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Introduction to Physical Science – SCI 110 Student Course Guide INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIAL - Required (

Introduction to Physical Science – SCI 110 Student Course Guide

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIAL - Required

( including all mandatory software)

Tillery, B. W., Enger, E. E., & Ross, F. C. (2008). SCI110: Integrated science: 2009 custom edition (4 th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIAL - Supporting The following resources provide additional background and supporting information for this course. There is no need to purchase these items for the course.

Disney, M. J. (2007, September/October) Modern cosmology: science or folktale? American Scientist [Electronic copy]. Retrieved on November 25, 2007 from

http://www.americanscientist.org/template/AssetDetail/assetid/55839?&print=yes

Herper, M., & Langreth, R. (2007, June 18). Will you get cancer? Forbes, 179 (13), 52-68. Retrieved January 20, 2008, from EBSCO-Host database (via Strayer University’s LRC).

Hindo, B. Schneyer, J. (2007, December 17) Monsanto: winning the ground war. Business Week. Retrieved January 20, 2008 from Electric Library database (via Strayer University’s LRC).

Pace, N. R. (2001). The universal nature of biochemistry [Special feature]. Proceedings of the National Academic of Sciences, 98, 805 – 808. Retrieved November 1, 2006 from http://www.pnas.org

Struck, D. (2007, January 6) In the global energy rush, nuclear gets a resurgence. The Washington Post. [Electronic version]. Retrieved April 23, 2007, Electric Library database (via Strayer University’s LRC).

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

Introduction to Physical Sciences introduces the student to basic concepts from the physical sciences such as motion, force, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism and the atomic theory of matter. Discusses the scientific principles that underlie everyday phenomena, modern technologies and planetary processes. Examines how the various branches of science, such as physics, chemistry, geology, meteorology, astronomy, relate to each other. Lab portion of the course reinforces basic concepts.

II. COURSE OUTCOMES

Upon the successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

Describe the characteristic values and procedures of science

Give examples of how the physical laws governing motion, energy and heat relate to everyday phenomena

Describe the physical basis for phenomena that are unique to waves, including interference

and the Doppler effect

Describe the physical basis for electricity and magnetism, as well as light and other forms of electromagnetic radiation

Explain the relationships between the Periodic Table of Elements, the inner structure of atoms, and the chemical properties of substances

Analyze the risks and opportunities of modern nuclear technologies

Discuss the life cycles of stars, galaxies, and the universe

Analyze the physical structures, properties and processes that shape the Earth and its climate

Discuss the natural history and evolution of life on the Earth

Relate the fundamental concepts for understanding ecosystems to a variety of ecological communities

Analyze and apply models of inheritance

Analyze the risks and opportunities of genetic engineering

III. COURSE EXPECTATIONS

As adult students, we expect you to share your experiences and knowledge with your peers in course discussions.

As adult students, we expect active participation and commitment to your learning experience.

As adult students, we expect you to communicate professionally with your professor about your progress in this course.

As adult students, we know you expect prompt and qualitative feedback that will foster learning.

As adult students, we know you expect to apply what you are learning in your personal and professional lives.

IV. WEEKLY COURSE SCHEDULE

The weekly schedule below describes the learning activities that will help you achieve the course outcomes listed above and the assignments that will be used to measure your mastery of the outcomes. Each week is divided into sections consisting of readings, lectures, activities and assignments. For selected assignments, you will find a rubric that will be used to evaluate your performance.

WEEK 1 Course outcome in focus:

Describe the characteristic values and procedures of science

Supporting topics:

What is Science?

Weekly Activities:

Reading:

Chapter 1, “What is Science?”

Assignments:

No written assignment for this week.

Course Lectures:

Activity Faculty Introduction, course overview and expectations

Review course philosophy, expectations, assignments and late policy, grading, academic integrity, APA, and attendance policy

Activity Student introductions

Lecture/discussion on science

Activity – Science

Activity – Science: Dependent and Independent Variables Lab

http://www.mhhe.com/biosci/genbio/virtual_labs/BL_01/BL_01.html

WEEK 2 Course outcome in focus:

Give examples of how the physical laws governing motion, energy and heat relate to everyday phenomena

Supporting topics:

Describing and measuring motion

Newton’s laws of motion

The basic vocabulary of work and energy

Sources of energy to power modern societies

Weekly Activities:

Reading:

Chapter 2, “Motion”

Chapter 3, “Energy”

Assignments:

Assignment #1: Paper Due Week Three:

In a documented essay of 600 - 900 words please address the following questions, in your own words:

o

First discuss how energy can be converted from one form to another, giving specific examples

o

Define what we mean by fossil fuels and explain why there are an attractive source of energy

o

Describe two different energy alternatives to fossil fuels in detail. Discuss how they work, how they compare with fossil fuels, and their relative advantages and

disadvantages.

This paper should adhere to APA style standards including the following: double-spaced, 1” margins, title page, in text citation of references, and a reference page.

Course Lectures:

Lecture/discussion on motion

Activity - Motion

Lecture/discussion on energy

Activity - Energy

WEEK 3

Course outcome in focus:

Give examples of how the physical laws governing motion, energy and heat relate to everyday phenomena

Describe the physical basis for phenomena that are unique to waves, including interference and the Doppler effect

Supporting topics:

The kinetic-molecular theory of heat

Temperature and heat

Properties of wave phenomena

Properties of sound waves

Weekly Activities:

Reading:

Chapter 4, “Heat and Temperature”

Chapter 5, “Wave Motions and Sound”

Assignment:

Assignment #2: Paper Due Week Four:

In a documented essay of 900 - 1200 words please address the following issues, in your own words:

o

How does the study of heat relate to the kinetic theory of matter?

o

What is heat?

o

What is temperature?

o

What is the relationship between heat and temperature?

o

How are they different?

o

What are the various properties of a substance that determine its heat

capacity?

o What are the various sources of heat?

This paper should adhere to APA style standards including the following: double-spaced, 1” margins, title page, in text citation of references, and a reference page.

Course Lectures:

Lecture/discussion on heat and temperature

Activity – Heat – Kinetic Theory Lab

Lecture/discussion on wave motion and sound

Activity: Wave Motion and Sound – Doppler Effect Lab

WEEK 4

Course outcome in focus:

Describe the physical basis for electricity and magnetism, as well as light and other forms of electromagnetic radiation

Supporting topics:

Electricity

The relationship between electricity and magnetism

Light

Wave and particle nature of light

Weekly Activities:

Reading:

Chapter 6, “Electricity”

Chapter 7, “Light”

Assignment: There are no out of class assignments this week.

Course Lectures:

Quiz 1

Lecture/discussion on electricity

Activity - Electricity

Lecture/discussion on light

Activity - Light

WEEK 5

Course outcome in focus:

Explain the relationships between the Periodic Table of Elements, the inner structure of atoms, and the chemical properties of substances

Supporting topics:

Structure of the atom

Configuration of electrons in atoms

Chemical Compounds

Chemical Reactions

Weekly Activities:

Reading:

Chapter 8, “Atoms and Periodic Properties”

Chapter 9, “Chemical Reactions”

Assignment:

Assignment #3: Paper Due Week Six:

In a documented essay, please address the following issues, in your own words:

o

Describe the difference between a mixture and a compound

o

Suppose that you have a pure substance. How can you tell whether it is a compound or an element?

o

What is the difference between an ionic and a covalent bond?

o

Explain why ionic compounds are formed when a metal from the left side of the periodic table reacts with a nonmetal from the right side. Give two examples of such compounds.

o

Explain why covalent bonds are formed when nonmetals from the right side of the periodic table bond with each other. Give two examples of such compounds

This paper should adhere to APA style standards including the following: double-spaced, 1” margins, title page, in text citation of references, and a reference page.

Course Lectures:

Lecture/discussion on atoms and periodic properties

Activity - Atoms and Periodic Properties – Decoding the Periodic Table Lab

Lecture/discussion on chemical reactions

Activity - Chemical Reactions -- Enzyme-Controlled Reactions Lab

http://www.mhhe.com/biosci/genbio/virtual_labs/BL_11/BL_11.html

WEEK 6

Course outcome in focus:

Analyze the risks and opportunities of modern nuclear technologies

Discuss the life cycles of stars, galaxies, and the universe

Supporting topics:

Radioactive decay

Nuclear technologies

Types and characteristics of stars

Galaxies

Weekly Activities:

Reading:

Chapter 11, “Nuclear Reactions”

Chapter 12, “The Universe”

Assignments: There are no out of class assignments this week.

Course Lectures:

Lecture/discussion on nuclear reactions

Activity - Nuclear Reactions

Lecture/discussion on the Universe

Activity - The Universe -- Newton’s Cannon Lab

WEEK 7

Course outcome in focus:

Analyze the physical structures, properties and processes that shape the Earth and its climate

Supporting topics:

Structure of the Earth

Plate tectonics

Processes that affect the Earth’s surface

Weekly Activities:

Reading:

Chapter 15, “Earth”

Chapter 16, “Earth’s Surface”

Assignment: There are no out of class assignments this week.

Course Lectures:

Quiz 2

Lecture/discussion on the Earth

Activity - The Earth

Lecture/discussion on the Earth’s surface

Activity – The Earth’s Surface

WEEK 8

Course outcome in focus:

Analyze the physical structures, properties and processes that shape the Earth and its climate

Supporting topics:

The atmosphere

Weather

Climate

Water on Earth

Weekly Activities:

Reading:

Chapter 17, “Earth's Weather”

Chapter 18, “Earth's Water”

Assignment:

Assignment #4: Paper Due Week Nine:

In a documented essay of 900 - 1200 words please address the following issues, in your own words:

o

Describe your local and surrounding ecologies and environments

o

List the specific factors that distinguish your local ecology and environment.

o

Discuss how human activities have affected your local ecosystems

o

Describe the ways that global warming might affect your local ecosystems

o

Relative to other parts of the world, would your local ecosystems be affected more or less?

This paper should adhere to APA style standards including the following: double-spaced, 1” margins, title page, in text citation of references, and a reference page.

Course Lectures:

Lecture/discussion on the Earth’s weather

Activity – The Earth’s Weather

Lecture/discussion on the Earth’s water

Activity – The Earth’s Water

WEEK 9

Course outcome in focus:

Discuss the natural history and evolution of life on the Earth

Supporting topics:

Evidence about life from Earth’s past

Classifying organisms

The origin of life on Earth

Evolution

Weekly Activities:

Reading:

Chapter 21, “The Origin and Evolution of Life”

Chapter 22, “The History of Life on the Earth”

Assignments: No out of class assignments this week.

Course Lectures:

Lecture/discussion on the origin and evolution of life

Activity - The Origin and Evolution of Life – Natural Selection Lab

http://www.mhhe.com/biosci/genbio/virtual_labs/BL_12/BL_12.html

Lecture/discussion on the history of life on earth

Activity - The History of Life on Earth

WEEK 10

Course outcome in focus:

Relate the fundamental concepts for understanding ecosystems to a variety of ecological communities

Analyze and apply models of inheritance

Analyze the risks and opportunities of genetic engineering

Supporting topics:

Environments and ecosystems

Models of inheritance

Molecular genetics

Weekly Activities:

Reading:

Chapter 23, “Ecology and the Environment”

Chapter 26, “Mendelian and Molecular Genetics”

Assignment: No out of class assignments this week.

Course Lectures:

Lecture/discussion on ecology and the environment

Activity - The Environment – Environment Lab

http://www.mhhe.com/biosci/genbio/virtual_labs/BL_24/BL_24.html

Lecture/discussion on Genetics

Activity - Genetics – Gene Splicing Lab

http://www.mhhe.com/biosci/genbio/virtual_labs/BL_22/BL_22.html

WEEK 11

Final Assignment:

Quiz 3

V. ASSIGNMENT OUTLINE AND GRADING Assignment Type

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Value

Due Date

This section outlines graded Assignments (including but not limited to exams, quizzes, papers,

presentations, class participation and group projects), value, and due dates.

Grading Scale

90-100

A

80-89

B

70-79

C

60-69

D

59 or Below

F