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Report on consumer preference for


packaged milk

by

ANUP RANAWARE (Roll No: 32)

Project Supervisor: Mr. Sameer Kulkarni

A REPORT SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF


THE REQUIREMENTS FOR

POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN MANAGEMENT


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CHANAKYA INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES &


RESEARCH
ANDHERI (WEST), MUMBAI 400 058

Declaration

I declare that the Project Report entitled “Report on consumer preference for packaged

milk” is a record of independent study carried out by me under the guidance of Mr.

Sameer Kulkarni. This has not been submitted previously for the award of Post-graduate

Diploma in Management to Chanakya Institute of Management Studies & Research,

Mumbai.

Mumbai Anup Ranaware


22nd April 2009 Roll No. 32
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Approval Sheet

This Project Report entitled


“Consumer preference for packaged milk”,
Submitted by:
ANUP RANAWARE (Roll No.32)
In requirements for the Post graduate diploma in management, Chanakya Institute of

Management Studies & Research, Mumbai has been accepted.

Mr. Sameer Kulkarni Dr. Prakash Mature


(Asst. Professor) (Director)

Place: MUMBAI
Date: 22nd April 2009
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Acknowledgement

On successful completion of my project, I would like to acknowledge the guidance &

support of people who have helped in my work.

I would first like to thank Mr. Sameer Kulkarni for guiding me through the project &

providing his valuable inputs on my work project and for the help he extended during the

project & for providing necessary inputs & information. His encouragement & support

helped me in going beyond the parameters of the project & coming up with this work.

I would also like to thank Dr. Prakash Mature in a special way for giving me this

opportunity to work on this project.

Finally, I would like to thank Mr. Roshan Khundrakpam and all colleagues at

Chanakya Institute of Management Studies & Research for their help in providing the

necessary information & reports required for the project. This project is a credit to the

help extended by all of them.


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Abstract

This report is an incisive study of all the aspects of consumer preference towards the

packaged milk brand & Indian buying pattern, trends, lifestyle & their choice for

packaged liquid milk. The report aims to find out the different factors for preferring the

particular brand by consumers. The report also contains the SWOT analysis of Dairy

industry & the future prospects for dairy sector. The report completely based on the data

collected through the consumer survey. Chi-square test & graphical representation these

tools are used for analysing the consumer survey data.

Additionally, the report emphasised on the relationship between the various personal

factors like age, gender, monthly family income, no. of members in family.etc. & various

brand preference parameters like quality, quantity, price, advertisement, health,

consideration, taste, fat content, and packaging with preference for packaged milk.

It also examine major players of packaged liquid milk at Mumbai region & their market

share & major factors which influence the consumer to purchase a particular packaged

milk brand.
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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY 4

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SCOPE OF THE STUDY ERROR: REFERENCE SOURCE NOT FOUND

SWOT ANALYSIS OF DAIRY INDUSTRY ERROR: REFERENCE

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MAJOR PLAYERS IN MUMBAI REGION ERROR: REFERENCE

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LITERATURE REVIEW ERROR: REFERENCE SOURCE NOT FOUND

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CONCLUSION ERROR: REFERENCE SOURCE NOT FOUND

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BIBLIOGRAPHY 63

Introduction

Dairy industry plays a dynamic role in India's agro-based economy. Dairy sector,

mainly an offshoot of agriculture sector in India, has taken shape of an industry in

a big way today. Intimately interwoven with the socio-economic fabric of rural

people in India, dairying has played a crucial role in providing nutritional security

to the millions of households. It has also strengthened our economy all along by

supplementing family incomes and generating gainful employment in the rural

sector. All this is substantiated by the fact that Livestock accounts for 4.36% of

India's total GDP and 24.72% of Agricultural GDP as of the figures available for

2007.

Dairy is now a highly specialised field today that involves production,

procurement, storage, processing and distribution of dairy products. The dairy

industry involves processing of raw milk into products such as consumer

packaged milk, butter, cheese, yogurt, condensed milk, and skimmed milk powder

and ice cream.etc.

In India about 46 % of the total milk produced is consumed in liquid form and 47

% is converted into traditional products like cottage butter, ghee, paneer, khoa,

curd, malai, etc.


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Market size for milk (sold in loose or packaged) is estimated to be 36 million MT

valued at Rs.470bn. The milk surplus states in India Uttar Pradesh, Punjab,

Haryana, Rajasthan, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and

Tamil Nadu. The manufacturing of milk products is concentrated in those

milk surplus states. The top 6 states together contribute for 58 percent in the

national production viz. Uttar Pradesh, Punjab, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Tamil

Nadu and Gujarat.

Background of the study

Milk is one of the essential commodity in human being diet, which is

inevitable in our day-to-day life. Milk and other dairy products are the by-

products of several million agriculturalists.

It is estimated that around 20% of the total milk produced in the country is

consumed at producer-household level and remaining is marketed through various

cooperatives, private dairies and vendors. Also of the total produce more than

50% is procured by cooperatives and other private dairies. While for cooperatives

of the total milk procured 60% is consumed in fluid form and the rest is used for

manufacturing processed value added dairy products; for private dairies only 45%

is marketed in fluid form and the rest is processed into value added dairy products

like ghee, makhan etc.

Gone are the days when milk can be purchased only from milk vendors, but now

days when almost all items are sold in readymade forms in packets and milk is no

more exception. It can be purchased at any time from a grocery shop. It is also

good from health point of view as it is purified and the Cholesterol content

is removed from it. Several brands are available in the form of packet milk.
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The term "Brand Preference" means the preference of the consumer for one

brand of a product in relation to various other brands of the same product

available in the market. Customer may be buyer or user. The choice of the

consumers is revealed by brand preference. This brand preference is the

comparatively investing and a new field of study. This study "BRAND

PREFERENCE FOR PACKAGED MILK WITH SPECIAL

REFERENCE TO ANDHERI AREA" gives a clear picture on users of

packaged milk.

Objective of the study

The objective of the study is to find the brand preference for packaged milk

among consumers in Andheri. In this study the aims at analyzing the following

aspects:

1) To find out the brand preference for packaged milk in Andheri area among

packaged milk consumers.

2) To study the relationship between the various personal factors, such as quality,

quantity, price, advertisement, health, consideration, taste, fat content, packaging

with preference for packaged milk.

3) To find out the different factors for preferring the particular brand.

4) To know the sources of information which provide about packaged milk from

the consumers?
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5) To know the degree of satisfactions derived by the consumers.

6) To find out the alternative choice of consumers in case of non-availability of

their preferred brand.

7) To find out the awareness of the consumers about the packaged milk.
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Significance of study

Market size & Growth

The preferred dairy animal in India is buffalo unlike the majority of the world

market, which is dominated by cow milk. As high as 98% of milk is produced at

rural India, which caters to 72% of the total population, whereas the urban sector

with 28% population consumes 56% of total milk produced. Even in urban India,

as high as 83% of the consumed milk comes from the unorganised traditional

sector. Presently only 12% of the milk market is represented by packaged

and branded pasteurised milk, valued at about Rs. 8,000 crores. Thus the

market size for packaged milk is more & still there is a chance of growth in

packaged milk sector.

Importance to organised sector

Several consumers in urban areas prefer to buy loose milk from vendors due to the

strong perception that loose milk is fresh, but consumers are now switching over

to packaged milk brands for health reasons. Today, people prefer to buy

unadulterated milk from malls like Big Bazaar.

Quality of milk sold by the unorganised sector, however, is inconsistent and so is

the price across the season in local areas. Adulteration of milk with water, caustic

soda, and some whitening agents is a common complaint for the unorganised

sector.
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The drivers for packaged milk are the increase in milk production, timely

availability of milk, increased urbanisation, greater affluence and people looking

for value-added products.

Lifestyles and food habits are changing. People are willing to pay more for

quality. Thus, the organised sector is growing for packaged milk.


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Scope of the study

India's dairy market is multi-layered. It's shaped like a pyramid with a vast market

for low-cost milk. The bulk of the demand for milk is among the poor in urban

areas whose individual requirement is small, maybe a glassful for use as whitener

for their tea and coffee. Nevertheless, it adds up to a sizable volume - millions of

litres per day. In the major cities lies an immense growth potential for the modern

sector. Presently, barely 778 out of 3,700 cities and towns are served by its milk

distribution network, dispensing hygienically packed wholesome, quality

pasteurised milk.

According to one estimate, the packed milk segment would double in the next five

years, giving both strength and volume to the modern sector. The narrow tip at the

top is a small but affluent market for western type milk products like flavoured

milk, powder milk, Tetra pack .etc.

Underlying growth of 15% in packaged liquid milk over foreseeable future

The market for packaged milk alone is expected to grow at 10-15% in

volume terms driven by growth in population, rising income levels and

health consciousness. While a section of medical practitioners and others have

been lately discouraging milk consumption, the Indian food habits will

ensure a negligible impact from this. Of the 3700 cities and towns in India,

only about 800 cities and towns are served by the organized milk sector.

This leaves the organized sector with huge untapped market.


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Operating margins improved lately, to remain stable going forward

Operating margins (EBITDA/Sales), which have been stable at around 10-11%,

have been on the rise over last two years. EBITDA margin was 12% for FY06 and

14% for the first 9 months of FY07. Expected EBITDA margins to stabilise at

around 12% despite rising competition and rising retailer margins, as

contribution of value-added products rise going forward. Margins are most

sensitive to milk procurement prices. Cost of procured milk constitutes 70% of

sales value.

Launch of value-added products under consideration

Indian Dairy sector is considering launch of various value-added milk products

such as milk flavoured with real fruits (not with fruit essence), nutritional

products, and cultured milk products. These are likely to be low volume but high

margin products. They will be sold mainly on health platform - a platform

that's biggest sales driver of food products worldwide and lately in India.

Innovation to seed future growth

The bulk of the demand for milk is among the poor in urban areas whose

individual requirement is small, maybe a glassful for use as whitener for their tea

and coffee. Thus, there is an opportunity for organised sector to introduce small

packaged milk (Sachet) which should be available in ready to drink format.

Low Capital Intensity in Business (Low Risk)

Capital intensity of this business is low, net working capital is just around 4-6% of

sales. Receivable are almost zero as the entire sales take place on cash only. There

is absolutely no risk of bad debt for organised sector.


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Tie up with International Dairy majors

The company in its quest for innovation may tie up with international dairy majors

who can bring better technology or other innovation to complement the

company’s skill, knowledge & abilities & fund.

Export Potential

India has the potential to become one of the leading players in milk and milk

product exports.

Location advantage: India is located amidst major milk deficit countries in Asia

and Africa. Major importers of milk and milk products are Bangladesh, China,

Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines, Japan, UAE, Oman and

other gulf countries, all located close to India.

India's exports of milk and milk-based products showed a significant drop of

nearly 55% during the past year and were estimated at Rs 436 crore in 2007-08.

Packaged flavoured milk, Concentrated milk and cream products such as skimmed

milk powder continues to be the largest item of export, which together accounts

for nearly 78% of net milk and milk products exports during the year 2007-08.

The exports of skimmed milk power reached Rs 343 crore in 2007-08 as against

Rs 78 crore in 2001-02.

On the other hand butter, butter oil, ghee and other milk fat together accounted

for just over 10% of the net milk and milk product exports from India during

2007-08.
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SWOT Analysis of Dairy Industry

 Strengths

• Demand profile: Absolutely optimistic.

• Margins: Quite reasonable, even on packed liquid milk.

• Flexibility of product mix: Tremendous. With balancing equipment, you can

keep on adding to your product line.

• Availability of raw material: Abundant. Presently, more than 80 per cent of milk

produced is flowing into the unorganized sector, which requires proper

channelization.

• Technical manpower: Professionally-trained, technical human resource pool,

built over last 30 years.

 Weaknesses

• Perishability: Pasteurization has overcome this weakness partially. UHT gives

milk long life. Surely, many new processes will follow to improve milk quality

and extend its shelf life.

• Lack of control over yield: Theoretically, there is little control over milk yield.

However, increased awareness of developments like embryo transplant, artificial

insemination and properly managed animal husbandry practices, coupled with

higher income to rural milk producers should automatically lead to improvement

in milk yields.

• Logistics of procurement: Woes of bad roads and inadequate transportation

facility make milk procurement problematic. But with the overall economic

improvement in India, these problems would also get solved.


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• Problematic distribution: Yes, all is not well with distribution. Moreover, it is

only a matter of time before we see the emergence of a cold chain linking the

producer to the refrigerator at the consumer’s home.

• Competition: With so many newcomers entering this industry, competition is

becoming tougher day by day. But then competition has to be faced as a ground

reality. The market is large enough for many to carve out their niche.

• Processing & packaging capacity: the current level of processing and packaging

capacity limits the availability of packaged milk.

 Opportunities

• Value addition: There is a phenomenal scope for innovations in product

development, packaging and presentation. Given below are potential areas of

value addition:

o Steps should be taken to introduce value-added products like shrikhand,

ice creams, paneer, khoa, flavoured milk, dairy sweets, etc. This will lead

to a greater presence and flexibility in the market place along with

opportunities in the field of brand building.

o Addition of cultured products like yoghurt and cheese lend further strength

- both in terms of utilization of resources and presence in the market place.

o A lateral view opens up opportunities in milk proteins through casein,

caseinates and other dietary proteins, further opening up export

opportunities.

o Yet another aspect can be the addition of infant foods, geriatric foods and

nutritionals.
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• Export potential: Efforts to exploit export potential are already on. Amul is

exporting to Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nigeria, and the Middle East. Following the

new GATT treaty, opportunities will increase tremendously for the export of agri-

products in general and dairy products in particular.

• Rising awareness about hygiene standards and adulteration of loose milk has led

consumers in urban areas to switch over to packaged milk

 Threat

• Threat to co-operatives: Big names like Reliance, Wal-Mart, Dabur are

entering the private diary sector through tie ups with farmers, which indirectly

affect the business of co-operatives in dairy sector

• Competition from strong players: Many corporate are planning a foray

into the dairy business sensing the big opportunity.

Reliance and Wal-Mart have already made an entry into this business by signing

deals with farmers to procure 7 lakh litres and 15 lakh litres of milk per day.

Dabur India is exploring the possibility of entering into the milk-based drink

segment.

Amul has also forayed into the flavoured yoghurt segment.

• Threat from local vendors: 69 per cent of the households use loose liquid

milk, mostly home delivered by traditional vendors on monthly credit basis.

• Lack of Awareness: Still, several consumers in urban areas prefer to buy

loose milk from vendors due to the strong perception that loose milk is fresh.

Lower level of awareness about scientific processing of milk was leading to

consumers preferring loose milk, which exposes them to adulteration.


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• Tetra packaging: Tetra Pak is pushing its strengths - clean milk and long

shelf life. Milk in Tetra Pak packages can last several months unopened at room

temperature, which will tap the market of milk in traditional pouches, which again

force the organized sector to shift from traditional polythene pouches to tetra

packaging.
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Major Players in Mumbai

Region

“Purity is a guarantee for

Health”

“Builds Bone, Builds Life”

“Har Maa ka Pehla Vishwas”


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“Fresh & Pure”

“Live Life The Healthy

Way”

The interest of customers & the


distributors is taken care of by the
government while fixing the selling
prices, which are always low as
compared to the market

Kolhapur Zilla Sahakari Dudh


Utpadak Sangh Ltd. well known
with its popular brand “Gokul”

“Good Morning to Good Health”


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Literature Review

Dairy

Milk and milk products is rated as one of the most promising sectors in the

processed food industry. India is the largest producer of milk in the world with

production of 97.1 million tones in 2005-06, growing at a CAGR of 4%.

According to estimates by Dairy India, the size of the Indian dairy market is Rs 2,

27,340 crores, which is expected to more than double to Rs 5, 20,780 crores by

2011. India’s total milk production is projected to cross 100 million tones by end

of 2007 according to the tenth five-year plan estimates. Milk and milk products

account for a significant 17% of India’s total expenditure on food. India is on the

Verge of assuming an important position in the global dairy industry.


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About 35% of milk produced in India is processed. The organized sector

comprising of large dairy plants processes about 13 million tones, whereas the

unorganized sector (halwaiis and vendors) process about 22 mtpa.

Milk and milk products is rated as the most promising sectors and is
expected to more than double by 2011.

Traditional dairy products are India’s largest selling and profitable segment and

accounts for more than 50% of milk and dairy products. With liberalization, the

import of technology and machinery has effected modernization and technological

breakthrough in production of traditional milk products and this has encouraged

the growth of the organized sector in the dairy segment.

As per estimates by dairy India 2007, by 2011 private dairies are slated to outpace

the cooperative sector and become the largest producers of milk in the industry.

Private dairies are likely to contribute double the quantity of milk that would be

contributed by cooperatives in 2011.

Many corporate are planning a foray into the dairy business sensing the big

opportunity.

Reliance and Wal-Mart have already made an entry into this business by signing

deals with farmers to procure 7 lakh litres and 15 lakh litres of milk per day.
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Dabur India is exploring the possibility of entering into the milk-based drink

segment. Yakult Danone plans to launch health drinks and yoghurts based on

probiotics bacteria. Amul has also forayed into the flavoured yoghurt segment.
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Indian consumer behaviour

The Indian consumers are noted for the high degree of value orientation. Such

orientation to value has labelled Indians as one of the most discerning consumers

in the world. Even, luxury brands have to design a unique pricing strategy in order

to get a foothold in the Indian market.

Indian consumers have a high degree of family orientation. This orientation in

fact, extends to the extended family and friends as well. Brands with identities that

support family values tend to be popular and accepted easily in the Indian market.

Indian consumers are also associated with values of nurturing, care and affection.

These values are far more dominant that values of ambition and achievement.

Product which communicate feelings and emotions gel with the Indian consumers.

Apart from psychology and economics, the role of history and tradition in shaping

the Indian consumer behaviour is quite unique. Perhaps, only in India, one sees

traditional products along side modern products. For example, hair oils and tooth

powder existing with shampoos and toothpaste.

Different segments of Indian consumer

The socialites

Socialites belong to the upper class. They prefer to shop in specialty stores, go to

clubs on weekends, and spend a good amount on luxury goods. They are always

looking for something different. They go for high value, exclusive products.

Socialites are also very brand conscious and would go only for the best known in

the market.
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The conservatives

The Conservatives belong to the middle class. The conservative segment is the

reflection of the true Indian culture. They are traditional in their outlook, cautious

in their approach towards purchases; spend more time with family than in partying

and focus more on savings than spending. Slow in decision making, they seek a

lot of information before making any purchase. They look for durability and

functionality but at the same time are also image conscious.

They prefer high value consumer products, but often have to settle for the more

affordable one. These habits in turn affect their purchasing habits where they are

trying to go for the middle and upper middle level priced products.

The working women

The working woman segment is the one, which has seen a tremendous growth in

the late nineties. This segment has opened the floodgates for the Indian retailers.

The working woman today has grown out of her long-standing image of being the

homemaker. Today, she is rubbing shoulders with men, proving herself to be

equally good, if not better. Working women have their own mind in decision to

purchase the products that appeal to them.


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Increasing Awareness of Indian Consumers

Over the years, as a result of the increasing literacy in the country, exposure to the

west, satellite television, foreign magazines and newspapers, there is a significant

increase of consumer awareness among the Indians.

Today more and more consumers are selective on the quality of the

products/services.

This awareness has made the Indian consumers seek more and more reliable

sources for purchases such as organized retail chains that have a corporate

background and where the accountability is more pronounced. The consumer also

seeks to purchase from a place where his/her feedback is more valued.

Indian consumers are now more aware and discerning, and are knowledgeable

about technology, products and the market and are beginning to demand benefits

beyond just availability of a range of products that came from ‘trusted’

manufacturers.

The Indian consumers are price sensitive and prefer to buy value for money

products.

Changing Trends in Indian Consumer Behaviour

Bulk Purchasing

Urbanisation is taking place in India at a dramatic pace and is influencing the life

style and buying behaviour of the consumers.

The working urbanites are depending more on fast and ready-to-serve food, they

take less pain in traditional method of cooking and cleaning.


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Bulk purchases from hyper stores seems to be the trend these days with purchasing

becoming more of a once-a-week affair, rather than frequent visits to the

neighbourhood market/store/vendor.

The popular growing shopping trend among urbanities is purchasing from super

markets to hyper stores.

Trendy Lifestyles

The current urban middle and upper class Indian consumer buying behaviour to a

large extent has western influence. There is an increase in positive attitude towards

western trends. The Indian consumer has become much more open-minded and

experimental in his/her perspective. There is now an exponential growth of

western trend reaching the Indian consumer by way of the media and Indians

working abroad.

Foreign brands have gained wide consumer acceptance in India, they include

items such as;

 Beverages
 Packed food
 Ready to eat food
 Pre-cooked food
 Canned food
 Personal care products
 Audio/video products
 Garment and apparel
 Footwear
 Sportswear
 Toys
 Gift items
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Foreign brands vie increasingly with domestic brands for the growing market in

India. Foreign made furniture is well accepted by the Indian consumers.

Malaysian, Chinese, Italian furniture are growing in popularity in India.

Indian consumers have also developed lifestyles which have emerged from

changing attitudes and mind sets; exposure to western influences and a need for

self-gratification. Beauty parlours in cities, eateries, designer wear, watches, and

hi-tech products are a few instances which reflect these changes.

Top class, middle class and lower class are income related classifications of the

population and each of this class has its own consumption pattern.

Mumbaikars caught in web of milk suppliers


http://www.dnaindia.com/report.asp?newsid=1239350

A study in Mumbai has shown that certain milk dairies supplying milk to the city

virtually have a monopoly in fixed areas within the city.

Consumers are aware that there are at least ten to twelve major suppliers of milk

in the city, but rarely if ever do they get milk from the dairy of their choice from

the retailer who delivers milk to the doorstep.

When a consumer asks for a local milk supplier to deliver a particular

manufacturer's milk to the doorstep, the most likely answer the consumer is likely

to get is that "in this area, that particular brand of milk is not available".

The real reason, however, is that there are major distributors in each area who

decide which brand of milk will sell in a certain area. The incentive for this

segregation varies again, from greater margins in the sale of the particular brand,
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the bargaining capacity of the distributor if he picks larger volumes from a

particular brand and the nitty-gritty of keeping multiple accounts with multiple

brands offered.

This act prevents the consumer the right of choice and the right to gauge for

himself the quality and nature of the milk available in Mumbai.

Dilution of milk with water and then adding substances to it to make it thicker and

sweeter has now become a fine art with the milk mafia. Raids carried out by the

Food and Drugs Administration have revealed that the milk dropped at fixed

points is often carried away to nearby chawls and hutments, where a systematic

parallel adulteration industry works for a couple of hours to slice open the sealed

packet of milk, dilute its contents and seal it.

Consumers have no alternative to fight this 'group extortion' by the milk vendors

than to unite and insist on the milk brand of their choice. Multiple direct outlets by

the manufacturers will help in this fight to get the Mumbaikar his daily supply of

fresh, safe milk.


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Consumer preferences for milk


http://www.ilri.org/ilripubaware/uploaded%20files/SDP_BRIEF%201

Why raw milk is so popular in India? There are several reasons:

• Raw milk is 20 to 50 percent cheaper than packaged milk, as its


supply involves fewer costs.

• Many prefer the taste and high buttermilk content of raw milk.

• Raw milk can be sold in variable quantities, allowing even very


poor households access to some milk.

• In areas where transport is poor, it is often easier to find a farmer


with a cow than a shop with packaged milk.

• Consumers feel, justifiably, that simply boiling raw milk removes


most health hazards.

Some consumers, however, especially in the higher-income brackets, prefer

packaged milk. Again, there are several reasons for this:

• They feel there are fewer health risks, and greater guarantee of quality
and/or consistency.

• Pasteurized milk is generally packaged, making it convenient to carry and


store.

• It has a longer shelf life.

Several major factors influence to buy packaged milk

• The preference for raw milk throughout most of India is based on

considerations of taste, affordability, and availability.

• These factors are unlikely to change significantly in the near future. A

marked shift in preference from raw to packaged milk will probably only

occur if there is a substantial increase in income levels in India.


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• However, such a rise in income levels would lead to an increase in

consumption of both raw and packaged milk, benefiting both the unorganized

and organized sectors of the dairy industry.

How might price changes affect demand for milk products?

Milk is generally considered a necessity which is not very responsive to price

changes, though there are some interesting variations. How would consumers

react to a price increase?

• Raw milk-

Poor people attach such value to raw milk that they would not buy much

less if the price rose. Richer people are more likely to react to a rise in raw

milk prices by buying less.

• Pasteurized milk-

A price rise for pasteurized milk would have the opposite effect; higher-

income groups would still buy approximately the same amount of

packaged milk, and lower-income groups are more likely to buy less.

Limiting the availability of raw milk and thereby increasing its price

would not easily persuade poor people to reduce their consumption of raw

milk.

The consequent budgetary problems they would face might instead result

in reduced consumption of food items, with implications for nutritional

intake and health.


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Mahanand breaks new ground with ATM, Fresh Café


http://www.fnbnews.com/article/print.asp?articleid=15794

The bulk vending system for milk is not a new one. It is already there in places

like Delhi and Kolkata. So the concept of Any Time Milk is known. When we

were thinking of alternatives to pouch packing of milk and reaching out to the

consumers directly by eliminating the middlemen so that the problem of

adulteration is also taken care of, we thought that the bulk vending system should

be a good alternative. But when we studied the consumer behaviour in Delhi and

Mumbai, we came up with a lot of differences. We were a little apprehensive of

the fact that Mumbai consumers may not like to visit a milk booth for collecting

milk. If we have the same system of inflexible timings for Mother Dairy bulk

vending system as it happens in Delhi with two hours in the morning and two

hours in the evening, Mumbai consumers may not like it. We decided that in order

to be more consumer friendly we should adapt to the consumer behaviour of

Mumbai where people coming from home and going back home is not a uniform

pattern. Some of them leave very early in the morning and return home early.

Some reach home very late. So we thought of making any time milk centre where,

whenever you have time you can come and collect your milk. That may give the

flexibility and consumer acceptability also to our bulk vending system. So we

termed it as Mahanand ATM. Gradually, the acceptability is increasing.


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Packaged milk majors battle to gain market share


http://www.fnbnews.com/article/print.asp?articleid=16306

Recognising the growth potential of the Rs 200 crores packaged milk segment,

major players Amul, Nestle and Mother Dairy are stepping up their marketing

plans to woo new users.

For starters, Gujarat Co-Operative Milk Marketing Federation Ltd (GCMMF) is

getting ready to export its packaged milk brands to Malaysia, Mauritius and

Thailand to pump up volumes. GCMMF chief manager R S Sodhi said, "After

China, we will be exporting Amul milk to far east countries soon. We are already

present in Hong Kong and Singapore."

On the other hand, Amul's rivals Nestle and Mother Dairy are fine-tuning their

marketing strategy to gain market share in the Indian market place. As for Nestle

India Ltd's strategy, a company spokesperson informed that the company is

carrying out direct consumer contact activities that focus on highlighting the

convenience, quality and health benefits of Nestle milk products.

According to industry sources, Nestle India may decide to exit from the packaged

milk segment in India. However, the company spokesperson said that Nestle India

continuously reviews its product portfolio to maximise shareholder value on a

long term basis. "Nestle milk is not being debated for discontinuation but will

continue to be subjected to the normal review process like any other product for

maximising shareholder value," he added.


36

According to analysts, there's an increasing demand for packaged milk brands as

compared to other milk products this year, mainly because FMCG majors are now

opting for high decibel advertising to promote their Tetra Pak brands.

"As these ads harp on the benefits of packaged milk brands over other milk

products, consumers are now switching over to packaged milk brands for health

reasons. On the other hand, leading retailers in Mumbai have a different view on

the growing popularity of milk in Tetra Pak. Gone are the days when consumers

relied on 'Bhaiya milk' or a nearby dairy. Today, people prefer to buy

unadulterated milk from malls like Big Bazaar. While Amul is doing well, Mother

Dairy is also picking up sales in the last few months," said retailers in east

Mumbai.

Packaged Milk Brands at Amul to cost more


http://www.indiapackagingshow.com/news/newsfiles/262.htm
.

The prices of packaged milk brands of Amul have shot up by 8 per cent. The

dearer brands include Amul Shakti, Amul Taaza and Amul Gold. This comes in

the wake of a similar hike by Hindustan Lever Ltd and Colgate India.

The Rs 2 billion tetra pak milk segment is expected to register a 20 per cent

growth in 2006. Gujarat Co-operative Milk Marketing Federation (GCMMF)

Chief Manager, R.S.Sodhi in an interview to a news paper said, ``with the

introduction of VAT, our category is now taxable. There is also a rise in the

packaging costs this year. So we have hiked the price of Amul Shakti from Rs 24

to Rs 26, Amul Taaza from Rs 22 to Rs 24 and Amul Gold from Rs 24 to Rs 27.’’


37
38

Methodology

This study aims to identify the impact of brand preference on packaged milk

among the consumers for its purpose data were collected by survey methods

through questionnaire. This questionnaire contained the questions regarding the

size of the packaged milk and the reasons for preferring particular brand of

packaged milk.

Sampling:

Totally 44 respondents have been interviewed and the data have been

collected. The area of study has been restricted to Andheri area totally 44

respondents were selected at random for the purpose of the study.

Frame work of analysis:

The study of brand preference for packaged milk has been made through

questionnaire method. 44 respondents are selected randomly and were

asked to answer the question based upon their answer the classification of

respondents are done and are analyzed and interpreted. Graphical

representation & Chi-square test is used while analyzing and interpreting

the data.

Source of data:

The study is based on primary data only. The required information was

collected through the questionnaire from the consumers directly by

interviewing them.
39

Analysis and Interpretation

 Age of respondent:

Below 25 - Above
Preferred Brand 25 50 50 Total
Aarey 2 4 0 6
Warana 0 1 1 2
Amul 6 7 2 15
Mother Dairy 3 3 0 6
Mahanand 0 2 0 2
Other 1 8 4 13
Total 12 25 7 44

Chi-square value: 11.729

Degree of freedom: 10

P-value: 0.30360291
40

As per the age of respondent, 15 out of the 44 respondent are loyal to the Amul

brand & P-value is 0.30360291 > 0.05 therefore result is non-significant i.e.

relationship between age of respondent & their preferred brand is not up to the

level.

Factors influence to purchase present Above


brand Below 25 25 - 50 50 Total
Price 3 4 2 9
Taste 1 2 1 4
Advertisement 0 0 0 0
Friends 0 0 0 0
Quality 6 13 4 23
Relatives 0 1 0 1
Health 0 1 0 1
Packaging 0 0 0 0
fat control 1 1 0 2
Availability 1 3 0 4
Doctor 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0
Total 12 25 7 44

Chi-square value: 3.991

Degree of freedom: 12

P-value: 0.98359825
41

Best alternatives for Non- Below 25 - 50 Above Total


availability of preferred 25 50
brand
Aarey 2 4 2 8
Warana 0 1 0 1
Amul 1 6 1 8
Mother Dairy 2 3 1 6
Mahanand 5 3 0 8
Nestle 0 3 0 3
Gokul 0 0 2 2
Other(Local) 2 5 1 8
Total 12 25 7 44

23 out of the 44 respondent are quality conscious & P-value is 0.98359825 which

is much greater than 0.05 therefore result is non-significant i.e. there is no

relationship between factors influence to purchase present brand of respondent &

age of respondent.

Chi-square value: 20.961

Degree of freedom: 14

P-value: 0.1026361
42

Aarey, Amul, Mahanand & other local packaged milk are the best alternatives for

respondent’s preferred brand. P-value is 0.1026361 which is close to 0.05 i.e.

result is non-significant; therefore there is slightly relationship between best

alternatives for non-availability of preferred brand & age of the respondent.

Below Above
Have you ever changed your brand 25 25 - 50 50 Total
Yes 8 15 0 23
No 4 10 7 21
12 25 7 44
Reasons,
Price raise 1 2 0 3
Improper packaging 0 0 0 0
Lack of availability 6 8 0 14
More fat control 1 2 0 3
Poor quality 0 1 0 1
Poor Taste 0 1 0 1
Other 0 1 0 1
Total 8 15 0 23

For changing brand

Chi-square value: 9.262


43

Degree of freedom: 2

P-value: 0.00974501

23 out of the 44 respondents have changed their packaged milk brand due to the

lack of availability of preferred brand in market. P-value is 0.00974501 < 0.05 i.e.

result is significant therefore there is a relationship between changing of preferred

brand & age of respondent.

Below 25 - Above
Preferred size of Packaged Milk 25 50 50 Total
44

250 ml 0 0 0 0
500 ml 5 11 3 19
1 litre 7 14 4 25
Total 12 25 7 44

Chi-square value: 0.018

Degree of freedom: 2

P-value: 0.99104038

14 out of the 25 respondents having an age between 25-50 years preferred 1 litre

of packaged milk. P-value is 0.99104038 > 0.05 i.e. result is non-significant;

therefore there is no relationship between size of packaged milk & age of

respondent.
45

Below Above
Preferred Brand Awareness through 25 25 - 50 50 Total
Friends 2 5 0 7
Doctor 0 0 0 0
Advertisement 6 9 4 19
Shop keeper 3 8 0 11
Relatives 1 2 3 6
Other 0 1 0 1
Total 12 25 7 44

Chi-square value: 10.338

Degree of freedom: 8

P-value: 0.24209947

9 out of the 19 respondents have an age between 25-50 years well known about

their preferred brand through advertisement. P-value is 0.24209947 > 0.05 i.e.

result is non-significant; therefore there is no relationship between preferred

brand awareness factor & age of respondent.


46

 Gender:

Preferred Brand Male Female Total


Aarey 4 2 6
Warana 1 1 2
Amul 11 4 15
Mother Dairy 3 3 6
Mahanand 2 0 2
Other 8 5 13
Total 29 15 44

Chi-square value: 2.416

Degree of freedom: 5

P-value: 0.78908905
47

As per the gender of respondent, Amul is most dominant packaged milk brand

preferred by 15 respondents, out of those 11 respondents are male & 4 are female.

P-value is 0.78908905 > 0.05 i.e. result is non-significant; therefore there is no

relationship between brand preference & gender of respondent.

Factors influence to purchase present brand Male Female Total


Price 4 5 9
Taste 4 0 4
Advertisement 0 0 0
Friends 0 0 0
Quality 19 4 23
Relatives 0 1 1
Health 1 0 1
Packaging 0 0 0
fat control 0 2 2
Availability 1 3 4
Doctor 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0
Total 29 15 44

Chi-square value: 16.066

Degree of freedom: 6

P-value: 0.01340407
48

19 out of the 23 respondents are male & 4 are female who are quality conscious P-

value is 0.01340407 < 0.05 i.e. result is significant; therefore there is a

relationship between factors influence to purchase preferred brand & gender of

respondent.

Best alternatives for Non-availability of


preferred brand Male Female Total
Aarey 4 4 8
Warana 0 1 1
Amul 8 0 8
Mother Dairy 3 3 6
Mahanand 5 3 8
Nestle 2 1 3
Gokul 2 0 2
Other(Local) 5 3 8
Total 29 15 44

Chi-square value: 8.766

Degree of freedom: 7

P-value: 0.26989579
49

Most of the male are preferred Aarey, Amul, Mahanand & other local brand as

compared to the female & Amul is best alternative for male for their preferred

brand. P-value is 0.26989579 > 0.05 i.e. result is non-significant; therefore there

is no relationship between best alternatives of preferred brand & gender of

respondent.

Have you ever changed your brand Male Female Total


Yes 12 11 23
No 17 4 21
29 15 44
Reasons,
Price raise 1 2 3
Improper packaging 0 0 0
Lack of availability 9 5 14
More fat control 0 3 3
Poor quality 1 0 1
Poor Taste 1 0 1
Other 0 1 1
Total 12 11 23

For changing brand

Chi-square value: 4.046

Degree of freedom: 1

P-value: 0.04427614
50

Almost equally male & female have changed their preferred brand due to lack of

availability of preferred brand. P-value is 0.04427614 < 0.05 i.e. result is

significant; therefore there is a relationship between changing of brand & gender

of respondent.

Preferred size of Packaged Milk Male Female Total


250 ml 0 0 0
500 ml 14 5 19
1 litre 15 10 25
Total 29 15 44

Chi-square value: 0.9

Degree of freedom: 1

P-value: 0.34278171
51

15 out of the 25 respondents are male used 1 litre size of packaged milk. P-value

is 0.34278171 > 0.05 i.e. result is non-significant; therefore there is no

relationship between size of packaged milk & gender of respondent.

Preferred Brand Awareness through Male Female Total


Friends 4 3 7
Doctor 0 0 0
Advertisement 16 3 19
Shop keeper 5 6 11
Relatives 4 2 6
Other 0 1 1
Total 29 15 44

Chi-square value: 7.055


52

Degree of freedom: 4

P-value: 0.13301012

16 out of the 19 respondents are male well known about their preferred brand

through advertisement. P-value is 0.13301012 > 0.05 i.e. result is non-significant;

therefore there is no relationship between preferred brand awareness factor &

gender of respondent.

 Monthly income of family:

Preferred Brand < 10,000 10,001 - 20,000 > 20,000 Total


Aarey 1 2 3 6
Warana 0 1 1 2
Amul 0 4 11 15
Mother Dairy 0 1 5 6
Mahanand 1 0 1 2
Other 1 6 6 13
Total 3 14 27 44
53

Chi-square value: 11.675

Degree of freedom: 10

P-value: 0.03073962

As per the monthly income of the family, again Amul is a most preferred brand

whose income is > 20,000 Rs / month & 6 out of the 13 respondent preferred local

brands whose income is between 10,001- 20,000 Rs / month because of the easily

availability of local brand with cheaper rate. P-value is 0.03073962 < 0.05 i.e.

result is significant; there is a relationship between monthly income of the family

& brand preference.

Factors influence to purchase 10,001 -


present brand < 10,000 20,000 > 20,000 Total
Price 1 4 4 9
Taste 1 1 2 4
Advertisement 0 0 0 0
Friends 0 0 0 0
Quality 1 5 17 23
Relatives 0 1 0 1
Health 0 0 1 1
Packaging 0 0 0 0
fat control 0 1 1 2
Availability 0 2 2 4
54

Doctor 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0
Total 3 14 27 44

Chi-square value: 8.658

Degree of freedom: 12

P-value: 0.73183078

17 out of the 23 respondent whose monthly income is > 20,000 are more quality

conscious. P-value is 0.73183078 > 0.05 i.e. result is non-significant; therefore

there is no relationship between factor influence to purchase present brand &

monthly income of family.

Best alternatives for Non- 10,001 -


availability of preferred brand < 10,000 20,000 > 20,000 Total
Aarey 0 3 5 8
Warana 0 0 1 1
Amul 1 1 6 8
Mother Dairy 1 2 3 6
Mahanand 0 3 5 8
Nestle 1 0 2 3
Gokul 0 2 0 2
Other(Local) 0 3 5 8
Total 3 14 27 44
55

Chi-square value: 13.406

Degree of freedom: 14

P-value: 0.49483322

The respondent whose monthly income is > 20,000 Rs. are equally considering

Aarey, Amul, Mahanand & local packaged milk are the best alternatives for their

preferred brand milk. P-value is 0.49483322 > 0.05 i.e. result is non-significant;

therefore there is no relationship between best alternatives of non-availability of


56

preferred brand & monthly income of family.

10,001 -
Have you ever changed your brand < 10,000 20,000 > 20,000 Total
Yes 2 5 16 23
No 1 9 11 21
3 14 27 44
Reasons,
Price raise 0 2 1 3
Improper packaging 0 0 0 0
Lack of availability 1 1 12 14
More fat control 1 2 0 3
Poor quality 0 0 1 1
Poor Taste 0 0 1 1
Other 0 0 1 1
Total 2 5 16 23

For changing brand

Chi-square value: 2.316

Degree of freedom: 2

P-value: 0.31411378
57

12 out of the 14 respondents whose monthly income is > 20,000 Rs are changing

their preferred brand due to lack of availability of preferred brand in market. P-

value is 0.31411378 > 0.05 i.e. result is non-significant; therefore there is no

relationship between changing of preferred brand & monthly income of family.

Preferred size of Packaged 10,001 -


Milk < 10,000 20,000 > 20,000 Total
250 ml 0 0 0 0
500 ml 1 6 11 18
1 litre 2 8 16 26
Total 3 14 27 44

Chi-square value: 0.094

Degree of freedom: 2

P-value: 0.9540874
58

16 out of 26 respondents having monthly income > 20,000 Rs. used 1 litre size of

packaged milk. P-value is 0.9540874 > 0.05 i.e. result is non-significant;

therefore there is no relationship between size of packaged milk & monthly

income of family.

Preferred Brand 10,001 -


Awareness through < 10,000 20,000 > 20,000 Total
Friends 0 1 6 7
Doctor 0 0 0 0
Advertisement 1 5 13 19
Shop keeper 1 6 6 13
Relatives 0 2 2 4
Other 1 0 0 1
Total 3 14 27 44
59

Chi-square value: 18.016

Degree of freedom: 8

P-value: 0.02110685

13 out of the 19 respondents have a monthly income > 20,000 Rs. well known

about their preferred brand through advertisement. P-value is 0.02110685 < 0.05

i.e. result is significant; therefore there is a relationship between preferred brand

awareness factor & monthly income of family.

 No. of members in family:

1-3 4-6 more than


Preferred Brand members members 6 Total
60

Aarey 0 6 0 6
Warana 1 1 0 2
Amul 6 9 0 15
Mother Dairy 3 2 1 6
Mahanand 1 1 0 2
Other 3 10 0 13
Total 14 29 1 44

Chi-square value: 12.406

Degree of freedom: 10

P-value: 0.25880272
61

As per the number of members in family, 9 out of the 15 respondents having 4-6

members & 6 respondents having 1-3 members in their family who preferring

Amul brand. P-value is0.25880272 > 0.05 i.e. result is non-significant; therefore

there is no relationship between brand preference & no. of members in family.

Factors influence to purchase 1-3 4-6 more


present brand members members than 6 Total
Price 2 7 0 9
Taste 4 0 0 4
Advertisement 0 0 0 0
Friends 0 0 0 0
Quality 5 17 1 23
Relatives 1 0 0 1
Health 1 0 0 1
Packaging 0 0 0 0
fat control 0 2 0 2
Availability 1 3 0 4
Doctor 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0
Total 14 29 1 44

Chi-square value: 16.142

Degree of freedom: 12

P-value: 0.18481844
62

17 out of the 23 respondents having 4-6 members & 5 respondents having 1-3

members in their family who are quality conscious. P-value is 0.18481844 > 0.05

i.e. result is non-significant; therefore there is no relationship between factors

influence to purchase present brand & no. of members in family.

Best alternatives for Non- 1-3 4-6 more


availability of preferred brand members members than 6 Total
Aarey 1 7 0 8
Warana 0 1 0 1
Amul 4 4 0 8
Mother Dairy 3 3 0 6
Mahanand 3 5 0 8
Nestle 0 2 1 3
Gokul 1 1 0 2
Other(Local) 2 6 0 8
Total 14 29 1 44

Chi-square value: 19.209

Degree of freedom: 14

P-value: 0.15711598
63

Aarey is best alternative brand for respondent having 4-6 members in their family.

P-value is 0.15711598 which is closer to 0.05 i.e. result is non-significant;

therefore there is slightly relationship between best alternatives for preferred

brand & no. of members in family.

Have you ever changed more


your brand 1-3 members 4-6 members than 6 Total
Yes 5 18 0 23
No 9 11 1 21
14 29 1 44
Reasons,
Price raise 1 2 0 3
Improper packaging 0 0 0 0
Lack of availability 3 11 0 14
More fat control 0 3 0 3
Poor quality 1 0 0 1
Poor Taste 0 1 0 1
Other 0 1 0 1
Total 5 18 0 23

For changing brand

Chi-square value: 3.749

Degree of freedom: 2
64

P-value: 0.15343166

11 out of the 14 respondents have 4-6 members in their family who changing their

brand due to lack of availability in market. P-value is 0.15343166 which again

close to 0.05 i.e. result is non-significant; therefore there is slightly relationship

between no. of members in family & changing of brand.

1-3 4-6 more


Preferred size of Packaged Milk members members than 6 Total
250 ml 0 0 0 0
65

500 ml 7 10 1 18
1 litre 7 19 0 26
Total 14 29 1 44

Chi-square value: 2.419

Degree of freedom: 2

P-value: 0.29834642

19 out of the 26 respondents having 4-6 members in their family used 1 litre size

of packaged milk for consumption. P-value is 0.29834642 > 0.05 i.e. result is

non-significant; there is no relationship between no. of members in family &

preferred size of packaged milk.

Preferred Brand Awareness 1-3 4-6 more


through members members than 6 Total
66

Friends 1 5 1 7
Doctor 0 0 0 0
Advertisement 7 12 0 19
Shop keeper 3 8 0 11
Relatives 3 3 0 6
Other 0 1 0 1
Total 14 29 1 44

Chi-square value: 7.664

Degree of freedom: 8

P-value: 0.46696025

12 out of the 19 respondents have 4-6 members in their family well known about

their preferred brand through advertisement. P-value is 0.46696025 > 0.05 i.e.

result is non-significant; there is no relationship between no. of members in

family & preferred brand awareness factor.

Findings
67

As per the age of respondent

 7 out of the 15 respondents having age of 25 – 50 years who preferring

Amul brand.

 13 out of the 23 respondents having age of 25 – 50 years are quality

conscious.

 6 out of the 8 respondents having age of 25 – 50 years preferred Amul as a

best alternative for their regular brand.

 8 out of the 14 respondents having age of 25 – 50 years changing their

preferred brand due to lack of availability of preferred brand in market.

 14 out of the 25 respondents having an age between 25-50 years preferred 1

litre of packaged milk.

 9 out of the 19 respondents having an age between 25-50 years well known

about their preferred brand through advertisement.

As per the gender of respondent

 11 out of the 15 respondents are male who preferred Amul as a lead brand.

 19 out of the 23 respondents are male who are quality conscious.

 8 out of the 8 respondents are male preferred Amul as a best alternative for

their regular brand.

 9 out of the 14 respondents are male changing their preferred brand due to

lack of availability of preferred brand in market.

 15 out of the 25 respondents are male used 1 litre size of packaged milk.
68

 16 out of the 19 respondents are male well known about their preferred brand

through advertisement.

As per the monthly income of family

 11 out of the 15 respondents having monthly income > 20,000 Rs

preferring Amul as a lead brand.

 17 out of the 23 respondents are quality conscious having monthly

income > 20,000 Rs.

 6 out of the 8 respondents having monthly income > 20,000 Rs

preferred Amul as a best alternative for their regular brand.

 12 out of the 14 respondents having monthly income > 20,000 Rs

changing their preferred brand due to lack of availability of preferred brand

in market.

 16 out of 26 respondents having monthly income > 20,000 Rs. used 1

litre size of packaged milk.

 13 out of the 19 respondents having a monthly income > 20,000 Rs. well

known about their preferred brand through advertisement.

As per the no. of members in family

 9 out of the 15 respondents having 4-6 members & 6 respondents having 1-3

members in their family who preferring Amul brand.

 17 out of the 23 respondents having 4-6 members & 5 respondents having 1-3

members in their family who are quality conscious.

 7 out of the 8 respondents having 4 – 6 members in their family preferred


69

Aarey is best alternative for their regular brand.

 11 out of the 14 respondents having 4-6 members in their family changing their

brand due to lack of availability in market.

 19 out of the 26 respondents having 4-6 members in their family used 1 litre

size of packaged milk for consumption.

 12 out of the 19 respondents having 4-6 members in their family well known

about their preferred brand through advertisement.


70

Conclusion

• From the above findings, majority of the population in Andheri region are

from upper middle class & more conscious about the quality of packaged

milk.

• Most of the consumers preferred Amul as their regular brand in their diet.

• Amul & Aarey are the best alternatives for non-availability of their

preferred brand.

• More than 70% of the respondents are having > 20,000 Rs. monthly

income.

• 80% of the respondents are having 4-6 members in their family.

• 60% of the respondents are having an age between 25-50 years.

• Advertisement & Shopkeeper are the most important factors for the

awareness of preferred brand.

• 70% of the respondents used 1 litre size of packaged milk.

According to Chi-square test,

There is a relationship between following factors,

• Changing of a preferred brand & age of a respondent (due to the lack of

availability of preferred brand in market)

• Factors influence to purchase preferred brand & gender of respondent

(quality is a major factor which influence to purchase preferred brand)


71

• Changing of a preferred brand & gender of a respondent (due to the lack of

availability of preferred brand in market)

• Monthly income of family & brand preference (high income level, more

brand quality conscious)

• Preferred brand awareness factor & monthly income of family (through

advertisement)
72

Questionnaire

Personal details

1. Age :

2. Gender : Male Female

3. Marital Status : Married Unmarried

4. Educational Qualification : Above Graduation

Graduation

Below Graduation

5. Occupation : Housewife

Professional

Employed

Other (specify)

6. Family Income (per month) : Less than 10,000 Rs.

Rs.10, 001 – Rs.20, 000

More than Rs.20, 000

7. Family Members : 1-3 members 4-6 members

More than 6 members

8. No. of Children in family :

Brand Preference

1. Which brand is preferred in your family?

Aarey Warana
73

Amul Mother Dairy

Mahanand other (specify)

2. Which of the following factors influence you to choose present brand?

Price Quality Fat

control

Taste Relatives Availability

Advertisement Health Doctor

Friends Packaging Others

3. How did you know your preferred brand?

Friends Advertisement Relatives

Doctors Shop keepers others(specify)

4. Which size of packaged milk do you preferred?

250 ml 500 ml 1 litre

5. Do you know the name of the manufacturer of your preferred brand?

Yes No

6. State the degree of satisfaction in the following (for your preferred brand)

Sr. Highly Not


No. Characteristics Satisfactory Satisfactory Satisfactory

1) Price

2) Quality

3) Taste

4) Packaging

5) Advertisement
74

7. Have you ever had the scarcity of milk in the market?

Yes No
8. In case of non-availability of your preferred brand, what will be your next best
alternative choice? (Name it)

9. Have you ever changed you brand?

Yes No

If yes, mention the reason:

Price raises Improper Packaging

Lack of Availability More Fat control

Poor Quality Poor Taste

Other (specify)

10. Name the substitute packaged milk brand for your regular milk brand with

reason.

Brand Reason

1)

2)
75

3)

11. Do you feel that your preferred brand of the milk enhances the richness of Tea
/ Coffee?

Yes No

12. Will you change the brand if your family income level is increases?

Yes No

13. Mention the reasons for selecting the next brand:

Same Price Same packaging

Same Taste Same Quality

No other alternative

14. Have you ever suggested your preferred brand of milk to your friends or
relatives?

Yes No
76
77

Bibliography

Books

 Consumer Behaviour by Solomon

 Brand Management by S. L. Gupta

 Business Statistics by Beri

Websites

 http://www.dnaindia.com/report.asp?newsid=1239350

 http://www.ilri.org/ilripubaware/uploaded%20files/SDP_BRIEF
%201

 http://www.fnbnews.com/article/print.asp?articleid=15794

 http://www.fnbnews.com/article/print.asp?articleid=16306

 http://www.indiapackagingshow.com/news/newsfiles/262.htm

 http://people.ku.edu/~preacher/chisq/chisq.htm
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