Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 4

Lopez, Jielyn Cerlette A.

BSN 2B

Submitted to: Mrs. Princess Izon

Bioethics
1. What is ethics? Ethics is the science of morality or the systematic study of moral rules and principles. - Answers.Com Ethics is the rules of conduct recognized in respect to a particular class of human actions or a particular group, culture Dictionary.Com

Ethics, for me, is a well based standard of right and wrong that prescribe what people have to do, when it comes to rights, freedom, judgment, obligations, equality etc. It is the standards that impose reasonable obligations for human being to refrain from doing something immoral, like rape, fraud, stealing, murder and many others. Ethics may also refer to the study of ones ethical standards, and examine whether they are reasonable and well-founded. 2. What is moral? Moral are rules or habits of conduct, especially of sexual conduct, with reference to standards of right and wrong - Answers.Com Moral is an ideal code of conduct, one which would be espoused in preference to alternatives by all rational people, under specified conditions - Wikipedia.Org Moral is a certain code of conduct on which people must live their lives in accordance to choosing what is right or wrong.
3.

Legal Divisions of Ethics Meta-ethics is the investigation of the nature of ethical statements. It studies the nature of ethical sentences and attitudes. It includes the question as what good and right means; whether and how we know what is right and good, whether moral values are objective, and how ethical attitudes motivate us. Meta-ethics is one of the most important fields in Philosophy.
a.

Normative Ethics bridges the gap between metaethics and applied ethics. It is the attempt to arrive at practical moral standards that tell us right from wrong, and how to live moral lives.
b. 1 Homework in Bioethics

Lopez, Jielyn Cerlette A. BSN 2B

Submitted to: Mrs. Princess Izon

b.1. Theory of Conduct this is the study of right and wrong, of obligation and permissions, of duty, of what is above and beyond the call of duty, and of what is so wrong as to be evil. It proposes standards of morality, or moral codes or rules. b.2. Theory of Value looks at what things are deemed to be valuable. c. Applied Ethics applies normative ethics to specific controversial issues. Many of these ethical problems bear directly on public policy. 4. Article Red Light, Green Light: The California Cloning and Stem Cell Laws By Margaret R. McLean The recent signing of stem cell and reproductive cloning legislation by California Governor Gray Davis demonstrates, once again, that the Golden State is ahead of the regulatory pack. The legislation includes a permanent ban on reproductive cloning and an explicit endorsement of stem cell research. The stem cell bill thaws the federally induced chill on such research by opening up opportunities and state funds for study of multipotent and pluripotent stems cells, including those produced by nuclear transplantation. Both pieces of legislation are rooted in the post-Dolly national debate about cloning. As that debate was reaching impasse in 1997, California enacted a five-year moratorium on the use of cloning technology to produce a child. As required by that legislation, California appointed a committee to evaluate the "medical, ethical, and social implications" of human cloning. That panel - on which I served spent over two years listening to specialists and members of the public discuss how the state ought to respond both to the potential to produce cloned human beings through somatic cell nuclear transplantation and to the budding use of this technique to produce human stem cells. The committee's report was delivered to Sacramento in January. The committee's unanimous conclusion to ban reproductive cloning - cloning to produce a child for rearing - rested chiefly on profound concerns for the physical safety both of the baby produced and of the gestational mother. But reproductive cloning raises many other significant social and ethical problems, including confusing familial relationships, psychological harms to the DNA donor, and commercialization of the family.
2 Homework in Bioethics

Lopez, Jielyn Cerlette A. BSN 2B

Submitted to: Mrs. Princess Izon

The use of nuclear transplantation technology in medical research - "non-reproductive cloning" in the advisory committee's report - raised neither these particular safety nor the relational concerns, and the committee concluded that it was justified by the potential to alleviate the suffering caused by diseases such as diabetes and Parkinson's. Such research, the committee recommended, ought to be subject to state regulation and restricted to blastocysts of less than fourteen days. Strikingly, the committee championed regulations that would govern both privately and publicly funded research. Again, the decision was unanimous. On 22 September, Governor Davis signed the first law in any state explicitly endorsing stem cell research "involving the derivation and use of human embryonic germ cells, and human adult stem cells from any source including somatic cell nuclear transplantation," with oversight from the institutional review boards. Embryos cannot be bought or sold. With another stroke of the pen, Davis signed the permanent ban on human reproductive cloning. This bill also mandates the formation of a nine-member state advisory committee to consider what the prior committee described as "dangerous or unwise applications of our new scientific knowledge of human biology." The bills' roots in the advisory committee recommendations show that citizen panels can aid the legislative process. Now California must address federal attempts to criminalize the very research it just encouraged. 5. Reaction Paper on Human Cloning Human cloning is the creation of a genetically identical copy of a human being (not usually referring monozygotic multiple births), human cell, or human tissue. Although the possibility of cloning human beings has been the subject of speculation for much of the twentieth century, scientists and policy makers began to take the prospect seriously in the 1960s. It is said human therapeutic cloning believe the practice could provide genetically identical cells for regenerative medicine, and tissues and organs for transplantation, which in theory can cure a number of diseases like cancer, heart disease and even diabetes. However, there are some ethical and religious issues that should be answered before Human Cloning became a medical procedure. Legally, any form of human cloning is ban, in any part of the world as mandated by a resolution in the United Nation assembly. However there are moves in certain sector particularly in molecular and cellular medicine to push for the adoption of laws to pursue further research on this study. In my own perception, Human Cloning is grave offense to the dignity of the person as well as to the fundamental equality of all people. A human being born through experimentation and genetic engineering is an insult to the basic principles and creation of
3 Homework in Bioethics

Lopez, Jielyn Cerlette A. BSN 2B

Submitted to: Mrs. Princess Izon

humanity. It also violated the Churchs position that human life is sacred and it should not be violated. On the grounds of other biological research like the production of stem cell to combat cancer, I can say that Im highly in favor of such research mainly due to its therapeutic effect. In light to the article by Margaret R. McLean , the State of California has unprecedentedly passed the law on stem cell and permanently bans the reproductive cloning. With it, it signifies that my own perceptions are also the same with other legislator who view human cloning as a violation to the sanctity of life.

Homework in Bioethics