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TABLE OF CONTENTS : About Bahrain why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 6 Articles

TABLE

OF

CONTENTS

:

TABLE OF CONTENTS : About Bahrain why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 6 Articles 20
TABLE OF CONTENTS : About Bahrain why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 6 Articles 20
TABLE OF CONTENTS : About Bahrain why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 6 Articles 20

About Bahrain

why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 6 Articles 20 Revolution Timeline 26

4

Demonstrations

40

Barack Obama Speech

69

The Trial

75

Members of Parliament 82

Medics

86

Labours

94

Athletes

97

Lawyers

101

Bloggers

105

Journalists

109

TABLE OF CONTENTS : Teachers Students 115 112 Human Rights 119 Human rights defenders 123

TABLE

OF

CONTENTS

:

TABLE OF CONTENTS : Teachers Students 115 112 Human Rights 119 Human rights defenders 123 Photographers
TABLE OF CONTENTS : Teachers Students 115 112 Human Rights 119 Human rights defenders 123 Photographers
TABLE OF CONTENTS : Teachers Students 115 112 Human Rights 119 Human rights defenders 123 Photographers

Teachers

Students 115

112

Human Rights

119

Human rights defenders

123

Photographers 128

Royal Wedding

132

Mosques

137

F1 & Economy

140

Pearl Tube: Bahrain Revolution Videos

150

Bahrain in Pictures 156

Freedom Martyrs 171

Revolution ART

201

Revolution Cartoons

210

Websites

218

SECTION 1.0
About BAHRAIN : Bahrain Profile Leader : Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifah Prime Ministers: Khalifa ibn

About

BAHRAIN

:

About BAHRAIN : Bahrain Profile Leader : Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifah Prime Ministers: Khalifa ibn Salman
About BAHRAIN : Bahrain Profile Leader : Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifah Prime Ministers: Khalifa ibn Salman
About BAHRAIN : Bahrain Profile Leader : Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifah Prime Ministers: Khalifa ibn Salman

Bahrain Profile

Leader : Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifah

Prime Ministers:

Khalifa ibn Salman Al Khalifa - since1971.

Population : 718,306

Capital City : Manama

Independence date :

15 August 1971 (from UK)

Religions :

Islam ( Shia 70 % and Sunni 30 %)

Exports :

petroleum and petroleum products, alumi- num, textiles

Location :

Middle East, archipelago in the Persian Gulf, east of Saudi Arabia

Area : 665 km sq

the Persian Gulf, east of Saudi Arabia Area : 665 km sq Hamad bin Isa al

Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifah:

of Saudi Arabia Area : 665 km sq Hamad bin Isa al - Khalifah: Khalifa ibn

Khalifa ibn Salman Al Khalifa

of Saudi Arabia Area : 665 km sq Hamad bin Isa al - Khalifah: Khalifa ibn

Bahrain Location

SECTION 2.0
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty Bahrain is rich in oil country and
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty Bahrain is rich in oil country and

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain?

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty Bahrain is rich in oil country and Small
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty Bahrain is rich in oil country and Small
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty Bahrain is rich in oil country and Small

1.Poverty

Bahrain is rich in oil country and Small popula- tion of citizens in this country But the majority of people do not get something from this wealth Because of widespread financial corruption by government and by the ruling family in Bahrain.

by government and by the ruling family in Bahrain. CNN Report : Poverty in Bahrain .

CNN Report : Poverty in Bahrain . URL : http://youtu.be/fDfVo_Noino

: Poverty in Bahrain . URL : http://youtu.be/fDfVo_Noino Bahrain Center for Human Rights Half of Bahraini

Bahrain Center for Human Rights

Half of Bahraini Citizens are Suffering from Pov- erty and Poor Living Conditions

Bahrain Centre for Human Rights stated that half of Bahraini citizens are suffering from poverty and poor living standards. This figure was based on official statistics and studies on number of unem- ployed Bahrainis, beneficiaries of social aid who are unable to work, and employees with low income.

In its report, released today, BCHR stated that based on official figures and studies there are 20,000 unemployed Bahrainis, while the oppositions estimate the number to be more than 30,000. If the average of these figures is taken, in addition to their dependents who are affected by the unemployment, the number will exceed 80,000 people. It worth mentioning that the unemployed and their dependents are not receiving any social secu- rity aids in contradiction with the Constitution.

The report also revealed that the number of households who are unable to work and those who receive financial assistance from Minis- try of Labour and charitable contribution from charity funds associations exceeds 20,000 families, which are around 80,000 people whom each receive BD18 per months. While, the poverty level (Poverty Income Threshold) for a household, according to official stud- ies and statements, is BD309 per month.

The report revealed that according to official figure, quarter of employed Bahrainis live be- low the poverty level of BD309 per month. That brings the total of Bahrainis suffering from poverty and poor living conditions to around 200,000 people (half of total Bahrainis).

The report that was released yesterday dur- ing the ‘Poverty and Economic Rights’ semi- nar tackled also the problem of housing in Bahrain. A large portion of the society lacks decent housing. Unemployed citizens and those who are receiving financial assistance cannot receive housing loans granted by the Government. Whereas, around 44,000 fami- lies with a low income are waiting in the wait- ing list for Government subsidised housing for up to 12 years or more. The official statistics shows that there are 6,000 ruined houses

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty and that there is a project for
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty and that there is a project for

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain?

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty and that there is a project for rebuilding
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty and that there is a project for rebuilding
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty and that there is a project for rebuilding

1.Poverty

and that there is a project for rebuilding or main- taining 45,000 houses but in a period of 8 years.

The report stated that the poverty rate is increas- ing in Bahrain at the same time as the average income is increasing. This shows the large differ- ences between classes of income and living stan- dards. A survey conducted by Bahrain Monetary Agency found that while the poverty rate is increas- ing, there are 5,200 wealthy people in Bahrain. The survey showed that the average wealth of each of them reaches US$4.2 millions, which is above the international average of wealthy people of US$3.8 millions. The same survey indicated that the private wealth in Bahrain worth around US$20 to 30 billions.

Bahrain is proud of being one of most liberal countries in terms of its economy and in attract- ing foreign investments and of its tax-free so- ciety (no tax on income and sales); however, there are 23 types of high fees imposed by the Government on people in return of its services.

The report pointed out that the poverty and miser- able conditions of citizens are caused by unequal distribution of wealth, waste of public money, finan- cial & administrative corruption, poor planning, and dumping the market with low wage foreign workers who constitute 60% of the labour force. The report also pointed out that the continuation and domina- tions of a small group of influential powerful people on the national economy, both in private and public sectors, are considered as a barrier to real reforms.

The above influential powerful people have taken over large land areas in Bahrain, especially the re- claimed lands and the ones that will be reclaimed in the future. The decree that was passed by the Government to allow foreign investors to own lands in Bahrain caused sharp increased of lands’ prices. This will lead to accumulate more wealth for land- lords, and will make it more difficult for middle class to have a piece of land. In addition to the above, the price of building materials have dramatically

gone up in the last few years which makes it more difficult for a citizen to build a house.

The report also tackled the social and security impact of poverty in Bahrain. Statistics shows that the crime rate, especially robbery, have escalated. Divorce rate and number of people choosing to be single have also increased. Additionally, number of working women and children participating in the working force with bad working conditions have increased.

BCHR warned that increasing number of citi- zens classified as poor and the deteriorating of living standards will definitely reflect on the political and social tranquility of the coun- try, especially when official reports indicate that the unemployed people will boost from 20,000 to 80,000 people in the next decade and that the average salary will drop by 19%. There will also be an increase of citizens seek- ing Government housing to 80,000 people.

BCHR made many recommendations in its re- port; among them are: implementation of the Constitution’s article that grants social secu- rity and benefits for unemployed and people who are unable to work; deciding rate for mini- mum wage; reforming both Administrative and Legislative branches of the Government; and establishing active supervision over admin- istrative and financial activities in the Gov- ernment for fighting against the corruption.

In this seminar, BCHR is lunging a two year campaign with the aim of awakening civil societies and related institutions and individu- als to press for passing appropriate policies and reforms to solve the poverty problems in Bahrain.

Source:http://www.bahrainrights.org/node/199

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty Page | 10
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty Page | 10

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain?

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty Page | 10
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty Page | 10
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty Page | 10

1.Poverty

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty Page | 10
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty Page | 10
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty Page | 10
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty Page | 10
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 1.Poverty Page | 10
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 2.Discrimination Bahraini Shi’ites feel neglect in government hous
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 2.Discrimination Bahraini Shi’ites feel neglect in government hous

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain?

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 2.Discrimination Bahraini Shi’ites feel neglect in government hous -
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 2.Discrimination Bahraini Shi’ites feel neglect in government hous -
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 2.Discrimination Bahraini Shi’ites feel neglect in government hous -

2.Discrimination

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 2.Discrimination Bahraini Shi’ites feel neglect in government hous -

Bahraini Shi’ites feel neglect in government hous- ing crunch

MANAMA (Reuters) - Seventeen years have passed and Bahraini government clerk Saeed is still waiting to move out of his ramshackle house in Barbar, a Shi’ite village outside the capital Manama, and into government housing.

For Saeed and other Bahraini Shi’ites, the intermi- nable waiting time is just another sign of the discrimi- nation and neglect by a government which they say gives priority in housing, jobs and services to Sunnis.

Saeed is one of about 53,000 mostly Shi’ite Bah- rainis out of a national population of 600,000 who are waiting to receive housing from their Sunni-led government because they can- not afford to buy land or houses themselves.

“When I went to the government the last time, I told them I’m going to die before I get a government house, it’ll end up going to my children,” Saeed said.

With a family of 14 crammed under

and a salary of 250 dinars (419 pounds) a month, he is barely able to provide for them. A new flat or house is a distant dream for Saeed.

The housing issue, high unemployment and at- tempts by the government to grant Sunnis from outside the country jobs and citizenship in order to change the demographic balance lie at the heart of deep-seated discontent among Bahrain’s Shi’ites.

The divisive issues, denied by Manama -- a close ally of Washington and Riyadh -- will dominate Bahrain’s October 23 parliamentary election.

his roof,

Bahrain, with its majority Shi’ite population ruled over by the Sunni Khalifa dynasty, has been afflicted by sporadic rioting since the mid- 1990s, which the government has portrayed as an Iran-inspired plot to overturn the monarchy.

HISTORIC RIVALRY Rivarly between Shi’ite and Sunni Islam dates back to the period after the death of Prophet Mo- hammad 13 centuries ago. Sunni rulers share Western fears that Iran -- a non-Arab Shi’ite state with considerable influence in the Arab world -- is seeking to become a nuclear weap- ons state with ambitions to dominate the region.

Attempts to contain widespread Shi’ite dis- content in Bahrain by the restoration of par- liament and a managed democracy have sharpened appetites for a change in a system where the ruling family still calls the shots.

The vote for lower house will be the third in the Gulf Arab country since King Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa launched a reform pro- cess a decade ago to help quell Shi’ite pro- tests. Besides Kuwait, Bahrain is the only Gulf Arab country with an elected parliament but laws must pass through a Sunni-dom- inated upper house appointed by the king.

Housing Minister Sheikh Ebrahim bin Khalifa al-Khalifa said there was no prejudice in award- ing government housing and that any delays were caused by the increase in population.

“We are going (down the list) by name, with- out any other considerations,” he told Reuters.

But many Shi’ites cannot shake off the sus- picion they are being discriminated against, and as the country gears up for the elec- tion, Bahrain’s sectarian rift -- or rath- er the divide between its rulers and their

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 2.Discrimination Shi’ite subjects -- looks set to deepen
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 2.Discrimination Shi’ite subjects -- looks set to deepen

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain?

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 2.Discrimination Shi’ite subjects -- looks set to deepen further.
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 2.Discrimination Shi’ite subjects -- looks set to deepen further.
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 2.Discrimination Shi’ite subjects -- looks set to deepen further.

2.Discrimination

Shi’ite subjects -- looks set to deepen further.

The resentment, analysts say, is fuelled fur- ther by the appalling living conditions endured by Shi’ite villagers while they see housing, health care and other benefits being allocated by their government to Sunnis from elsewhere.

“Most Shi’ites feel that their situation is caused by discrimination and because nationalised foreigners are taking up most of the hous- ing projects,” said Nabeel Rajab from the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights (BCHR). “I think this is one form of discrimination. In some areas there’s no housing and also no in- frastructure like sewage systems or water sup- ply,” said Theodore Karasik of Dubai’s Insti- tute for Near East and Gulf Military Analysis.

In the past two months, Bahrain, also home to the U.S. Navy’s Fifth Fleet and a regional off- shore banking centre, has cracked down on some Shi’ite opposition groups, accusing their lead- ers of plotting to overthrow the Sunni monarchy.

PRICED OUT Any hope someone like Saeed had of buy- ing a piece of land was dashed when land pric- es shot up during a five-year property boom that ended only when the global financial crisis hit in 2008. In the aftermath of the debt crunch, hous- ing loans also became more difficult to obtain.

“There is a big disconnect between the loans people can get and the prices at which develop- ers can build,” said Mike Williams, senior director at property consultants CB Richard Ellis Bahrain.

Bahrain’s Shi’ite opposition also says the hous- ing shortage is further aggravated by the exten- sive land ownership of the ruling Khalifa family.

There is no reliable data on land ownership avail-

able in Bahrain, but the ruling family holds stakes in property developments on newly reclaimed land on Bahrain’s north coast, land which the Shi’ite opposition says the gov- ernment allocated for investment purposes.

Bahrain’s business registry shows that Emar Bahrain, owner of the Bahrain Financial Har- bour development, is linked to the royal fam- ily. A probe by parliament in March concluded that 65 square kilometres (25 square miles) of state land had been given to private companies without appropriate compensation since 2003.

“Not a single (penny) out of this reclama- tion and public property being transferred to private companies went to the public bud- get,” said Khalil Marzooq, a member of par- liament from Shi’ite opposition group Wefaq.

He said this land could have been worth at least 10 billion dinars, money which could have been used for housing projects. Ali Fateel, a Shi’ite who lives in Bani Jamra village, said he applied for government hous- ing 20 years ago and is desperate to move out of his three-room flat as his family grows.

Fateel said he thought villagers were slow to be awarded government housing because the leader of the Shi’ite opposition in the 1990s, Sheikh Abdul Amir al-Jamri, was born there.

Fateel’s three teenage sons and his daugh- ter still have to sleep in the same small room at an age when sexes are normally sepa- rated in his deeply conservative society.

“I applied before my son was born, almost 20 years ago. What if he wants to marry soon, then I need to rent another flat for his family,” he said. He did not expected to get government housing anytimesoon.“Idon’tseeitcoming,”Fateelsaid.

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Al Wefaq steps up demands for
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Al Wefaq steps up demands for

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain?

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Al Wefaq steps up demands for naturalisation
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Al Wefaq steps up demands for naturalisation
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Al Wefaq steps up demands for naturalisation

3.Political Naturalization

there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Al Wefaq steps up demands for naturalisation Manama:

Al Wefaq steps up demands for naturalisation

Naturalization Al Wefaq steps up demands for naturalisation Manama: Al Wefaq Society has increased pres- sure

Manama: Al Wefaq Society has increased pres- sure on the Interior Ministry, demanding to know the exact number of its expatriate staff. “We would like to know the precise num- ber of non-Bahrainis who work for the Minis- try of Interior in all the departments, both ci- vilians and uniformed, and regardless of the nature of their contracts,” Jalal Fairuz asked in the question submitted on Sunday at parliament. “We wish also to know their grades and the reasons behind employing them and whether their positions had been initially offered to Bah- rainis,” the MP, one of 17 representing the so- ciety in the 40-member Lower House, said. The ministry, according to Bahraini laws, has two weeks to respond to the queries of the MPs. The society said it wanted all the figures and data related to the staff that have been employed since 2002, the year when the parliament, cur- rently in its second four-year term, was re-opened. Al Wefaq has been applying relentless pressure on

the Interior Ministry regarding its employment policiesamongallegationsthatithadfordecades favoured giving jobs to foreigners, mainly from Syria, Jordan, Yemen and Pakistan, and has consistently turned down Bahraini applications. Charges The ministry has repeatedly said it did not shut out Bahrainis and that it was easing out the expatriates to replace them with citizens. But Al Wefaq wants to monitor every step of the process and to be on high alert over the natu- ralisation figures. “We want to see the ministry plan being implemented to replace the non- Bahrainis. We also want to know the exact num- ber of the relatives of foreign personnel work- ing for the ministry and the accurate figures of those who were given citizenship,” Fairuz said.

Also Read :

Political Naturalization in Bahrain:

Various Violations of Citizens and For- eign Workers Rights

URL : “ http://bahrainrights.hopto.org/node/425

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Page | 14
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Page | 14

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain?

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Page | 14
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Page | 14
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Page | 14

3.Political Naturalization

Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Page | 14
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Page | 14
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Page | 14
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Page | 14
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Page | 14
Why there is a revolution in Bahrain? 3.Political Naturalization Page | 14
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands N e w Y o
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands N e w Y o
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands N e w Y o

Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain?

Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands N e w Y o r
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands N e w Y o r

4.Steeling Lands

New York Times small, dense areas. ‘We are 17 people crowd-

ed in one small house, like many people in the southern district,’ he said. ‘And you see on Google how many palaces there are and how the al-Khalifas [the Sunni ruling family] have the rest of the country to themselves.’

Bahraini activists have encouraged people to take a look at the country on Google Earth, and they have set up a special user group whose members have access to more than 40 images of royal palaces.”

“While Facebook has gotten all the face time in Egypt, Tunisia and Bahrain, don’t forget Google Earth, which began roiling Bahraini politics in 2006. A big issue in Bahrain, particularly among Shiite men who want to get married and build homes, is the unequal distribution of land.

On Nov. 27, 2006, on the eve of parliamentary elections in Bahrain, The Washington Post ran this report from there: “Mahmood, who lives in a house with his parents, four siblings and their chil- dren, said he became even more frustrated when he looked up Bahrain on Google Earth and saw vast tracts of empty land, while tens of thousands of mainly poor Shiites were squashed together in

and saw vast tracts of empty land, while tens of thousands of mainly poor Shiites were
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands S a m e s
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands S a m e s
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands S a m e s

Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain?

Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands S a m e s c
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands S a m e s c

4.Steeling Lands

S a m e s c a l e ! How many people live in
S
a
m
e
s
c
a
l
e
!
How many people live in Manama?
And how many property owners are
there? Who is allowed to enter the
city? And what’s the density of its
population?
the city? And what’s the density of its population? Ask the same questions for this “Bahrain”island

Ask the same questions for this “Bahrain”island over here!

Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands They call this a private
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands They call this a private
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands They call this a private

Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain?

Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands They call this a private property
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands They call this a private property

4.Steeling Lands

Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands They call this a private property (owned

They call this a private property (owned by a member of the ruling family)

That’s OK. But just be reminded

that it’s twice as big as Sadadvil-

lage

and did the owner of it pay

for it?!

Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands some pictures of “their”palaces and
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands some pictures of “their”palaces and
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands some pictures of “their”palaces and

Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain?

Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands some pictures of “their”palaces and manors
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands some pictures of “their”palaces and manors

4.Steeling Lands

Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands some pictures of “their”palaces and manors on
Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands some pictures of “their”palaces and manors on
Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands some pictures of “their”palaces and manors on

some pictures of “their”palaces and

manors

on the

west

side

of

the is-

land.

Lands some pictures of “their”palaces and manors on the west side of the is- land. Page
Lands some pictures of “their”palaces and manors on the west side of the is- land. Page
Lands some pictures of “their”palaces and manors on the west side of the is- land. Page
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands You have seen where they
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands You have seen where they
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands You have seen where they

Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain?

Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands You have seen where they live.
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands You have seen where they live.

4.Steeling Lands

You have seen where they live. Now, see the misery they caused to our people.

in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands You have seen where they live. Now, see the misery they caused
in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands You have seen where they live. Now, see the misery they caused
in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands You have seen where they live. Now, see the misery they caused
in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands You have seen where they live. Now, see the misery they caused
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands An island with no beaches…
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands An island with no beaches…
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands An island with no beaches…

Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain?

Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands An island with no beaches… All
Could Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands An island with no beaches… All

4.Steeling Lands

Google Earth cause a revolution in Bahrain? 4.Steeling Lands An island with no beaches… All those

An island with no beaches… All those beaches are forbidden to the public, for no good reason!

The coastal line of all Bahrain is- lands is 161 KM long.

More than 90% of this line con- stitutes privately-owned (illegally- possessed) property.

For more information, visit : http://www.ogleearth.com/BahrainandGoogleEarth.pdf

SECTION 3.0
Articles : “They fear that the real political transferring into a democracy may create another

Articles

:

Articles : “They fear that the real political transferring into a democracy may create another bloody
Articles : “They fear that the real political transferring into a democracy may create another bloody
Articles : “They fear that the real political transferring into a democracy may create another bloody

“They fear that the real political transferring into a democracy may create another bloody country such Iraq”

By Mr. Khalil Al-Marzooq

When we had a dialogue with members of the Na- tional Assembly and the Asalah political societies, they said they invoke the Iraqi bloody scene when- ever we talked - we are the opposition - about real democratic change in Bahrain, they expressed fear if there is democratic change that the Sunni com- munity will be killed in the streets and that their ar- eas will be neglected and their sons will imprisoned and fired from their jobs and the Sunni mosques will be destroyed!

Of course, we did not argue them about the issue of the killing in Iraq and the other unacceptable is- sues, simply because we condemn the killings and oppression of any party!

And we were truly surprised, what makes you imag- ine that the Shiites in Bahrain are brutal? Were there any such incidents that made you afraid of the Shiites this way? In respond to our queries, they claimed that the Sunni public is afraid, and we told them the government does not recognize only two- thirds of the parliament, the constitution does not represent only 60% in the Constituent Assembly, we will not allow a State where one party is ruling on the expense of the other we will neither accept injustice to anyone no matter his ideological background is. We shall build everything together hand in hand- Our National State. Despite all this, the National Assembly and the Asalah political societies insisted on their fear of Sunni suppression in the future in

insisted on their fear of Sunni suppression in the future in Mr. Khalil Al-Marzooq case pro-democracy

Mr. Khalil Al-Marzooq

case pro-democracy movement succeeds in Bahrain whenever we discussed with them the fair demands of peaceful movement.

We have asked the National Assembly and the Asalah political societies representatives to review our slogans and theirs, our logos and theirs our positions and theirs in order to see who is talking about unity and speak about the entity and who is talking about a certain com- munity. We raised a question: Who converts any political difference as an attack on a cer- tain community? Also, who talks about a holis- tic vision for the nation a united one nation and on the other hand who is talking about fears of the change into the real democracy and the fear of suppression against Sunni??? (It is very obvious and has been documented in international media who is talking about what)

Today we ask… Who is activating the bloody Iraqi scene?

A r t i c l e s : Who is killing people in the

A r t

i c

l e s

:

A r t i c l e s : Who is killing people in the streets
A r t i c l e s : Who is killing people in the streets
A r t i c l e s : Who is killing people in the streets

Who is killing people in the streets and in custo- dy? Who is imprisoning and torturing innocent people? Whose areas are being attacked? Whose women are sent to prison and tortured bru- tally by male & female torturers? Who are being fired out of their jobs? Whose properties (money-houses-cars…etc) are being destroyed and robbed? Whose mosques are being demolished? Who are prevented from practicing their religious rituals? And whose voice is being silenced? And who…. and who….and who ?

We have sacrificed with OUR blood in the public streets for the Pride of Bahrain for BOTH of us- Sunni & Shiites. Our youths have been imprisoned for the sake of fair demands for BOTH of us. In the 90’s Bahrain uprising, some of you claimed that whoever protested at that time was a disloyal to Bahrain, despite these unreal claims our youth’s blood and our mothers’ tears and our imprisoned men and women’ cries of painful torture have cre- ated your current political societies and have made some of you Parliament Members and presented living with some sort of dignity for BOTH of us.

Today, you will be the first to benefit of OUR sacri- fice, OUR blood and OUR pain. There are SOME who dance with joy to see our blood and hear our pain; however these SOME will be the first to enjoy the fruit of our sacrifice in the future.

Congrats and a round of applause to the Bahrain Youths who have been brought up on the true val- ues of “Sacrifice and Altruism”. You are really origi- nal Bahraini PEARLS, which will never change de- spite all the harsh conditions; whatever/ whoever is genuine will never ever change over all times.

(Original Arabic Article Al-Wefaq):

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7037283072&set=a.459171508071.254298.2

03200448071&type=1&theater)

Articles : The first point: the speech of extremism and narrow-mindedness versus the speech of

Articles

:

Articles : The first point: the speech of extremism and narrow-mindedness versus the speech of for
Articles : The first point: the speech of extremism and narrow-mindedness versus the speech of for
Articles : The first point: the speech of extremism and narrow-mindedness versus the speech of for

The first point: the speech of extremism and narrow-mindedness versus the speech of for- giveness and open-mindedness. Where do reli- gion, humanity, civilization and intellect stand?

By Shaikh Ali Salman- Secretary-General of Al- wefaq Political and Islamic Society

To start with, there is an idea that might be pos - sibly raised in the flow of our speech, at the be- ginning or at the end, which is: whenever you find an invitation that provokes hatred, extremism and stir grudges, I would like you to know that this in- vitation has absolutely nothing to do with religion.

Never be deceived even if such invitation of hatred has been called for by a scholar-academic or reli- gious- or you came across it in a book that claims it is about Islam. All religions and not only Islam, all re- ligions since the first messengers of God have car- ried an invitation of love and understanding. Neither Prophet Mohammed PBUH nor Jesus PBUH nor Moses PBUH were rude or stony-hearted. No one of the Messengers of God has ever been forceful or violent. Their messages completed each other at a high pure spiritual level which has reached its perfec- tion in Prophet Mohammed PBUH. All messengers of God have carried messages of love, guidance to the correct path of God and justice. Therefore, if you find an individual or a group of people which invites you to kill or hate in the name of religion, you should know for sure that it has absolutely noth- ing to do with any religion. No matter how huge or small the number of people calling for such false invitation are; just be careful not to be deceived. This is, in short, what we are going to talk about.

In our society, we live to experience two different

about. In our society, we live to experience two different Shaikh Ali Salman ideological and political

Shaikh Ali Salman

ideological and political schools, the school of extremism vs. the school of open-mindedness. The Extremists school has produced a public speech that negatively targets any other par- ty which is not theirs. This speech could be described, sometimes, as religiously extreme against other religions or ideologies. The ex- tremism could also be classified into various degrees, highly extreme, average or mild. Ac- cording to this school, people are either be-

lievers or Kafer (non-believers of the existence of God), they are very sensitive about accus- ing others of being Kafer. Islam is the circle which they have surrounded themselves with and whoever has a different view than theirs

is out of this circle. As a result of this narrow-

mindedness, they have given themselves the authority to judge and classify all oth- ers compared to their own believes because they think that they are an ideal standard. In

fact, we came with this realistic analysis after

a thorough historical diagnosis of our reality.

After the 15th of March we have noticed that the tone of segregation and extremism in pub-

Articles : lic speeches has replaced the tone of love and understanding. And the values

Articles

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Articles : lic speeches has replaced the tone of love and understanding. And the values of
Articles : lic speeches has replaced the tone of love and understanding. And the values of
Articles : lic speeches has replaced the tone of love and understanding. And the values of

lic speeches has replaced the tone of love and understanding. And the values of unity and living in harmony have been replaced with extreme ig- norance and negligence to others. The narrow- minded or extreme public speech- claimed to be addressed in the name of religion- has dramatically changed into a tool that encourages revenge. The question is: whom are they targeting and wishing to kill? The extremists are targeting their broth- ers in Islam of other ideologies and their partners who share the same land. They want revenge from protesters who raised their voices peaceful- ly to demand fair rights for all citizens to live with dignity. Of course, revenge is nothing of Islam or any religion. You may wonder about the reasons for such extreme speech. Well, there are certainly several motives that have created this significant change. First, some people falsely argue that the pro-democracy protesters are destroying our coun- try. Besides, there is another group of people who disagree with the pro-democracy movement be- cause they have personal interests and benefits that they want to gain on the expense of others- as if we are in a war and the only way to win the riches is by defeating the opponent. For instance, some are talking about increasing the number of their party’s representatives in the parliament and I would like to ask them: where is your faithful and pure love to this land (Bahrain)? Another is asking for the leadership and managerial positions at Bah- rain Petroleum Company (BAPCO) and Salmany- ia Medical Complex for the members of their own community or political society. To those I would re - peat the same question: where is your faithful and pure love to this land (Bahrain)? Where is the slo- gan “Bahrain comes first”? These motives are ap- parent to any observer to the reality of our society.

Now turning to the other school, which we believe it has been founded on the message of Noah, Abra- ham, Moses, Jesus and all the other prophets and messengers of Allah. A school that has always em- phasized on the value of altruism and loving the

good for everyone…Prophets had been sent to spread love among all the people and to pave the path of happiness and invite the people on the globe to accept and respect each others.

The school we are talking about is the one which carried out an invitation to be opened to others ideas, respect others’ opinions, for- give and insist on living in total harmony and acceptance of others. Who has established the true value of living in harmony between Muslims and Jews? He is none other than Prophet Mohammed PBUH. So why should we join the school of forgiveness and open- mindedness and strongly support its speech?

Firstly, because this a highly civilized hu- manitarian harmonious speech which con- sistently meets with the messages of God sealed with the Islamic message.

Secondly, because the other speech invites for segregation and sectarianism and who- ever is calling for the division of the society is destroying this land. Such speeches may lead people to divide for ridiculous reasons and eventually will destroy the whole country for good. For example, as a result of such ir- responsible speeches some people may hate each others just because some live in the city and others live in the countryside. I n Bah- rain, we live in a very small country, so this is likely to happen if we follow the wrong school and respond to the wrong invitation. There are tiny if any boarders within Bahrain, so if you grow the seeds of hatred instead of love among people, where and how are you going to live? We have a unite destiny despite our different ideologies and political directions.

Thirdly, we are in a state where we must be rational and prioritize our country’s in- terests to our own personal ones and in- vite all the parties to calm things down and

Articles : focus on the debate, there is a political dispute and there are different

Articles

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Articles : focus on the debate, there is a political dispute and there are different political
Articles : focus on the debate, there is a political dispute and there are different political
Articles : focus on the debate, there is a political dispute and there are different political

focus on the debate, there is a political dispute and there are different political views, the idea is to limit the political controversy and not turn it into a religious or ethnic or sectarian conflict.

To sum up, the historical and contemporary read - ing leads us to a clear conclusion which is: the speech of extremism and narrow-mindedness an- tagonizes everyone and provoke infighting. And the civilized speech of forgiveness and open-mind- edness which calls for harmony and union shall last forever and lead to a better future for us all.

(Original Arabic Article Al-Wefaq):

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SECTION 4.0
Revolution Timeline: In Bahrain, protesters take to Bahrain authorities launch surprise attack on protesters Bahrain

Revolution

Timeline:

Revolution Timeline: In Bahrain, protesters take to Bahrain authorities launch surprise attack on protesters Bahrain
Revolution Timeline: In Bahrain, protesters take to Bahrain authorities launch surprise attack on protesters Bahrain
Revolution Timeline: In Bahrain, protesters take to Bahrain authorities launch surprise attack on protesters Bahrain
Revolution Timeline: In Bahrain, protesters take to Bahrain authorities launch surprise attack on protesters Bahrain

In Bahrain, protesters take to Bahrain authorities launch surprise attack on protesters Bahrain protesters back at Pearl Square despite violence Bahrain’s king says he’ll release some political prisoners

U.S. tacks toward king amid Bahrain turmoil

Bahrain protesters clash with police Saudi Arabian, gulf forces enter Bahrain Bahrain declares state of emergency

Troops, police assault protesters in Bahrain’s capital

Protesters in Bahrain defy ban on rallies

BAHRAIN: Security forces continue wide, deep crackdown on dissent

4 Bahrain protesters sentenced to death for killing 2 officers

After crushed protests, Bahrain is accused of increased oppression of Shiites

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Revolution Timeline: Feb. 14, 2011 In Bahrain, protesters take to streets In Bahrain, a small

Revolution

Timeline:

Revolution Timeline: Feb. 14, 2011 In Bahrain, protesters take to streets In Bahrain, a small island
Revolution Timeline: Feb. 14, 2011 In Bahrain, protesters take to streets In Bahrain, a small island
Revolution Timeline: Feb. 14, 2011 In Bahrain, protesters take to streets In Bahrain, a small island

Feb. 14, 2011 In Bahrain, protesters take to streets

In Bahrain, a small island emirate on the Arab side of the Persian Gulf near Saudi Arabia, riot police attacked hundreds of demonstrators with tear gas, rubber bullets, concussion grenades and pellets, according to human rights observers. A member of parliament reported at least one protester dead and three injured.

In Bahrain, demonstrators were not demanding the collapse of the Sunni Muslim monarchy, which oversees a nation that is predominantly Shiite, but citizen access to a more participatory government. Their demands include a new constitution; an in- vestigation into corruption, torture and purported attempts to suppress the Shiite majority by natural- izing new Sunni citizens; and release of up to 500 political prisoners, many of them under 18.

King Hamad bin Isa Khalifa responded last week with an offer of 1,000 dinars (about $2,650) to each family in the country. Maryam Alkhawaja of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights, who was at Monday’s protests, said many see the offer as a slap in the face.

“Is that the price of our freedom? They think we’re not going to go out and protest because we re- ceived 1,000 dinars?” she said.

At least 14 people reportedly were injured in clash- es earlier in the day and on Sunday outside the capital, especially in the area of Karzakan, accord- ing to Reuters news agency.

By Ramin Mostaghim and Kim Murphy, Los Ange- les Times

By Ramin Mostaghim and Kim Murphy, Los Ange- les Times A woman shows empty packages of

A woman shows empty packages of tear gas said to have been used by riot police… (Hamad I Mohammed, Reuters)

Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker and Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times February 17, 2011 Bahrain

Revolution

Timeline:

Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker and Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times February 17, 2011 Bahrain authorities
Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker and Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times February 17, 2011 Bahrain authorities
Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker and Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times February 17, 2011 Bahrain authorities

By Ned Parker and Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times

February 17, 2011 Bahrain authorities launch surprise attack on protesters

Security forces in tiny but strategic Bahrain launched

a brutal assault early Thursday against at least

1,000 defiant anti-government protesters, including children, camped out in tents in the capital’s Pearl Square. At least two were killed and 50 hurt.

Death toll: Three people were killed and 231 wound- ed in a police operation to clear protesters from a Manama square Thursday, Bahrain’s health minis- ter said. Faisal bin Yaqoob al-Hamer told Reuters that 36 people were still being treated, including one in intensive care.

A barrage of tear gas canisters thundered across

the square about 3 a.m. as dozens of police cars, armored security vehicles and ambulances con- verged on a makeshift tent city in the center of Manama that was beginning to resemble a smaller version of Tahrir Square in Cairo, where Egyptian protesters this month were successful in overthrow- ing their president.

month were successful in overthrow- ing their president. A Bahraini man is comforted at a hospital

A Bahraini man is comforted at a hospital in Manama as he grieves for one of… (Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times)

Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times February 19, 2011 Bahrain protesters back at

Revolution

Timeline:

Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times February 19, 2011 Bahrain protesters back at Pearl
Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times February 19, 2011 Bahrain protesters back at Pearl
Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times February 19, 2011 Bahrain protesters back at Pearl

By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times

February 19, 2011 Bahrain protesters back at Pearl Square despite violence

When hundreds of men approached the square Sat- urday, policemen fired off tear-gas canisters. Hours later, red welts marked his arms from the final skir- mish before the Bahraini police retreated on orders of Crown Prince Salman ibn Hamed Khalifa.

The demonstrators let out wild cheers at being back in the plaza that has come to embody the demo- cratic aspirations of Bahrainis, much as Cairo’s Tahrir Square proved the beating heart of Egypt’s popular uprising.

At least six Bahrainis have died since Monday, and hundreds more have been wounded.

As night fell, people in the square were unsure whether the government really would allow them to remain or whether they should brace for another crackdown.

Around him, volunteers set up tents, and doctors and nurses rebuilt their clinic. The space twinkled with hundreds of gleaming white candles for the dead.

The square was becoming a village, but no one knew for how long.

square was becoming a village, but no one knew for how long. Protesters rejoice after entering

Protesters rejoice after entering Pearl Square, where government forces… (Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times)

Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times Feb. 21, 201 Bahrain’s king says he’ll

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Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times Feb. 21, 201 Bahrain’s king says he’ll release
Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times Feb. 21, 201 Bahrain’s king says he’ll release
Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times Feb. 21, 201 Bahrain’s king says he’ll release

By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times

Feb. 21, 201 Bahrain’s king says he’ll release some political prisoners

Bahrain’s king announced plans to release an un- specified number of political prisoners Monday in a move apparently aimed at appeasing an opposition movement that is pressing for reforms in this small Persian Gulf country. In another development, exiled Shiite opposition figure Hassan Mushaima announced plans to re- turn from London on Tuesday. It would be another test for authorities, who have a warrant outstanding for his arrest. The monarchy says it wants to pursue a national dialogue in the aftermath of its decision last week to order security forces to open fire on anti-govern- ment demonstrators. The demonstrators have mostly been Shiite Mus- lims, who are the majority in Bahrain and complain of discrimination by the Sunni Muslim royal family. On Monday, a new movement called the National Unity Group also called for reforms. The move- ment, which has close ties to the government and Sunni community, positioned itself as an alternative to the popular protests centered in Pearl Square in Manama, the capital. Protesters have demanded that all political prison- ers be freed, the government be dissolved and the constitution be revised. The king, Hamed ibn Isa Khalifa, said the release of the political prisoners was a direct result of a rally by the new organization. He did not say how many detainees were being freed. Wefaq, the main Shiite opposition group, ac- knowledged that the announcement of the release amounted to a concession. But it said it was insuf- ficient to start negotiations with the government. Wefaq officials said they doubted that the most high-profile detainees would be freed.

with the government. Wefaq officials said they doubted that the most high-profile detainees would be freed.
Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times March 5, 2011 U.S. tacks toward king

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Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times March 5, 2011 U.S. tacks toward king amid
Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times March 5, 2011 U.S. tacks toward king amid
Revolution Timeline: By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times March 5, 2011 U.S. tacks toward king amid

By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times

March 5, 2011 U.S. tacks toward king amid Bahrain turmoil

Despite its eagerness to show support for protest- ers across the Middle East, the Obama administra- tion has lined up squarely with the royal family of Bahrain as tens of thousands march in the streets demanding reform in the strategic kingdom that is home to the U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet. While Bahraini demonstrators continue to denounce the monarchy’s reform offers as a sham, U.S. offi- cials are praising the king of the Persian Gulf island nation and have taken a lead role in pushing for negotiations aimed at satisfying Bahrain’s margin- alized Shiite Muslim majority. Since the unrest started in Bahrain on Feb. 14, the king has fired four Cabinet ministers, replac- ing three of them with Shiite officials, and released 23 political prisoners. But he hasn’t yielded to de- mands that he fire the longtime prime minister, who is also his uncle, overhaul the government and pro- vide new powers to an elected parliament. Bahraini protesters, who complain that the king- dom’s mostly poor Shiites have no real political power and little access to the top jobs in business or government, on Tuesday again turned out tens of thousands of people — a large showing in a country of about 600,000 citizens, who constitute about half the total population. In the first days of the unrest, it appeared that the Obama administration might turn its back on the monarchy. On Feb. 17, Bahrain security forces fired on demonstrators, killing seven people and prompt- ing an angry call from Obama to King Hamed ibn Isa Khalifa.

seven people and prompt- ing an angry call from Obama to King Hamed ibn Isa Khalifa.

Hamad I. Mohammed / Reuters

Revolution Timeline: March 13, 2011 Bahrain protesters clash with police Police fired tear gas to

Revolution

Timeline:

Revolution Timeline: March 13, 2011 Bahrain protesters clash with police Police fired tear gas to disperse
Revolution Timeline: March 13, 2011 Bahrain protesters clash with police Police fired tear gas to disperse
Revolution Timeline: March 13, 2011 Bahrain protesters clash with police Police fired tear gas to disperse

March 13, 2011 Bahrain protesters clash with police

Police fired tear gas to disperse hundreds of anti-government demonstrators blocking ac- cess to the financial district Sunday morning, as sectarian tension escalated in this tiny island kingdom. The clashes began early Sunday after protest- ers set up barricades across a main road into downtown Manama, the capital city, and turned away cars headed for work. Dozens of police- men in riot gear forced the demonstrators back in a series of clashes over two hours, eyewit- nesses said. The decision by several hundred demonstra- tors to block the road appeared to be an effort by some members of the opposition to broaden the protests and to escalate the pressure on the government. But there were also signs of grow- ing sectarian strains, as a group of Shiite Mus- lim protesters clashed with Sunnis armed with sticks at Bahrain University, witnesses said.

By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times

at Bahrain University, witnesses said. By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times Hasan Jamali / Associated

Hasan Jamali / Associated Press

Revolution Timeline: By David S. Cloud and Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times March 14, 2011

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Timeline:

Revolution Timeline: By David S. Cloud and Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times March 14, 2011 Saudi
Revolution Timeline: By David S. Cloud and Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times March 14, 2011 Saudi
Revolution Timeline: By David S. Cloud and Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times March 14, 2011 Saudi

By David S. Cloud and Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times

March 14, 2011 Saudi Arabian, gulf forces enter Bahrain

Hundreds of troops from Saudi Arabia and police officers from the nearby United Arab Emirates have entered Bahrain at the request of the ruling family, a move that further polarized the tiny island nation and marks the first time Arab nations have inter- vened in another country’s affairs amid sweeping unrest in the region. Bahrain television showed a line of armored vehi- cles Monday carrying Saudi soldiers crossing the 16-mile King Fahd Causeway that links the two countries. The surprise deployment came after several days of worsening violence that had para- lyzed the country and threatened to bring down the monarchy. But if the intent of Bahrain’s ruling Khalifa family was to shore up its precarious position, it seemed at least as probable that bringing in Saudi troops would worsen the crisis by raising the chance of violence and uniting the often-fractious opposition behind a single issue: a refusal to yield to outside military pressure. After learning of the Saudi troops’ arrival, dem- onstrators began expanding the barricades and checkpoints they have set up to keep authorities out of the tent city that has arisen at the Pearl roundabout. Demonstrators have occupied the traf- fic circle since February to protest what they say is systematic discrimination against majority Shiite Muslims by the country’s Sunni rulers. In a statement, the White House urged Saudi Ara- bia and any other countries that might dispatch troops “to show restraint and respect the rights of the people of Bahrain, and to act in a way that supports dialogue instead of undermining it,” said Tommy Vietor, a spokesman for the National Secu- rity Council.There was no immediate sign that the Saudi troops were moving against the protesters. No soldiers or police were visible near the square by late Monday.

the protesters. No soldiers or police were visible near the square by late Monday. Saudi Arabian,

Saudi Arabian, gulf forces

Revolution Timeline: By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times March 15, 2011 Bahrain declares state

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Revolution Timeline: By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times March 15, 2011 Bahrain declares state of
Revolution Timeline: By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times March 15, 2011 Bahrain declares state of
Revolution Timeline: By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times March 15, 2011 Bahrain declares state of

By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times

March 15, 2011 Bahrain declares state of emergency

Bahrain’s king declared a three-month state of emergency Tuesday in an effort to quell a month- old uprising as rival groups of protesters and gangs set up more checkpoints around the capital. The move by King Hamed ibn Isa Khalifa appeared to amount to a declaration of martial law the day af- ter hundreds of troops and police from Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates poured into Bahrain with the support of the government after worsening violence paralyzed Manama, the capital, in recent days. Few military units, either from Saudi Arabia or Bah- rain, were visible around Manama on Tuesday, but the Associated Press reported that a Saudi ser- geant had been shot and killed by a protester, ac- cording to Saudi security official. The report could not be immediately confirmed.

In neighborhoods populated largely by Sunnis, young men carrying sticks and metal rods, many with their faces covered, blocked roads and exam- ined cars. At several checkpoints, the gangs stood next to Interior Ministry security forces and said they were guarding their neighborhoods against Shiites. Near Pearl roundabout, the traffic circle occupied by Shiite demonstrators since last month, protest- ers had established their own barricades. Most cars were being allowed to pass. Several young men said they were prepared to block police or military units from entering the area, though no security forces were visible on the streets.

to block police or military units from entering the area, though no security forces were visible
Revolution Timeline: By David S. Cloud and Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times | Los Angeles

Revolution

Timeline:

Revolution Timeline: By David S. Cloud and Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times | Los Angeles Times
Revolution Timeline: By David S. Cloud and Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times | Los Angeles Times
Revolution Timeline: By David S. Cloud and Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times | Los Angeles Times

By David S. Cloud and Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer

March 16, 2011 Troops, police assault protesters in Bahrain’s capital

Military troops and police moved against thousands of anti-government protesters occupying a land- mark square in Bahrain’s capital early Wednesday after the king had declared a three-month state of emergency and instructed the military to battle un- rest in the strategic nation. The security forces fired tear gas and shotguns as they pushed into Pearl Square, and at least two people were killed, eyewitnesses said. An army ambulance with its light flashing was seen leaving the area. Four tanks and half a dozen other armored vehicles were positioned 300 yards from Pearl with soldiers manning machine guns, and helicopters circled the area but didn’t immediately intervene. Dozens of soldiers milled about casually outside the square as smoke rose. More than 20 white buses stood nearby, apparently used to transport the riot police who were blocking access to the square. Army vehicles were also visible on an overpass leading into Manama’s downtown financial district. The troops apparently seized the road from protest- ers, who had sealed off the road in recent days and turned parts of the city into a ghost town.

ers, who had sealed off the road in recent days and turned parts of the city

AFP/Getty Images

Revolution Timeline: By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times March 25, 2011 Protesters in Bahrain defy

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Revolution Timeline: By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times March 25, 2011 Protesters in Bahrain defy ban
Revolution Timeline: By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times March 25, 2011 Protesters in Bahrain defy ban
Revolution Timeline: By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times March 25, 2011 Protesters in Bahrain defy ban

By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times

March 25, 2011 Protesters in Bahrain defy ban on rallies

Bands of protesters in more than a dozen villages Friday defied Bahrain security forces and the gov- ernment’s ban on demonstrations to press for the ouster of the country’s ruling family. At least one person died, dozens were injured and some were arrested as protesters, mainly in Shiite Muslim villages, held rallies against the ruling Sunni Muslim dynasty, according to an opposition politi- cal party, human rights groups and media reports. Some protesters reportedly encountered tear gas or were shot at by security forces using birdshot. Early Saturday, during a fierce sandstorm, groups of protesters broke the curfew and tried to reach the Pearl Square traffic circle, where they had camped for weeks before the government cracked down. But the protesters retreated when they heard that a fleet of police cars was approaching. The Bahraini government set up military and po- lice cordons at the main roads into Shiite villages. By mid-morning, ski-masked soldiers in tanks and armored personnel carriers and riot police with ba- tons, guns and tear gas had established check- points and taken up positions on the Budaiya high- way, which threads together villages such as Sar, Bani Jamra and Duraz. The streets were largely empty on what should have been a busy weekend shopping day. Pairs of fighter jets skimmed the highway and other Shiite areas. But protests flared around 3 p.m., as groups of young men ranging in number from a few dozen to a few hundred gathered by mosques and cemeter- ies in villages and moved toward the blockades. On the highway by Duraz, riot police surged down a street leading into town, firing tear gas. In the vil- lage, young men collected before a small Shiite mosque and walked down the main street toward

the police, unarmed, some wearing scarves and white rags to shield themselves from the tear gas, whose acrid smell hung in the air. They warned visitors that police were firing rubber bullets. With each round of tear gas, the front line ran back toward the square, an ebb and flow reportedly repeated in other villages. In the village of Maameer, 71-year-old Isa Mo- hammed Ali died after inhaling tear gas, ac- cording to the opposition group Wefaq, which did not back the rallies. Ali’s family said emer- gency calls to the island nation’s main hospital, the Salmaniya Medical Center, which is sur- rounded by security forces, went unanswered. The Interior Ministry confirmed Ali’s death, and concluded, without an autopsy, that it was due to natural causes. Five to 10 people were arrested in the village of Samaheej, according to the Bahrain Youth Society for Human Rights. Bahrain has cut phone ties and direct flights to Iran, Iraq and Lebanon. The pro-government English paper, the Gulf Daily News, quoted Bahrain’s foreign minister as saying that Leba- non’s Hezbollah is supporting discord and ter- rorism in the tiny monarchy, and that Persian Gulf countries plan to deport thousands of Leb- anese Shiites for alleged ties to Hezbollah and Iran’s Revolutionary Guard.

Revolution Timeline: By Alexandra Sandels April 15, 2011 BAHRAIN: Security forces continue wide, deep crackdown

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Revolution Timeline: By Alexandra Sandels April 15, 2011 BAHRAIN: Security forces continue wide, deep crackdown on
Revolution Timeline: By Alexandra Sandels April 15, 2011 BAHRAIN: Security forces continue wide, deep crackdown on
Revolution Timeline: By Alexandra Sandels April 15, 2011 BAHRAIN: Security forces continue wide, deep crackdown on

By Alexandra Sandels

April 15, 2011 BAHRAIN: Security forces continue wide, deep crackdown on dissent

In the latest developments in Bahrain’s ongoing crackdown on the country’s political opposition and human-rights activists, more than two dozen uni- formed and plainclothes security officers stormed the home of prominent defense lawyer Mohammed Tajer on Friday night and detained him, said watch- dog group Human Rights Watch in a statement. The lawyer has at several times defended opposi- tion figures and rights activists detained in security raids, and Human Rights Watch says he is the first defense lawyer to be detained in the Arabian Pen- insula monarchy in more than 10 years. Earlier this week, media reports said the daugh- ter of a prominent Bahraini rights activist who was picked up in a night raid on her home a week ago had started a hunger strike for his release. Meanwhile, the state-run Bahraini news agency re- ported Sunday that more than 100 civil servants in the country had been fired from their jobs for par- ticipating in anti-government protests and that they would be prosecuted for partaking in the demon- strations.

ticipating in anti-government protests and that they would be prosecuted for partaking in the demon- strations.
Revolution Timeline: From the L.A. Times April 28, 2011 4 Bahrain protesters sentenced to death

Revolution

Timeline:

Revolution Timeline: From the L.A. Times April 28, 2011 4 Bahrain protesters sentenced to death for
Revolution Timeline: From the L.A. Times April 28, 2011 4 Bahrain protesters sentenced to death for
Revolution Timeline: From the L.A. Times April 28, 2011 4 Bahrain protesters sentenced to death for

From the L.A. Times

April 28, 2011 4 Bahrain protesters sentenced to death for killing 2 officers

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates— A military court in Bahrain on Thursday convicted four Shiite protest- ers and sentenced them to death for the killing of two policemen during anti-government demonstra- tions last month in the Gulf kingdom, state media said. Three other Shiite activists, who were also on trial, were sentenced to life in prison for their role in the policemen’s deaths. Bahrain’s human rights groups blasted the verdict and said the trial, conducted in secrecy, had no le- gal credibility and was politically motivated. “This verdict is a message from the government, determined to stop the democracy movement,” said Nabeel Rajab, head of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights. “It’s a warning, saying this is how we will treat you if you continue to demand your rights.”

we will treat you if you continue to demand your rights.” A man looks at a

A man looks at a billboard in Muharraq, Bahrain, that demands no leniency for those who opposed the Bahraini regime. (Hasan Jamali / Associated Press / April 28, 2011)

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Demonstrations : Police and protesters clash in Bahrain (CNN):The unrest spreading through North Africa and

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : Police and protesters clash in Bahrain (CNN):The unrest spreading through North Africa and the
Demonstrations : Police and protesters clash in Bahrain (CNN):The unrest spreading through North Africa and the
Demonstrations : Police and protesters clash in Bahrain (CNN):The unrest spreading through North Africa and the

Police and protesters clash in Bahrain

(CNN):The unrest spreading through North Africa and the Middle East has reached the Persian Gulf nation of Bahrain, according to reports from the state news agency. At least three police officers and one demonstra- tor have been injured in clashes, the news agency reported. The injuries occurred during an attack on a police station during protests Sunday eve- ning, the news agency said. After three officers were injured, police fired on protesters with rubber bullets, causing one injury, the news agency said. Further protests were scheduled to take place in

Bahrain on Monday, making the country the latest in a string of nations to experience popular pro- tests that began in Tunisia. Protesters who have organized on Facebook, Twit- ter and with e-mails want political reforms, includ- ing a constitutional monarchy. Recently, Bahrain’s King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa offered more than $2,500 to Bahraini families, ostensibly in celebration of Monday’s 10th an- nivesary of the adoption of the country’s National Action Charter.

in celebration of Monday’s 10th an- nivesary of the adoption of the country’s National Action Charter.
Demonstrations : BAHRAIN PROTEST DEATHS POINT TO EXCESSIVE POLICE FORCE Amnesty International has condemned the

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : BAHRAIN PROTEST DEATHS POINT TO EXCESSIVE POLICE FORCE Amnesty International has condemned the heavy-
Demonstrations : BAHRAIN PROTEST DEATHS POINT TO EXCESSIVE POLICE FORCE Amnesty International has condemned the heavy-
Demonstrations : BAHRAIN PROTEST DEATHS POINT TO EXCESSIVE POLICE FORCE Amnesty International has condemned the heavy-

BAHRAIN PROTEST DEATHS POINT TO EXCESSIVE POLICE FORCE

Amnesty International has condemned the heavy- handed tactics used by Bahrain’s riot police earlier today after the second death in two days of protests calling for political reform in the tiny Gulf state.

Fadhel ‘Ali Matrook was among a crowd of people mourning the death yesterday of ‘Ali ‘Abdulhadi Mushaima’, killed in clashes between protesters and police, when he was shot dead by police ear- lier today in Bahrain’s capital, Manama. Riot police are said to have opened fire on the crowd without warning during the funeral.

“This second killing within two days is both tragic and a very worrying development,” said Malcolm Smart, Amnesty International’s Director for the Middle East and North Africa.

“The Bahrain authorities must thoroughly investi- gate what occurred, stand down the police involved in these shootings and make clear to the police that the use of excessive force will not be tolerated.”

“An independent investigation is also urgently re- quired to establish the facts, particularly whether the level of force used by the police, both yester- day and today, can possibly be justified.”

“Eyewitness reports of today’s shooting received by Amnesty International suggest strongly that Fad- hel ‘Ali Matrook’s death was caused by excessive force, in which case the police responsible must be brought to justice.”

Over 10,000 people reportedly joined today’s fu- neral procession for ‘Ali ‘Abdulhadi Mushaima’, who died on Monday during clashes with riot police in the village of al-Daih, east of Manama.

with riot police in the village of al-Daih, east of Manama. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL WORLDWIDE Eyewitnesses told

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL WORLDWIDE

Eyewitnesses told Amnesty International that police opened fired on the procession of mourners with- out warning, as they chanted slogans criticizing the government and calling for Bahrain to have a new constitution and a democratically elected govern- ment.

“Peaceful protesters were chanting ‘Khalifa leave’ and within minutes of the procession beginning, we got attacked by the riot police; bullets were shower- ing the peaceful protesters and there was tear gas everywhere. Several wounded are being rushed to the hospital and many are screaming,” Maryam Al-Khawaja, from the Bahrain Center for Human Rights, told Amnesty International.

Fadhel Ali Almatrook was shot dead close to al-Sal- maniya hospital in Manama. According to the Bah- rain Youth Society for Human Rights, more than 20 people required hospital treatment as a result of in- juries caused by the riot police on Monday.

Monday’s “Day of Rage” protests in Bahrain, orga- nized on Facebook and Twitter and apparently in- spired by unrest in Egypt and Tunisia, took place mainly in Shia villages around Manama.

Demonstrations : “Like many in the region, those in Bahrain who feel their dignity has

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : “Like many in the region, those in Bahrain who feel their dignity has been
Demonstrations : “Like many in the region, those in Bahrain who feel their dignity has been
Demonstrations : “Like many in the region, those in Bahrain who feel their dignity has been

“Like many in the region, those in Bahrain who feel their dignity has been compromised are demanding change. The authorities must listen to these calls, rather than retaliating with violence,” said Malcolm Smart.

On Friday, Amnesty International highlighted the deteriorating human rights situation in Bahrain with its report Crackdown in Bahrain: human rights at the crossroads.

The organization called on the government to en- sure proper investigations into allegations of torture and other serious abuses by the security forces.

In August-September 2010, the Bahrain authorities swooped on 23 opposition political activists, de- taining them incommunicado for two weeks during which some allege they were tortured.

The authorities have also curtailed freedom of expression, closing critical websites and banning opposition publications. Hundreds of people have been arrested or imprisoned for participating in protests.

Demonstrations : After crackdown, army makes show of force in Bahrain’s capital Manama, Bahrain (CNN)

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : After crackdown, army makes show of force in Bahrain’s capital Manama, Bahrain (CNN) :
Demonstrations : After crackdown, army makes show of force in Bahrain’s capital Manama, Bahrain (CNN) :
Demonstrations : After crackdown, army makes show of force in Bahrain’s capital Manama, Bahrain (CNN) :

After crackdown, army makes show of force in Bahrain’s capital

Manama, Bahrain (CNN) : People prayed and demonstrated late Thursday outside a Manama hospital, where scores had come for treatment fol- lowing a pre-dawn raid by government forces on an encampment of protesters that left at least four dead. Army vehicles, meanwhile, were patrolling the streets of Bahrain’s capital. They filled the void left by government security forces, who hours earlier had stormed protesters gathered in Pearl Round- about, a landmark circle in the city center. The throngs congregated Thursday night near the Salmaniya Medical Complex and chanted, “With our blood and our souls, we will fight for the mar- tyrs,” voicing their resolve in the face of a govern- ment clampdown that has elicited sharp criticism in Bahrain and internationally. Six people have died since protesters took to the streets Monday demanding reform and the intro- duction of a constitutional monarchy. The tiny but strategically critical island nation of Bahrain is an American ally and houses the headquarters of the U.S. Navy’s Fifth Fleet. Those killed in the Pearl Roundabout raid included Ali Abdullah, a 22-year-old who went to the pro- tests with his 20-year-old brother, his father told CNN. The college senior, majoring in engineering, died at the hospital Thursday from his injuries. Ahmad Abdullah blamed Bahrain’s prime minister -- Prince Khalifa bin Salman bin Hamad Al Khalifa, uncle of King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa who has held his position since 1971 -- for his son’s death, calling the leader a “killer.” Witnesses described a blunt show of force by police firing pellets, rubber bullets and tear gas to force protesters out of the square, where thousands had been rallying and in some cases encamping throughout the week.

rallying and in some cases encamping throughout the week. Violent crackdown in Bahrain Zainab Farda said

Violent crackdown in Bahrain

Zainab Farda said she was in a large tent for wom- en and children with her two daughters, ages 6 and 8, when they woke up to tear gas. She said they placed onions over their noses, but had to flee after security forces set fire to their tent. “After all that has happened, we are not going to quit,” Farda said. “If we quit now, we’re going to die.” Before word of the latest death, health minister Dr. Faisal Ben Yacoub Al Hamar said on state televi- sion that three people had died and at least 225 had been injured in the raid. Bahrain is one of the latest countries in the Middle East and North Africa to face a surge of dissent fol- lowing the revolts that toppled longtime autocrats in Tunisia and Egypt. While Bahrain’s interior ministry said in a statement Wednesday that those responsible for the two ear- lier deaths had been detained, authorities on Thurs- day defended their actions at the Manama round- about. They said security forces used a minimum of force and found firearms, knives and flags of Hezbollah, a Lebanon-based group that the United States lists

Demonstrations : as a terrorist organization. In a news conference, Foreign Minister Khalid al Khalifa

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : as a terrorist organization. In a news conference, Foreign Minister Khalid al Khalifa claimed
Demonstrations : as a terrorist organization. In a news conference, Foreign Minister Khalid al Khalifa claimed
Demonstrations : as a terrorist organization. In a news conference, Foreign Minister Khalid al Khalifa claimed

as a terrorist organization. In a news conference, Foreign Minister Khalid al Khalifa claimed protesters had attacked disciplin- ary forces -- saying he was surprised that they had, given the available freedoms in Bahrain. He added he plans to raise the issue of what happened in Manama with the country’s king. Al Khalifa also disputed an assertion that troops came from neighboring countries, insisting that all those involved are from Bahrain. According to the state-run Bahrain News Agen- cy, an interior ministry official said security forces evacuated the people after “exhausting all oppor- tunities for dialogue with them.” “Some of them have responded and left quietly, while others refused to comply with the law, which called to intervene in order to disperse them,” the official said. Bahrain’s army asked citizens to “distance them- selves from gatherings in vital areas in the capital” because it will “create fear and shock” and cause serious traffic disruptions. But Ali Ahmed, 34, who said he has slept at the square since Monday night, said the attack only emboldened demonstrators. He called claims that police had warned protesters to evacuate “a lie.” Ahmed had been one of about 3,000 people who laid out blankets and pitched tents at Pearl Round- about this week, with police nowhere to be seen at times. But by the time police had completed their raid ear- ly Thursday, the circle was cleared of protesters and convoys of more than 50 military armored per- sonnel carriers, each armed with machine guns, had driven into the area. Some of the trucks had razor wire. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon was among the international leaders who weighed in on Thurs- day, urging restraint and opposing government-led violence. He said that he is “disturbed by the vio-

lent means used to disperse demonstrators.” The British Foreign Office confirmed Thursday it had temporarily closed its embassy in Bahrain. Brit- ish Foreign Secretary William Hague said he spoke with his Bahrainian counterpart and stressed the “need for peaceful action to address the concerns of protesters.” Jennifer Stride, a U.S. Fifth Fleet spokeswoman, said there’s no “indication the protests will cause significant disruption” for the U.S. military, which she said is not being targeted. The fleet has more than 30 ships, including the aircraft carriers USS Enterprise and USS Carl Vinson and their respec- tive carrier strike groups U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said, mean- while, that the United States has told Bahrain it has “deep concerns” about the crackdown on anti-gov- ernment protesters and said the protesters’ funer- als and Friday prayers should “not be marred by violence.” “We call on restraint from the government, to keep its commitment to hold accountable those who have utilized excessive force against peaceful demon- strators, and we urge a return to a process that will result in real, meaningful changes for the people there,” Clinton said. Bahrain’s king has asked Abdul Latif Bin Rashid Al Zayani -- a former major general who headed Bahrain’s public security for 10 years -- to be an unofficial envoy to the United States to deal with diplomatic fallout from the crisis, according to se- nior State Department officials and other sources familiar with the appointment. Zayani was already in Washington holding meet- ings as the incoming leader of the Gulf Cooperation Council, and the king asked him to stay to talk with U.S. officials, the sources said. He met Thursday at the State Department with Under Secretary William Burns, Assistant Secretary Jeff Feltman and Dennis Ross, a White House adviser on the Middle East.

Demonstrations : Still, the most significant political reaction may be within Bahrain itself. Hours after

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : Still, the most significant political reaction may be within Bahrain itself. Hours after the
Demonstrations : Still, the most significant political reaction may be within Bahrain itself. Hours after the
Demonstrations : Still, the most significant political reaction may be within Bahrain itself. Hours after the

Still, the most significant political reaction may be within Bahrain itself. Hours after the crackdown at Pearl Roundabout, the Al Wefaq political party announced it had decided to withdraw from parlia- ment, party official Abdul Jalil Khalil said. Al Wefaq had been the most well represented party in the lower chamber of parliament, with 18 out of 40 seats. Khalil, who has been head of the Al Wefaq parlia- mentary bloc, explained that the unrest is “a turn- ing point” for the nation of about 1 million people. He noted that the casualty figures are “large scale” given the size of the population. “After what happened today, people are asking us to leave parliament. Quit the government,” Khalil said. Al Wefaq is a Shiite party in a country that, despite the fact two-thirds of its population are Shiites, is ruled by a Sunni Muslim royal family. In recent years, younger Shiites have staged vio- lent protests to complain about discrimination, high unemployment and corruption. Any Shiites say the country’s constitution has done little to improve their condition. Barak Seener, a Middle East fellow at the Royal United Services Institute, a London-based think tank, said he thinks the party’s withdrawal will lead “to the greater disenfranchisement of the Shia ma- jority” and that the upheaval is “very, very danger- ous” for the United States. “It’s so important for the United States to have a friendly regime there,” Seener said. He emphasized that Bahrain “has no choice but to clamp down” and can’t afford to “blink” amid the turmoil. “A disenfranchised Shia population is very danger- ous because it has the ability to destabilize Bahrain and it also is vulnerable to Iranian penetration,” he said. “There’s been numerous cells of Shia terror- ists that have been uncovered with extensive links

to the Iranian regime. Iran uses them as a proxy to extend their sphere of influence.” Al Khalifa stressed to reporters Thursday that both Shiite and Sunni Muslims in the country are loyal and patriotic. “We belong to one homeland,” he said. CNN’s Arwa Damon, Nic Robertson and Journalist Mansoor Al-Jamri in Bahrain, CNN’s Joe Sterling in Atlanta and CNN’s Elise Labott and Chris Lawrence in Washington contributed to this report.

Demonstrations : Protesters in Bahrain retake Pearl Roundabout Manama, Bahrain (CNN) : Thousands of joyous

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : Protesters in Bahrain retake Pearl Roundabout Manama, Bahrain (CNN) : Thousands of joyous Bahrainis
Demonstrations : Protesters in Bahrain retake Pearl Roundabout Manama, Bahrain (CNN) : Thousands of joyous Bahrainis
Demonstrations : Protesters in Bahrain retake Pearl Roundabout Manama, Bahrain (CNN) : Thousands of joyous Bahrainis

Protesters in Bahrain retake Pearl Roundabout

Manama, Bahrain (CNN) : Thousands of joyous Bahrainis retook a major square in the heart of the island nation’s capital Saturday -- a dramatic turn of events two days after security forces ousted demonstrators from the spot in a deadly attack. The sight of citizens streaming into Pearl Round- about came as the Bahrain royal family made moves designed to end a turbulent week of unrest capped by calls from world leaders to talk with op- position leaders with an eye to reform. Crown Prince Salman ordered the removal of the military from the Pearl Roundabout, a top demand by opposition forces, and told CNN’s Nic Robert- son that citizens would be permitted to stay in the spot without fear. “We have, under the leadership of his majesty, decided that the best way to handle the situation without any further loss of life or injuries is through dialogue,” he said. The crown prince said he was deeply sorry for the deaths of protesters. An investigation will be launched and those responsible will be held ac- countable, he said. “This is a terrible tragedy for our nation,” he said. Salman also said the government will be embrac- ing talks with all parties, a sign that the government is stepping back from confrontation and embracing dialogue. “All political parties in the country deserve a voice at the table,” he said. The crown prince said he was deeply sorry for the deaths of protesters. An investigation will be launched and those responsible will be held ac- countable, he said. “This is a terrible tragedy for our nation,” he said. Salman also said the government will be embrac- ing talks with all parties, a sign that the government is stepping back from confrontation and embracing

government is stepping back from confrontation and embracing Talking with Crown Prince of Bahrain dialogue. “All

Talking with Crown Prince of Bahrain

dialogue. “All political parties in the country deserve a voice at the table,” he said. Bahrain’s military withdrew from the square after is- suing a statement saying it “successfully complet- ed” its mission of “safeguarding vital areas in the center of the capital.” Police were placed in charge but withdrew from the roundabout on the heels of the military. Thousands of people streamed into the roundabout, the focal point of protests in central Manama, wav- ing flags, praying, dancing and honking horns. “I’m feeling freedom,” one protester said moments after soldiers and police retreated. “It’s the begin- ning, the beginning of our freedom.” While there was anger in the crowd over longstand- ing grievances, it was a sharp contrast to deadly confrontations early Thursday and Friday evening. Many of the protesters are Shiite Muslims, who make up 70 percent of the residents of the island kingdom and have long harbored deep political and economic grievances against the Sunni ruling fam- ily. Bahrain is one of several countries in the Middle

Demonstrations : East and North Africa to face a surge of dissent fol- lowing the

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : East and North Africa to face a surge of dissent fol- lowing the revolts
Demonstrations : East and North Africa to face a surge of dissent fol- lowing the revolts
Demonstrations : East and North Africa to face a surge of dissent fol- lowing the revolts

East and North Africa to face a surge of dissent fol- lowing the revolts that toppled longtime autocrats in Tunisia and Egypt. This week’s ferment upended the kingdom, a tiny but strategically critical country that’s a key U.S. ally and home to the U.S. Navy’s Fifith Fleet, and left 10 dead and many injured. Two protesters were killed early this week. Four people died after security forces stormed the Pearl Roundabout early Thursday, ousting an encamp- ment of sleeping demonstrators and taking control of the location. Four others died on Friday evening after demon- strators attempted to approach the square and the security forces fired bullets and tear gas at them. World leaders have urged the Bahrain government to open talks with protest leaders. As international condemnation rolled in over the military’s use of force against peaceful demonstra- tors, the royal family urged a dialogue with all sec- tors of the society to resolve the situation. In a nationally televised address Friday, Salman of- fered his condolences, cautioned citizens and se- curity forces to restrain themselves, and said the country wants a nation where neither Sunni or Shi- ites are favored. After Salman’s TV appearance, King Hamad an- nounced that the crown prince is to lead a dialogue “with all parties and sections of Bahrain, without exception.” But a leading member of parliament from Bahrain’s main Shiite opposition party, al-Wifaq, told CNN that there can be no dialogue with the government while the military controls the streets. The crown prince ordered the military Saturday to withdraw from Bahrain’s streets and left the police in charge to “oversee law and order.” He appealed for calm and said “the situation is going back to normal.” “We are starting a new stage, a stage that we will

discuss all our issues with all honesty and integrity,” he said. “To all the citizens of Bahrain, I hope that we be shoulder to shoulder, collaborate with each other, and communicate with all the political forces.”

Demonstrations : Bahrain’s Pearl Statue is gone, but it remains an icon of democracy The

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : Bahrain’s Pearl Statue is gone, but it remains an icon of democracy The Washington
Demonstrations : Bahrain’s Pearl Statue is gone, but it remains an icon of democracy The Washington
Demonstrations : Bahrain’s Pearl Statue is gone, but it remains an icon of democracy The Washington
Demonstrations : Bahrain’s Pearl Statue is gone, but it remains an icon of democracy The Washington

Bahrain’s Pearl Statue is gone, but it remains an icon of democracy

The Washington Post:The Pearl Statue that sat at the center of the Arab Spring protests in Bahrain was a classic piece of meaningless, made-to-order modernism, drab but sleek in a style beloved by high-end hotels and authoritarian governments. As long-standing sectarian tensions between the country’s politically dispossessed Shiite majority and its Sunni ruling class erupted in mid-February, the Pearl Statue became the unlikely symbol of a vigorous democratic movement.

But like the opposition, it has been broken: On March 18, three days after foreign troops from Saudi Arabia and other Persian Gulf states arrived to enforce a brutal crackdown on protesters, the government toppled the statue. The monument stood 300 feet tall, and was built in 1982 to commemorate a meeting in Bahrain of the Gulf Cooperation Council, a group of six Gulf Arab states. The design resembled a cheap per- fume bottle, an all-too-transparent effort to create an instant icon. With a bulbous white sphere sup- ported by six upward-thrusting legs, it recalled both Bahrain’s past as a center of the pearl trade, and its future integration into a regional economic jug- gernaut, fueled by oil, trade and speculation.

There is an innate incompetence to many authori- tarian regimes, and when the government of King Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa explained the statue’s de- struction, it spoke with contradiction and confusion. Officially, it was part of a traffic realignment and redevelopment of the Pearl Roundabout, where protesters had gathered in the tens of thousands before government troops used live ammunition to disperse them. But the country’s foreign minister, Sheik Khalid bin Ahmed al-Khalifa, spoke what ev- eryone assumed was the real truth: “We did it to

what ev- eryone assumed was the real truth: “We did it to remove a bad memory.”

remove a bad memory.”

Unfortunately, there was yet more incompetence evident in the statue’s physical removal when a worker was killed by falling debris. Videos of the de- struction, on YouTube, show only the beginning and the end of the demolition, editing out the death.

The government went even further. The Pearl Stat- ue was part of the regime’s standard branding, a tourist’s reference point and a ubiquitous presence in the country’s catalogue of iconography. The 500- fils coin — worth about $1.33 — which showed the statue on one side, has mostly disappeared from circulation. So, too, has the trade in Pearl Statue memorabilia, key chains, keepsakes and other tchotchkes, which flourished after democracy pro- testers adopted the Pearl Statue as an icon of the movement.

“Any reference to the Pearl can get you into trouble today,” said a young artist who feared arrest if he spoke openly. “It’s like it never happened. Except it’s everywhere on Facebook and the Internet.”

Expunging a symbol is never an easy process. By

Demonstrations : their very nature, symbols are more than physical objects, and they circulate in

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : their very nature, symbols are more than physical objects, and they circulate in complex
Demonstrations : their very nature, symbols are more than physical objects, and they circulate in complex
Demonstrations : their very nature, symbols are more than physical objects, and they circulate in complex

their very nature, symbols are more than physical objects, and they circulate in complex ways. The foreign minister’s explanation of the statue’s de- struction — to remove a bad memory — sounds a bit like the common habit of hiding photographs of faithless lovers or abusive relatives. But there was something more vindictive at work in Bahrain: It was a desecration of an object that had quickly, and surprisingly, become widely meaning- ful for the majority of the population, and at a deep- er level, an attempt to assert power by demonstrat- ing control over the physical landscape.

Younger, cosmopolitan Bahrainis were both be- mused and horrified by the statue’s removal. One woman compared it to the 2001 destruction of the Bamiyan Buddhas in Afghanistan, not because the Pearl Statue was of commensurate artistic or his- toric importance, but because the act of destroying it seemed so petty, anachronistic and foolish. There was also genuine regret for the loss.

“It was very sudden, and it did make a difference,” said another young man, who also spoke on the condition of anonymity. “Not because of how it looked, but because it had taken on significance in our lives. It was always there.” That “always” re- veals how young Bahrain society is.

The gulf region is filled with art and architecture that is meant to look pretty and mean nothing. No place on Earth has been more successful at co- opting modernism to suggest progress while de- naturing it of anything relating to conflict, reform or liberal openness.

For decades the Pearl Statue had functioned just as it was meant to: a sleek white presence that vaguely suggested a common past and a hope- ful future. When it was built nearly three decades

a hope- ful future. When it was built nearly three decades ago, it towered over everything

ago, it towered over everything around it. But then Bahrain, like its gulf neighbors, started building big- ger, pushing its bland glass towers ever higher. The Pearl began to seem almost quaint.

It took on layers of meaning that no one ever intend-

ed. Vast tracts of the country’s main island are held by the royal Khalifa family, which has made other parts of the country overcrowded and land hungry. Developers now routinely push the island’s borders

out into the sea, reclaiming land from the gulf for new housing and development. But that’s come at

a cost. Coastal villages now sit high and dry, inland, with no relationship to the water.

A deep nostalgia prevails, especially among Shiites,

for the old days, when boys would swim in search of freshwater springs just offshore. Those springs have mostly dried up, an ominous environmental change that has shaken the country’s sense of itself as a green oasis in an otherwise torrid landscape. Even memories of the country’s pearl-diving past, which was lucrative for traders but brutal to the div- ers, are growing hazy and remote.

Demonstrations : Among other meanings, the Pearl Statue repre- sented the social costs of becoming

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : Among other meanings, the Pearl Statue repre- sented the social costs of becoming prosperous
Demonstrations : Among other meanings, the Pearl Statue repre- sented the social costs of becoming prosperous
Demonstrations : Among other meanings, the Pearl Statue repre- sented the social costs of becoming prosperous

Among other meanings, the Pearl Statue repre- sented the social costs of becoming prosperous and globalized, a consumer culture of shopping malls and beautiful highways, leading to a spiritual nowhere. But it was the act of ordinary citizens lay- ing claim to its meaning that made it intolerable to the government. In April, as the ruling family pur- sued a brutal crackdown against the opposition in- cluding (according to human rights activists) sev- eral deaths by torture, the government announced

a new statue was rising, at another faceless inter- section.

This time, it was a map of the country, which looked weirdly like a heart ripped from the chest of some sacrificial victim. It was made of aluminum, plas- tic and fiberglass — easier to demolish than the concrete and metal structure of the old Pearl, and

a smart move in case it too began to take on un- wanted meaning.

protests. But it is the physical “being there” — in large numbers, unafraid of bullets and tear gas — that makes governments change their ways.

The Bahraini government can never obliterate the memory of the Pearl Statue, but it can remove the statue itself, just as it can change the physical shape of the island that is home to this country’s fractious society. Real power, it turns out, is very old fash- ioned. Movements may gestate in cyberspace, but it is Revolution 1.0 that will change the world.

The statue itself, it seems, has been given a burial at sea. Several locals report that its remains were removed, to become landfill for yet more coastal reclamation. It was impossible to confirm this, how- ever, because no one who knows for sure is talking about the Pearl.

Most people here who were willing to talk about the statue saw its destruction as yet more blind and self-destructive rage from the government. One Shiite village had already created a mini-Pearl statue, a kind of martyr image of the icon. And the Pearl was not budging from the Web, where much

of the political hostility was still playing out — Sun- nis were actively poring over Facebook images to denounce Shiites who had gone to the Pearl Roundabout — long after the physical protests had been squashed. The physical destruction of the statue seemed at first wildly old-fashioned. But that may be the point.

It was the physicality of the statue that mattered. In

a virtual age, the real has become newly precious,

and by embracing the Pearl Statue, the democracy movement gave genuine substance to something that was never meant to be anything more than a hollow placeholder for meaning. Activists can use the Internet as a tool to build communities and plan

Demonstrations : Spillover of government-incited violence affecting vulnerable bystanders The Bahrain Center for Human

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : Spillover of government-incited violence affecting vulnerable bystanders The Bahrain Center for Human
Demonstrations : Spillover of government-incited violence affecting vulnerable bystanders The Bahrain Center for Human
Demonstrations : Spillover of government-incited violence affecting vulnerable bystanders The Bahrain Center for Human

Spillover of government-incited violence affecting vulnerable bystanders

The Bahrain Center for Human Rights deeply re- grets the reports of several separate attacks on Asian workers in various parts of the capital, Mana- ma on Sunday (March 13). The BCHR condemns, unequivocally, the violent targeting or harassment of any segment of Bahraini society.

BCHR calls on the Bahraini authorities to immedi- ately cease their policy of recruiting foreign mer- cenaries, many of whose citizenship is reportedly fast-tracked, and using them to oppress the local population. Seven Bahrainis have already been killed since the beginning of the current uprising, all as a result of the use of gunshot, bird pellets and rubber bullets by riot police.

AccordingtotheGulfDailyNews(http://www.gulf-dai-

ly-news.com/NewsDetails.aspx?storyid=301780),

an Asian man has been killed and another suffered critical injuries on Sunday March 13, after they were allegedly attacked by youth carrying wooden planks and sticks in separate incidents in Mana- ma. It is also reported that six other stabbings of Bangladeshi and Pakistani workers occurred in the same evening.

The perpetrators of violence have not been identi- fied, but the incident confirms fears that spillover from the government’s policies of using mercenar- ies against locals will result in indiscriminate attacks on Asian residents. The BCHR also notes that that the general outbreak of mob violence will inevitably target bystanders, particularly workers who make up the most vulnerable portion of Bahraini society.

workers who make up the most vulnerable portion of Bahraini society. The Bahrain Center for Human

The Bahrain Center for Human Rights

Demonstrations : BAHRAINI PROTESTERS TELL OF BLOODSHED AS CRACKDOWN ESCALATES Bahraini protesters today told Amnesty

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : BAHRAINI PROTESTERS TELL OF BLOODSHED AS CRACKDOWN ESCALATES Bahraini protesters today told Amnesty
Demonstrations : BAHRAINI PROTESTERS TELL OF BLOODSHED AS CRACKDOWN ESCALATES Bahraini protesters today told Amnesty
Demonstrations : BAHRAINI PROTESTERS TELL OF BLOODSHED AS CRACKDOWN ESCALATES Bahraini protesters today told Amnesty

BAHRAINI PROTESTERS TELL OF BLOODSHED AS CRACKDOWN ESCALATES

Bahraini protesters today told Amnesty Internation- al of bloody scenes on the streets as government security forces stepped up their violent crackdown on demonstrations and blocked access to hospi- tals.

At least six people were reportedly killed in the cap- ital Manama amid continuing protests as the army used tanks to flatten the peaceful protest camps set up in recent weeks to demand reform in the Gulf state. Government forces also surrounded hospitals and attacked doctors trying to help the wounded. “The distressing reports and images coming out of Bahrain today provide further evidence that the au- thorities are using lethal and other excessive force to crush protests, with reckless disregard for hu- man life,” said Malcolm Smart, Amnesty Interna- tional’s Middle East and North Africa Director. “Wounded protesters have also been prevented from accessing medical attention by government

The Bahraini authorities must immediately

put a stop to this bloodshed.” Security forces attacked the mainly Shi’a protest camp at Manama’s Pearl Roundabout camp early on Wednesday. Family members of those wounded at the round- about and people trying to approach the area told Amnesty International that the army opened fire on them without warning. “I was walking towards the Pearl Roundabout… We were 5km from the roundabout when we were shot with live ammunition - one shot came one metre away from me. There were two tanks in the street and a helicopter above us,” said Nabeel al Rajab,director of the banned Bahrain Centre for Human Rights.

forces

Amnesty International also received testimonies from medical staff who were prevented from treat-

from medical staff who were prevented from treat- AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL WORLDWIDE ing the victims of violence.

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL WORLDWIDE

ing the victims of violence. “We are waiting to do something and the army is not allowing us. We know there are hundreds injured and they are not allowing them to come here,” said one doctor at the central Salmaniya hospital who did not wish to be named due to safety fears. “A doctor went to the gate this morning trying to come in and the army beat him. They also threw tear gas and another type of gas at the emergency entrance of the hospital.” Another doctor said he was afraid of going to work because he heard of colleagues being attacked trying to reach the hospital. “Hundreds of doctors and nurses are willing to pro- vide services but they are stuck in their houses and do not know what to do, they are afraid of leaving their houses in case they are shot,” the doctor told Amnesty International. “The Salmaniya hospital is surrounded by the army. Injured people have instead been brought to small health centres that can’t really provide optimal medical care and can’t deal with these injuries.” In the nearby town of Sitra, a local resident told Amnesty International that she was afraid to go outside. “We can’t go out because the army is everywhere. They are throwing tear gas in the street. If anyone leaves their house, the army shoot at them,” she said.

Demonstrations : Bahrain hospitals under siege as soldiers maintain Manama crackdown Bahraini protesters near a

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : Bahrain hospitals under siege as soldiers maintain Manama crackdown Bahraini protesters near a roadblock
Demonstrations : Bahrain hospitals under siege as soldiers maintain Manama crackdown Bahraini protesters near a roadblock
Demonstrations : Bahrain hospitals under siege as soldiers maintain Manama crackdown Bahraini protesters near a roadblock

Bahrain hospitals under siege as soldiers maintain Manama crackdown

Bahraini protesters near a roadblock set up to pre- vent riot police entering their village of Malkiya, south of Manama in Bahrain. Photograph: Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters Bahrain’s two main hospitals remain surrounded by masked soldiers despite demands from America that the kingdom must ease its violent crackdown on demonstrators and the medical workers treating them.

Soldiers also continue to patrol all main roads in the capital Manama and have cordoned off access to the former hub of the protest movement, Pearl Roundabout, which was destroyed under govern- ment orders on Friday, denying the restive demon- strators a focal point.

The tiny Gulf state has the feel of a nation under siege as it approaches a second week of martial law imposed for three months by its besieged rul- ers. In addition to the troop presence, neighbour- hoods remain largely empty; large, glitzy shopping malls have been virtually abandoned and helicop- ters regularly buzz over the debris-strewn scenes of recent street clashes.

Hospitals, particularly the Salmaniya medical clinic near the centre of town, have received extra atten- tion, largely because of the significance they have taken on since the protests began in January.

As well as being used to treat hundreds of casu- alties, nearly all of them unarmed protesters, the hospitals served as rallying points for protesters, who took refuge from riot police in the relative safe- ty of their grounds.

Salmaniya was one of several hospitals attacked

grounds. Salmaniya was one of several hospitals attacked Bahraini protesters near a roadblock set up to

Bahraini protesters near a roadblock set up to prevent riot police entering their village of Malkiya, south of Ma- nama in Bahrain. Photograph: Hamad I Mohammed/ Reuters

by security forces during the week. Their entrances clearly show scuffs from rubber bullets and teargas canisters, as well as sound grenades were found well inside hospital grounds.

Images of thousands of protesters, joined by doc- tors with bullhorns and outraged ambulance driv- ers, lionised the anti-government movement and contributed greatly to the regime’s public relations woes outside Bahrain.

Several doctors have been arrested, among them a leading surgeon, Ali al-Ikri, who has been accused of having contact with foreign agents. Others claim to have been intimidated by security forces and prevented from leaving their homes.

“I live in a neighbourhood surrounded by colonels and senior officers,” said one doctor, who did not want to give her name. “If I go out I will be followed.

Demonstrations : There is a real risk to my safety and those of my colleagues.

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : There is a real risk to my safety and those of my colleagues. I
Demonstrations : There is a real risk to my safety and those of my colleagues. I
Demonstrations : There is a real risk to my safety and those of my colleagues. I

There is a real risk to my safety and those of my colleagues. I have been prevented from returning to work. When I left the hospital, it was in utter cha- os.”

predominantly Shia Muslim protesters who have defied the authority of the Riyadh-backed Sunni dynasty for two deeply destabilising months.

Kuwait is to send a medical team of 40 specialists to be deployed inside the hospitals as the govern- ment looks for new ways to manage the vehement anti-regime movement.

Regional repercussions continue, though, with new demonstrations in Iraq on Saturday against the Saudi role and strident criticism from Shia Islamic clerics, which have sharply raised the sectarian stakes in Bahrain, a majority Shia Muslim state.

“This is about us being sidelined and them getting in people who will stay on message,” said another doctor. “I know for a fact that the wards will be tidied up and some of the patients moved. The Kuwaitis will report back in good faith that all is in order and that will be the official narrative.”

The US state department demanded on Friday that attacks on hospitals stop. “We call on security forces to cease violence, particularly on medical facilities and personnel,” it said.

At least 70% of Bahrainis are Shias. The establish- ment, however, is almost exclusively Sunni. The Shias have long complained that the status quo discriminates against them, denying them opportu- nities and access to decision-making.

“We are not waging war,” said Bahrain’s foreign minister, Sheikh Khalid bin-Ahmed al-Khalifa. “We are restoring law and order. It is a very volatile situ- ation and in volatile situations you expect violence to happen.”

The US secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, said the solution to the country’s crisis could only come through political dialogue. “We have made clear that security alone cannot resolve the challenges facing Bahrain,” Clinton told reporters in Paris. “Vi- olence is not the answer; a political process is.”

In the face of sustained international criticism, the strategy of the ruling dynasty has been to make Bahrain’s crisis a regional problem, by inviting Gulf forces into the kingdom. Hundreds of troops from the six-nation Gulf Co-operation Council alliance were dispatched to Bahrain last week. Qatar said it had deployed troops and Kuwait has sent navy ships to patrol waters near Bahrain, where a mari- time curfew has been ordered from 6pm-6am.

A fourth Bahraini protester died on Saturday from wounds he suffered earlier in the week.

Relatives of another victim, IT technician Ahmed Farhan, said they saw him being executed as he lay prostrate on a street in the suburb of Sitra.

“They killed him in cold blood,” said Ali Hassan Ali, a physical education teacher. “I was standing near him when he was shot. He fell, they chased us away and shot him in the head at point-blank rage with a bird-shot gun.”

The victim’s injuries were consistent with being shot in the head from close range.

However, Saudi Arabia continues to take a regional lead in the crisis, insisting on a hard line against the

Demonstrations : Rights group: Bahrain targets wounded protesters By Erika Solomon DUBAI (Reuters) - Human

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : Rights group: Bahrain targets wounded protesters By Erika Solomon DUBAI (Reuters) - Human Rights
Demonstrations : Rights group: Bahrain targets wounded protesters By Erika Solomon DUBAI (Reuters) - Human Rights
Demonstrations : Rights group: Bahrain targets wounded protesters By Erika Solomon DUBAI (Reuters) - Human Rights

Rights group: Bahrain targets wounded protesters

By Erika Solomon

DUBAI (Reuters) - Human Rights Watch said on Wednesday that Bahrain authorities were harass- ing and isolating hospital patients wounded in anti- government protests when security forces began a crackdown in the kingdom two weeks ago.

Bahrain’s Sunni rulers this month imposed mar- tial law and brought in troops from Sunni-led Gulf neighbors, including Saudi Arabia, to quell weeks of unrest during pro-democracy demonstrations led mostly by the state’s Shi’ite majority.

Twenty-four people were killed in the ensuing clashes, the government said Tuesday. The op- position Wefaq party says 250 people have been detained and another 44 have gone missing since the crackdown.

The security measures were condemned by Iran, the main Shi’ite power in a region dominated by Sunni Muslim rulers, which said they could lead to a wider conflict.

Foreign Minister Sheikh Khaled al-Khalifa said Iran should stop its “offensive” against Bahrain, tell- ing pan-Arab daily al-Hayat that political dialogue could only start once security had been restored in the island kingdom. Opposition parties reiterated denials of any foreign backing Wednesday.

U.S.-based Human Rights Watch said it was con- cerned Bahrain forces were targeting hospital pa- tients who were protesters or bystanders in scat- tered demonstrations that broke out last Friday in a planned “Day of Rage” that police quickly quashed.

in a planned “Day of Rage” that police quickly quashed. People wait at the Salmaniya hospital

People wait at the Salmaniya hospital to hear about the well-being about their family members who were injured after riot police stormed an anti-government protest camp, in Manama February 17, 2011.

“Human Rights Watch (HRW) has documented several cases in which patients with protest-relat- ed injuries were transferred to or sought treatment at Salmaniya and were then severely harassed or beaten,” it said in a statement.

In the March 16 crackdown, Bahraini forces took over Salmaniya medical center, the country’s larg- est public hospital.

Bahrain’s government has said it raided the hos- pital because it had been “overrun by political and sectarian activity.”

HRW’s report comes a day after the Interior Minis- try released a statement calling on Bahrainis not to avoid hospital care, as it could cause their condi- tion to deteriorate.

Demonstrations : The rights group said the ministry had not dealt with patients’ fears about

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : The rights group said the ministry had not dealt with patients’ fears about harassment.
Demonstrations : The rights group said the ministry had not dealt with patients’ fears about harassment.
Demonstrations : The rights group said the ministry had not dealt with patients’ fears about harassment.

The rights group said the ministry had not dealt with patients’ fears about harassment.

“These people who need treatment are facing this difficult choice, and many choose not to go to the hospital,” HRW’s Bahrain researcher Faraz Saneif told Reuters.

“It will be an ongoing problem as disturbances con- tinue in villages surrounding Manama.”

HRW cited several cases where patients were quickly picked up by police after they gave hospi- tals their identification and cited the cause of their injuries as tear gas, rubber bullets and birdshot, which were all used to disperse protesters.

Security forces told HRW the patients were trans- ferred to Salmaniya hospital or the Bahrain De- fense Force hospital for surgery. HRW said the patients’ families were given no information on the whereabouts or condition of their relatives.

“We don’t want Bahrain to be a place for other coun- tries to settle their accounts,” Wefaq leader Sheikh Ali Salman told a news conference in Manama.

Talks offered by the crown prince in early March, initially bogged down by debates on conditions, were dropped after the crackdown.

“The priority now is to return to security and order. There’s no doubt that a political process will start and develop, but only after we’ve restored stabil- ity,” Sheikh Khaled said.

(Editing by Jon Boyle and Janet Lawrence)

SECURITY BEFORE TALKS

More than 60 percent of Bahrainis are Shi’ites and most are calling for a constitutional monarchy. But demands by hardliners for the overthrow of the monarchy have alarmed minority Sunnis, who fear unrest serves Iran.

Sheikh Khaled told al-Hayat that Bahrain did not want Iranian mediation and called on “Iranians to stop this offensive that we have been exposed to.”

Bahrain’s main Shi’ite opposition group Wefaq and six smaller opposition groups rejected claims by the government that protests were organised by outside forces and said Bahrainis were striving for democracy and freedoms.

Demonstrations : Agency: 4th protester to die in Bahrain may have been tortured (CNN) --

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : Agency: 4th protester to die in Bahrain may have been tortured (CNN) -- A
Demonstrations : Agency: 4th protester to die in Bahrain may have been tortured (CNN) -- A
Demonstrations : Agency: 4th protester to die in Bahrain may have been tortured (CNN) -- A

Agency: 4th protester to die in Bahrain may have been tortured

(CNN) -- A fourth person who died while in the cus- tody of Bahrain police in recent days may have been tortured, Human Rights Watch said Wednes- day, as it called for urgent investigations into the deaths of detainees. The death of Kareem Fakhrawi, 49, was the fourth detainee death reported by the Bahrain govern- ment in nine days, the human rights group said. He was detained April 3 after going to a police sta- tion to complain about a predawn raid on the house of a relative, the agency said. Police reported he died Tuesday. “Four detainee deaths in nine days is a crime, not

a coincidence,” said Joe Stork, deputy Middle East director at Human Rights Watch. “The govern-

ment tells families of detainees nothing about their whereabouts or well-being while they are alive or about the circumstances of their deaths.” At Fakhrawi’s funeral Wednesday, a crowd of mourners demanded to see his corpse because of concerns he had been tortured, then took photos and videos of the body, the agency said.

A video of a dead body, purported to be Fakhrawi’s,

was posted on Facebook Wednesday and showed

a badly bruised corpse as people crowded around

to take pictures. The body had ligature marks around one of the an- kles and deep reddish-purple bruises on the entire upper arms and on a large part of one thigh. The face was black and blue and blood was on the right side of the neck. In a posting on Twitter, the Bahrain News Agency said an official at the Bahrain Defense Force Hos- pital attributed Fakhrawi’s death to kidney failure. Human Rights Watch said its personnel did not see the body in person, but urged a thorough and im-

partial investigation into allegations of torture. “Bahrain is flagrantly violating the most basic hu-

“Bahrain is flagrantly violating the most basic hu - An Indian child stands next to a

An Indian child stands next to a placard during a pro- test against the political turmoil in Bahrain in Mumbai on March 25, 2011.

man rights by arbitrarily detaining hundreds, keep- ing their whereabouts secret, and covering up the reasons for deaths in custody,” Stork said. The human rights agency did view the body of an- other person who died in custody -- protester Ali Isa Saqer -- and said it showed signs of “horrific abuse” and torture. The human rights agency said there may be as many as 430 people who have been arrested in Bahrain in the government’s effort to quell protests there. A member of Human Rights Watch observed Saqer’s body Sunday after Bahraini authorities said he died in detention. “His body showed signs of severe physical abuse. The left side of his face showed a large patch of bluish skin with a reddish-purple area near his left temple and a two-inch cut to the left of his eye,” Human Rights Watch said in a statement. “Lash marks crisscrossed his back, some reaching to his front right side. Blue bruises covered much of the back of his calves, thighs, and buttocks, as well as his right elbow and hip. The tops of his feet were

Demonstrations : blackened, and lacerations marked his ankles and wrists.” Saqer, 31, died at a

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : blackened, and lacerations marked his ankles and wrists.” Saqer, 31, died at a detention
Demonstrations : blackened, and lacerations marked his ankles and wrists.” Saqer, 31, died at a detention
Demonstrations : blackened, and lacerations marked his ankles and wrists.” Saqer, 31, died at a detention

blackened, and lacerations marked his ankles and wrists.”

Saqer, 31, died at a detention center in early April, according to the general director of Muharraq Gov- ernorate Police. Saqer was being held on charges of attempted murder of policemen while trying to run them over with his car March 13. Authorities said Saqer was creating chaos at the detention center, and when security forces sought to subdue him, he resisted them and sustained various injuries in the process. He was sent to the hospital, where he later died. Human Rights Watch said there were at least two other people who have died in the custody of po- lice in Bahrain recently. United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon spoke with Bahrain’s foreign minister Wednesday about the situation. “He said he was very concerned about the violence

in which demonstrators have been killed or injured,”

a U.N. statement said. “He called for maximum re-

straint and caution.” The foreign minister, Sheikh Khalid bin Ahmed bin Mohammed Al Khalifa, recently spoke to CNN about accusations that protesters were being abused.

He said the demonstrations had quickly led the

country to “the brink” and that calling in the military had been necessary to restore stability and safety. “Our economy came to the brink of collapse,” Sheikh Khalid said. “So we had no choice but to protect the

from collapse, from total

collapse internally. And from external threats.”

interests of our country

Demonstrations : Analysis: West turns blind eye to Bahrain crackdown (Reuters) - The fate of

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : Analysis: West turns blind eye to Bahrain crackdown (Reuters) - The fate of Bahrain’s
Demonstrations : Analysis: West turns blind eye to Bahrain crackdown (Reuters) - The fate of Bahrain’s
Demonstrations : Analysis: West turns blind eye to Bahrain crackdown (Reuters) - The fate of Bahrain’s

Analysis: West turns blind eye to Bahrain crackdown

(Reuters) - The fate of Bahrain’s protest movement is a stark reminder of how Western and regional power politics can trump reformist yearnings, even in an Arab world convulsed by popular uprisings against entrenched autocrats. Bahrain is not Libya or Syria, but Western toler- ance of the Sunni monarchy’s crackdown suggests that interests such as the U.S. naval base in Ma- nama, ties to oil giant Saudi Arabia and the need to contain neighboring Iran outweigh any sympathy with pro-democracy demonstrators mostly from the Shi’ite majority. “The response from the West has been very timid and it shows the double standards in its foreign policy compared to Libya,” said Nabeel Rajab of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights. “Saudi influence is so huge on Bahrain now and the West has not stood up to it, which has disap- pointed many. They’re losing the hearts and minds of the democrats in Bahrain.” Iran has hardly been consistent either, fiercely criticizing Bahrain’s treatment of its Shi’ites, and praising Arab revolts elsewhere as “Islamic awak- enings” -- except the uprising in its lone Arab ally Syria, which it blames on a U.S.-Israeli plot. Bahrain’s king said on Sunday a state of emergen- cy, imposed in March after Saudi-led troops arrived to help crush protests, would be lifted on June 1, two weeks before it expires. That would be two days before a deadline set by Formula One organizers for Bahrain to decide whether to reschedule a Grand Prix it was to have hosted on March 13. The motor race was post- poned because of the unrest then shaking the Gulf island. Bahrain is eager to prove that stability has returned after the upheaval in which at least 29 people, all but six of them Shi’ites, have been killed since pro-

all but six of them Shi’ites, have been killed since pro- tests erupted in February. VERBAL

tests erupted in February.

VERBAL SLAPS

Apart from verbal slaps on the wrist, the United States and its allies have stood by as Bahrain, egged on by Saudi Arabia, has pursued a punitive campaign that appears to target Shi’ites in general, not just the advocates of more political freedoms, a constitutional monarchy and an end to sectarian discrimination. Some protesters had gone further, demanding the overthrow of the al-Khalifa family that has ruled Bahrain for 200 years. Bahrain, which accuses Shi’ite Iran of instigating the unrest, has detained hundreds of protesters and put dozens on trial in special courts. Others have lost their government jobs. The dragnet has swept up politicians, journalists and even medical staff. Four detainees have died in police custody. The government denies reports by rights groups of torture and abuse. Last month the main Shi’ite Wefaq opposition party reported the demolition, often by night, of at least 25 Shi’ite mosques -- described by the authorities as illegal structures. Pro-government media have depicted the protest- ers as violent traitors, driven by sectarian designs to disenfranchise Sunnis and encouraged by Iran to further its regional influence. “Bahrain has killed twice as many of its citizens as

Demonstrations : Syria has if one adjusts for population size. Yet its ambassador was welcome

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : Syria has if one adjusts for population size. Yet its ambassador was welcome at
Demonstrations : Syria has if one adjusts for population size. Yet its ambassador was welcome at
Demonstrations : Syria has if one adjusts for population size. Yet its ambassador was welcome at

Syria has if one adjusts for population size. Yet its ambassador was welcome at the Royal Wedding in Britain, and Bahrain was given a pass for repress- ing its revolution,” said Joshua Landis, a Middle East expert at Oklahoma University. “Either it is because Shi’ites are not considered as highly as Sunnis due to Western enmity with Iran and fear of the ‘Shi’ite Crescent’, as it is often called, or it is because the U.S. has a strong rela- tionship with Saudi Arabia and needs oil and mili- tary bases in the Persian Gulf,” Landis said. Western officials deny that military action against Muammar Gaddafi’s Libya versus rebukes for Bah- rain reflect hypocrisy.

LIBYA QUITE DIFFERENT

“There is a complete difference between the two circumstances,” British Foreign Office Minister Alistair Burt told Reuters last week, citing Libyan and Arab League calls for Western action to halt Gaddafi’s intent to kill his own people. “We’ll continue to make representations to Bah- rain, but in Bahrain there was a political process of dialogue between respective factions which we would encourage to be continued.” Saudi intervention, however, stymied any immedi- ate prospects of political dialogue in Bahrain, as

hardliners in the ruling al-Khalifa family silenced reformists led by the Crown Prince. Washington has offered only muted criticism of its Bahraini ally in public, although even some Shi’ite politicians acknowledge it has raised its voice in private. “There was sustained pressure from Western gov-

ernments, especially the U.S

But it was low-pro-

file, given the friendly relationships with Bahrain,” said Wefaq’s Jasim Husain. The United States, trying to balance its interests and its ideals as revolts threaten its Arab friends and foes alike, has struck a middle course on Syr-

ia, an old antagonist. It has tightened sanctions to punish President Bashar al-Assad’s use of force against demonstra- tors, but has stopped short of calling for the over- throw of a regime it sees as a vital, if unsavory, component in regional stability.

“Bahrain escaped the kind of criticism Syria got out of deference to Saudi Arabia, which has absolutely no interest in reforms in Bahrain, let alone regime change,” Murhaf Jouejati, a Middle East scholar at George Washington University, said.

“Moreover, Bahrain, an ally of both Saudi Arabia and the U.S., is home to the U.S. Fifth fleet, and Washington has every interest in the continued dominance of the pro-American and anti-Iranian Bahraini monarchy.”

For now, Bahrain may have jammed the authori- tarian lid back on, at a significant cost in national trauma, sectarian rancor and regional tension. It is hard to imagine the story is over.

Demonstrations : In Bahrain, a candlelight vigil can land you in jail By Roy Gutman

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : In Bahrain, a candlelight vigil can land you in jail By Roy Gutman |
Demonstrations : In Bahrain, a candlelight vigil can land you in jail By Roy Gutman |
Demonstrations : In Bahrain, a candlelight vigil can land you in jail By Roy Gutman |

In Bahrain, a candlelight vigil can land you in jail

By Roy Gutman | McClatchy Newspapers

SITRA, Bahrain — In the back alleys and streets of this Shiite Muslim town, a police crackdown looms at any hour of the day, but never more so than at nightfall, when even innocuous civil disobedience can lead to jail and perhaps torture.

The angry young men here know from experience that the police will use helicopters, blunderbuss rifles and tear gas to confront them, but they plot their next nighttime protest march nevertheless, in what’s become a cat-and-mouse game under Bah- rain’s state of emergency, imposed to crush what remains of the country’s protest movement.

The police, mainly Sunni Muslims recruited from Pakistan’s Baluchistan province as well as Yemen, Syria and other Muslim countries, deploy three or four vans at the entrances to this town’s residential neighborhoods. Inside are 12 to 20 men ready to pounce the first moment they hear of a demonstra- tion — even a candlelight vigil — against the gov- ernment.

They chase the protesters down the streets and alleys, firing birdshot from blunderbusses, while other protests spring up not far away. A visitor driv- ing through Sitra one recent evening saw police chasing and firing in one quarter, and young men marching and chanting in another nearby.

The chants aren’t ambiguous. “Down with the king,” a group of about 30 young men chanted as they marched about with small tea candles, refer- ring to King Hamad bin Isa al Khalifa, the head of the Khalifa dynasty.

This is what passes for normal now in Bahrain, a Sunni-ruled island nation that’s home to the head- quarters of the U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet and where most people follow the Shiite branch of Islam.

For the past two months, the country’s rulers have imposed a harsh crackdown on a protest move- ment that was among the first to spring up after Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak was pushed from that country’s presidency in February.

The crackdown has included bulldozing Shiite mosques, arresting mainstream opposition poli- ticians and closing the country’s main opposition newspaper.

The protest marches that dominated life for weeks here are gone, as is the iconic Pearl Square monu- ment, which had been the gathering point.

Still, every night in many Bahraini villages and towns, residents gather on their rooftops at 8:15 and again at 10 to issue what’s become a protest cry: “Allahu akbar,” or “God is great.” Police deploy helicopters to try to drown out this protest, and to drop tear gas canisters on the rooftops, residents say.

The Sunni government has seized control of the health care system, and that’s the police’s secret weapon for tracking down protesters, which some experts say violates international conventions that require the humane treatment of all civilians and nondiscriminatory treatment of the injured and sick.

“Today when we see a person injured with bird- shot, we have nowhere to take them,” said an ob-

Demonstrations : server from an international human rights group whose name is being withheld to

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : server from an international human rights group whose name is being withheld to avoid
Demonstrations : server from an international human rights group whose name is being withheld to avoid
Demonstrations : server from an international human rights group whose name is being withheld to avoid

server from an international human rights group whose name is being withheld to avoid retaliation. “Birdshot is being used as a distinctive marker to identify protesters. They will not receive treatment. They will be arrested.”

The U.N. Office of the High Commissioner for Hu- man Rights estimates that more than 1,000 people have been detained in the crackdown.

bin Mubarak al Khalifa, a diplomat drafted to serve as a government spokesman, told McClatchy that he hadn’t seen the report. A copy was emailed. Two days later, the same question was put at a news conference to Dr. Hala al Mehza, the acting health minister, who also said she wasn’t aware of the report and asked a reporter to send a copy. Asked by email Sunday what she thought of the report, Mehza didn’t respond.

The environment is suffused with fear. With new political trials starting weekly and masked militia- men arresting civilians without judicial process, many Bahrainis live in a state of fright. When a Mc- Clatchy correspondent attempted to visit a promi- nent human rights activist, a taxi driver refused and dumped his fare on the main road. “Do you want them to kill me?” he said of the police. “They could destroy my taxi.”

Indeed, taxi drivers and human rights advocates report that authorities have wrecked at least 60 to 70 taxis, apparent retribution for carrying protesters during the February and March demonstrations.

Mehza also said she was in almost daily touch with the U.N.’s high commissioner for human rights in Geneva and had cordial conversations with officials there. Yet on Sunday, High Commissioner Navi Pil- lay voiced deep concern about the “dire” human rights situation. She charged that Bahrain’s secret trial of protesters, which led to death sentences for four, was “illegal and absolutely unacceptable” and she spoke of reports of “severe torture” of human rights defenders currently in detention.

State media give banner headlines to government claims that are at total variance with the known facts.

The government, which dominates the airwaves of state television, the state news agency and the print media, offers little response to the internation- al criticism the crackdown has received.

A scathing report by Physicians for Human Rights,

a U.S. group that shared the 1997 Nobel Peace

Prize, accused Bahrain in a report April 22 of an “all-out assault on health care and health profes- sionals,” abductions of doctors in the middle of the night and “egregious” acts against patients and health professionals that included “torture, beating, verbal abuse, humiliation, and threats of rape and killing.”

Asked on May 1 for a comment, Sheikh Abdulaziz

On the eve of World Press Freedom Day on May 3, Prime Minister Prince Khalifa ibn Salman al Khalifa pledged that Bahrain would protect journalists and provide a working atmosphere “to work freely and confidently.” A day later, the same paper that had run that story bannered the pledge of King Hamad himself, under the headline: “Press pillar of democ- racy.”

But the regime has driven the sole opposition daily into receivership; fired, deported or arrested senior staff; and forced the editor to resign and will put him on trial next week.

Bahrain’s government began its crackdown after Saudi Arabia sent in troops to help quell protests in

Demonstrations : mid-March, but the al Khalifa dynasty has long had a policy of trying

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : mid-March, but the al Khalifa dynasty has long had a policy of trying to
Demonstrations : mid-March, but the al Khalifa dynasty has long had a policy of trying to
Demonstrations : mid-March, but the al Khalifa dynasty has long had a policy of trying to

mid-March, but the al Khalifa dynasty has long had a policy of trying to dilute the Shiites’ overwhelm- ing majority — Shiites outnumber Sunnis here by nearly four to one — by offering citizenship to Sun- nis from other nations.

In part because the Shiite birthrate is so high, the effort hasn’t turned the tide, however.

After the East German Communist regime brutally suppressed a popular uprising in June 1953, play- wright Bertolt Brecht advised the country’s govern- ment that it needed a new population. “The people have lost the government’s confidence,” he wrote. “Wouldn’t it be simpler if the government dissolved the people and chose a new one?”

The Bahraini government isn’t the first dictatorship to run afoul of its public.

and chose a new one?” The Bahraini government isn’t the first dictatorship to run afoul of
Demonstrations : ‘Hundreds held’ in Bahrain crackdown Al Jazeera: Shia Bahrainis suspected of taking part

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : ‘Hundreds held’ in Bahrain crackdown Al Jazeera: Shia Bahrainis suspected of taking part in
Demonstrations : ‘Hundreds held’ in Bahrain crackdown Al Jazeera: Shia Bahrainis suspected of taking part in
Demonstrations : ‘Hundreds held’ in Bahrain crackdown Al Jazeera: Shia Bahrainis suspected of taking part in

‘Hundreds held’ in Bahrain crackdown

Al

Jazeera: Shia Bahrainis suspected of taking part

in

anti-government protests have been arrested by

the authorities in reprisals that have also target- ed school girls and medical staff treating injured

protesters, relatives of those detained have told Al Jazeera. A woman who only identified herself as Yasmine said she feared for herself and her family. “I am hiding my identity because I might be target- ed. My children and family might be targeted and my husband inside may suffer even more,” she told

Al Jazeera.

Bahraini security forces, who are loyal to the ruling Sunni al-Khalifa family, have continued their crack- down on the Shia majority in the island kingdom, blaming them for protests that sought political re- forms.

A state of emergency has been in place since

March, but it is expected to be lifted in the first week of June. Bahrain has not changed its prime minister, in power since 1971 when the country gained inde- pendence from Britain, despite the restoration of parliamentary system in 2002. Yasmine said her husband was arrested almost two months ago when 10 masked men in civilian clothes climbed over the family’s garden walls and forced their way into their home. “They searched everywhere. They took our per- sonal belongings they took our documents even our property documents for the house,” she said. She has not seen her husband since his arrest, although she has been able to speak to him twice briefly on the phone. The first time was three days after he was detained. He phoned asking her to bring him clothes, she

said. The second time she could hear voices in the background.

The second time she could hear voices in the background. “I could hear a voice say,

“I could hear a voice say, ‘if your children start to cry or you cry I will stop the call’.” According to Human Rights Watch, Yasmine’s hus- band is one of about 1,000 people who have been arrested since the crackdown on pro-democracy protesters began in mid-March. The organisation says about 600 remain in deten- tion. The Shia community say the conspicuous silence from the US government has given authorities in Bahrain the chance to act with impunity, as the world’s media attention focuses on other pro-de- mocracy movements in the region. The US is a major ally of Bahrain, which is home to its naval base, but the authorities had to rely on Saudi Arabia, which is predominantly Sunni, to send in troops to put down the protests. US undersecretary for political affairs William J Burns and Jeffry D Feltman, assistant secretary at the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs, declined to testify on Friday at a congressional hearing looking into alleged human rights abuses in Bahrain.

Demonstrations : Also Read : How Bahrain is Oppressing its Shia Majority By : HRW

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : Also Read : How Bahrain is Oppressing its Shia Majority By : HRW URL
Demonstrations : Also Read : How Bahrain is Oppressing its Shia Majority By : HRW URL
Demonstrations : Also Read : How Bahrain is Oppressing its Shia Majority By : HRW URL

Also Read :

How Bahrain is Oppressing its Shia Majority

By : HRW URL : “http://www.hrw.org/en/news/2011/05/22/how- bahrain-oppressing-its-shia-majority

Concern Over Bahrain Human Rights

URL : “http://www.voanews.com/policy/editorials/Con-

cern-Over-Bahrain-Human-Rights-122062969.html

BAHRAIN: Report alleges torture, calls for Obama, U.S. leaders to help

By : La Times URL : “http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/

babylonbeyond/2011/05/bahrain-new-report-details-

alleged-torture-calls-on-obama-to-hep-ahead-of-thurs-

day-speech.html

Bahrain activists jailed following ‘politi- cally motivated’ trials

By : Amnesty URL : “http://www.amnesty.org/en/news-and-updates/

Bahrain must commute protesters’ death sentences

By : Amnesty

URL : “http://www.amnesty.org/en/news-

and-updates/bahrain-must-commute-

protesters%E2%80%99-death-sentences-2011-05-

23

How Radical are Bahrain’s Shia?

URL : “http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/67855/ justin-gengler/how-radical-are-bahrains-shia

Hospitals no haven for Bahrain’s wounded demonstrators

URL : “http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/2692740. html

Patrick Cockburn: Bahrain is trying to drown the protests in Shia blood

By : The independent

URL : “http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/com-

mentators/patrick-cockburn-bahrain-is-trying-to-

bahrain-activists-jailed-following-politically-motivated- drown-the-protests-in-shia-blood-2284199.html

trials-2011-05-18

News| Bahrain crackdown arrested 54 undocumented migrants; Migrant rights group appeals to Bahrain govt. to grant amnesty for undocumented migrants

URL : “http://migranteme.blogspot.com/2011/05/news-

bahrain-crackdown-arrested-54.html

How Bahrain is oppressing its Shia majority

By : The Guardian URL : “http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/

may/22/bahrain-change-view-human-rights

Bahraini State Terror Continues

URL : “http://mwcnews.net/focus/analysis/10683- bahrain-terror.html

As Crackdown Nears End, Bahrainis Struggle to Turn the Page

URL : “http://www.pbs.org/newshour/

rundown/2011/05/bahrain-dispatch.html

Obama gives Bahrain a pass on crackdown

URL : “http://www.salon.com/news/politics/war_

room/2011/05/13/bahrain_human_rights_state_de-

partment/index.html

Demonstrations : Also Read : Bahraini State Terror Continues URL : “ http://mwcnews.net/focus/analysis/10683-bah-

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : Also Read : Bahraini State Terror Continues URL : “ http://mwcnews.net/focus/analysis/10683-bah-
Demonstrations : Also Read : Bahraini State Terror Continues URL : “ http://mwcnews.net/focus/analysis/10683-bah-
Demonstrations : Also Read : Bahraini State Terror Continues URL : “ http://mwcnews.net/focus/analysis/10683-bah-

Also Read :

Bahraini State Terror Continues

URL : “http://mwcnews.net/focus/analysis/10683-bah- rain-terror.html

What’s changed in Bahrain?

URL : “http://www.socialistworker.co.uk/art.

php?id=24789

Robert Fisk: Why no outcry over these torturing tyrants?

URL : “http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commen-

Detained Bahraini activist said to show signs of abuse

URL : “http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/

tators/fisk/robert-fisk-why-no-outcry-over-these-tortur- meast/05/10/bahrain.activist.abuse/index.

ing-tyrants-2283907.html

html?hpt=T2

Activists decry U.S. silence on Bah- rain’s crackdown

URL : “http://www.kansascity.com/2011/05/13/2872645/ activists-decry-us-silence-on.html

Bahrain: From hospital to prison

URL : “http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/opinion/201

1/05/201151285040679763.html

Bahrain says Gulf troops to remain after emergency rule lifted; court sen- tences protester

URL : “http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/bahrain-

military-chief-says-gulf-reinforcements-to-remain-af-

ter-emergency-rule-lifted/2011/05/12/AFpL3owG_story.

html

Bahrain: Special court upholds 2 death sentences

URL : “http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2011/05/22/

general-ml-bahrain_8479327.html

Peter Goodspeed: Silence and fear settle over Bahrain

URL : “http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2011/05/11/ peter-goodspeed-silence-and-fear-settle-over-bahrain/

U.S.quiet as Bahrain abuses increase

URL : “http://www.tucsonsentinel.com/nationworld/

report/051011_bahrain_abuse/us-quiet-as-bahrain-

abuses-increase/

Jeremy Laurance: Doctors must speak up about this human rights scandal

URL : “http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/

health-and-families/features/jeremy-laurance-doc-

tors-must-speak-up-about-this-human-rights-scan-

dal-2281551.html

Bahraini State Terror Continues

URL : “http://mwcnews.net/focus/analysis/10683- bahrain-terror.html

Bahrain, a kingdom of ominous si- lence

URL : “http://www.dailystar.com.lb/Opinion/

Commentary/2011/May-10/Bahrain-a-kingdom-of-

ominous-silence.ashx#axzz1NJLpVlTO

Bahrain accuses activists of plots to topple state

URL : “http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110508/ap_

on_re_mi_ea/ml_bahrain_5

Demonstrations : Also Read : Bahrain Silence surrounding represion continues URL : “

Demonstrations :

Demonstrations : Also Read : Bahrain Silence surrounding represion continues URL : “
Demonstrations : Also Read : Bahrain Silence surrounding represion continues URL : “
Demonstrations : Also Read : Bahrain Silence surrounding represion continues URL : “

Also Read :

Bahrain Silence surrounding represion continues

URL : “http://www.fidh.org/Bahrain-Silence-surround- ing-repression-continues

Bahrain: Arbitrary Arrests Escalate

URL : “http://www.eurasiareview.com/bahrain-arbitrary-

arrests-escalate-04052011/

UN urges Bahrain to free detained ac- tivists

URL : “http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/20

11/05/201155155822502904.html

Bahraini Protests On Life Support

URL : “http://pubrecord.org/world/9332/bahraini-pro- tests-life-support/

Bahrain renews emergency law as re- pression persists

URL : “http://www.amnesty.org/en/news-and-updates/

Bahrain: UN official urges probe after media professionals die in detention

URL : “http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?News

ID=38162&Cr=Bahrain&Cr1

Government accuses activist of fabri- cating photo in Bahrain

URL : “http://edition.cnn.com/2011/

WORLD/meast/04/11/bahrain.activist/index.

html?iref=storysearch

Hospitals show ugly truth about Bah- rain, as US looks the other way

URL : “http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/politics/hos-

pitals-show-ugly-truth-about-bahrain-as-us-looks-

the-other-way-20110415-1dhw0.html

BAHRAIN: Fourth person dies in po- lice custody as human rights groups allege torture

URL : “http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/

bahrain-renews-emergency-law-repression-persists- babylonbeyond/2011/04/bahrain-torture-human-

2011-05-04

rights-protest-activist-dead.html

ISO takes out rally to support Bahraini people

URL : “http://nation.com.pk/pakistan-news-newspaper-

CNN arrests expose crackdown in Bahrain

URL : “http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/

daily-english-online/Regional/30-Apr-2011/ISO-takes- meast/04/11/bahrain.detain/

out-rally-to-support-Bahraini-people

Shia in Bahrain: Repression and re- gression

URL : “http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/features/20

11/04/20114301242374870.html

A man died in custody confession on television that he had killed two police- men

URL : “http://byshr.org/?p=396

Rights Activist: One in Every 1,000 Bahrainis in Detention for Political Reasons

URL : “http://www.voanews.com/english/news/

middle-east/Rights-Activist-One-in-Every-1000-Bah-

rainis-in-Detention-for-Political-Reasons-119337559.

html

SECTION 7.0
Barack Obama Speech Obama Middle East Speech is a long-standing partner, and we are committed

Barack Obama Speech

Barack Obama Speech Obama Middle East Speech is a long-standing partner, and we are committed to
Barack Obama Speech Obama Middle East Speech is a long-standing partner, and we are committed to
Barack Obama Speech Obama Middle East Speech is a long-standing partner, and we are committed to

Obama

Middle

East

Speech

Barack Obama Speech Obama Middle East Speech is a long-standing partner, and we are committed to

is a long-standing partner, and we are committed to its security. We

recognize that Iran has tried to take advantage of the turmoil there, and that the Bahraini government has a legitimate interest in the rule of law. Nevertheless, we have insisted publically and privately that mass arrests and brute force are at odds with the universal rights of Bahrain’s citizens, and will not make legitimate calls for reform go away. The only way forward is for the government and opposi- tion to engage in a dialogue, and you can’t have a real dialogue when parts of the peaceful opposition are in jail. The government must create the conditions for dia- logue, and the opposition must participate to forge a just future for all Bahrainis.( ) And for this season of change to succeed, Coptic Christians must have the right to wor- ship freely in Cairo, just as Shia must never have their mosques destroyed in Bahrain. “

“(

)Bahrain

Barack Obama Speech Alwefaq Statment: 19 may 2011 Al Wefaq expressed its welcoming to President

Barack Obama Speech

Barack Obama Speech Alwefaq Statment: 19 may 2011 Al Wefaq expressed its welcoming to President Obama’s
Barack Obama Speech Alwefaq Statment: 19 may 2011 Al Wefaq expressed its welcoming to President Obama’s
Barack Obama Speech Alwefaq Statment: 19 may 2011 Al Wefaq expressed its welcoming to President Obama’s

Alwefaq Statment: 19 may 2011

Al Wefaq expressed its welcoming to President Obama’s speech to the MENA region and consid- ered it very important and very welcomed by Wefaq and the reform movement. The committed strategy towards democratic transformation and meeting the peaceful aspirations of the people in this region he outlined is long-awaited step. We also support his call for a real and meaningful dialogue between the Bahraini authority and the opposition, and with sim- ilar importance his call for establishing the environ- ment for the dialogue in Bahrain, especially when he emphasized that “you can’t have a real dialogue when parts of the peaceful opposition are in jail”, and stopping repression of the citizens of Bahrain.

The Bahraini people will look seriously into the key measures outlined in the speech in the coming days as we approach the end of the national safety status. We are looking to real commitment from the US on these new strategies and principles of dem- ocratic transformation in the region. We will also watch carefully how US will contribute to the trans- formation process, and are hoping the President continues to speak out when he sees repression by US allies of democracy seekers in this ongoing pro- cess. Will the US change stop turning a blind eye to repression? Will the US be more assertive in telling its friends the time has come to end oppression? Will the US encourage allies in the region to respond to genuine reform calls, which meet the aspirations of all the people in real participation in their public affairs, which will bring peace and stability to the whole nation, regardless of class, religion or sect.

URL :”http://on.fb.me/kgrpz0

to the whole nation, regardless of class, religion or sect. URL :” http://on.fb.me/kgrpz0 ” Al-Wefaq Society

Al-Wefaq Society

Barack Obama Speech Statement of Amal Society about the American president’s speech By the name

Barack Obama Speech

Barack Obama Speech Statement of Amal Society about the American president’s speech By the name of
Barack Obama Speech Statement of Amal Society about the American president’s speech By the name of
Barack Obama Speech Statement of Amal Society about the American president’s speech By the name of

Statement of Amal Society about the American president’s speech

By the name of Allah, the most merciful, the most graceful.

Islamic Action Society – Amal would like to thank all international, local and regional, politi- cal and human rights parties, which are still try- ing to stop the bleeding, the flagrant violations and the daily and repeated abuse by Al-Khalifa against the freedoms and rights guaranteed by local and international systems and instruments.

Islamic Action Society emphasizes on welcom- ing the speech of the president of United States, Mr. Obama – who is elected by the free will of his people without a pressure of foreign armies, and not through huge number of foreign mercenaries, not through repression and terrorism – to install an absolute power by force- to see that president Obama’s speech came with words that expressed (minimum and much less), than what Bahraini people expected behind their peaceful revolution.

Obama has equated between the rights of our Bahraini people, the victim, to a claimed right of killer gangs that could save their power by the help of GCC armies and the power of the foreign regimes, and they destroyed a public, peaceful and civilized upraising. In his speech, Obama overbalanced the right to an authority that does not have legitimacy, against the right of our people, the source of power and authorities.

The American president’s speech as what we see, and according to the conflict elements in our is- land, does not express the political commitment to the American principals of democracy and freedom charters. And it does not express the right of our

freedom charters. And it does not express the right of our Amal Society people to defend

Amal Society

people to defend those rights and principals based on those charters that made the American upris- ing as well. The speech was a double standard speech, it reached an attempt to a detestable adapt between the values and principles which represent the rights of the people who own the legitimacy, and the narrow interests of Al-Khalifa, and there arms, which represent an aristocratic tyrannical layer, that claims the commitment to the political, and hu- man rights, which it is far away from their dictionary.

The Islamic Action Society emphasizes that ille- gitimate interests must not rule this world. And the general right in expressing the opinion, and de- fending the human rights according to lawful and justice charters, that gives that people the rights to Referendum, and elect, worth to be sacrificed for, no matter what is the person origin or character. The reactions of Al-Khalifa authorities to Obama speech and other political and human rights pres- sures, did not pass till now the traditional repeated reactions that aims to escape forward from any justice commitment to Bahraini people, who owns that sovereignty, and to the international com-

Barack Obama Speech munity… the Al-Khalifa authorities have already launched a repression and harassment campaign

Barack Obama Speech

Barack Obama Speech munity… the Al-Khalifa authorities have already launched a repression and harassment campaign
Barack Obama Speech munity… the Al-Khalifa authorities have already launched a repression and harassment campaign
Barack Obama Speech munity… the Al-Khalifa authorities have already launched a repression and harassment campaign

munity… the Al-Khalifa authorities have already launched a repression and harassment campaign against the peaceful politicians and citizens. And many victims have fallen, the detentions have been filled with arrested people with no warrants

and no fair trails, as well as Al-Khalifa have already betrayed their vows to the people about making a political openness, and launching the freedoms, and electing an establishment council delegated by people, to prepare for a referendum constitution all these are done outside the moral and political framework of Al-Khalifs, even if it was pressured by a pillar country president like Obama himself So are Al-Khalifa ready to commit to Obama speech,

in spite of its position that not in the interest of the

complete justice that reaches to return the right to our people of the peaceful democratic uprising which demand the right of deciding their political regime.

From this we emphasize the following:

We are not against dialogue as a principle and as

a civilized value to debate the political issue, but any dialogue must not be forced, and it must not be accomplished under the Saudi and Bahraini army, and the notorious national security. And it must not be out of the basic article (Sovereignty

people are the source of all pow-

is for people

ers), the people have the absolute right to choose their government freely, and they have the right to decide their fate whenever they decide to. The

people of Bahrain rise in conscious of their right.

It must be taken into consideration the use of the

huge amount of mercenaries on our island, to play with the demographic composition, and make them a pillar party to decide the political fate of

our country in the interest of Al-Khalifs; which can- not be accepted in any way, and it is considered

a violent assault against sovereignty of people,

and a crime against our country and its people. We cannot accept any compensation that equate

a terrorist mercenary and an originated citizen.

We cannot accept any dialogue while the pillars and leaders of the oppositions are behind bars, and excluded outside the country, only because of free voices they released, and because defending the justice in their country… those leaders repre-

sents the political and religious spectrums in our

country, with them people will rise to make a better future, and we cannot give them up under any dia- logue between special parties… and we especially would like to mention of this spectrum: the leaders

of the Islamic Action Society and its secretariats,

the leader of Wafa mainstream, and Haq move- ment, human rights activists, clergymen, teachers, the arrested women, university and school stu- dents, and many others of our struggler citizens. Any dialogue should be preceded by steps that gives

the justice back the oppressed and justifies the right

to its natural place. The most important steps are

giving up all parties and personal who violated the justice and human rights, and practiced violations that affects the citizens security, and their peaceful right of expressing their opinions and demand of so- cial justice, and those who practiced the murders in streets and in jails through the systematical torture, plus the ones who brought the mercenaries armies to repress the people, and who incited secretari- ally, and participated in threatening the civil peace, as well as those who excessive the public resourc- es, and civil interests, or those who committed the crime of expelling and suspending people from their jobs and studies. Either directly or indirectly. Through our experience with the regime in prac- ticing dialogue, we didn’t found any commitment

to the vows and promises even to the simplest principles of the dialogue. That is due to their un- faith with the dialogue and the backward tribal minds. So it is the right of people to decide their fate in a scientific dialogistic justice frame. From this, we don’t find any value to any dialogue with-

Barack Obama Speech out the monitoring a credible of UN or civil or in- ternational

Barack Obama Speech

Barack Obama Speech out the monitoring a credible of UN or civil or in- ternational political
Barack Obama Speech out the monitoring a credible of UN or civil or in- ternational political
Barack Obama Speech out the monitoring a credible of UN or civil or in- ternational political

out the monitoring a credible of UN or civil or in- ternational political organization, which is ac- cepted by the people and opposition of Bahrain. Allowing the free people of Bahrain and without any pressure to express their opinion toward the dialogue through free and independent confer- ences and meetings between the institutions of civil society. Bahraini people has filled the streets with a number that exceeds the 600 thousand demonstrator for three consecutive times along the street of 14Feb revolution that end to the freedom roundabout, that was when they had the opportu- nity to express their opinion and aspirations with absolute freedom. Hence, this people deserve to be re-given the right for the peaceful expression of any coming step to negotiation or dialogue. The institutions that regime calls it a (constitution- al), and calls to dialogue through it, are an integral part of the conflict cause, and it is basically a result of the repressive corrupt political reality which dis- puted with it on the power, and they are institutions that reflect no one but the power’s will only, and can- not express the people’s will who filled the streets to express their ambition beyond those formal and fake manifestations of sectarian and corrupt. Stop the campaigns of atonement and intellec- tual terrorism that are led by the regime through alliances with sectarian and terrorist parties that assault the cultural aspects of the main sect in Bahrain, and subjecting the leaders of these atonement campaigns to fair and public trials in order to be punished to what they have done.

Finally, the people of Bahrain are not the lowest level in terms of right comparing with the other free nations who looked forward to end the des- potism and discrimination and incitement to ha- tred. Also, their rights and humanitarian are not less than the ones of any other people in this

world including the American free people

of Bahrain are an advanced people, who have

people

their cultural and humanitarian accomplishments that are recorded thousands years ago and in- stalled in the history books in terms contrary to the culture and history of the tribal Khalifa gang.

Islamic Action Society – Amal Manama – Bahrain Beirut Office 20 May, 2011 URL :” http://on.fb.me/lyn4jH

Also Read :

Bahrain Responds to Obama Speech by Continuing Crackdown

By : human rights first

URL : “http://www.humanrightsfirst.org/2011/05/23/

bahrain-responds-to-obama-speech-by-continuing-

crackdown/

Why Bahrain Should to Be Front And Center in Obama’s Middle East Speech

By : Mark Leon Goldberg URL : “http://www.undispatch.com/why-bahrain-should- to-be-front-and-center-in-obamas-middle-east-speech

SECTION 8.0
The Trial : BAHRAIN URGED TO HALT EXECUTION OF PROTESTERS Authorities in Bahrain must not

The

Trial

:

The Trial : BAHRAIN URGED TO HALT EXECUTION OF PROTESTERS Authorities in Bahrain must not allow
The Trial : BAHRAIN URGED TO HALT EXECUTION OF PROTESTERS Authorities in Bahrain must not allow
The Trial : BAHRAIN URGED TO HALT EXECUTION OF PROTESTERS Authorities in Bahrain must not allow

BAHRAIN URGED TO HALT EXECUTION OF PROTESTERS

Authorities in Bahrain must not allow the execution of four protesters sentenced to death by a military court over the killing of two police officers in anti- government demonstrations last month, Amnesty International said today.

“The Bahraini authorities have a responsibility to bring to justice those who commit violent crimes. But when doing so, they must uphold the right to fair trial and they must not use the death penalty under any circumstances,” said Malcolm Smart, Amnesty International’s Director for the Middle East and North Africa.

“In this case, the accused were tried before a spe- cial military court, although they are civilians. It also appears that the trial was conducted behind closed doors. As well, those sentenced have no right of appeal except to another special military court, raising great fears about the fairness of the entire process.”

The court sentenced Ali Abdullah Hassan al-Sank- is, Qassim Hassan Matar, Saeed Abduljalil Saeed and Adbulaziz Abdulridha Ibrahim Hussain to death on 28 April.

Three other defendants tried with them, Issa Ab- dullah Kadhim Ali, Sadeq Ali Mahdi and Hussein Jaafar Abdulkarim, were sentenced to life in prison by the same court. All seven accused are reported to have denied the charges.

The death sentences can be appealed in Bahrain’s military court. However, should the appeal fail, the

military court. However, should the appeal fail, the Amnesty International final verdict cannot be appealed in

Amnesty International

final verdict cannot be appealed in Bahrain’s or- dinary courts. The four men could therefore face imminent execution.

The seven men were accused of the premeditated murder of two policemen by running them over with a vehicle on 16 March. On 15 March, Bah- rain’s King had declared a state of emergency – termed the State of National Safety (SNS) – after Saudi Arabia sent in a thousand troops to help the government quell anti-government protests.

The seven accused are believed to have been held incommunicado following their arrests and the families are said to have been denied access to them, Amnesty International has learnt.

Government officials reportedly said that a total of four policemen have been killed during protests in March.

King Hamad bin ‘Issa Al Khalifa imposed the state of emergency for three months but it may be re- newed with the approval of the National Council or parliament. It provided for the establishment of a special military court to try those accused of of- fences under the emergency and a special military appeal court.

The Trial : Since the SNS was imposed, more than 500 peo- ple have been

The

Trial

:

The Trial : Since the SNS was imposed, more than 500 peo- ple have been arrested
The Trial : Since the SNS was imposed, more than 500 peo- ple have been arrested
The Trial : Since the SNS was imposed, more than 500 peo- ple have been arrested

Since the SNS was imposed, more than 500 peo- ple have been arrested with many of them detained incommunicado and at undisclosed locations. At least four have died in detention in suspicious cir- cumstances since the end of March.

Local media reports say 312 detainees were re- leased today. The government’s Information Af- fairs Authority has told the media that more than 400 other cases have been referred to the military courts.

Many of the detainees were taken from their homes, often at night, by groups of police and security forc- es who wore masks, failed to produce arrest war- rants and sometimes assaulted those they wished to detain and members of their families.

“Bahrain is in the grip of a deepening human rights crisis and the severity of the sentences imposed today, following a military trial behind closed doors, will do nothing to reverse that,” said Malcolm Smart.

“King Hamad bin Issa Al Khalifa must urgently make it clear that he will not allow these death sentences to be carried out,” he added.

In 2010, two Bangladeshi national were sentenced to death in Bahrain. Jassim Abdulmanan was ex- ecuted in June and Russell Mezan was sentenced to death in March. His death sentence was upheld in October. Only foreign nationals have been sen- tenced to death and executed in Bahrain in recent years. Executions carried out in Bahrain are normally by firing squad.

The Trial : Why Bahrain is Trying Civilians Before a Military Court The seven men

The

Trial

:

The Trial : Why Bahrain is Trying Civilians Before a Military Court The seven men who
The Trial : Why Bahrain is Trying Civilians Before a Military Court The seven men who
The Trial : Why Bahrain is Trying Civilians Before a Military Court The seven men who

Why Bahrain is Trying Civilians Before a Military Court

The seven men who went on trial in Bahrain on Thursday have made history as the country’s first- ever civilians to be tried before a military court. Fac- ing the death penalty, they’ve been sequestered in an unknown location for weeks and accused of murdering two policemen by running them over with a car. They’ve had no communication with family or friends since being taken into custody last month. Human rights activists fear they have been subjected to torture. More worrisome, they have been denied access to legal counsel and face tri- al proceedings sealed to the public. The Bahrain News Agency said the seven men have pleaded not guilty to all charges against them. It is the first trial to be publicly announced since the country fell under martial law on March 15, when the Sunni regime (and U.S. ally) began a severe crackdown on the opposition, a campaign that has seen about 500 mostly Shi’a anti-government sup- porters arrested and held incommunicado. “Put- ting civilians to military court is a surprise,” says Nabeel Rajab, head of the Bahrain Center for Hu- man Rights. “The government has taken it too far.” Rights advocates fear that a conviction in this case may start a wave of death penalties for activists in the island Kingdom, which has rarely imposed such a sentence. The last time Bahrain handed out a death penalty was two years ago. (And ac- cording to state media, the military court in Bahrain convicted four Shi’ite protesters and sentenced them to death for the killing of two policemen dur- ing anti-government demonstrations last month in the Gulf kingdom. The three other Shi’ite activists, who were also on trial, were sentenced to life in prison for their role in the policemen’s deaths.)

life in prison for their role in the policemen’s deaths.) Tents are seen engulfed with fire

Tents are seen engulfed with fire as Gulf Cooperation

Council (GCC) forces move into Pearl Square to evacu- ate anti-government protesters, in Manama March 16,

2011.

(See TIME’s exclusive photos of the crackdown in Bahrain.) Under martial law, almost all civil liberties have been curtailed — as well as judicial recourse. The April 15 arrest of prominent defense attorney Mo- hammed al-Tajer sent a chill through the opposi- tion: he is now incarcerated alongside many of his clients. “We have this legal black hole where no one knows what their rights are, what their access is, and they’re really at the mercy of the regime,” says Shadi Hamid, director of research at Brook- ings Doha Institute. “Essentially, legal protection is suspended — this is a part of martial law. Almost anything can be justified under the pretense of ‘na- tional security.’ So all bets are off, and it should be very worrying to the opposition.” Bahrain’s military prosecutor said the seven men

The Trial : are being tried under a 2006 anti-terrorism law which mandates the death

The

Trial

:

The Trial : are being tried under a 2006 anti-terrorism law which mandates the death penalty.
The Trial : are being tried under a 2006 anti-terrorism law which mandates the death penalty.
The Trial : are being tried under a 2006 anti-terrorism law which mandates the death penalty.

are being tried under a 2006 anti-terrorism law which mandates the death penalty. The statue has long been criticized by international rights groups as being vague, providing a too-broad definition of what qualifies as terrorism (as in its reference to “threats to national unity”). “Anything interfering with the government’s sway can be labeled ‘terror- ism,’” says Joe Stork, deputy director the Middle East and North Africa at Human Rights Watch. “So the risk of a capital sentence is very great.” (See pictures of government troops routing protest- ers from Pearl Square.) Though little is known about how country’s military courts operate, proceedings will likely mirror those of Bahrain’s state security court, where human rights activists say government-forced confessions were often the sole basis for conviction. That court, which was allowed to detain prisoners without trial for a period of three years, was abolished by the king in 2001 as a gesture of political reform. “What we’re seeing is unprecedented in recent Bahrain history, and that’s what makes it so frightening,” says Hamid. “The regime has given up all pretense of wanting any kind of reform.”

The Trial : Bahrain sentences two protesters to death, but frees newspaper columnist DUBAI, United

The

Trial

:

The Trial : Bahrain sentences two protesters to death, but frees newspaper columnist DUBAI, United Arab
The Trial : Bahrain sentences two protesters to death, but frees newspaper columnist DUBAI, United Arab
The Trial : Bahrain sentences two protesters to death, but frees newspaper columnist DUBAI, United Arab

Bahrain sentences two protesters to death, but frees newspaper columnist

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — A special military tribunal in Bahrain Sunday upheld death sentenc- es against two Shiites for the alleged murder of two policemen at the start of the government’s harsh crackdown in March, touching off demonstrations in at least 10 Shiite villages on the small Gulf is- land.

It was the latest rebuff to President Barack Obama’s call Thursday for the ruling Sunni government to end the use of brute force and mass arrests of its political critics, and came one day after a tear gas attack on the home of Nabeel Rajab, the most out- spoken independent human rights advocate.

At the same time, in a conciliatory gesture, the gov- ernment Sunday released a 26-year-old columnist and blogger for the now-suppressed Al Wasat dai- ly. Haider Mohamed al Noaimi, subject of a Mc- Clatchy article two weeks ago, was released after about a month in jail.

“I cannot believe I am free,” he told McClatchy Sunday night by telephone from Bahrain, adding, “I wish everybody else was.”

Noaimi, who’s 26, was widely known as a voice of moderation in the standoff between the Sunni- led minority government, which invited in troops from Sunni-ruled Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, and the majority Shiite population. True to his reputation, his first words to the outside world were conciliatory.

“The biggest challenge for Bahrain is to go back

to the way it was,” he said., “when we were all to- gether, and when there were no problems between Sunnis and Shiites.” His wife Sajeda said Noaimi had lost a lot of weight in prison, and returned with long hair and a beard.

She noted marks on his hands indicating he had been beaten but said he was in high spirits.

The secret trial for the mid-March deaths of two policemen has been widely criticized for the ap- parent lack of due process. The defendants were accused of driving vehicles into two policemen and then mutilating the bodies by driving over them again and again.

A video purporting to show the killing was played on state-controlled television while the trial was still under way, and was used as prime evidence during the proceedings against the defendants, Rajab said.

One of those accused died in detention, although his confession, likely to have been obtained un- der extreme coercion, was included in the official televised “documentary” on the case. But the de- meanor of every defendant shown confessing on the program raised questions about whether any- thing they said was not under duress.

The trial moved at breakneck speed, with the pro- ceedings opening April 17 and sentences issued April 28 -- death for four Shiites and life imprison- ment for three others. On Sunday, the court com- muted the death sentences against Qasim Has-

The Trial : san Mattar Ahmed and Saeed Abdul Jalil Saeed to life imprisonment. The

The

Trial

:

The Trial : san Mattar Ahmed and Saeed Abdul Jalil Saeed to life imprisonment. The chief
The Trial : san Mattar Ahmed and Saeed Abdul Jalil Saeed to life imprisonment. The chief
The Trial : san Mattar Ahmed and Saeed Abdul Jalil Saeed to life imprisonment. The chief

san Mattar Ahmed and Saeed Abdul Jalil Saeed to life imprisonment.

The chief lawyer for the defendants, Mohammed al Tajir, was arrested the day before the trial began, and other lawyers couldn’t meet their clients until the trial opened, giving them no time to prepare a defense, Bahraini human rights observers said.

Adding to the challenges for anyone trying to recon- struct the proceedings, the lawyers were warned not to talk to outsiders about the process, accord- ing to Rajab. Neither of two lawyers who took part in the proceedings would respond to requests from McClatchy Sunday for information on what hap- pened in the trials.

One reason that demonstrations broke out Sunday -- and young men in the Shiite villages have been staging marches regularly for more than a month -- was a widespread belief that at least one of those sentenced to death was nowhere near the scene when the killing was said to have occurred, and was in no position to drive a vehicle.

Ali Abdullah Hasan al-Singace, who was sentenced to death by firing squad along with Abdul Aziz Ab- dullah Ibrahim Hussein, was very overweight and had one leg completely in a cast at the time, ac- cording to hospital records cited by several mem- bers of the opposition.

International human rights groups have pleaded with Bahrain’s U.S.-allied government not to pro- ceed with the executions, but now the only hope of the defendants appears to be a decision by King Hamad bin Issa al-Khalifa to commute the sen- tences.

Also Read :

U.S. condemns arrest of opposition fig- ures in Bahrain

By : CNN URL : “http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/

meast/03/18/bahrain.protests/?hpt=T2

Buzek on the sentencing to death of Bahrainis

By : European Parliament

URL : “http://www.europarl.europa.eu/president/view/

fr-en/press/press_release/2011/2011-April/press_re-

lease-2011-April-19.html;jsessionid=B01EE649CC95E

54C90D212477C16AC3D

Inconsistencies in Televised Confes- sion of Bahraini Protesters Who Were Sentenced to Death

By : New York magazine URL : “http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2011/04/bahrains_ sentences_four_protes.html

Update: Two protesters sentenced to death and five given life imprisonment

By : Bahrain Center for Human Rights URL : “http://bahrainrights.hopto.org/en/node/3983

Bahrain repeals emergency law while putting opposition on trial

By : The Independent URL : “http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/mid-

dle-east/bahrain-repeals-emergency-law-while-putting-

opposition-on-trial-2281171.html

Fair trial urged for Bahraini opposition activists

By : Amnesty URL : “http://www.amnesty.org/en/news-and-updates/

fair-trial-urged-bahraini-opposition-activists-2011-05-

11

SECTION 9.0
Members of Parliament The Story of The Kidnapped Bahraini MP Matar Matar Mr. Mattar’s profile:
Members of Parliament The Story of The Kidnapped Bahraini MP Matar Matar Mr. Mattar’s profile:

Members of Parliament

Members of Parliament The Story of The Kidnapped Bahraini MP Matar Matar Mr. Mattar’s profile: Mattar
Members of Parliament The Story of The Kidnapped Bahraini MP Matar Matar Mr. Mattar’s profile: Mattar
Members of Parliament The Story of The Kidnapped Bahraini MP Matar Matar Mr. Mattar’s profile: Mattar

The Story of The Kidnapped Bahraini MP Matar Matar

Mr. Mattar’s profile:

Mattar Ebrahim Mattar, 35-year old, was the young- est MP in Bahrain’s Parliament for Al Wefaq Po- litical Society, the largest political bloc in Bahrain. He represented the largest constituency in Bahrain and was voted to parliament with a majority vote of 85.72% (7689 votes). Al Wefaq parliamentary bloc, including Mr. Mattar, resigned from parliament in protest of the government crackdown on pro-de- mocracy protesters on Feb 17th. Mattar holds a Masters degree in Computer Science specializing in Artificial Intelligence. He is married and a father of two young children. Please refer to Appendix A for more background information on Mr. Mattar.

Kidnapping story:

On Sunday May 1st, 2011 at around 11:30 PM, Mr. Mattar received a call from an anonymous man tell- ing him that there was an envelop for him and ask- ing him to collect it. Mr. Mattar told asked the man to deliver it to Alwefaq Society, but the man refused.

On Monday May 2nd, 2011 at around 7:30 PM Mr. Mattar received a call from an anonymous lady tell- ing him that she had an envelop for him and asking him to collect it. Mr. Mattar asked her to deliver it to Alwefaq Society, but she insisted that she was too scared to go there, so he agreed to meet her near Alhelli Supermarket in Aldaih Village where he lives. He went there with his wife at around 8.20 pm, where his wife then approached the lady and asked her to follow them by car to Mr. Mattar’s house where she should put the envelop in the mail box. Mr. Matar did not want to receive the envelop by hand be- cause he did not know what it might contain. But the lady insisted to talk to him in person, so he stepped down the car and went to her and convinced her to follow his car and to put the envelop in the mail box.

to follow his car and to put the envelop in the mail box. Matar Matart When

Matar Matart

When he started to drive and moved in front of the lady’s car he looked back through the mirror and saw masked men near the lady’s car. They were in civilian clothes and wearing black masks. At first he thought that the men had come for the lady, but soon found that they were in fact after him. So he speeded up and tried to drop his wife at a safe place, but they chased him, and after a dangerous chase in the streets they cornered him, took him out of his car and put him into their car at gun point.

Why Mattar’s Safety & Life is at a Great Risk? On Thursday April 28th 2011, Bahrain TV aired “confessions” of the protestors accused of run- ning over two police men by car. One of the pro- testors Ali Isa Saqer– one of four who died in custody – mentioned in his “confession” that:

“We were in the Pearl Roundabout, on 16th March, and Mattar Mattar and Hassan Moshaimea had come to us and told us to block the riot police to prevent them from getting through and, if the po- lice did get through, to run over them with our cars and leave them behind. Hence, when I eventually reached my car and saw policemen in front of me, I thought of their words and ran over the policemen”! It is worth noting that Mr. Mattar was not at the roundabout on that day altogether and that he

Members of Parliament and Al Wefaq are known for their moderate views and utter rejection
Members of Parliament and Al Wefaq are known for their moderate views and utter rejection

Members of Parliament

Members of Parliament and Al Wefaq are known for their moderate views and utter rejection to
Members of Parliament and Al Wefaq are known for their moderate views and utter rejection to
Members of Parliament and Al Wefaq are known for their moderate views and utter rejection to

and Al Wefaq are known for their moderate views and utter rejection to using violence means from all sides. It is also worth noting that Has- san Moshaimea heads an outlawed opposition bloc that has a bitter relationship with Al Wefaq.

Ever since this “confession” was aired on local TV,

Mattar knew that he was now a target for arrest, kid- nappingorevenassassination,asthisistheusualfate

of those accused in such “confessions” aired on TV.

A day prior to the day of kidnapping, i.e. on May

1st 2011, Mr. Mattar had a meeting with a US Embassy officials in Bahrain based on the of- ficial’s request. The official told Mattar that they wanted to meet with him because they were wor- ried about him after the TV-aired “confessions”.

In the meeting, Mr. Mattar expressed his seri- ous concerns about his own safety in the com- ing period, and that he was under threat of being kidnapped, arrested or even assassi- nated, hoping that his message would be con- veyed to the concerned US officials in Bahrain.

Held Incommunicado and in Great Danger

Since Monday May 2nd 2011, we heard absolutely

no news about Mattar or his whereabouts. Mattar’s wife and family are fearing the worst may happen

to him. In the past few weeks, four prisoners died in

custody with clear marks of torture on their bodies. Another group of four prisoners were sentenced to death by a military court, and three others sen- tenced to life imprisonment, and hundreds held in- communicado with strong evidence indicating they are undergoing extreme forms of torture. Due to the dangerous nature of the accusation publically aired against Mattar, his family is specially and ter- ribly worried about his life and safety, while insist- ing that those accusations are completely false.

Al Wefaq Society has made it clear that Mr. Mat- tar’s kidnapping and detention, and the false ac-

cusation made against him, are in fact a punish- ment for Mr. Mattar’s prodemocracy peaceful activities and his work with international human rights organizations and international media in defense of basic human rights for all Bahrainis. Al Wefaq further insists that those activities are part of Mr. Mattar’s responsibilities towards the people who elected him and that those activities are in full accordance with Bahrain’s constitution.

Also Read :

Bahrain: ongoing secret detention of former MPs, Mattar Mattar and Jawad Fairuz

By : Alkarama website

URL : “http://en.alkarama.org/index.php?option=com_c

ontent&view=article&id=738%3Abahrain-ongoing-se-

cret-detention-of-former-mps-mattar-mattar-and-jawad-

fairuz-&catid=19%3Acommuniqu&Itemid=84

Bahrain detains two Shiite former par- liament

By : Mohamed Abd el Fattah URL : “http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-

news/8956202-bahrain-detains-two-shiite-former-

parliament

Members of Parliament Al-Wefaq expresses its concern over the fate of two Members of Parliamen
Members of Parliament Al-Wefaq expresses its concern over the fate of two Members of Parliamen

Members of Parliament

Members of Parliament Al-Wefaq expresses its concern over the fate of two Members of Parliamen After
Members of Parliament Al-Wefaq expresses its concern over the fate of two Members of Parliamen After
Members of Parliament Al-Wefaq expresses its concern over the fate of two Members of Parliamen After

Al-Wefaq expresses its concern over the fate of two Members of Parliamen

After being arrested by masked men in Bahrain

concern

Urgent:

Al-Wefaq

expresses

its

of Parliament

Al-Wefaq National Islamic Society wishes to ex- press its concern over the fate of two of its resign- ing legislators, who were arrested in the evening hours on Monday 2 May 2011. At the time of re- lease of this statement, no information was avail- able with regards to their whereabouts let alone reasons and circumstances causing their arrest.

In short, security forces through masked civil- ian men, arrested head of Public Utilities and Environment Committee, the resigned Mem- ber of Parliament of Bahrain Jawad Fairuz Ghu- loom (aged 48). He was arrested in front of his house in Hamad Town, south of Manama.

Jawad was elected as Member of Parliament of Bahrain for the period 2010-2014 but offered his resignation in protest of ways the authorities ad- dressed political problem engulfing the kingdom. Additionally, he was elected as MP for the inter- val 2006-2010. Also, he served as Vic Presi- dent of the Northern Municipal Council for the period of 2002-2006. Still, Jawad is an on-going member of the general secretariat of Al-Wefaq.

On the same date, the authorities arrested Mattar Ebrahim Mattar (aged 35) after being chased in a public street by a group of civilian masked men. Mattar was elected as Member of Parliament of Bahrain for the period 2010-2014, though he of- fered his resignation in protest of governmental security crackdown on public protests. Previ- ously, he served as a superintendent within La- bour Market Regulatory Authority (LMRA) and an academic at Kuwait University. Mattar pos-

over

the

fate

of

two

Members

Kuwait University. Mattar pos- over the fate of two Members Matar Matart and Jawad Fairuz sesses

Matar Matart and Jawad Fairuz sesses a Master’s degree in computer science.

Al-Wefaq stresses that Jawad and Mattar worked the parameters of the society regarding calls for a comprehensive and transparent reforms package via peaceful measures in a civilized manner. The society contends that the two resigning MPs were arrested for expressing their views for change.

Whilst calling for their immediate release, Al-We- faq holds the authorities responsible for the safety and well-being of Jawad and Mattar. Finally, Al- Wefaq calls on parliaments and councils of repre- sentatives as well as human rights organizations all over the world to press the authorities in Bah- rain for the release of Jawad Fairuz Ghuloom and Mattar Ebrahim Mattar and all other detainees.

Al-Wefaq National Islamic Society Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain 3 May 2011

URL : ” http://www.aminshahidi.com/en/Global-News/latest-

news/394-Al-Wefaq-expresses-its-concern-over-the-fate-of-

two-Members-of-Parliamen.html

SECTION 10.0
Medics : Am n est y :Med i ca l Pr ofess ion als Are

Medics

:

Medics : Am n est y :Med i ca l Pr ofess ion als Are Aga
Medics : Am n est y :Med i ca l Pr ofess ion als Are Aga
Medics : Am n est y :Med i ca l Pr ofess ion als Are Aga

Am n est y :Med i ca l

Pr ofess ion als Are Aga i n T a rg e te d w i t h

Ar r es t

of

P re s i d ent

of

B a h ra i n

Medical Society and Charges Against 47 Others For Treating Inju red Protesters

As Bahraini Parliament Renews Repressive ‘State of Emergency,’ Crackdown Continues, Fueling Hu- man Rights Crisis, Says Amnesty International Medical Professionals Are Again Targeted with Ar- rest of President of Bahrain Medical Society and Charges Against 47 Others For Treating Injured Protesters (New York) -- The Bahraini government must end its relentless crackdown on human rights, Amnesty International said today after the country’s parlia- ment voted to extend a repressive state of emer- gency amid continued arrests of dissidents. “The Bahraini authorities must stop detaining any- one who opposes them and release protesters who have been locked up for peacefully demanding re- form,” said Philip Luther, Amnesty International’s deputy director for the Middle East and North Af- rica. “Even since the protests on the streets were vio- lently crushed in mid-March the government’s per- secution of dissidents has not abated, while the re- newal of the so-called ‘State of National Safety’ will only exacerbate this human rights crisis.” Bahraini media reported that members of parlia- ment voted overwhelmingly on Tuesday to extend the “State of National Safety” for another three months, even though it is not due to expire for an- other six weeks. Under emergency law, protesters and political ac- tivists have been arrested, without warrants, held incommunicado and tried before military courts. On Monday, two members of Parliament from al- Wefaq, the largest Shi’a political party, were de- tained. Jalal Fairuz, 48, and Matar Ibrahim Matar, 35, were arrested by armed men wearing civilian clothes and their whereabouts are unknown. Both have been

clothes and their whereabouts are unknown. Both have been Amnesty International critical of the government and

Amnesty International

critical of the government and have given media in- terviews to international media outlets. All 18 al-Wefaq members of Parliament had re- signed in February to protest the government’s crackdown on protests, including the deaths of demonstrators and others as a result of excessive use of force. Only 11 resignations were accepted, including those of the two men arrested. Medical professionals continue to be targeted for arrest, with Dr. Ahmed Jamal, President of Bahrain Medical Society, arrested at his clinic on Monday. Around 47 other doctors and nurses, some detained for weeks, are facing trial in a military court after they were charged Tuesday for their role in treating anti-government protesters. The overwhelming majority of those detained since March 2011 are Shi’a Muslims who were active during the protests, most of whose whereabouts re- main unknown. Some detainees have been tortured or otherwise ill-treated following arrest and at least four people have died in suspicious circumstances. The dismissal of government employees who were known to have participated in protests continues unabated. There have also been reports of several Shi’a mosques being destroyed by the security forces, al- legedly because they did not have building permits.

Medics : This has increased suspicions that the majority Shi’a population of Bahrain is being

Medics

:

Medics : This has increased suspicions that the majority Shi’a population of Bahrain is being punished
Medics : This has increased suspicions that the majority Shi’a population of Bahrain is being punished
Medics : This has increased suspicions that the majority Shi’a population of Bahrain is being punished

This has increased suspicions that the majority Shi’a population of Bahrain is being punished for the February-March protests, which called for re- forms and, in some cases, regime change. Amnesty International is a Nobel Peace Prize-win- ning grassroots activist organization with 3 million supporters, activists and volunteers in more than 150 countries campaigning for human rights world- wide. The organization investigates and exposes abuses, educates and mobilizes the public, and works to protect people wherever justice, freedom, truth and dignity are denied.

URL : “ http://www.amnestyusa.org/news/press-re-

leases/medical-professionals-are-again-targeted-

with-arrest-of-president-of-bahrain-medical-soci-

ety-and-cha

Medics : The Guardian :Bahrain’s medics are the targets of retribution At about 11pm on

Medics

:

Medics : The Guardian :Bahrain’s medics are the targets of retribution At about 11pm on 2
Medics : The Guardian :Bahrain’s medics are the targets of retribution At about 11pm on 2
Medics : The Guardian :Bahrain’s medics are the targets of retribution At about 11pm on 2

The Guardian :Bahrain’s medics are the targets of retribution

At about 11pm on 2 May, Bahrain’s criminal investi- gations directorate summoned Dr Nedhal al-Khali- fa, a 42-year-old dermatologist. Her father dropped her off at their headquarters at the ministry of in- terior at about midnight. Her family, including her four young children, didn’t hear anything from her until she was released two days later. Her hus- band, Dr Sadiq Abdulla, a vascular surgeon, also 42, was detained in the same fashion on 14 April. His whereabouts and condition remains unknown, as does the reason for his detention.

These two doctors are among hundreds of Bah- rainis detained without official explanation since mid-March, including scores of other doctors, nurs- es and medics. In almost all cases, the authorities have provided no information about their where- abouts or wellbeing. During this same period, at least four people have died in detention from abuse or medical neglect and the authorities are starting to televise “confessions” that might have been co- erced. Except for a handful who saw a lawyer for the first time during their special military court trial, none of those detained have had access to law- yers or family members.

The arrests of so many medical professionals are part of a government policy of retribution against Bahrainis who supported pro-democracy protests. Some medics criticised assaults by security per- sonnel on protesters at the Pearl roundabout in mid-February and again in mid-March that left more than a dozen dead, as well as several security of- ficers, and many wounded. In the unfolding official narrative of events, the largely peaceful protests that brought hundreds of thousands of Bahrainis to the streets to demand democratic reforms were in

to the streets to demand democratic reforms were in Bahraine medics march outside a hospital in

Bahraine medics march outside a hospital in protest after po- lice stormed a makeshift protest camp in Pearl Square on 17 February 2011. Photograph: John Moore/Getty

fact part of a “coup attempt”, in the words of prime minister Khalifa bin Salman al-Khalifa. “No violators will get away with it,” he added. “All co-conspirators and abettors must be held accountable.”

Medical personnel have been targets of repres- sion from the outset. Security forces attacked a medical tent at the roundabout on the night of 17 February, assaulting and arresting doctors. Medics subsequently alleged that security officials ordered ambulances not to respond to calls from wounded protesters. When authorities violently dispersed the roundabout protesters on 16 March, security forc- es, armed and in many cases masked, had taken over the main hospital. There, and in other medi- cal facilities, people whose wounds suggested they had been protesters were beaten, and many were arrested. Portions of the hospital became detention sites.

Authorities said that 47 doctors and medics will

Medics : soon face prosecution, apparently in a special mili- tary court, for alleged acts

Medics

:

Medics : soon face prosecution, apparently in a special mili- tary court, for alleged acts that
Medics : soon face prosecution, apparently in a special mili- tary court, for alleged acts that
Medics : soon face prosecution, apparently in a special mili- tary court, for alleged acts that

soon face prosecution, apparently in a special mili- tary court, for alleged acts that include claims of bringing weapons into the hospital, stealing blood so that protesters could feign serious injury, ap- plying medications to simulate symptoms of nerve gas, refusing to treat injured or ill people who were not Shia and generally “serving the agenda of the protesters”. They said 150 others are under inves- tigation and suspended from their positions. Au- thorities said they will “reveal details” at a news conference on Sunday.

Human Rights Watch has written to Bahraini au- thorities requesting information to verify the crimi- nal allegations – some serious and some far- fetched – but so far has received no response. Our researchers had regular and relatively unrestricted access to the main hospital between 17 Febru- ary and 16 March. We saw protesters’ tents in the parking lot outside the emergency wing, staffed by people who provided information to journalists and others reflecting protester views. Between 10 March and 16 March, rallies took place there fea- turing speeches by leading opposition figures. But at no point did we see or otherwise learn about any activities corresponding to the more serious government allegations.

In a public letter dated 26 April, seven leading national and international associations of medi- cal professionals, including the American Medical Association and the American College of Emer- gency Physicians, called on Bahrain’s leaders to cease all attacks on health facilities, medical pro-

URL:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/

may/05/bahrain-medics-arrest-retribution

Also Read :

Bahrain medics claim confession under torture

By : aljazeera URL : “http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/20

11/05/2011512111835943173.html

Bahrain to Put Medical Staff on Trial

By : The wall street journal URL : “http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142405274

8704740604576301283984376762.html

Doctors Detained in Bahrain Face Ac- cusations of Medical Abuses

By : TALEA MILLER - pbs newshour URL : “http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2011/05/

detained-doctors-in-bahrain-face-accusations-of-medi-

cal-abuses.html

College urged to help free medics in Bahrain

By : Irish Times URL : “http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/

ireland/2011/0516/1224297038495.html

Attacks on physicians in Bahrain

By :Japan Times URL : “http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/

eo20110429cc.html

Bahrain: Masoud Jahromi, a professor wrongly Imprisoned

By : IHRC URL : “http://bikyamasr.com/wordpress/?p=32912

Medics : HRW : Bahrain’s Medics are the Targets of Retribution At about 11pm on

Medics

: