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STAFF ABSENCES REPORT

Occupational and Non-Occupational Incidents

HUMAN RESOURCES SERVICES

MARCH 2004
Why We Analyze Data

Analysing absence data is important for two reasons:

• The process enables an organization to determine whether or


not it has an absence problem

• It can help the organization to understand what is driving


absenteeism
Assessing the Magnitude of Absenteeism

Days lost per employee and percentage lost time are the two
metrics used to gain an overall understanding of the magnitude
of the problem.

Days lost per employee = total days lost


number of employees

Percentage lost time = number of days lost through absence x 100


(# of employees) x (# working days)

Technically, percentage lost time is the better overall measure


of absenteeism. Days lost per employee, however, has an
advantage in terms of simplicity of calculation. For this reason, it
is the metric most commonly used by organizations to assess
absenteeism
Assessing the Nature of Absenteeism

Two other metrics are important in understanding the nature of


absenteeism:

• Incidence or Frequency

• Duration
Absence Incident

An absence incident is any continuous absence from


commencement until return to work e.g. a 1 day absence is 1
incident. Likewise, a consecutive 12-day absence is also one
incident.

Absence incidence is related to:

• Psychosocial factors
• Job satisfaction
• Workplace factors
• Organizational factors
• Health risk factors
Absence Duration

Absence duration is the total number of days absent from work


per absence incident. Generally, duration is considered to be a
measure of severity, i.e. the longer the absence the more severe
the health issue.

Absence duration is related to:

• Timely reporting and follow-up


• Quality medical care
• Rigorous case management
• Responsive, modified work accommodation
• Sentinel effect
• Sick leave and disability plan designs
BENCHMARKING ABSENTEEISM MAGNITUDE

Benchmarking Against Statistics Canada

Statistics Canada’s absenteeism statistics, while not serving as


a perfect source of comparison, at least provide a crude
benchmark against which a school board can compare its
employee absenteeism levels with those of the education sector
in general.

According to Statistics Canada (Perspectives on Labour and


Income, Catalogue 75-001, Winter 2002, Vol. 13 No. 04)
Education Services employees lost 6.8 days of work in 2001
due solely to their own illness or disability.
BENCHMARKING ABSENTEEISM MAGNITUDE
Benchmarking Against Other School Boards

Benchmark data has been compiled for the four largest


employee groups: elementary teachers, secondary teachers,
educational assistants and custodians. In the school boards that
have participated in the needs assessment, these four groups
represent 85-90% of the employee population.

The following chart illustrates the average number of days lost


per employee per year due to personal illness in the other
boards;

Days Lost per Employee Per Year Due to Personal Illness


Elementary Secondary Educational Custodians
Teacher Teacher Assistants

7.88 6.54 9.15 11.82


STAFF ABSENCES REPORT

List of Employee Groups

Assoc of Business Professional


Non-Union Board Office Managers, Supervisors, Analysts, Administrators
Assoc Prof Student Services Personnel
Psycho-Ed Consultants, Social Workers, Speech & Lang, Attendance
Princ & Vice Principals
CPCO Members – Principals and Vice Principals
Custodial Maintenance
Custodial and Maintanance Employees
CUPE 10 Month
Elementary School Secretaries, Education Assistants, Librarians, Chaplains
CUPE 12 Month
Professional Support - Computer Support Technicians, Audio-Visual Tech, Secondary
Secretaries, Attendance, Guidance, Head Secretaries, Union Board Office
Elementary Teachers
Classroom, FSL, ESL, SPST, Coordinators, Resource
Secondary Teachers
Department Heads, Classroom, SPST, Coordinators, Resource
Average Sick Days / Employee
2001-2002 School Year
10.00

9.00 8.75
8.13 8.18
8.00

7.02
7.00

6.00
Sick Days
Average

5.01
5.00

4.00
3.40

3.00
2.26
2.00
1.37

1.00

0.00
Assoc Business Assoc Prof Student Principals - VP's Custodial - CUPE 10 Month CUPE 12 Month Elementary Secondary
Prof Support Maintenance Teachers Teachers
Employee Group
Average Sick Days / Employee
2002-2003 School Year
10.00
9.31

9.00
8.25 8.26
8.00
7.46

7.00

6.00 5.79
Sick Days
Average

5.00
4.14
4.00

3.00 2.65
2.06
2.00

1.00

0.00
Assoc Business Assoc Prof Student Principals - VP's Custodial - CUPE 10 Month CUPE 12 Month Elementary Secondary
Prof Support Maintenance Teachers Teachers
Employee Group
Wo r k p l a c e S a f e t y a n d I n s u r a n c e B o a r d ( WS I B )

1 2. 0 0

1 0. 0 0

8. 0 0

6. 0 0

4. 0 0

2. 0 0

0. 0 0
1 99 9 -20 0 0 2 00 0 -20 01 2 0 01 -2 00 2 2 0 02 -20 0 3

Sc hool Ye ar s

Note : 9 8 . 5 % o f E mp l o y e e s o n WS I B h a v e R e t u r n e d t o Wo r k
1 . 5 % r e ma i n o n WS I B
Wo r k p l a c e S a f e t y a n d I n s u r a n c e B o a r d ( WS I B )
b y E mp l o y e e Gr o u p

35

30

25 As s oc o f B u s i n e s s P r o f

C u s t od i a l M a i n t e na n c e
20
C UP E 1 0 M on t h

C UP E 1 2 M on t h
15
E l e me nt a r y T e a c he r s

10 Se c o nd a r y T e a c h e r s

0
1 99 9 -20 00 2 0 00 -20 0 1 2 00 1 -20 02 2 0 02 -2 00 3

Sc hool Ye ar s
Short Term Disability (STD)

70.00

60.00
Average Days Lost / Incident

50.00

40.00

30.00

20.00

10.00

0.00
1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003
School Years

Note: 65% of Em ployees on STD have Returned to Work


23% of Em ployees on STD continued into Long Term Disability
12% of Em ployees on STD becam e Inactive

Early Intervention Program w as applied to 15% in 2001-2002 and 28% in 2002-2003


Short Term Disability (STD) by Employee Group

120.00

100.00

80.00
Average Lost Days / Incident

CUPE 10 Month
CUPE 12 Month
60.00 Custodial-Maintenance
Elementary Teachers
Secondary Teachers

40.00

20.00

0.00
1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003
School Years
Long Term Disability (LTD)

45

40

35

30
Number of Incidents

25

20

15

10

0
1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003
School Years