging from the fundamentals and extraction of physical parameters from the raw data, to applications of FAIMS
extending from homeland security to environmental analysis to proteomics. This review is also launching point for
further exploration of Laser Diode Thermal Desorption (LDTD) technology, consisting of a semi-conductor based laser
diode, allows scientists to rapidly analyze compounds.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 38
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

DETECTION OF MICROBIAL LIMIT IN HERBAL PRODUCTS: AN OVERVIEW

Abhishek Dwivedi and Ameeta Argal

Ragiv Gandhi College of Pharmacy, Bhopal, M.P-India


abhiherbal@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Herbs and herbal products are gaining importance now a day due to very less or no side effects. The microbial limit
tests are designed to perform the qualitative and quantitative estimations of specific viable microorganisms present in
herbal substances or in the samples. Since, the herbal products deals with the formulation of various dosage form
which ultimately be used by the human for alleviating certain kind of ailments (including cosmetics) to treat the
dreadful diseases. Therefore, the test should be performed in all the dosage form to ensure that the formulation is
free from micro-organism and it also ensure that it will not going to harm the human body as concern to the micro-
organism. All the aspects are detailed out in present paper.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 39
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

AN OVERVIEW
SAFETY, EFFICACY AND QUALITY CONTROL GUIDELINES OF HERBAL MEDICINES
Jitendra Singh Rajput* & Ashok Kumar Patel
ips.jitendra@gmail.com, Patelashok19@gmail.com
School of Pharmacy & Technology Management, NMIMS University, Mumbai (Maharashtra), INDIA

ABSTRACT

During the latter part of this century the practice of herbalism has become mainstream throughout the world. This is
due in part to the recognition of the value of traditional medical systems, particularly of Asian origin, and the
identification of medicinal plants from indigenous pharmacopeias that have been shown to have significant healing
power. Generally these formulations are considered moderate in efficacy and thus less toxic than most
pharmaceutical agents. This review highlights the current advances in knowledge about the safety, efficacy, quality
control, marketing and regulatory aspects of botanical medicines. Phytotherapeutic agents are standardized herbal
preparations consisting of complex mixtures of one or more plants which contain as active ingredients plant material
in the crude or processed state.Herbal drug technology is used for converting botanical materials into medicines,
where standardization and quality control with proper integration of modern scientific techniques and traditional
knowledge is important.Plants contain hundreds of constituents and some of them are very toxic, such as the most
cytotoxic anti-cancer plant-derived drugs, digitalis and the pyrrolizidine alkaloids, etc. However, the adverse effects of
phytotherapeutic agents are less frequent compared with synthetic drugs, but well-controlled clinical trials have now
confirmed that such effects really exist. Considering the extent of use of herbal remedies and food supplements a
comprehensive surveillance system for monitoring the adverse health effects of these products is essential.
Surveillance of a large population is needed for the complex task of identifying the uncommon and unpredictable
adverse effects which are potentially serious.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 40
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

AN OVERVIEW
REGULATION OF HERBAL MEDICINES IN THE SOUTH-EAST ASIA REGION
Ashok Kumar Patel* & Jitendra Singh Rajput
Patelashok19@gmail.com, ips.jitendra@gmail.com
School of Pharmacy & Technology Management, NMIMS University, Mumbai (Maharashtra), INDIA

ABSTRACT

Traditional medicine and complementary medicine (TM/CM) have been used, through the ages, in all countries of
South-East Asia Region (SEAR). Many countries in this Region have extensive systems of TM within existing health
services. In the rural areas of countries such as India, Nepal and Sri Lanka, a large proportion of the population use
traditional medicines to meet their primary health care needs. Governments in SEAR are encouraging medical
doctors to work with traditional practitioners at the hospital level, and to support research on TM. Many countries in
SEAR need expertise and guidance to develop national regulations and safety monitoring systems. According to
WHO global survey on national policy and regulation of TM, there are three common difficulties and challenges:
1. Lack of information sharing
2. Lack of safety monitoring for herbal medicines and
3. Lack of methods to evaluate their safety and efficacy.
National drug regulatory authorities have to establish guidelines on all elements of quality assurance, evaluate
dossiers and data submitted by the producers, and check post-marketing compliance of products with the
specifications set out by the producers as well as compliance with GMP. The manufacturers have to adhere to Good
Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP), GMP and GLP standards, establish appropriate specifications for their
products, intermediates and starting materials and compile a well-structured, comprehensive documentation on
pharmaceutical development and testing.This document aims to facilitate the registration and regulation of herbal
medicines by establishing the foundation for a harmonized regulatory standard to meet the common demands of the
Region.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 41
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

AN OVERVIEW
NEED OF STANDARDIZATION FOR HERBAL MEDICINES
Ashok Kumar Patel* & Jitendra Singh Rajput
Patelashok19@gmail.com, ips.jitendra@gmail.com
School of Pharmacy & Technology Management, NMIMS University,
Mumbai (Maharashtra), INDIA.

ABSTRACT

Every Herbal Formulation must be standardized as per WHO guidelines. The objective of WHO guidelines is to define
basic criteria for the evaluation of quality, safety and efficacy of drugs herbal medicines. India is one of the world’s
twelve leading biodiversity centers with the presence of over 45,000 different plant species, out of this about 15,000-
20,000 plants have good medicinal properties of which only about 7,000-7,500 are being used by traditional
practitioners. India has a great role to play, as supplier of herbal products not only to meet the domestic needs, but
also to take advantage of the tremendous export potential. To be a global supplier of herbal medicines conforming to
international specification the following aspects are still demanding the attention: Proper botanical identification of all
medicinal plants in Indian System of Medicine, All herbal ingredients in preparation to be specified by their botanical
names besides their common names, Processing of medicinal plants in a scientific, economic and safe way using
similar ones used for modern drugs, Isolation and chemical characterization of acute ingredients including inorganic
constituents, Pharmacological and clinical studies to ascertain their efficacy and safety, Standardization to ensure
uniformity. The use of medicinal plants in combination to be limited to facilitate analysis and to apply quality control
and standardization parameters to herbal drug preparations. World Health Organization currently recommends and
encourages traditional herbal remedies in natural health care programs because these drugs are easily available at
low cost and are comparatively safe.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 42
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

A REVIEW ON QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION OF AMINO ACIDS IN PHARMACEUTICAL FORMULATIONS.


Vishnoi Akanksha, Jain Anurekha, Toppo Emmanuel, Maliwal Deepika.
Pharmaceutical Analysis Division, B. R. Nahata College of pharmacy,Mandsaur MP.

ABSTRACT

In the last decade the pharmaceutical industries have been extensively using Nutritional formulation, which contain
proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and other nutritive materials. Amino acids are primary component of
proteins and they are essential to life. In protein rich formulation, nutritional value depends on the, quality and Amino
acid profile. The separation, identification, and quantification analysis of Amino acids have become a routine task in
biotechnology, biomedical, food quality control and pharmaceutical formulations. It is necessary to hydrolyze a
protein/peptide to its individual amino acid constituents before amino acid analysis (commonly Acid hydrolysis). In
Amino acid determination a large number of methods are available. In this Review article we discuss simple and
valuable methods for Amino acid analysis in neutraceutical. As amino acids have a net charge this varies with the pH,
this property can be used to separate amino acids using ion-exchange resins. Electrophoresis is a technique that
uses the net charge of amino acids as a basis for separation. Thin layer chromatography is often used for separation
and identification of amino acids from formulation with reference to the RF values. Like conventional TLC using silica
coated plates, the cellulose in paper can be used for the chromatography of amino acids. At present, most workers
derivatize the amino acids before separation, usually making the phenylthiohydantoin compounds which can be
detected by intense UV absorbance. Amino acids can be analyzed by standard GC methods, but due to their zwitter
ionic nature they must be derivatized to increase their volatility. Nowadays the fast and sensitive high performance
liquid chromatographic analysis of derivatized amino acids is a good alternative for amino acids. GLC-MS is another
technique that is occasionally used for quantitative analysis.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 43
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

PREVENTION OF AFLATOXIN CONTAMINATION IN HERBAL MEDICINAL PLANTS.


Singh Chandra Prakash, Jain Anurekha, Garg Rajesh, Toppo Emmanuel.
Pharmaceutical Analysis Division, B. R. Nahata College of pharmacy,
Post Box 6, Mandsaur (M.P.) 458001, India
E-mail: singhprakash06@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Aflatoxins are a group of structurally related toxic secondary metabolites produced by three species Aspergillus
flavus, Aspergillus parasiticus and the rare species A. nomius and known to be highly toxic and potential carcinogens.
Aflatoxins produce a wide range of clinical effects in animals. The economic impact of reduced productivity, increased
of disease because of immune suppression, subtle but chronic damage to vital organs and tissues, and interference
with reproductive capacity is many times greater than that of acute livestock death.
Aflatoxins are the only mycotoxins currently regulated by U.S. Food and Administration (FDA). The FDA has
established action levels which prohibit the use of a contaminated lot. Aflatoxins are very difficult, if not impossible, to
control once established. Therefore, prevention is the key to management. Preventing or reducing Aflatoxin Exposure
in herbal medicinal plants can be done by pre-harvesting and post harvesting management.
Pre-Harvest prevention includes Irrigation, Insecticides, Competitive exclusion, Timing of harvest and Post-Harvest
(Drying & Storage) includes hand sorting, Drying on mats, Sun drying, Storing bags on wooden pallets or elevated off
ground Insecticides, Rodent control, Hand sorting, Winnowing, Washing and Chemoprotectant.These pre and post
harvesting management brought together a driving force to control preventing and reducing Aflatoxin exposure in
herbal medicinal plants.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 44
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

USE OF CURCUMA LONGA ROOT EXTRACT AS AN INDICATOR IN ACID – BASE TITRATIONS


Mukesh K. Sunarthi, Anurekha Jain, Chirag Jain, Deepika Maliwal
Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis
B.R.Nahata Contact research Centre, Mandsaur 458001 (M.P.)

ABSTRACT

Turmeric Curcuma longa Linn., Family Zingiberaceae , is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant. It Thrives as an
important coloring agent for curries and other foods, is also an important medicinal herb, used by both Chinese and
Ayurvedic medicine practitioners.The present work highlights the use of the methanolic extract of the Curcuma longa
as an acid – base titrations. It is found to be very useful economical ,simple and accurate indicator for said titrations.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 45
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

PHARMACOLOGICAL & PHYTOCHEMICAL REVIEW ON ABRUS PRECATORIUS


Jain Deepak *, Toppo Emmanuel, Gupta V. B.
B. R. Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mhow-Neemuch road, Mandsaur, MP

ABSTRACT

Abrus precatorius (Fam: Leguminosae) is a folklore medicinal plant traditionally indicated to treat cancer,ulcer and
fever. The purpose of the present study was aimed to compile all recent, traditional use and chemical constituent of
this plant. The seeds,leaves,roots has been utilized for treatment of various ailments, such as anti-fertility,
antiphlogistic, anti-ophthalmic, the methanolic extract of seeds inhibit the motility of human spermatozoa, agglutinins
isolated from seeds are used in the treatment of AIDS & Hepatitis, paste of seeds applied in sciatica, stiffness of
shoulder joints,baldness ,hair wash to kill lice, hair vitaliser, enhance hair grouth, cure dandruff and other hair
diseases, the leaf juice is sweet in taste and used to treat hoar senses and the leaf juice mixed with oil is applied on
painful swelling of the body, abrus lectins, iso-lectineand abrin has immunostimulatory properties , plants is also used
to treat epilepsy by Tanzanian traditional healers, Antitumor and proapoptotic effect of Abrus agglutinin derived
peptide in Dalton’s lymphoma tumor model , Abrin induced oxidative stress mediated DNA damage in human
leukemic cells and its reversal by N-acetylcysteine, treatment of certain sex-hormone-related diseases such as
prostate and breast cancer have also been studied. A wide range of chemical compounds have been established
including, seeds contain albuminous substance abrin,poisonous protein,fat splitting enzyme, glucoside abrussic acid,
lupeol acetate, sitosterol, gallic acid, haemagglutinin, trigonellin, cholin, protein abrins I, II, III. leaves contains
glycyrrhizin glucoside, precol,abrol,abrasin precasine and abrin, roots contains stigmasterol, quercetin, toxic alkaloids
such as lectin, abrin,I solectin, glucoside- abrallin, abruquinones A,B,C,D,E,F,&G and glycyrrhizin, oleanolic acid.
Shell contains the red colouring matter, sweet triterpienoid glycosides known as abrusoside A,B,C&D. This
contribution provides a comprehensive review of its ethnomedical uses, chemical constituents and the
pharmacological profile as a medicinal plant. Particular attention has been given to antitumor activity,
immunostimulatory properties, oral contraceptive properties, treatment of AIDS & Hepatitis effects presented in this
review such that the potential use of this plant either in pharmaceutics and other field.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 46
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

BETA VULGARIS L.: PHYTOCHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS, TRADITIONAL USES AND PHARMACOLOGICAL


PROPERTIES: A REVIEW
Pancholi Sunil*, Soni Priyanka and Soni Vishal
B.R. Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur, MP

ABSTRACT

Many herbal remedies individually or in combination have been recommended in various medical treatises for the
cure of different disease. Beta vulgaris L., commonly known as “garden beet” has been recognized in different system
of traditional medicines for the treatment of different disease and ailments of human beings. It contains several
phytoconstituents such as folic acid, betin, vitamin B6, vitamin C, cellulose, carbohydrates, pectin and betanin. Mainly
belong to flavanoids. Traditionally juice of root is used as liver tonic, in inflammation of eyes; in combination with oil it
is good for burns. Root decoction is used in habitual constipation and hemorrhoids. Root of beet has been used for
treatment of cancer. The red beet is valuable in uterine disease. Leaves of the plant are used as diuretic, purgative, in
inflammation, in headache, in spleen diseases, earache etc. the seeds are traditionally used as carminative,
expectorant, in inflammation and seed oil is applied in localized pains. Tubers are also used as expectorant, in
inflammation and mental troubles.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 47
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

APPLICATION OF FACTORIAL DESIGN IN PHARMACEUTICAL ANALYSIS


Prachi Saxena , Alankar Shrivastava, Anurekha Jain,
Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, B.R.Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M.P.)
E.mail- mysteriousprachi@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Factorial designs are used in experiments where the effects of different factors, or conditions, on experimental results
are to be elucidated. Some practical examples where factorial designs are optimal are experiments to determine the
effect of pH of buffer for ionization of drug and stability of ion-pair complex for extractive spectrophotometery, SCF-
techniques, HPLC, Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy and other techniques of analytical estimation. Factorial designs
are the designs of choice for simultaneous determination of the effects off several factors and their interactions during
estimation of drugs in pharmaceutical formulation as well as in biological fluids i.e urine, serum, blood etc. In
statistics, a full factorial experiment is an experiment whose design consists of two or more factors, each with discrete
possible values or "levels", and whose experimental units take on all possible combinations of these levels across all
such factors. A full factorial design may also be called a fully-crossed design. Such an experiment allows studying the
effect of each factor on the response variable, as well as the effects of interactions between factors on the response
variable. This article introduces some elementary concepts of the design and analysis of factorial designs.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 48
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

NEED FOR COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DIFFERENT EXTRACTION TECHNIQUES ON THE BASIS OF


PHYTOCHEMICAL AND PHARMACOLOGICAL STUDY OF VITEX NEGUNDO LINN.
Pragya Shrivastava, E. Toppo, V. Soni, E. Jarald
B.R.Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M.P.)
Email ID-shrivastava.ap.pragya4@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Extraction refers to processes for the isolation of active ingredients from drug material, this may be by dissolving in a
suitable menstrum (liquid solvent eg. water or alcohol). It is the process of extracting out of all active ingredients from
the drug with the help of a solvent. The extraction technique separated out soluble plant metabolites leaving behind
insoluble cellular marc. This review deal, i need of development and optimization of extraction techniques for high
yield of Vitex negundo plant, the proposed techniques included are soxhlet, maceration, ultrasonication extraction,
microwave-assisted extraction, parameter under consideration viz -solvent ratio, drug and solvent ratio, time,
temperature. Hydroalcoholic solvent is selected for extraction of Vitex negundo because previous studies have
already demonstrated the anti-inflammatory activity of 70%v/v alcoholic extract from Vitex negundo leaf and the total
yield of extract was 11.5 percent obtained by maceration and antinociceptive activity of Vitex negundo Linn. leaf
extract are also reported. Three solvent ratio( alcohol:water-60:40,70:30,80:20) will be used to optimized extraction
techniques for higher percentage yield. Alkaloid, irrioid glycosides, flavanoids, lignans, terpenoid, sterols, resin and
tannins are major class of compound isolated from this plant according to the former phytochemical studies on Vitex
negundo. Conventionally, the extraction temperature of soxhlet method between 45-60 ◦C recommended to protect
the extract from decomposition.Ultrasonication extraction and microwave assisted extraction have been developed for
the fast extraction, reduced extraction time and higher percent yield of extract.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 49
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

IN VITRO ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF COCCINIA GRANDIS LEAVES AND FRUITS


Vedvir S. Parihar, Ashish K. Sharma, Prasant Kumar Singh*, Rajesh Kumar, Anurag Mishra, Rajiv Gupta
Faculty of Pharmacy, Babu Banarasi Das National Institute of Technology & Management, Dr. Akhilesh Das Nagar,
Lucknow- 227 105 (U.P.), India.

E-mail: rajiv961@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT

The in vitro antioxidant activity of extracts of Coccinia grandis fruits and leaves has been investigated by DPPH (1, 1-
Diphenyl, 2-picryl-hydrazyl) free radical and superoxide scavenging activity (NBT). The aqueous extract of Coccinia
grandis leaves and fruits showed significant antioxidant activity by inhibiting DPPH and superoxide radical when
compared with methanolic extract. Free radical scavenging activity might be generated due to the presence of
flavonoid. The aqueous extract of fruits exhibited potent antioxidant activity with low IC50 values in these two methods.
These finding could justify the inclusion of this plant in the management of various disorders in traditional medicine.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 50
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

EFFECT OF PUNICA GRANATUM LINN SEED EXTRACT IN GASTRIC ULCER IN DIABETIC RATS.
Narendra Chouhan, Pradeep T. Deshmukh, Rupesh Goutum, Narendra Silawat, Swapnil Goyal, Rupesh Soni, Rahul
Trivedi
Department of Pharmacology, B.R.Nahata college of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M.P), Mandsaur Institute of
Pharmacy,Mandaur(M.P). Bhagwant University, Ajmer (Raj.).

ABSTRACT

Peptic ulcer occurs in that part of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) which is exposed to gastric acid and pepsin, i.e. the
stomach and duodenum. The effect of seeds of Punica granatum extract was studied in pylorus ligated and aspirin
induced ulcer model in diabetic rat. This experiment was carried out to show the effect of orally applied seed extract
on gastric ulcer in diabetic animals. Groups (Group I Normal control, Group II Diabetic control, Group III Standard
treated, Group IV, Seed extract treated). Ranitidine was taken as a standard antiulcer drug and results were
compared with the diabetic control (group II). On comparision of groups, it was observed that group III & IV showed
the highly significant (** P<0.01) at 6th day in pyrolus ligated rats and highly significant in aspirin induced rat model (**
P<0.01).

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 51
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

HATCH WAXMAN ACT: THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS FOR MARKETING OF GENERIC DRUGS
Pankaj Arora*1, M.S. Ranawat2, M. M. Gupta1, Uttam Singh Baghel1, Namita Arora3
1Jaipur College of Pharmacy, Institutional Area, Sitapura, Jaipur (Rajasthan)
2B. N. College of Pharmacy, Udaipur (Rajasthan)
3Rajasthan University of Health Sciences, Pratap nagar, Jaipur (Rajasthan)

ABSTRACT

The Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act, informally known as the "Hatch-Waxman Act" [Public
Law 98-417], is a 1984 United States federal law.
This act sets the process by which the marketers of generic drugs can file Abbreviated New Drug Applications
(ANDAs) to seek FDA approval of the generic drugs. Section 505(j) (5)(B)(iv), the so called Paragraph IV, allows 180
day exclusivity to companies that are the "first-to-file" an ANDA against holders of patents for branded counterparts.
When a pharmaceutical company first markets a drug, it is usually under a patent that allows only the pharmaceutical
company that developed the drug to sale it.
• Generic drugs can be legally produced for drugs where:
• The patent has expired,
• In countries where a patent(s) is/are not in force,
• For drugs which have never held patents, or
The generic company certifies the brand company's patents are either invalid, unenforceable or will not be infringed.
The HATCH WAXMAN ACT gives the legislative process for the generic drugs to market their brands. This act
ultimately benefits to the patients and insurance company. This act has become a good strength for Indian pharma
companies.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 52
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

PHYTOSOMES: A NOVEL CARRIER FOR HERBAL MEDICINES


Yadav R, Single A, Gupta V.D
MJRP UNIVERSITY JAIPUR
Email: rajeevyadav27@ymail.com

ABSTRACT

Phytosomes are advanced form of herbal products that are better absorbed, utilized and as a result produce better
result than convention herbal extracts.Phytosomes are also called as Phytolipid delivery system. These are lipophillic
substances with a definite melting point , freely soluble in nonpolar solvent and moderately soluble in fats.
Polyphenatic polar phytoconstituents when complexed with phospholipid like phosphatidylcholine give rise to a new
drug delivery system is called as PHYTOSOMES. Phytosomes are created when the standardized extract and active
ingredients of an herb are bound to the phospholipid on a molecular level. Phytosomes structures contains the active
ingredients surrounded by the phospholipid. Phytosomes are better able to transition from a hydrophillic environments
into the lipid friendly environments of the enterocytes cell membrane and from there into the cell finally reaching the
blood. Phytosomes process produced little cells because these can be easily protected from the destruction by
digestive secretion and gut bacteria. Most of bioactive constituents of phytomedicines are flavanoids
(eg:anthocyanidine from bilberry, catechine from green tea, silymarin from milk thistle). Water soluble flavanoid
molecule can be converted into lipid compatible molecular complexes i.e called phytosomes.chemical analysis
indicate that in phytosomes usually a flavanoides molecules linked with atleast one phosphotidylcholine molecule.
These are novel complexes which are prepared by reacting from 3-2 moles but preferably with one mole of a natural
or synthetic phospholipid s.a phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylserine with one mole of
components for eg: flavolignanans. Complex formation ratio of components and phospholipid is 1:1$ 2:1.
Phytosomes forms a bridge between the conventional delivery system and novel delivery system.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 53
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

NEPHROPROTECTIVE ACTIVITY OF EMBELIA RIBES FRUITS IN DRUG INDUCED NEPHROTOXICITY


CISPLATIN IN MICE
Vimal K Parihar*, Nitesh Kasama, Rajni Sahu, Hari Singh Anjana, Umashankar Hatila, Rahul Trivedi, Zafar Akbar
Department of Pharmacology, B.R.Nahata college of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M.P.)

ABSTRACT

Drug induced nephrotoxicity (DIN) is relatively common complication of several diagnostic and therapeutic agents.
The most common manifestation of DIN is a decline in the GFR which results in a rise in the serum creatinine and
blood urea nitrogen (BUN). The nephroprotective effects of ethanol extract of Embelia ribes fruits alone and with
vitamin E in cisplatin (12mg/kg I.P.) induced nephrotoxicity in mice was studied. The serum urea, creatinine and blood
urea nitrogen level in the cisplatin treated group; were significantly elevated (P<0.01) whereas the body weight was
significantly lowered with respect to normal control group. The serum urea, creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels
were reduced in the embelia ribes fruit extract treated (200mg/kg; 400mg/kg P.O.) dose dependently, where as with
Vitamin E treated it showed more beneficial effect in cisplatin model. The level of GSH were elevated significant
(P<0.01) with the Embelia ribes fruit (200-400mg/kg) and Embelia ribes (200mg/kg) & vitamin E (200mg/kg) treated
group the result showed a better protection.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 54
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

AN OVERVIEW:
INTERNATIONAL REGULATIONS FOR HERBAL DRUGS
Subodh Khekale*, Kishor Mandage & Sagar Vyawahare
khekalesk@yahoo.co.in
School of Pharmacy & Technology Management, NMiMS University, Shirpur (Maharashtra)

ABSTRACT

Although people has freedom to use herbal medication without regulations, herbs need to be regulated as some are
dangerous, doses are unknown, often labels are misleading, and they can interfere with prescription medications,
foods, and other herbs. Currently, use of herbal drugs is increasing globally, China has about 33% share of herbal
drugs in pharma industry, Malaysia has 1 billion market and more than 45% Australians prefer alternative medicines.
So as like for chemical drugs the regulations are being developed, modified and implemented for herbal products,
worldwide. It takes about 12 years & $231 million to develop a new chemical drug. But cost of proving an herb is less
and manufacturers place them in “food category” so strict regulation towards them is important. This indicates the
need of regulation of the herbal drugs, worldwide.
The first regulation for herbals was issued by WHO in 1972 for their safety, efficacy and use and in 1998 it issued
another guideline to practitioners, manufacturers, distributors with GMPs. EMEA issued guideline on quality of herbal
drugs along with its stability studies on 30 March 2006 and provided addendum to earlier guideline for combinations
of herbal substances and/or preparations on 26 July 2007. Recently, on 1st Feb. 2008 EU provides guidance on how
to declare the different types of herbal finished products. WHO issued guidelines on safety monitoring of herbal
medicines by pharmacovigilance in 2004 through the clinical trials.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 55
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

DATURA STRAMONIUM: A REVIEW ON ITS PHYTOCHEMISTRY AND PHARMACOLOGICAL PROFILE


Gourani Anshul * Soni Vishal , Soni Priyanka
Dept of Herbal Research, B. R. Nahata College of Pharmacy, Contract Research Center, Scientific Industrial
Research Organization, Mandsaur, MP, India

ABSTRACT

Herbal drug have got tremendous momentum in global health care system. Many plant have been found to have
therapeutic potential and being used since time immemorial. Datura stramonium commonly known as jimsclweed in
indigenous in India with along history of traditional medicinal uses in many countries. In the traditional system of
medicine different part of plant are used as antispasmodic, in asthma, in ulcer, in inflammation, in rheumatism etc.
The phytoconstituent reported in DS are tropane alkaloid, hyoscyamine, hyoscine, flavanoids and coumarins. DS has
a brief profile of pharmacological activity, the present review is therefore an effort to give a detail survey of the
literature on its pharmacognosy, photochemistry and traditional and pharmacological uses.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 56
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

PHARMACOVIGILANCE STUDY: A REVIEW


Uttam S. Baghel*1, B. Shirivastava2, Pankaj Arora1, M. M. Gupta1, Manmohan Singhal2
1Jaipur College of Pharmacy, Institutional Area, Sitapura, Jaipur (Rajasthan)
2School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, JNU, Jaipur (Rajasthan)

ABSTRACT

WHO defines pharmacovigilance as the science and activities relating to detection, assessment, understanding and
prevention of adverse effects or any other medicine related problems.
Objective of the study:
• To improve patient care and safety in relation to the use of medicines, and all medical and paramedical
interventions.
• To improve public health and safety in relation to the use of medicines.
• To contribute for the assessment of benefit, harm, effectiveness and risk of medicines, encouraging their
safe, rational and more effective (including cost-effective) use.
• To promote understanding, education and clinical training in pharmacovigilance and its effective
communication to health professionals and the public.
• To provide information to users for optimizing safe and effective use of medicines.

The methods used for pharmacovigilance are Active Surveillance, Passive Surveillance, Stimulated Reporting,
Comparative Observational Studies, Targeted Clinical Investigations and Descriptive Studies. The study of
Pharmacovigilance has wide scope in the field of herbal, traditional & complementary medicines, blood products &
biologicals.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 57
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

COMPARATIVE ANATOMICAL STUDY OF LEAF OF JAAL (SALVADORA OLEOIDES) AND CHOTA JAAL
(SALVADORA PERSICA)
Sumitra Singh1, Vijay Naresh2, Nitin Gandhi, Surendra Kr. Sharma1
1.Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar–125001,
2.Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jaipur National University, Jaipur (Rajas than)
vijaydhull@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Southern Haryana is a region with rich floral biodiversity and cultural diversity. Most people of south Haryana rely on
the use of indigenous plants for healthcare. Salvadora oleoides And S. persica (family-Salvadoraceae) recently
included in the list of endangered plant species by Government of Haryana. These have been traditionally used in this
region for the treatment of common skin ailments by local community and till date not much studies has performed on
these plant, hence these were selected to comparative anatomical study of leaf.
Salvadora oleoides tree, commonly known as Jaal and Salvadora persica known as chota jaal locally was collected
from Pali region of Southern Haryana state of India for pharmacognostical and physiochemical parameters studies.
A comparative study on the leaf (lamina + petiole) anatomy of Salvadora persica and Salvadora persica as jaal and
chota jaal respectively, has been done. The significant differences observed between the species are: in Salvadora
persica the leaf epidermis is triseriate at the midvein region, while in Salvadora oleoides is biseriate.
In the petiole of Salvadora persica, isolated patches of sclerenchyma are present around the vascular bundle, while in
Salvadora oleoides individual sclerenchyma cell are present at the abaxial side of vascular bundle. An analysis on the
variation of studied leaf anatomical character of the investigated that of reported Salvadora persica will be provided.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 58
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

A REVIEW ON ENICOSTEMMA LITTORALE


D.S.Panwar, M.S.Panwar, K.Dave
Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy, Mandsaur

ABSTRACT

Enicostemma littorale (Gentianaceae) also called as a Chota chirayata in Hindi, Mamejavo in Gujarati, Nagajiha in
Bengal and Vellarugu in Tamil is a glabrous perennial herb with sessile lanceolate leaves and is found throughout
India up to a height of 1500 ft. qualitative analysis of the ash content of aerial part of the plant revealed the presence
of minerals like iron, potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, silica, phosphate, chloride, sulphate and carbonate.
Monoterpine alkaloids like enicoflavin and gentiocrucine were also isolated. In addition to the steroids, triterpenoids
including catechins, saponins, betuline were also isolated.
Various Ayurvedic formulations containing E. littorale as one of the ingredients have been shown to produce anti-
hyperglycemic activity in hyperglycemic rat models. The use of hot aqueous extract of E. littorale by the inhabitants
for the treatment of diabetes, fever, stomach pain, dyspepsia and malaria. This herb is also known for its anticancer
property and hypolipidaemic effect in p-dimethylaminobenzene (p-DAB) induced hepatotoxic animal and also anti-
inflammatory.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 59
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

DNA MARKERS: AS A NEW PHARMACOGNOSTIC TOOL IN HERBAL DRUG TECHNOLOGY


Gupta R.K.*1, Gupta V.2, Sharma R.3, Gupta V.D.1, Sheeja E.3, Jain A.3
*1Mahatma Jyoti Rao Phoole University, Jaipur,(Raj.)
2School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jaipur National University, Jaipur, (Raj.)
3B.R. Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur, (M.P.)
E.mail. rakesh.gupta206@yahoo.co.in

ABSTRACT

This review provides a brief account of various DNA-based technologies that are useful in genotyping and quick
identification of botanicals with suitable examples. The world market for herbal medicine, including herbal products
and raw materials has been estimated to have an annual growth rate between 5 and 15%. Total world herbal drug
market is estimated as US $62 billion and is expected to grow1 to US $5 trillion by the year 2050. India has a great
wealth of traditional knowledge and wisdom. Ayurveda contributes Rs 3500 crores (US $813 million) annually to the
internal market. The Indian medicinal plants-based industry is growing at the rate of 7–15% annually. Herbal drug
technology is used for changing plant materials into medicines, where standardization and quality control with proper
attachment of modern scientific techniques and traditional knowledge is most important. Chromatographic techniques
and marker compounds are used to standardize plant preparations which have limitations because of their variable
sources and chemical difficulty or complexity. DNA-based molecular markers have utility in the many fields like
embryology, taxonomy, physiology, genetics, etc. DNA-based techniques have been world widely used for
authentication of plant species of medicinal importance. Pharmacognosy mainly addresses quality-related issues
using routine botanical and organoleptic parameters of crude drugs, and chemoprofilingassisted characterization with
chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. The advance pharmacognosy includes all the aspects of drug
development and discovery, where biotechnology-driven applications play an important role. Current focus on
chemotype-driven fingerprinting and related techniques requires integration with genotype-driven molecular
techniques so that an optimal characterization of botanical materials is possible.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 60
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ANTI-DIABETIC EFFECT OF PUNICA GRANATUM IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODEL


Gaurav Panwar, Monarch Jagdhari, Rupesh Soni, Narendra Silawat
Depatment of Pharmacology,B.R.Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M.P)

ABSTRACT

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by a high blood glucose concentration hyperglycaemia
due to deficiency or defective response of insulin. Diabetes mellitus is a group of syndromes characterized by
hyperglycemia, altered metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins and an increased risk of complications from
vascular disease.
This experiment was carried out to show the effect of orally applied peel extract on blood glucose level in
normal animals. Peel extract 50 &100 mg/kg (group II & III) decreased the blood glucose level significantly (* P<0.05)
at 7th & 10th day, respectively and showed hypoglycaemic effect. The effect was compared to the normal control
(group I).This experiment was carried out to show the effect of orally applied peel extract on blood glucose level in
diabetic animals. Peel extract of 50 & 100 mg/kg (group III & IV) decreased the blood glucose level significantly on
10th day and showed antihyperglycaemic effect while positive control (group II) showed decreasing blood glucose
level significantly at 7th day . The effect was compared to the diabetic control (group I). On comparison of groups, it
was observed that group II & IV showed the highly significant (** P<0.01) results at 7th & 10th day, respectively and
group III showed significant results (* P<0.05) at 10 day.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 61
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

GESTATIONAL DIABETES
Aneesh Ahmed1*, E.Edwin Jarald1, Sheeja Edwin Jarald1, Showkat Ahmed2
1TIFAC-CORE in Green Pharmacy, B.R.Nahta Colledge of Pharmacy, Mandsaur
2Unijules Life Sciences Ltd., and Associated Companies, Nagpur

ABSTRACT

Gestational diabetes mellitus, GDM is a condition in which women without previously diagnosed diabetes exhibit high
blood glucose levels during pregnancy. Babies born to mothers with gestational diabetes are at increased risk of
problems typically such as being large for gestastional age (which may lead to delivery complications), low blood
sugar, and jaundice. Gestational diabetes is a treatable condition and women who have adequate control of glucose
levels can effectively decrease these risks. Women with gestational diabetes are at increased risk of developing type
2 diabetes mellitus after pregnancy, while their offspring are prone to developing childhood obesity, with type 2
diabetes later in life. Most patients are treated only with diet modification and moderate exercise but some take anti-
diabetic drugs, including insulin. This condition is treated by medications like, Metformin, Insulin, Thiozolidanes,
Pioglitazone, etc. and one herbal drug claimed to treat this condition is Karnim Plus. This paper covers the
pathophysiology of gestational diabetes, symptoms, complications, types and medications used.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 62
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

FLOATING MICROSPHERES: A NOVEL APPROACH FOR DELIVERING DRUG WITH POOR BIOAVAILABILITY
& SHORT HALF LIFE.
PANWAR M.S., JAIN R. , RATNAWAT S., MENARIA P.
MANDSAUR INSTITUTE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR MP

ABSTRACT

It is widely known that the gastric residence time (GRT) is one of the important factors affecting the drug
bioavailability of the pharmaceutical dosage form. Variable and short gastric emptying can result in incomplete drug
release from the drug delivery system above the absorption zone that is stomach or upper part of intestine.Floating
microspheres are gastro-retentive drug delivery systems based on non-effervescent approach. Hollow microspheres
are in strict sense, spherical empty particles without core. These microspheres are characteristically free flowing
powders consisting of proteins or synthetic polymers, ideally having a size less than 200 micrometer. Solid
biodegradable microspheres incorporating a drug dispersed or dissolved throughout particle matrix have the potential
for controlled release of drugs. Gastro-retentive floating microspheres are low-density systems that have sufficient
buoyancy to float over gastric contents and remain in stomach for prolonged period. As the system floats over gastric
contents, the drug is released slowly at desired rate resulting in increased gastric retention with reduced fluctuations
in plasma drug concentration. Gastro retentive floating microspheres have emerged as an efficient means of
enhancing the bioavailability and controlled delivery of many drugs The increasing sophistication of delivery
technology will ensure the development of increasing number of gastro-retentive drug delivery systems to optimize
the delivery of molecules that exhibit absorption window, low bioavailability, and extensive first pass metabolism. The
control of gastro intestinal transit could be the focus of the next decade and may result in new therapeutic possibilities
with substantial benefits for patients.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 63
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ESTIMATION OF 3- ACETYL-11-KETO- Β -BOSWELLIC ACID IN A MARKETED HERBAL PRODUCT RHEUMAX


(HERBAJULES RUMATIS) USING HPTLC
K. Varshney1, P. Kumar2, E. E. Jarald2, S. Edwin2, S. Ahmed3
1Aligarh College of Pharmacy, Aligarh
2TIFACORE in Green Pharmacy, B. R. Nahata College of Pharmacy,
Mhow- Neemuch Road, Mandsaur (M.P.)-458001, India
3Unijules Life Sciences Pvt. Ltd., Nagpur (Maharastra)

ABSTRACT

A highly sensitive and accurate HPTLC method was developed and validated for quantitative estimation of 3- acetyl-
11-keto-β-boswellic acid in a marketed herbal product “Rheumax” (Herbajules Rumatis) containing extract of
Curcuma longa, Boswellia serrata, Tinospora cordifolia and Vitex negundo. The method employed TLC aluminium
plates precoated with silica gel 60F254 as the stationary phase. The solvent system used for 3- acetyl-11-keto- β -
boswellic acid was hexane-ethyl acetate (5:5), which gave compact spot at Rf - 0.24. Densitometric analysis of 3-
acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid was done at 254 nm. Linear regression equation for 3- acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic
acid was found to be Y= -35.042 + 336.513X with R2= 0.99919 and Sdv = 1.79 %. The range for linearity was found
to be 1500 to 4000 ng per spot for 3- acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid. The method was validated for accuracy,
precision, specificity and roubustness.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 64
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

GREEN TEA – AN HERBAL DRUG


Kavita Sharma*; Kratika Daniel; Vivek Daniel
Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy, Mandsaur MP

ABSTRACT

Green tea, produced from the plant Camellia sinensis is a affluent source of poly – phenolic compounds which are
extremely beneficial against degenerative diseases like arthrosclerosis, Diabetes, Rheumatism, Parkinsonism,
several cancer and has been used in Traditional system of medicine in many Asian countries. Epigallocatechin – 3 –
gallate is the most abundant catachin found in green tea and plays a pivotal role in green tea medicinal properties.
The potential health benefits ascribed to green tea include: antioxidant, cancer chemoprevention, improved
cardiovascular health, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotectant and immunomodulator.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 65
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

A REVIEW: INTERACTION OF THE VARIOUS SPICES WITH COMMONLY USED MEDICINES

Monarch Jagdhari, Gaurav Panwar, Rupesh Soni, Narendra Silawat.


Department of Pharmacology, B. R. Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M.P)

ABSTRACT

Many medicinal herbs and pharmaceutical drugs are therapeutic at one dose and toxic at another. Interactions
between herbs and drugs may increase or decrease the pharmacological or toxicological effects of either component.
Synergistic therapeutic effects may complicate the dosing of long-term medications; some interaction may antagonise
the drug action.
The major cause of interactions is due to the use of the various spices which are used in the meals with the
prescribed medicines. These herbs are often co-administered with therapeutic drugs raising the potential of drug–
herb interactions, which may have important clinical significance based on an increasing number of clinical reports of
such interactions.
Just like drug-drug and drug-food interactions, herb drug interactions are very common. Some herbal
medicines may cancel the effect of a prescription drug others may reduce it, or even exaggerate it. Here we have
tried to emphasis on interaction of various spices used in daily meals with the disease condition.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 66
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ANTIDIABETIC ACTIVITY OF MADHUMEHA CHURNA IN ALLOXAN INDUCED DIABETIC RAT


Neha Agrawal*,E. Edwin Jarald, Nazar Mustafa Mansoory,
Dept of Pharmacognosy, B.R.Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M.P.)

ABSTRACT

Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorders characterized by altered carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. The
herbal marketed product Madhumeha churna was evaluated for its antidiabetic activity in alloxan – induced diabetic
rats. Churna was administered orally (200mg/kg) for 10 consecutive days in diabetic rats. Expermental finding
showed significant antidiabetic potential of churna in terms of reduction of fasting blood glucose level in diabetic rats.
The effect of churna at 200mg/kg was comparable to that of standard drug glibenclamide (5mg/kg) p<0.05.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 67
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

EFFECT OF MOMORDICA CHARANTIA ON BIOPHYSICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS OF WOUND


HEALING IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED DIABETES IN RATS
Prahlad Patidar , Jyoti Patidar, Pradeep Deshmukh , Rupesh Soni ,Dharmendra Ahuja, Shree Ram Malu, Rahul
Trivedi,
Department of Pharmacology, B.R.Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M.P)

ABSTRACT

Momordica charantia Linn. fruit extrat in the form of an ointment (20% w/w dried powder in simple ointment base) was
evaluated for wound-healing potential in an excision wound model whereas the the fruit extract given orally was
evaluated for incision and dead space wound model in rats. The rats were divided into six groups of diabetic control,
diabetic treated, diabetic standard, normal control, normal treated and normal standard in excision wound model
whereas the rats were divided into four groups of diabetic control, diabetic treated, normal control and normal treated
in incision and dead space wound models, each group consisting of six rats. Wound-contraction ability in excision
wound mode was measured at different time intervals on days 4th, 8th, 16th and the study was continued until the
wound had completely healed. Tensile strength was measured in 10-day-old incision wound and hydroxyproline
content and wet and dry granulation weight of wound was evaluated for dead space wound. The extract treated
wounds were found to contract faster as compared to controls, the wet and dry granulation tissue weight and
hydroxyproline content was also increased as compared to controls. This suggests that Momordica charantia Linn.
fruit extrat promotes significant wound healing in diabetic rats.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 68
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

MODEL DESIGN FOR DRYING OF CRUDE DRUGS.


Prabhat S., Gupta V.B.,Garg R.,Jarald E.
B.R.Nahata college of Pharmacy.Mandsaur (M.P.)458001
E-Mail- saurabh2oo9prabhat@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT

Around the world about 35 to 70 thousand species of plants are used for medicinal purpose and its proper drying is
very important. Drying is the process which reduces moisture and essential for prevention of plants. During drying the
herbal drug may loss 30-40% of its active constituent due to unawareness of appropriate method of drying. The most
acceptable method is sun drying but due to direct exposure of sun light it may degrade one or more active
constituents. By taking this idea in mind we have to construct equipment which effectively dry the crude herbal drug
by minimizing the loss of constituent. The equipment design is considered for various parameters like temperature,
humidity and air flow. It was found that 30-50°C temperature is recommended for effectively drying of the crude drug
with optimum humidity and air flow condition to obtain maximum drug constituents. Thus the equipment is designed
and optimized on the above parameters for effective drying in verity of herbal crude drugs.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 69
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF LEAVES OF JASMINUM PUBESCENS


Gupta R.1, Gupta J.2 ,Bamaniya N.3
1 Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy, Mandsaur-458001, Madhya Pradesh, India.
2 GLA Institute of Pharmaceutical Research, Chaumuhan; District- Mathura-281001, U.P., India
3- B.R. Nahata college of Pharmacy, Mandsaur-458001, Madhya Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT

To validate the Tribal claim, the leaves of Jasminum pubescens (Family: Oleaceae) were studied for their
antimicrobial activity. The antimicrobial activity of petroleum ether, methanol, and aqueous extract were tested by
agar well diffusion method. All these three extracts exhibited marked antimicrobial activity against gram positive and
gram negative and fungi. The microbes used to determine antimicrobial activity are Bacillus subtilis, Escherchia coli,
Staphylococcus aureus and Saccharomyces ceriviciae. All the extracts showed moderate to significant antimicrobial
activity against standard test organisms.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 70
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

DRYING – AN ESSENTIAL STEPS FOR PRESERVATION OF MEDICINAL PLANTS


S. Soni, V.B. Gupta , R.Garg, E.Jarald
B.R. Nahata college of pharmacy, Mandsaur (M.P.)-458001
E-mail- sweta_s16@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Drying is the most essential method of medicinal plant preservation and, is also a most expensive in
medicinal plant production. Drug quality is due to its active constituents and their quality is significantly
influenced by the drying regime. Conventionally, low drying temperatures between 30 and 50°C are
recommended to protect sensitive active ingredients. During the storage and drying of agricultural
products, physical, chemical and microbiological changes occur. These changes are particularly
influenced by moisture content of material, relative humidity, drying temperature and storage conditions.
Generally leaves, stems, roots and flowers should be dried by spreading them in loose single layers on a
flat drying surface, and using simple drying methods like sun drying, shade drying and hot air oven drying.
This review deals with various methods available for drying of medicinal plants and the effects of drying
factors on the quality of the final product. Several empirical models for the drying of medicinal plants have
also been

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 71
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

TRANSFEROSOME: A PROMISING TOOL FOR TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY


Wadhwa Shailendra & Purohit P. S. R.
Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy, Mandsaur MP
E-mail: wadhwa_shail@yahoo.co.in

ABSTRACT

The transdermal route of drug delivery has gained great interest of pharmaceutical research, as it
circumvents number of problems associated with oral route of drug administration. The major barrier in transdermal
delivery of drug is the skin intrinsic barrier, the stratum corneum, the outermost envelop of the skin that offers the
principal hurdle for diffusion of hydrophilic ionizable bioactives. Recently, various strategies have been used to
augment the transdermal delivery of bioactives. Mainly, they include iontophoresis, electrophoresis, sonophoresis,
chemical permeation enhancers, microneedles, and vesicular system (liposomes, niosomes, elastic liposomes such
as ethosomes and transfersomes). Among these strategies transferosomes appear promising. Transport of this
vesicular system through skin and epithelial hurdle depends upon the flexibility of their membrane, which can be
attained using appropriate ratio of surfactant. Transfersomes have shown immense potential in drug delivery across
the skin.
Transferosomes enhances the penetration of most of the low as well as high molecular weight drugs, while in
case of lipophilic drugs the entrapment efficiency can reach up to 90%. Transferosome penetrate the stratum
corneum by either intracellular route or the transcellular route. Recent success also demonstrates the potential of
transfersome in vaccine, steroid, protein, and peptide delivery across the skin. It is also used for transporting genetic
material and achieving transfection.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 72
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

IN VITRO AND IN VIVO ANTIOXIDANT POTENTIAL OF ALCOHOLIC EXTRACT OF AMORPHOPHALLUS


CAMPANULATUS ROXB. TUBERS

Dubey B., Malviya N., Jain A. Gupta A., Jain S.,


Department of Pharmacognosy,
Smriti College of Pharmaceutical Education, Indore.

ABSTRACT

The present study investigated the in vitro and in vivo antioxidant potential of alcoholic extract of Amorphophallus
campanulatus Roxb. (Araceae) tubers. The extract was found to contain a large amount of polyphenols and also
exhibited an immense free radical scavenging ability. IC50 values denote the concentration of sample, which is
required to scavenge 50% of free radicals, IC50 for different antioxidant model were calculated as 127.41µg/ml for
DPPH radicals, 129.53µg/ml for O2•-, 131.60µg/ml for H2O2 and 149.31µg/ml for NO respectively. The extract also
inhibited •OH radical induced oxidation of protein (BSA) and LPO in murine hepatic microsomes. The determination of
metal chelating capacity of the extract indicated chelating of metal ions (Fe2+) to be a putative mechanism implicated
in the inhibition of •OH radical-induced BSA oxidation and LPO. Amorphophallus campanulatus tubers extract also
exhibited a significant antioxidant activity in acute oxidative tissue injury animal model constituted by CCl4 induced
hepatotoxicity. Oral administration of the extract at a dose of 40, 80 and 120 mg/kg of body weight significantly
protected from CCl4 induced elevation in AST and ALT in the serum, elevation in hepatic LPO, depletion of hepatic
GSH and decrease in the activities of hepatic antioxidant enzymes: SOD, CAT and GPX. The extract also protected
histopathological changes produced by CCl4 such as necrosis, fatty changes, ballooning and degeneration. The data
obtained in the present study suggests that the alcoholic extract of Amorphophallus campanulatus tubers have potent
antioxidant activity against free radicals, prevent oxidative damage to major biomolecules and afford significant
protection against oxidative damage in the liver.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 73
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

CHROMATOGRAPHY:

A TECHNIQUE USED IN QUALITY CONTROL OF HERBAL DRUGS

Gopal Singh Sisodiya,*Reena Gupta


gopal_sisodiya@yahoo.com
Mandsaur Institute Of Pharmacy,Mandsaur

ABSTRACT

Chromatography (from Greek :chroma, color and :graphein to write) is the collective term for the separation of
mixtures. It involves passing a mixture dissolved in a "mobile phase" through a stationary phase, which separates the
analyte to be measured from other molecules in the mixture based on differential partitioning between the mobile and
stationary phases.

Chemical fingerprints obtained by chromatographic, especially by hyphenated chromatographies, are strongly


recommended for the purpose of quality control of herbal medicines, since they might represent appropriately the
“chemical integrities” of the herbal medicines and therefore be used for authentication and identification of the herbal
products. Based on the conception of phytoequivalence, the chromatographic fingerprints of herbal medicines could
be utilized for addressing the problem of quality control of herbal medicines. Several novel chemometric methods for
evaluating the fingerprints of herbal products, such as the method based on information theory, similarity estimation,
chemical pattern recognition, spectral correlative chromatogram (SCC), multivariate resolution, etc., which showed
that the combination of chromatographic fingerprints of herbal medicines and the chemometric evaluation might be a
powerful tool for quality control of herbal products.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 74
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

EVALUATION OF AQUEOUS EXTRACT OF HEART WOOD OF CEDRUS DEODARA FOR ANTIDIABETIC


ACTIVITY AND ITS EFFECT ON HEPATIC ENZYMES OF GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN DIABETIC RATS
Pareek P., Jain S., Malviya N., Barik R.
Department of Pharmacognosy,
Smriti College of Pharmaceutical Education, Indore.

ABSTRACT

The present study was to evaluate the antidiabetic as well as the antioxidant potential of aqueous extract of Heart
wood of Cedrus deodara Roxb on alloxan induced diabetic rats. Animals with fasting blood glucose level between
200–300 mg/dl at 72 h were considered as diabetic and divided into different groups of six animals each and orally
administered with aqueous extract at a dose of 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg and glibenclamide 0.40 mg/kg in 2% acacia
suspension for 21 days. On day 22 rats were sacrificed and blood samples were collected from diabetic rats to
estimate biochemical parameters and tissues were excised to measure their antioxidant and glycogen status.
Reduction in blood sugar could be seen from 5th day after continuous administration of the extract and on 21st day
sugar levels were found to be reduced by 40.20%. Oxidative stress produced by alloxan was found to be significantly
lowered by the administration of Cedrus deodara aqueous extract (500 mg/kg). This was evident from a significant
decrease in lipid per oxidation level in liver induced by alloxan. The level of Glutathione, Catalase, Superoxide
dismutase and Glutathione-S-Transferase in liver, kidney and pancreas tissue were found to be increased
significantly after drug administration. These results demonstrate the antidiabetic and antioxidant potential of aqueous
extracts of Cedrus deodara and suggests that the plant may have therapeutic value in diabetes and related
complications.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 75
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

AYURVEDIC & HOMEOPATHIC APPROACH FOR SWINE FLU


Shastri Akansha, Soni Vishal, Soni Priyanka, Shivhare sham sunder
Department of Pharmacognosy,
B. R. Nahata college of Pharmacy-SIRO
Mhow Neemach Road, Mandsaur 458001 Madhya Pradesh, India

ABSTRACT

Swine flu is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses. It is called swine flu in North America
and Mexican flu in some countries. A new strain of influenza a virus subtype H1N1, officially referred to as the NOVEL
H1N1. It is first identified in April 2009. The symptoms of swine flu are similar to other influenzas, and may include
fever, coughing, headaches, joint and muscular pain, chills. Vomiting. The people near the age of 65 years or having
chronic health problem, pregnant women or young children are at the higher risk of the disease. The homeopathy and
ayurvedic approach with some precautions are more useful in this disease.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 76
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUGS


Aijaz A., Bhatt D., Shrivastav S., Malviya N., Jain S.
Department of Pharmacognosy,
Smriti College of Pharmaceutical Education, Indore.

ABSTRACT

Herbal medicines which formed the basis of health care throughout the world since the earliest days of mankind are
still widely used, and have considerable importance in international trade. Medicinal plants are important not only
when plant constituents are used directly as therapeutic agents, but also as starting materials for the synthesis of
drugs or as models for pharmacologically active compounds. Regulation on exploitation and exportation is therefore
essential along with international cooperation and coordination for their conservation so as to ensure their availability
for the future.

During the fourth international conference of Drug Regulatory Authorities (ICDRA) held in Tokyo in 1986, guidelines
for the assessment of herbal medicines were subsequently prepared by WHO and adopted by sixth ICDRA in Ottawa,
Canada, in 1991. Till then these efforts concentrate on herbal medicines, and found a basis at a later stage for the
assessment of other guidelines as well like Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR),1911; GCP guidelines,
Guidelines related to Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP), and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP)

Thus, the basics of all these regulatory bodies is to propose a framework for facilitating the regulation of herbal
medicines for the establishment of appropriate registration and regulation of herbal medicines based on criteria for
safety of use, therapeutic efficacy, quality control and pharmacovigilance.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 77
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

DENDRIMER : A REVIEW
Menaria Piyush* & Wadhwa Shailendra
Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy, Mandsaur, MP

ABSTRACT

A dendrimer is generally described as a macromolecule, which is characterized by its highly branched 3D structure
that provides a high degree of surface functionality and versatility.
The development of an efficient drug delivery system is very important to improve the pharmacological
activity of drug molecules and dendrimers have emerged as new alternatives and efficient tools for delivery of drug
molecules. As compare to linear polymeric carriers, the multivalent functionalities of dendrimers can be linked to drug
molecules or ligands in a well-defined manner and can be used to increase the binding efficiency and affinity of
therapeutic molecules to receptors via synergistic interaction.
Dendrimers have emerged as new alternatives and efficient tools for delivery of drug molecules. Dendrimers,
in particular, have attracted attention for their drug-delivery applications because multiple sites of attachment,
controllable, and well-defined size and structure that can be easily modified to change the chemical properties of the
system. Because of dendrimers cavities and interior branches, they are well-suited for use as carrier molecules in
drug delivery. The focus of this review is the current trends of dendrimer application as carriers for drug delivery
especially including oral, ocular, transdermal and targeted gene delivery.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 78
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

JUGLANS REGIA HEALS THE WOUND IN DIABETIC RATS


Shruti Sureka*, Swapnil Goyal1, Pradeep Deshmukh2, Vivek Daniel1, Narendra Silawat2
1Mandsaur Institute Of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M.P.)
2 B.R. Nahata college of pharmacy, Mandsaur (M.P.)

ABSTRACT

Wound healing is a complex natural phenomenon involving variety of phases. Diabetes is a pathophysiological
condition where there is suppression of healing. Many of the natural products are found to be useful in accelerating
the suppress wound healing. Juglans regia (walnut) is a very important plant in traditional system of medicine
reported to possess anti hyperlipideamic, analgesic, anti inflammatory, anti oxidant, free radical scavenging activity.
Hence an attempt was made to scientifically justify traditional claims for wound healing in alloxan induced diabetic
animals. We found very astonishing results that there was significant acceleration in wound healing by Juglans regia
(200 mg/kg /day in dead space wound model, 20 %w/w ointment in excision wound model).

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 79
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

PHARMACOGNOSTIC AND PRELIMINARY PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDIES


ON PONGAMIA PINNATA LINN. LEAVES
Apurva Kaushik2, Piyush Porwal1, Swapnil Goyal1, Yogesh Dahitule3, Shruti Sureka1, Kapilesh Dave1.
1Mahakal Institute of Pharmaceutical Studies, Behind Air Strip, Dewas Road, Ujjain (M.P.) – 456010
2Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy Rewas Dewda Road, Mandsaur.M.P-458001.
3Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Farleigh Dickinson University, Madison, NJ, USA.

ABSTRACT

The leaves of Pongamia pinnata Linn. (Fabaceae) are reported to have a great medicinal value. Pharmacognostic
evaluation including examination of morphological and microscopic characters, determination of leaf constants, ash
values, swelling factor, foaming index and extractive values were carried out. Phytochemical screening including
qualitative chemical examinations was also carried out.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 80
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

PLANT REVIEW: PAPAVER SOMNIFERUM

Mayank Gandhi , Kratika Daniel


Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy,
Mandsaur

ABSTRACT

Opium is a narcotic formed from the latex released by lacerating the immature seed pods of opium poppies
(Papaver somniferum, of family Papaveraceae). The plant is an erect, herbaceous annual, varying much in the colour
of its flowers, as well as in the shape of the fruit and colour of the seeds. All parts of the plant, but particularly the
walls of the capsules, or seed-vessels, contain a system of laticiferous vessels, filled with white latex. It contains up to
12% morphine, an opiate alkaloid, which is most frequently processed chemically to produce heroin for the illegal
drug trade. The resin also includes codeine and non-narcotic alkaloids, such as papaverine, thebaine and noscapine.
Meconic acid exists to the extent of about 5 per cent combined with morphine. Meconin and meconiasin exist in small
quantity only. Opium contains two main groups of alkaloids. Phenanthrenes include morphine, codeine and thebaine
are the main narcotic constituents. Isoquinolines such as papaverine have no significant central nervous system
effects and are not regulated under the Controlled Substances Act. Morphine is responsible for most of its harmful
effects such as lung edema, respiratory difficulties, coma, or cardiac or respiratory collapse, with a normal lethal dose
of 120 to 250 milligrams. The drug is used as hypnotic, sedative, astringent, expectorant, antispasmodic, and
diaphoretic.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 81
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

NEW SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC METHOD FOR ESTIMATION OF GATIFLOXACIN IN TABLETS USING N, N- DI


METHYL UREA AS HYDROTROPIC AGENT
Jain P.K.; Thakur A.; Maheshwari R. K.; Jain A.1
ADINA Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sagar, [M.P.]
1B.R. Nahata College of Pharmacy. Mandsour [M.P.]
prabhatjain16@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

A novel, safe and sensitive method of spectrophotometric estimation in ultraviolet region has been developed using
7.5 M N, N- di methyl urea solution as hydrotropic agent for the quantitative determination of Gatifloxacin, a poorly
water-soluble drug in tablet dosage form. Gatifloxacin shows maximum absorbance at 333 nm. Beer's law was
obeyed in the concentration range of 10 to 60 µg/ml. N N- di methyl urea does not absorb above 260 nm. Commonly
used tablet excipients and N, N- di methyl urea did not interfere in spectrophotometric estimation. Results of the
analysis were validated statistically and by recovery studies. Using 7.5 M N, N- di methyl urea solution for analysis of
two different tablet formulations of Gatifloxacin , the percent label claims and percent recoveries estimated were close
to 100 with low values of standard deviation, percent coefficient of variation and standard error.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 82
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ANTI DIABETIC POTENTIAL OF JUGLANS REGIA LINN. FRUITS


Rahul kaushik*, Swapnil Goyal1, Kapilesh Dave1, Pramod s. Kunwar2, Narendra S. Bangari2
1Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy, Rewas Dewara Road Mandsaur, (M.P.)

ABSTRACT

Oxidative stress due to abnormal production of reactive oxygen molecules (ROM) is believed to be involved in the
etiology of toxicity of many xenobiotics. Evidence suggests that ROM is involved in the diabetes. We studied the
Antidiabetic effects of hydro alcoholic extract of Juglans regia fruits in experimental diabetes induced by alloxan
monohydrate (80 mg/kg). Results reviled the significant Antidiabetic activity of Juglans regia fruits (200 mg/kg).

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 83
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ANTIDIARRHOEAL ACTIVITY GUIDED FRACTIONATION OF ROOTS OF PLUMBAGO


ZEYLANICA AND IDENTIFICATION OF LEAD MOLECULE RESPONSIBLE FOR ACTIVITY
Edwin S., Edwin E.J., Tripathi C., Soni S

Department of Herbal Drug Research

B.R. Nahata College of Pharmacy and Research Centre,

Mhow Neemuch Road, Mandsaur 458 001, Madhya Pradesh, India


E-mail: shikha.vns@gmail,com

ABSTRACT
In order to scientifically appraise some of the folkloric uses of Plumbago zeylanica Linn., the

present study was undertaken to examine the anti-diarrhoeal activity of crude extract and to identify

the led molecule. Anti-diarrhoeal activity of fractions were tested in castor oil and charcoal-induced

models in rats at two dose levels, 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg respectively.The crude extract was

fractionated to water soluble and water insoluble fractions. Water soluble fraction was found to be

more active than the water insoluble fraction. The water soluble fraction was further fractionated

with chloroform, butanol and aqueous fractions. The most active aqueous fraction was further

fractionated into poly and non poly saccharides and polysaccharides being more potent were

further fractionated to water- soluble and water insoluble polysaccharide fraction. Anti diarrhoeal

activities of all the fractions were performed and the most active fraction (fraction 1) was subjected

for physical, chemical, chromatogrsphic and spectroscopic studies.Bioassay-guided fractionation

led to the isolation and identification of a triterpenoid molecule. These results support the claim that

this plant is used traditionally to cure diarrhoea.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 84
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

GELUCIRE: A VERSATILE EXCIPIENT IN DRUG RESEARCH


Ruparel Nakul, Ghasadiya Ritesh, Saptarshi Dutta, Mukul Sengupta
Department of Pharmaceutics, L.B.Rao Institute Of Pharmaceutical Education And Research, Khambhat, Anand,
Gujarat-388620,India

ABSTRACT

The major problems affecting design of any dosage form are related with the solubility and stability
of drug substances. In this case Gelucire has emerged as the most resourceful excipient of all
times in drug research. Thanks to its profusion in terms of grades available for different needs and
its physical properties that support a variety of functionality requirements especially for the most
frequently used unit dosage forms. Gelucire can be used as a carrier, consistency building agent,
solubilizes, bioavailability enhancer, emulsifier and fatting agent etc. Generally hydrophilic property
of gelucire is useful in the dissolution enhancement as well as in controlled release formulation.
They is a group of inert semi-solid waxy amphiphilic excipient, which is surface active in nature and
disperses or solubilize in aqueous media forming micelles, microscopic globules or vesicles. They
have been widely studied as controlled release matrices as well as for improvement of
physicochemical properties of drug. Its ever increasing applications in drug research include its
utility in immediate release dosage forms, sustained release dosage forms. They are identified with
respect to their melting point and HLB value. The review discusses these applications in sufficient
detail citing examples and investigating the justifications for such functions.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 85
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

LIQUID FILLED HARD GELATIN CAPSULES - A TECHNOLOGY COMES OF AGE.


Shah Harshil, Ruparel Nakul, Saptarshi Dutta, Mukul Sengupta
Department of Pharmaceutics, L.B.Rao Institute Of Pharmaceutical Education And Research, Khambhat, Anand,
Gujarat-388620,India

ABSTRACT

The hard gelatin capsule has been used for many years as an oral delivery form. Initially drugs in granular form or
powdered form were usually filled into capsule to provide a unit dose that effectively masked the bitter taste of drugs
in an easy to-swallow container. But novel dosage forms emerges more and more in recent years. One of them is
liquid-filled hard gelatin capsules. The liquid-filled hard gelatin capsule is increasingly getting attention because of its
new-concept dosage form design, which delivers liquid drugs by solid form. This is indeed a stand out technology
over soft gel as it makes the encapsulation process not only easy and cost effective, but also eliminates many of the
problems related to soft gelatin capsules. This technology also provides the formulation scientist with flexibility to
quickly develop formulations when small quantities of drug substances are available. This article will review how
liquids filled into hard gelatin capsules can fulfill some of these demands and in particular will review the categories of
drugs for which the liquid and semi-solid filled capsule is particularly relevant, examine the compatibility issues
associated with excipient compare the liquid filled and sealed hard gelatin capsule with soft gelatin capsules and also
describe a new process for sealing hard gelatin capsules.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 86
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

PLGA NANOPARTICLES FOR TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY


Gurnany Ekta, Singhai Priyanka, Soni Arti, Thakur Abhilasha
ADINA Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sagar [M.P.]
abhilasha_thakur01@yahoo.co.in

ABSTRACT

Transdermal drug delivery is an attractive, non-invasive approach to drug administration and is likely to improve the
bioavailability of drugs by avoiding first pass metabolism and providing uniform drug plasma level. It provides a
procedure that allows a continuous intervention, and it is possible to cease the absorption preventing overdose or
undesirable effects. Biodegradable nanocarriers in this regard represent systems suitable for transdermal delivery of
small molecular weight drugs, peptides or genes. An array of natural and synthetic polymers has been investigated
for the synthesis of nanoparticles for delivery via transdermal route. The alternatives accessible for preparation have
augmented with advances in traditional methods, and many novel techniques for preparation of drug-loaded
nanoparticles are being developed and refined. PLGA represents a novel biocompatible, biodegradable and
resorbable polymer of choice for the preparation of nanoparticles providing a reservoir system for release into the
skin. Degradation property of PLGA nanoparticles is controlled by the proportion of lactic acid and glycolic acid units
present in the polymer chain. The end products are non-toxic which further augments their suitability. These
nanoparticles penetrate deeper in the skin upon massage in comparison to the free drug. The small size of the
carriers (10-1000nm) offers an increased surface area promoting a greater interaction with cellular systems,
increasing the biological activity and can also be used in cosmetology along with other areas of therapeutics.
Derivatization of PLGA can also be performed to get various other desirable properties so as to promote spatial and
temporal distribution of bioactives. The present article explores the potentiality of PLGA nanoparticles as suitable
vehicles for transdermal drug delivery.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 87
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

NOVEL APPROACHES FOR INTRANASAL TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY: AN OVERVIEW


Dave Kapilesh1*, Dr. Purohit Suresh2, Jain Anurekha3, Mandliya Rajesh1 & Shrivastva Nidhi1
1 Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M. P.)
2 Mewar Pharmacy College, Jodhpur (Raj)
3 B. R. Nhata College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M. P.)

ABSTRACT

The nasal route is widely used for the administration of drugs for both topical and systemic action. Topical
administration includes the treatment of congestion, rhinitis, sinusitis and allergy, and has resulted in the development
of a variety of different medications including corticosteroids, antihistamines, anticholinergics and vasoconstrictors.
The promising results obtained with enhanced drug bioavailability upon nasal administration have focused research
on the nasal application for systemic drug delivery. Currently, nasally administered drugs are used therapeutically and
are used in research for a variety of indications including Disorders of CNS, pain, diabetes insipidus, prostate cancer,
endometriosis, hypoglycemia, nausea, vomiting, smoking cessation and coronary artery disease. The nasal route of
administration has recently received attention for the delivery of systemically active peptides and proteins as a non-
invasive alternative to the peroral route, and to the invasive parenteral application, with its low patient acceptability.
Treatment of Epilepsy via Intranasal route is a challenging task but the advantageous features of nasal route support
the researchers to develop drug delivery system for the treatment of epilepsy. There are lots of carrier systems are
available by which we efficacy of antiepileptic drugs can be increased, like Microspheres, Nanoparticles,
Microemulsions, Hydrogel, Liposomes etc. Development of Intranasal microspheres of Carbamazepine,
Microemulsion of Valproic Acid, Microemulsion of Lamotrigine, & Microspheres of Diazepam are few recent
achievements in this direction.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 88
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

RP-HPLC ESTIMATION OF CILASTAZOL IN TABLET DOSAGE FORMS


Jain Rahul; Biltheary Avani, Yadav Shaili.
ADINA Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sagar, [M.P.]
prabhatjain16@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

A simple specific accurate and precise RP-HPLC method was developed and validated for the estimation of
Cilastazol in tablet dosage forms. A lichrocart C-18, 5 µm column having 250 x 4 mm i.d. in isocratic mode, with
mobile phase containing acetonitrile: methanol: 20 mm Phosphate buffer (45:45:10 v/v/v, pH 3.0 with Ortho
Phosphoric Acid) was used. The flow rate was 1.0 ml/min and effluents were monitored at 257 nm. The retention time
of Cilastazol was 4.00 min. The method was validated for specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, LOD, LOQ, and
robustness for estimation Olmesartan Medoxomil. LOD and LOQ was found to be 100ng/ml and 300ng/ml
respectively. Recoveries of Olmesartan Medoxomil in tablet formulation was found to be in the range of 99.08 -
100.01%. Proposed method was successfully applied for the quantitative determination of Olmesartan Medoxomil in
tablet dosage form.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 89
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

NTI-HYGROSCOPIC EFFECT OF DEXTRANS IN HERBAL FORMULATIONS


Kushwah L., Jain K.S., Attar A. M.., Joshi A.
Department of Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, B.R. Nahata College of Pharmacy, Innovation Square,
Mhow-Neemuch road, Mandsaur, M.P.

ABSTRACT

Equilibrium moisture sorptions of two dried aqueous herbal extracts and their mixtures with dextrans of various
molecular weights were investigated as a function of relative humidity at ambient temperature, and the data were
analyzed by both the Guggenheim–Anderson–deBoer (GAB) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) equations. Glass
transition temperatures (Tg) of the samples were measured by differential scanning calorimetry, and their
dependence on the moisture contents of the extracts was analyzed by the linear, Fox and expanded Gordon-Taylor
mathematical models. All dextran–extract mixtures exhibited single Tg values, indicating that they existed as single
homogeneous phases. The BET equation was found adequate for description of the moisture sorption isotherms for
all samples. The dextrans appeared to reduce the hygroscopicity of the herbal extracts solely by a dilution effect. The
observed increase in Tg and accompanying decrease in tackiness of the herbal extracts in the presence of dextrans
may be explained by the ability of dextrans to restrict the molecular mobility of simple sugars and to counteract the
plasticizing effect of water in the extracts. The expanded Gordon-Taylor equation has proved useful in predicting the
Tg of hygroscopic amorphous herbal mixtures.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 90
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

A REVIEW ON IN VIVO STUDIES FOR RESPIRATORY ALLERGY


Panwar Mangal Singh1*, Sharma Vijay1, Mahajan Govinda1, Dave Kapilesh1 & Gupta Rohit1
1. Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M. P.)

ABSTRACT

Asthma is defined as a chronic disease of the entire lung and asthma attacks may either be immediate,
delayed or dual in onset. Allergic asthma is a complex chronic inflammatory disease of the airways and its etiology is
multifactorial. It involves the recruitment and activation of many inflammatory and structural cells, all of which release
mediators that result in typical pathological changes of asthma. A wealth of clinical and experimental data suggests
that allergic asthma is due to an aberrant lung immune response mediated through T-helper type 2 (Th2) cells and
associated cytokine-signaling pathways.
The primary objective of respiratory allergy tests is to determine whether a low-molecular-weight chemical
(hapten) or high-molecular-weight compound (antigen) exhibits sensitizing properties to the respiratory tract. This may
range from reactions occurring in the nose (allergic rhinitis), in the bronchial airways (i.e., allergic bronchitis, asthma)
or alveoli (e.g., hypersensitivity pneumonitis).
The emphasis of this paper is to review methodologies suitable to identify respiratory allergens for the
purpose of hazard identification in animal models currently used in toxicology. This includes an analysis how the test
design, i.e., route, dose, frequency of dosing, timing of challenge exposures with the hapten or antigen and the
endpoint selected, can affect the outcome of study. The validity and the limitations of the various approaches are
discussed here.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 91
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

LIBS DEVICE FOR MULTI-ELEMENTAL IN SITU MEASUREMENTS


Kunwar P.S1, Singh N1, *Sharma R.K1 , Dhanjani N1, Shukla P1
1Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy,Mandsaur-458001

ABSTRACT

Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a simple, inexpensive analytical technique to determine the
elemental composition of a sample, regardless of whether the sample is a solid, liquid or gas. The beauty of LIBS is
its sensitivity to all elements, with typical limits of detection between 0.1-200 parts per million (depending on the
sample and the element of interest) in the vacuum ultraviolet range (VUV, λb200 nm). No sample preparation is
needed making it quick and easily adaptable to automated chemical monitoring equipment or portable units.
The technique can be used in a variety of complex analyses such as determination of alloy composition, analysis of
intact pharmaceutical solid dosages forms and their coating property ,origin of manufacture (by monitoring trace
components), and molecular analysis (unknown identification). There is also the option of using LIBS as a stand-off
analytical technique for corrosive or hazardous environments (such as space and nuclear reactors) preventing risk to
the operator as well as for military use in man-portable or robotics applications.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 92
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

FEATURE OF REGULATORY AFFAIRS FOR CLINICAL TRIAL


Rohit Gupta1*, Mahajan Govinda1, Dave Kapilesh1,& Panwar Mangal Singh1
Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M. P.)

ABSTRACT

Recent changes to the EU clinical trials directive have impacted on the time taken to gain regulatory approval in
early clinical development. It is important to submit the relevant data and documentation in the correct format in order
to proceed to the next Phase. The time taken for a drug to move on to the next clinical development phase can have
a profound impact on the company’s market share. Ensuring regulatory compliance will minimize the time taken to
gain approval.
Individuals who work in the area of Regulatory Affairs and Clinical Trials make sure that all the work meets
regulatory requirements. Under the direction of a Senior Associate or Manager, the Regulatory Affairs Associate is
responsible for gathering information and assembling regulatory submissions. They are also responsible for projects
such as literature searches and report preparation. Submissions may include annual reports, addition of new
investigators to clinical protocols, Certificates of Analysis, amendments providing for changes in the clinical program
manufacture of a product, and routine and supplemental filings. These individuals assist with and prepare for FDA
meetings, inspections, and audits from regulatory agencies.
Keeping current on regulations, laws, and guidelines is a very important aspect of this work. Companies rely
on reports from these individuals to ensure compliance. With respect to clinical trials, the primary focus of these
individuals’ work is on the implementation of clinical studies, with emphasis on study monitoring. This paper deals
with the current Aspects of regularity affairs for clinical Trials in detail.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 93
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

HEPATOPROTECTIVE ACTIVITY OF CALTROPIS PROCERA (AIT) R. BR.


Shrivastva Nidhi*, Goyal Swapnil1, Panwar Manisha1, Rajawat Anubha1 & Panwar Mangal Singh1
1. Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M. P.)

ABSTRACT

There are several herbs/herbal products and herbal formulations available for treating hepatic disorders.
Many herbs and their role in hepato-protection is established. However there are many more such herbs/herbal
products and are yet to be evaluated for their hepato-protective property. In one of our field surveys we found a shrub
Caltropis procera (Ait) R. Br. In our study we perform Hepatoprotective Activity of Caltropis procera (Ait) R. Br. in
CCl4-Induced Hepatotoxicity.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 94
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

AYURVEDIC AEROSOLS “ A BRIGHT HOPE FOR RESPIRATORY DISORDERS”


SOMYA GUPTA
B.R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Email – somyagup@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT

The present scenario of the anti asthmatic Aerosols formulation in pharmaceutical industries mainly deals
with allopathic medicines, but once again the ancient system of medicine that is the Ayurveda has found a sound
importance. Many of the drugs formulations from herbal origin have good applications in treating or preventing various
diseases, with no or very less side-effects and toxicity.
The present study was carried to formulate an Ayurvedic Aerosols preparation for treatment of various
respiratory disorders like asthma, bronchial spasm, bronchitis etc.
Ayurvedic Aerosols is a new hope from one among them. Recent scientific research has shown that
Ayurvedic Aerosols formulation inhibit asthma and other respiratory disorders, very effectively as compared to
Allopathic formulations.
The composition of polyherbal Ayurvedic Aerosol , formulation comprising anti asthmatic herbs which containing
mainly the therapeutically effective amount of plant extracts of Solanum xanthocarpum, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Curcuma
longa, Zingiber officinale, Piper longum, Emblica officinalis, Terminalia belerica, Ocimum sanctum, Adhatoda vasica,
Cyperus rotundus, Dathura, Eucalyptus, Tinospora cardifolia, Lepidium sativum, and Moringa oleifera, etc. so The
results of the present study suggest that some under process Ayurvedic Aerosol formulation like HK-07 is a
polyherbal formulation and investigations of following drugs Moringa oleifera, Adhatoda vasica, Lepidium sativum
have prove that to play an important roles in the treatment of asthma and other respiratory disorders.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 95
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ANTIMICROBIAL INVESTIGATION OF AN AYURVEDIC FORMULATION: SRNGYADI CHURNA USING DISK


DIFFUSION METHOD
Verma.M*, Jha.S1, Garg.R2, Gupta.S.
* Arya College of Pharmacy, SP-41, RIICO Industrial Area, Delhi Jaipur Highway, Kukas, Jaipur.
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, BIT, Mesra-Ranchi1
B.R Nahta College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur2
E Mail: manpharma@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT

Srngyadi churna is a reputed formulation used in pediatric disorders like jwar (fever), atisara (diarrrhoea), vaman
(vomiting), balakasa, swas (Cough & cold) etc. and other associated respiratory tract disorders. The formulation is
mentioned in the A.F.I. part I, 7:31 published by Government of India. The original reference is found in Sarangadhar
samhita, madhyamkhanda adhaya 6: 421/2. This is also mentioned in Bharatbhaishajaya ratnakar, vol.5 page No.31,
Kashyapa samhita, Bhaishajaya rathavali. The raw material entered into the formulations are fruits of Piper longum
Linn, belongs to family Piperaceae, roots of Aconitum heterophyllum Wall., belongs to family Ranunculaceae & gall of
Pistacia integerrima Linn., belongs to family Anacardiaceae. The aim of the present study was to investigate
antibacterial activity of alcoholic and aqueous extract of srngyadi churna. These extracts were examined against
some selective gram +ive and gram –ive bacterial strains using disk diffusion method. Alcoholic extract were shown
major activity against all the test organisms as compared to aqueous extract. The antimicrobial activity of the extracts
were compared to ofloxacin. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the alcoholic extract was determined by the
agar dilution method.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 96
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

MICRO WAVE ASSISTED EXTRACTION: A REVIEW


P. Bhatt, M. Soni, K. Patidar
Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy, Mandsaur

ABSTRACT

Microwave assisted extraction technique is one of the novel technique which have been developed for the extraction
of phyto-constituents from plants in order to shorten the extraction time, decrease the solvent consumption ,increase
the extraction yield and enhance the quality of extracts. Microwave assisted extraction has risen rapidly in the latest
decade and most application it has proven to be effective compared to traditional extraction techniques. The
technique is easy to use and the system is cheaper compare to other modern techniques such as supercritical fluid
extraction.
Although careful method development may generate some extraction selectively there is a need for additional clean
up after completed extraction. For some application only a filteration step is needed whereas for others solid phase
extraction or additional liquid – liquid extraction steps have to be performed to be able to use final analytical
technique. Compared to supercritical fluid extraction their is a disadvantages, since clean u is usually not needed for
this relatively selective technique. By considering economical and practical aspects, MAE is a strong competitor to
other recent preparation techniques. The companies that have manufactured micro wave assisted extraction plants,
especially a smaller, are receiving inquires from industries worldwide. Much of the demand for the use of MAE will
come from consumers who may be willing to pay a little extra for a products that were produced without the use of
solvents the future of MAE in research look bright with so many new applications under consideration and funding
available for any technology that promises to be clean, there will be increased research activity for many years to next
century . It seems that MAE is now over the hump and that it is rapidly developing into extraction method of choice for
the 21th century.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 97
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

HPTLC BASED METHOD FOR QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATION OF STIGMASTEROL IN PURE PHYTOSTEROL


Modi A*, Chandra S, Jarald E. E., Malik R
TIFAC-CORE, Workstation of Sonic Biochem, B. R. Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mhow-Neemuch Road, Mandsaur
(M.P.)-458001

ABSTRACT

Phytosterols are group of compounds (includes stigmasterol, -sitosterol, campesterol, brassicasterol ) which when
included in diet in sufficient amount i.e. 2-3 gm/ day decrease serum cholesterol concentration by reducing the
absorption of cholesterol from gut. A pure phytosterol was isolated from soya oil deodorize distillate. A highly sensitive
and accurate HPTLC method was developed for quantitative estimation of stigmasterol in pure phytosterol. The
method employed HPTLC aluminium plates precoated with silica gel 60F254 as the stationary phase. The solvent
system taken was chloroform-ethanol-formic acid (9.8:0.5:0.5) and derivatization was done with 5% methanol-
sulphuric acid reagent, in which spot of stigmasterol was found at Rf of 0.42. Densitometric analysis of stigmasterol
was done at 580 nm. Linear regression equation was found to be Y = -991.2+2619.3X with R2 = 0.9961. The range
for linearity was found between 0.6 to 1.8 g. Percentage of stigmasterol in pure phytosterol was found to be 45.23%.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 98
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON CONVENTIONAL EXTRACTION METHODS FOR BRAHMI AND EVALUATION OF

ITS ANTI-STRESS ACTIVITY USING ELEVATED PLUS MAZE MODEL

Sharma R1, Parial S.D1, Jarald E1,Santosh B1*, Anwar S Daud2, Showkat Ahmad

1TIFAC-CORE in Green Pharmacy, B. R. Nahata College of pharmacy, Mhow-Neemuch Road, Mandsaur (M.P.)-

458001, India.

2Unijules Life Sciences & associated Company, Nagpur.

ABSTRACT

In order to optimize the extraction methods of Brahmi for commercial purpose, two different methods of extraction were

compared and correlated with its anti-stress activity.

The leaves of Bacopa moniera were exhaustively extracted by soxhlet and maceration with different solvent alcohol,

water, hydro-alcohol(50:50) used in different solvent ratio (1:6, 1:8, 1:10) using various parameters like time (hrs),

temp., solvent, drug-solvent ratio. Best yield was obtained in the drug solvent ratio (1:10) and the yield was found to

be 26.2gm by hot continuous percolation process and evaluate anti-stress activity by using elevated plus maze model

activity was carried out with water, alcohol & hydroalcoholic extracts (obtained by hot continuous percolation &

maceration processes) at dose of 100 & 200mg/Kg B.W/p.o showed best activity in hydro-alcohol and water extracts.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 99
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF THIAZOLIDINE BASED SYDNONE

Sharma S K1, Gupta V D1, Sharma M1, Malik R1, Deshmukh P T2.
1CADD Laboratory, Department of Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry,
TIFAC-CORE in Green Pharmacy,, Innovation square, B. R. Nahata College of Pharmacy. Mandsaur, (M.P.), India,
458001
2Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, TIFAC-CORE in Green Pharmacy, Innovation square, B. R. Nahata
College of Pharmacy.Mandsaur, (M.P.), India, 458001

ABSTRACT

Antimicrobials seems the greatest contribution of medicinal chemistry to the therapeutics. Antimicrobials are one of
the few curative drugs. All mesoionic compounds known, sydnone ring is the most extensively studied because of
ease of its synthesis from primary amines and also it is the only mesoionic ring which undergoes a wide variety of
chemical reactions of synthetic utility.
Sydnones find their use as anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antibacterial, anticancer and analgesic agents. Sydnone
have nitrogen heterocycle in their structure with a lone pair of electrons on these heteroatoms, which are requisite for
the antimicrobial activity and condensation of other heterocycle, especially, sulfur or nitrogen containing with
thiazolidine will synergize with the antimicrobial action of sydnone derivatives.
In the current research work, N-substituted (1,3,4-thiadiazole-2yl) sydnone (Va-c) and 2-(nitroso(N-substituted
(1,3,4-thiadiazole-2yl)amino)acetic acid (IVa-c) were synthesized from 2-(N-substituted(1,3,4-thiadiazole-
2yl)amino)acetic acid (IIIa-c) as the key intermediated, which was prepared from thiosemecarbazide (I) and different
acids to form N-substituted-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-amine (II), Intrmediate (II) react with chloroacetic acid to gave
compound (III). Key intermediate (III) react with sodium nitrite to gave the title compounds (IVa-c) and this react with
acetyl-chloride to gave the title compounds (Va-c).
The structures of newly synthesized (IV,V) compounds were assigned on the basis of m.p. and various spectroscopic
(IR, NMR) and chromatographic techniques. All newly compounds were evaluated against some bacterial strains
(Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and fungal strain
(Saccharomyces cerevisiae) using disk plate method.
ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 100
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

TRADITIONAL MEDICINES FOR THE TREATMENT OF (HIV / AIDS): A REVIEW

Attar.A.M, Joshi.A, Sarsodia.G, Bonde.P


Dept. Of Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry
B.R.Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M.P)

ABSTRACT

HIV has infected around 40.3 million people worldwide. Current antiretroviral drugs have many disadvantages
including resistance, toxicity, limited availability, high cost and lack of any curative effect. Secondary infections
such as Candidiasis, T.B., MRSA infections etc pose a greater threat towards the fatality. An ethnomedical
survey in some regions of Tanzania has identified 36 plant species that are used traditionally for the treatment of
Candida infections. Twenty-one plant species are used to treat oral candidiasis (Utando) which is an important
sign of HIV/AIDS and some of the plants were reported to be active against other species Cryptococcus
neoformans, one of the important pathogenic fungi in HIV/AIDS. Some of the important plants with proven
antifungal activity include Abrus precatorius, Harrisonia abyssinica, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, Cajanus cajan,
Ziziphus mucronata, Dichrostachys cinerea, Acacia nilotica, Securidaca longepedunculata and Sclerocarya
birrea. Traditional South African medicinal plants, Bulbine alooides (L.) Willd. (Asphodelaceae), Hypoxis
sobolifera (Hypoxidaceae), Leonotis leonurus (L.) R.Br. (Lamiaceae) are used for the treatment of including
human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Leonotis leonurus inhibited HIV-1 significantly, HIV-1 PR inhibition was
observed for extracts of Hypoxis sobolifera (aqueous), Bulbine alooides (aqueous and ethanol) and Leonotis
leonurus (ethanol). Ethnomedical information about traditional plant increases the potential in development of
lead towards development of new drugs.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 101
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ANTI-ULCER AND ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF DHC-1, AN HERBAL FORMULATION


Bonde P, Jain Kumar.S, Kourav N, Attar A.M
Department of Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry,
B.R. Nahata College of Pharmacy,Innovation Square,
Mhow-Neemuch Road, Mandsour, M.P.

ABSTRACT

DHC-1, an herbal formulation derived from the popular plants Bacopa monniera, Emblica officinalis,
Glycyrrhiza glabra, Mangifera indica and Syzygium aromaticum, was tested for its anti-ulcer and
antioxidant activity in rats. Effect of various doses (125, 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, p.o.) of DHC-1
was studied on gastric secretion and gastric ulcers in pylorus-ligation and on ethanol-induced gastric
mucosal injury in rats. The reduction in ulcer index in both the models along with the reduction in
volume and total acidity, and an increase in the pH of gastric fluid in pylorus-ligated rats proved the
anti-ulcer activity of DHC-1. The increase in the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase
(CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH) and membrane bound enzymes like Ca2+ATPase, Mg2+ATPase,
and Na+K+ATPase and decrease in lipid peroxidation (MDA) in both the models showed the
antioxidant activity of the formulation. Thus, it can be concluded that DHC-1 possesses anti-ulcer
activity, which can be attributed to its antioxidant mechanism of action.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 102
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ASSESSMENT OF SAFETY OF HERBAL MEDICINES


Piyush Mantry 1*, Vivek Agrahari 1, Tahir Nizami 1, Durgesh Tiwari 1,
Mona Nagar 1, Vibhuti Kabra 2
1 Acropolis Institute of Pharmaceutical education & Research (AIPER), Indore, Madhya Pradesh,
India
2 Shubhdeep College of Pharmacy, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India
gmantryg@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT

A drug is defined as being safe if it causes no known or potential harm to users. There are three
categories of safety that need to be considered, as these would dictate the nature of the safety
requirements that would have to be ensured. Any assessment of herbal medicines must be based
on unambiguous identification and characterization of the constituents. A literature search must be
performed. This should include the general literature such as handbooks specific to the individual
form of therapy, modern handbooks on phytotherapy, phytochemistry and pharmacognosy, articles
published in scientific journals, official monographs such as WHO monographs, national
monographs and other authoritative data related to herbal medicines and, if available, database
searches in online or offline databases, e.g. WHO adverse drug reaction database, National
Library of Medicine’s Medline, etc. The searches should not only focus on the specific herbal
medicinal preparation, but should include different parts of the plant, related plant species and
information originating from chemotaxonomy. Toxicological information on single ingredients
should be assessed for its relevance to the herbal medicines.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 103
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ENZYMES IN HERBAL MEDICINES


Vivek Agrahari 1*, Piyush Mantry 1, Tahir Nizami 1, Durgesh Tiwari 1,
Mona Nagar 1, Vibhuti Kabra 2
1 Acropolis Institute of Pharmaceutical education & Research (AIPER), Indore, Madhya Pradesh,
India
2 Shubhdeep College of Pharmacy, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India
vivek.agrahari@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT

The enzyme activity status of phytopharmaceuticals and fermentative products is essential. It has
strong relevance to quality, stability and efficacy. Enzymes, besides playing a vital role in all living
organism also have vast number of industrial applications. These include consumable as well as
non consumable products. Enzymes are used in laundry and dishwashing detergents,
stonewashing jeans, pulp and paper manufacture, leather de-hairing and tanning, de-sizing of
textiles, deinking of paper, degreasing of hides and many more. Scientists are busy exploring
newer application for enzymes. One such area where enzymes being considered is improving the
yield in herbal drug extraction. There are reports which indicate that enzymes are beneficial in
improving the yield of oils from different plants (Jojoba seeds, Coconut oil extraction, Avocado,
etc.) and for extraction of fruit juices. In one study, release of stored anthraquinones from Morinda
citrifolia was achieved using commercial lipase enzyme. Extraction of flavones from Ginkgo biloba
leaves was also reported. This article deals with use of enzymes for herbal drug extraction.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 104
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

HERBAL BIOENHANCERS: A REVIEW


Vibhuti Kabra 1*, Vivek Agrahari 2, Piyush Mantry 2, Tahir Nizami 2, Durgesh Tiwari 2, Mona Nagar 2
1 Shubhdeep College of Pharmacy, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India
2 Acropolis Institute of Pharmaceutical education & Research (AIPER), Indore, Madhya Pradesh,
India
vibhuti.kabra@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT

Herbal bioenhancers are the substances which when mixed with the drug enhance the effectiveness
of drug without taking away its properties. These are at low doses promote and augment the
bioavailability or biological activity of drugs. Their development is based on ancient knowledge of
Ayurveda. They reduce the dose, shorten the treatment period and thus reduce drug-resistance
problems. Due to dose-economy, they make treatment cost effective; minimize drug toxicity and
adverse reactions. They are effective when used in combination with number of drug classes such as
antibiotics, antituberculosis, antiviral, antifungal and anticancerous drugs. They improve oral
absorption of wide range of nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, herbal extracts and amino acids.
They act through several mechanisms of action affecting mainly absorption process, drug metabolism
or action on drug-target. Since, bioavailability of drugs and nutrients is of equal relevant to animal
health as for as human health, uses of bioenhancers are also applicable in veterinary practice. This
review highlights some of the herbal bioenhancers and their applications in human and veterinary
practices.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 105
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

COMPARATIVE STUDY ON DIURETIC ACTIVITY OF FEW MEDICINAL PLANTS IN


INDIVIDUAL FORM AND IN COMBINATION FORM
Kuldeep kumawat1*, E. Edwin Jarald1, Narendra Nalwaya1, Showkat Ahmad2, Shamsuddin
Jamalludin2
1TIFAC-CORE In Green Pharmacy, B.R. Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mhow-Neemuch Road,
Mandsaur – 458001, Madhya Pradesh, India.
2Unijules Life Sciences Ltd. & Associated Companies, Nagpur.

ABSTRACT

In the present study the hydroalcoholic extracts of Tribulus terrestris (Gokhru), Boerhaavia diffusa
(Punarnava), Bergenia ligulata (Pashanbheda), Nigella sativa (Kalaunji) and combination of these
extracts were compared for their diuretic activity using Lipschitz test. Standard drug used was
furosemide (20 mg/kg body weight) in 0.9% sodium chloride solution. All the extracts significantly
increased urine elimination and Na+, K+ and Cl− excretion as compared to normal saline treated
groups. The hydroalcoholic extract of Nigella sativa showed better diuretic activity than the other
plant extracts. The combination of hydroalcoholic extracts of Tribulus terrestris and Boerhaavia
diffusa in 1:1 ratio showed better diuretic activity than the combinations of Tribulus terrestris :
Boerhaavia diffusa (1:2); Nigella sativa : Bergenia ligulata (1:1), and Nigella sativa : Tribulus
terrestris (1:1). Comparatively the hydroalcoholic extract of Nigella sativa showed better significant
activity than any other extracts and their combination.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 106
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

MODERN NMR SPECTROSCOPY TECHNIQUES


Sethi Mittul, Jain Sanjay, Deshraj, Kasama Nitesh
B. R. Nahata College of pharmacy, Post Box 6, Mandsaur (M.P.) 458001
E -mail – mittulsethi18@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

NMR is based on the fact that atomic nuclei have quantized spin states, which may be
differentiated in the presence of strong magnetic field. NMR is powerful tools used for elucidating
the structure of organic molecule.NMR is a form of absorption spectroscopy which is concerned
with the magnetic properties of certain nucleus. Recent development in NMR spectroscopy is 1D
NMR spectra, especially, proton spectra of organic compounds, usually consist of no of groups of
spectral lines (multipletes). Each group corresponds to one or more chemically distinct nuclides
and its central position defines. at least approximately, the chemical shift of the involved nuclei.
The chemical shifts are well known, because of large amount of empirical data, the number of
position of multipletes is generally not sufficient to define the molecular structure of compound
correspond to NMR. Additional information required for such a molecular structure elucidation and
available in 1D NMR spectra comes from scalar coupling (the J’s value) which determines the fine
structure of individual multipletes 1D NMR have a single chemical shift x coordinate axis. With the
development of more advanced spectroscopic methods, it has become possible to obtain two
dimensional spectra. In two dimensional experiments, both the x and the y axes have chemical
shift scales and the 2D spectra are plotted as a grid like a map. Eg. COSY Technique, HETCOR
Technique.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 107
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

NEPHROPROTECTIVE ACTIVITY OF EMBELIA RIBES FRUITS IN DRUG INDUCED


NEPHROTOXICITY IN RATS
Nitesh Kasama, Narendra Silawat, Vimal Parihar, Sangeeta Dwivedi, Digvijay Singh, Zafar Akbar,
Bharat Sharma,Mittul sethi, Desh Raj Sharma.
Department of pharmacology B.R.Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur (M.P.)

ABSTRACT

Oxidative stress due to abnormal production of reactive oxygen molecules (ROM) is believed to be
involved in the etiology of toxicity of many xenobiotics. Evidence suggests that in gentamicin
induced nephrotoxicity ROM is involved. We studied the nephroprotective effect of ethanol extract
of Embelia ribes fruits in gentamicin induced (40mg/kg) nephrotoxicity in rats. The study indicated
that Emblies ribes fruits significantly and dose dependently protected the gentamicin induced
nephrotoxicity. The serum urea, creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels in the gentamicin treated
groups were significantly elevated (p<. 001) whereas the body weight was significantly lowered
with respect to control groups. The serum urea, creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels were
reduced in the Embelia ribes fruits extract treated (200 and 400mg/kg p.o) in gentamicin model.
The levels of GSH were elevated significantly (p<0.01) in Embelia ribes fruits (200 to 400 mg/kg)
treated group. Ethanol extract of Embelia ribes fruits, partially ameliorated gentamicin induced
nephrotoxicity.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 108
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

BURN WOUND HEALING PROPERTY OF EMBELIN ISOLATED FROM THE ETHANOL


EXTRACT OF FRUIT OF EMBELIA RIBES BURN.
Md. Alam Khan,* M.A. Naidu
Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy,Mandsaur-458001

ABSTRACT

The study was undertaken to evaluate the burn wound healing property of embelin isolated from
the ethanol extract of fruit of Embelia ribes burn and to compare the effect of the combination of
embelin and silver sulphadiazine with silver sulphadiazine alone. Partial thickness burn wound
were inflicted upon four groups of six rats each. Group I was assigned as control, Group II
received the standard silver sulphadiazine. Group III was given embelin formulation 0.2% , and
group IV received the combination of the embelin formulation and standard. The parameters
observed were epithelialization period and % of wound contraction. It was noted that there was
significant improvement in burn wound contraction in the group treated in the .combination of
embelin formulation and silver sulphadiazine. The period of epithelialization also decreased
significantly in group III and IV. It was concluded that ethenolic extract of fruit of embelin as an
effective burn wound healing agent.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 109
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

TOXIC CONTAMINANTS IN HERBAL MEDICINES: A BIG TROUBLESOME


Singh A.P.*1, Deshmukh P.T.2, Gupta V.3, Rajpoot Pooja.4
*1,2B.R. Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur,(M.P.)
3School of pharmaceutical Sciences, Jaipur National University, Jaipur(Raj.)
4Rajiv Academy Of Pharmacy, Mathura (Uttar Pradesh.)

Email. pomitpharmabiz0103@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

This paper includes how advances in chemical and biomedical analysis would help to detect
intentional and unintentional toxic contaminants in herbal medicines. A World Health Organisation
survey indicated that about 70–80% of the world populations rely on non-conventional medicine
mainly of herbal sources in their primary healthcare. In recent years, we have witnessed the
increasing growth in popularity of over-the-counter (OTC) health foods, nutraceuticals, and
medicinal products from plants or other natural sources in developed countries. This indirectly
indicates that the public is not satisfied with their orthodox medical (OM) treatment. Such increase
in popularity has also brought concerns and fears over the professionalism of practitioners, and
quality, efficacy and safety of their treatment methods.Over the past decade several news-catching
episodes in developed communities indicated adverse effects, sometimes life threatening,
allegedly arisen consequential to taking of OTC herbal products or traditional medicines from
various ethnic groups. These OTC products may be contaminated with excessive or banned
pesticides, microbial contaminants, heavy metals, chemical toxins, and for adulterated with
orthodox drugs. Excessive or banned pesticides, heavy metals and microbial contaminants may be
related to the source of these herbal materials. This problem can be controlled by implementing
standard operating procedures (SOP) leading to Good Agricultural Practice (GAP), Good
Laboratory Practice (GLP), Good Supply Practice (GSP) and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)
for producing these medicinal products from herbal or natural sources. The public belief that herbal
and natural products are safer than synthetic medicines can only be ascertained by imposing
regulatory standards on these products that should be manufactured using these Good Practices.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 110
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

QUINOXALINE DERIVATIVES: POTENTIAL ANTIMICROBIAL AND CNS ACTIVE AGENTS

Shah A*, Singh N, Gupta V. D, Kunwar P. S


Mandsaur Institute of Pharmacy, Mandsaur

ABSTRACT

In present time, there is a growing interest in the development of newer and effective
antimicrobial agents. Quinoxaline derivatives are very useful compounds with well-known biological
activities. Notable among these are antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, amoebicidal, anticonvulsant
and anticancer. The main aim of the present study was to review the potential of some quinoxaline
derivatives for their antimicrobial and CNS activity. Quinoxalines have nitrogen heterocycle in their
structure and have a loan pair of electrons on these heteroatom, which are prerequisite for the
antimicrobial activity and condensation of any other heterocycle, especially, sulfur or nitrogen
containing with quinoxaline will result in a synergistic antimicrobial action of quinoxaline derivatives.
The CNS activity of some quinoxaline derivatives is reported specially anticonvulsants and that can
be the basis for development of newer CNS active agents. This review includes study of
substituted 2, 3-[(4-thio-2, 3-dihydrotriazino [3, 2- α])-thiazolol [4, 5-b]]-quinoxalines for their
possible antimicrobial and CNS activity.
S
N
N NH

N S N R
R = phenyl, 2-chlorophenyl, 2-hydroxyphenyl, 4-chlorophenyl, 4-methoxyphenyl, 4-nitrophenyl,
pyridin-2-yl, pyrrol-2-yl, 2-hydroxynaphthyl.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 111
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

NEUTRACEUTICALS: AN ALTERNATIVE TO MODERN MEDICINES

Sharma R.*1, Jain A.K..2, Gupta V.3, Gupta R.K.4


*1,2B.R. Nahata College of Pharmacy, Mandsaur, (M.P.)
3School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jaipur national University, Jaipur, (Raj.)
4Mahatma Jyoti Rao Phoole University, Jaipur, (Raj.)

Email. ravindra.sandilya@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

The present article reviews the general concept, categories, research developments, areas of
concern and regulatory aspects of nutraceuticals. The consumer is seeking complementary or
alternative beneficial products and the red tape of managed care makes nutraceuticals particularly
appealing. The term ‘nutraceutical’ was coined in 1979 by Stephen DeFelice, founder and
chairman of the Foundation for Innovation in Medicine located in Cranford, New Jersey. In recent
years there is a growing interest in nutraceuticals which provide health benefits and are alternative
to modern medicine. Nutraceuticals are non-specific biological therapies used to promote wellness,
prevent malignant processes and control symptoms. Nutrients, herbals and dietary supplements
are major constituents of nutraceuticals which make them instrumental in maintaining health, act
against various disease conditions and thus promote the quality of life. The lack of quality control is
a major area of concern for nutraceuticals. The quality of plant material and manufacturing
processes used for nutraceuticals are regulated by food laws, which lack the specificity required for
botanical drugs. This can have serious consequences. In USA, watershed legislation was passed
in 1994 to regulate the manufacture and marketing of nutraceuticals. This law, known as the
Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act, reversed 45 years of increasing FDA regulation of
health related products. These parameters like explosive growth, research developments, lack of
standards, marketing zeal, quality assurance and regulation will play a vital role in its success or
failure.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 112
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

AN ETHICAL ASPECT OF TRADITIONAL HERBAL MEDICINE RESEARCH AND WORLD


HEALTH
Gupta V.* , George M. , Joseph L.1, Singhal M.1, Gupta R. K.2
1 1

*1School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jaipur National University, Jagatpura, Jaipur, (Raj.)


2Mahatma Jyoti Rao Phoole University, Jaipur, (Raj.)

E.mail. vikas_gupta1911@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT

In this paper, we include concepts of significant ethical aspect for clinical research to international
traditional herbal medicine research. Traditional herbal medicines are naturally occurring, plant-
derived substances with minimal or no industrial processing that have been used to treat illness
within local or regional healing practices. Traditional herbal medicines are getting significant
attention in global health debates. Governments, international agencies and corporations are
increasingly investing in traditional herbal medicine research. Yet some literature addresses ethical
challenges in this research. In this paper we examine in detail three key, under approachable
dimensions of the ethical aspect in which particularly difficult questions arise for international herbal
medicine research: social value, scientific validity and favorable risk–benefit ratio. Many
considerable challenges exist in determining shared concepts of social value, scientific validity and
favorable risk–benefit ratio across international research collaborations. While, we argue that
collaborative partnership, including democratic deliberation, provide the context and process by
which many of the ethical challenges in international herbal medicine research can, and should be,
resolved. By investing in safety-monitoring infrastructure, “cross-training” investigators, and the
issues identified by this significant framework can promote ethically strong international herbal
medicine research that contributes to world health.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 113
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ALTERNATIVES TO ANIMAL EXPERIMENTATION


ABHISHEK AGNIHOTRI*1, ADITYA GANESHPURKAR2
1. DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY, B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF
PHARMACY MANDSOR [MP]
2. DIVISION OF PHARMACY, SRIT- PHARMACY JABALPUR [MP]

ABSTRACT

Individuals and organizations representing a broad spectrum of opposition to the use of animals in
research have grasped "alternatives to animals" as a catch phrase meaning anything from absolute
to partial replacement of live animals in biomedical research and testing.
W.M.S. Russell and R.L. Burch promote their definition of "alternatives" as "the three R's -
replacement, reduction, and refinement": Reduction in the number of animals used (implemented
by animal sharing, improved statistical design, phytogenetic reduction, and better quality animals);
Refinement of techniques (decreased invasiveness, improved instrumentation, improved control of
pain, improved control of techniques); Replacement of animal models (use of non-animal living
systems, use of non-living systems, and the use of computer simulation). Carol Newton proposed a
"3-S" principle - good science, good sense, and good sensibility. Harry Rowsell has added his
tenet of the "right animal for the right reason."
Alternatives to animal experimentation most often suggested are
• Physico-Chemical Techniques

• Computer or Mathematical Analysis

• Microbiological Systems

• Tissue/Organ Culture Preparation

• Plant Analysis

• Epidemiological Surveys

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 114
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF TEA ENIGMA ON 300 HUMAN SUBJECTS OF


BUNDLEKHAND REGION
Narendra S. Kushmakar*1, Narendra Choudhary1, Chakresh Patley1,Jitendra Sharma1 Pranita
Kashyap2, Narendra Silawat.1
1 Department of pharmacology BRNCP Mandsaur,MP. 2 Department of pharmacology SRITS
Raipur, C.G.

ABSTRACT

Tea beverage is commonly used in India. This study is focused to know whether tea is playing
any advantageous role in maintaining the health of people. We prepared a set of
questionnaires and collected a data of 300 peoples for evaluating health benefits of tea. Data
was analyzed and inference was made that people don’t think any harm or any side effect was
there using tea (milk tea) at a frequency of about 2 cup of tea daily for its stimulant action. Also
concluded that people feel uneasy if they don’t get tea; it may be due to habitual and psychotic
effect of tea on human beings.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 115
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

WOUND HEALING POTENTIAL OF TULSI (OCIMUM SANCTUM LINN.) OINTMENT IN


CUTANEOUS WOUND MODEL.

Chakresh Patley*1, Narendra Kushmakar1, Seema Kohli2, Rupesh Soni1


1 Department of pharmacology ,BRNCP ,Mandsaur , MP.
2 Department of pharmacology Govt. polytechnic college Jabalpur MP

ABSTRACT

Wound is defined as a loss or breaking of cellular and anatomic or functional continuity of living
tissues. The ointment of Ocimum sanctum Linn. leaves (100mg/kg/day for 10 days) was evaluated
for its wound healing activity in rats using excision wound models. Extract treated animals exhibit
87% reduction in wound area when compared to controls which was 59%. The extract treated
wounds are found to epithelize faster as compared to controls.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 116
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

ANTICONVULSANT AND ANALGESIC EFFECTS OF ALANGIUM SALVIFOLIUM LINN.


SEED EXTRACTS IN MICE
Ashish K.Sharma*, Rajesh Kumar, Anurag Mishra, Rajiv Gupta
Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Babu Banarasi Das National Institute of
Technology and Management, Lucknow -227 105 (U.P.), India,
E. mail: ashishsharma1436@yahoo.co.in

ABSTRACT

Ankol finds its mention in the traditional texts of Indian System of Medicine, literature survey revealed that not
much scientifically inclined research work has been done to explore the possibility of certain “Leads” despite
promising folkloric uses. The anticonvulsant activity of the plant Alangium salvifolium (Alangiaceae) seed extracts
was examined against well established models like Maximal Electroshock induced (MES) and Isoniazid (INH)
induced seizures, while the analgesic effect of the seed extracts was evaluated by hot plate and acetic acid
induced analgesic test methods. The phytochemical analysis of Alangium salvifolium seed extracts showed
presence of alkaloids, terpenoids, steroids, glycosides and carbohydrates as the main constituents. From the
acute toxicity study it was observed that chloroform, ethanol, and aqueous extracts of Alangium salvifolium seeds
are non-toxic at a fixed dose of 2000 mg/kg. Alangium salvifolium seed extracts (500mg/kg/p.o., body weight)
significantly delayed (P<0.01) the onset of the seizures and profoundly antagonized INH-induced seizures.
Moreover, Alangium salvifolium (500mg/kg/p.o., body weight) produced significant analgesic effects (P<0.01)
against thermal and chemically-induced nociceptive pain in mice. The ethanol extract of seed of Alangium
salvifolium showed significant (P<0.01) anticonvulsant and analgesic effect as compared to the Diazepam which
was taken as a standard for anticonvulsant studies and Ibuprofen for analgesic activity. These findings lend
pharmacological credence to the suggested folkloric, ethnomedicinal uses of the plant as a natural adjuvant for the
control or management of convulsions / epilepsy, as well as in the management of certain painful conditions.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 117
ONE DAY NATIONAL SEMINAR ON
TECHNOLOGICAL AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF HERBAL DRUG
ANALYSIS
07 October 2009

EFFECT OF FRUIT PULP OF FERONIA ELEPHANTUM ON CARBON TETRACHLORIDE


INDUCED HEPATIC DAMAGE IN ALBINO RATS

Anurag Mishra, Satyendra Singh*, Ashish K. Sharma, Manvi, Rajiv Gupta


Faculty of Pharmacy, Babu Banarasi Das National Institute of Technology and Management, Dr.
Akhilesh Das Nagar, Faizabad Road, Lucknow-227 105(U.P.)

ABSTRACT

Feronia elephantum Corr. commonly known as (Ayurveda : Dadiphal, Hindi:Kaith, English :


Elephant Apple). The pulp of the fruit is brown, mealy, odorous, resinous, astringent, acidic or
sweetish, with numerous small, white seeds scattered through it. The pulp represents 36% of the
whole fruit. The seeds contain a bland, non-bitter, oil high in unsaturated fatty acids. Traditional
Indian texts like Sahasrayoga and Shaarangadhara Samhita have mentioned the use of the plant
in liver complaints, internal abscess and inflammation .So it was thought to evaluate its
antihepatotoxic potential with the help of well established model. Preliminary phytochemical tests
revealed the presence of steroids, proteins, essential oils and tannins mainly. Ethanolic extract of
Feronia elephantum Corr. was administered to rats intoxicated by CCl4 (2 ml/kg body weight)
resulted in elevation of SGOT, SGPT, Alkaline Phosphatase and total bilirubin levels. After Acute
toxicity studies the 500 mg /kg was the dose selected for the hepatoprotective studies. Feronia
elephantum extract (200, 500 mg/kg body weight, p.o.) exhibited recoupment in both pre and post
treatment of biochemical changes induced by CCl4. The post treatment of 500mg/kg body weight
p.o. extract showed most significant hepatoprotective effect almost similar to the standard taken
i.e. Liv-52. Biochemical Enzymatic parameters of the serum indicated that Feronia elephantum
can be used as a potent hepatoprotective , thus justifying its role in our traditional texts. The best
storage condition was by freeze drying the pulp for future use.

ORGANISED BY
B. R. NAHATA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, MANDSAUR
Scientific & Industrial research organization (siro),
(siro), Recognized by Dept. of science & technology, Goi
IN collaboration WITH
TIFAC CORE IN GREEN PHARMACY AND NATIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT BOARD Page 118