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C 2329 HISTORY OF MODERN ARCHITECTURE MODEN)

( SEJARAH SENIBINA

2009

Michael Graves

was the recipient of the Prix de Rome fellowship of the American Academy in Rome. Under the auspices of the American Academy, Michael Graves spent the next two years in Rome and its environs, studying painting, and drawing the buildings and the landscape. At the Academy, Graves was exposed not only to the buildings of the great classical architects but also to the writings of the great classical critics and theorists. It was in Rome that Graves finally learned about the language of architecture. Also, in all of his previous education, Graves had never been exposed to the literature of criticism of architecture. This experience at the Academy had enormous influence on Michael Graves's subsequent academic career as well as on his architectural design practice. In 1962, Michael Graves accepted a teaching position at Princeton University. Michael Graves is currently the Schirmer Professor of Architecture at Princeton. The courses that Graves teaches in architectural theory and composition address various thematic topics including the relationship of buildings to landscape, the traditional elements of architecture, the idea of metaphor in architecture, the contrast between open space and the making of rooms, and the origins of furniture. In addition to teaching at Princeton, Michael Graves has been a visiting professor at the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Houston, the University of California at Los Angeles, the University of Maryland, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and the New School for Social Research in New
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on July 9, 1934 in Indianapolis, Indiana, Michael Graves had a childhood interest in drawing and painting that has stayed with him throughout his career in architecture. Michael Graves received his architectural training at the University of Cincinnati in a cooperative program that allowed him to work in the architectural office of Carl A. Strauss and Associates while completing his formal classroom education. It was at Strauss's office that Michael Graves met an early mentor, Ray Roush. Harvard University's Graduate School of Design and received a Master of Architecture degree the following year. After graduation, Michael Graves went to work for the designer and architect, George Nelson, where his long-standing interest in furniture design was encouraged. Michael Graves's stay at Nelson's office was short-lived however, because in 1960 he

C 2329 HISTORY OF MODERN ARCHITECTURE MODEN)


York, among others. Graves regularly participates in design critiques and juries for many universities, professional organizations, and publications here and abroad, and he lectures to audiences around the world.

( SEJARAH SENIBINA

2009

Portland building
In 1980, the portland building was designed in Portland, Oregon. The building was a design-build competition sponsored by the city of Portland. The faade of the building was organized according to classical order of bace, middle or body, and attic or head. The base, which is colored light green in reference to the ground, housed the most publicly accessible activities. The base of the building also stresses the importance of the street by providing a loggia and shopping area along the sidewalk.

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The middle section of the building placed the city service. The large windows of reflective glass symbolize the function of the building as the citys municipal offices. The figure of lady Commerce from the city seal, which is placed in front of the large windows represents a cultural tradition of the city. A balcony and a public pavilion that are located on the top floor overlook the commercial center give a distant view of Mount Hood. The large paired columns on the main facades make the building look very impressive. The columns also provoke a sense of passage through the building along its main axis, from fourth to fifth Avenue. The green roof atop the Portland Building, an architectural icon located in downtown Portland, Oregon, was completed in November, 2006. Designed by Michael Graves, the building was completed in 1981, and was hailed as a prototype of postmodern architecture, at the time adorning the covers of Newsweek and Time. The addition of the vegetated roof, or green roof, will provide a much needed, long-lasting roofing system with a variety of environmental benefits. The Portland Building is used as office space for a number of City of Portland government offices. The existing roof was at the end of its lifespan, therefore the building was slated for new roofing as part of capital facility improvements. A recent directive from the City of Portland to include green roofs as a potential option for public projects led to the inclusion of the vegetated roof into this project. Studies have shown that the
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( SEJARAH SENIBINA

2009

added protection provided by a green roof can double the lifespan of a roof, saving dollars down the road by eliminating future roof work. In addition to roof longevity, green roofs offer a variety of additional benefits, including decreased heating and cooling costs within the building, reducing storm water runoff, reduction of urban heat islands, and added green space. While more expensive than typical roofing, the costs can be offset by storm water credits, building energy cost savings, and in some situations the addition of a green roof can allow for increased building height.

C 2329 HISTORY OF MODERN ARCHITECTURE MODEN)

( SEJARAH SENIBINA

2009

PLOCEK HOUSE
Plocek House in Warren, New Jersey was designed in 1977. As the Post-Modern architect, Michael Graves adapted the elements of the classical past, especially Italian Renaissance. The three story house is division of basement, piano noble and attic. The entrance to the house is marked by a giant column with its base at the lower entry, its shaft on the main living level, and its capital in the story providing light from above. The rustication on the basement faade expresses the idea of capital weight as introduced in Italian Renaissances palazzo. The keystone, one of Michael Gravess affection, is here, the keystone is used differently it holds the entrance together by pushing it part. Between the large columns that flank the entrance is a void in the shape of a keystone . Only after entering the house will one discover the gigantic scale of keystone.

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