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Cisco CallManager Administration Guide

Release 3.0(9)

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Cisco CallManager Administration Guide Copyright © 2001, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

PART

1

PART 1 CONTENTS Preface xxi Purpose x x i Audience xxii Organization xxii Related Documentation Conventions

CONTENTS

Preface

xxi

Purpose xxi Audience xxii Organization xxii Related Documentation Conventions xxvi

Obtaining Documentation

xxv

xxvii

World Wide Web

xxvii

Documentation CD-ROM Ordering Documentation Documentation Feedback Obtaining Technical Assistance

Documentation CD-ROM Ordering Documentation Documentation Feedback Obtaining Technical Assistance
Documentation CD-ROM Ordering Documentation Documentation Feedback Obtaining Technical Assistance
Documentation CD-ROM Ordering Documentation Documentation Feedback Obtaining Technical Assistance

xxviii

xxviii

xxviii

xxix

Cisco.com xxix Technical Assistance Center Contacting TAC by Using the Cisco TAC Website Contacting TAC by Telephone

xxx

xxx

xxx

System Description

CHAPTER

1

Introduction

1-1

CHAPTER

2

Understanding Distributed Call Processing

2-1

 

Clusters

2-1

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Contents

Configuring a Distributed System

2-3

CHAPTER

3

Understanding Redundancy

3-1

 

Groups and Clusters

3-1

Components of a Group

3-2

Combining Redundancy with Distributed Call Processing

3-3

Configuring Call Processing Redundancy

3-5

CHAPTER

4

Understanding Auto-Registration

4-1

 

Enabling Auto-Registration

4-2

Disabling Auto-Registration

4-6

Reusing Auto-Registration Numbers

4-7

CHAPTER

5

Understanding Call Admission Control

5-1

 

Locations

5-2

Gatekeepers

5-3

CHAPTER

6

Understanding Route Plans

6-1

Route Plan Overview

Understanding Route Pattern Wildcards and Special Characters

Understanding Closest-Match Routing

Understanding Discard Digits Instructions

Understanding Route Patterns

Understanding the External Route Plan Wizard

6-1

6-11

6-12

6-24

6-25

Generated Route Filters

6-26

Generated Route Groups

6-27

Generated Route Lists

6-27

6-7

Generated Route Groups 6-27 Generated Route Lists 6-27 6-7 iv Cisco CallManager Administration Guide OL-1047-01

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Contents

Generated Route Patterns

6-29

CHAPTER

7

Understanding Device Support

7-1

 

Using DHCP and TFTP

7-1

Understanding DHCP and TFTP

7-2

Accessing the TFTP Server

7-3

Understanding How Devices Identify the TFTP Server

7-4

Understanding Device Loads Updating Device Loads

7-6

7-7

 

Updating a Load on a Cisco IP Phone Updating the Load on a Cisco Gateway

7-8

 

7-9

Verifying the Load on Cisco IP Phones

7-9

Adding Devices to Cisco CallManager

7-10

CHAPTER

8

Understanding Cisco WebAttendant

8-1

Cisco WebAttendant Configuration Checklist

Configuring Cisco CallManager for Cisco WebAttendant

8-2

8-3

Cisco WebAttendant Users

Setting Up Cisco IP Phones for Use with Cisco WebAttendant

8-4

Understanding Pilot Points and Hunt Groups

Understanding the Cisco Telephony Call Dispatcher

8-6

Client Installation and Configuration

8-10

8-9

8-4

Cisco WebAttendant Client Requirements

8-10

Client Installation

8-11

Client Configuration

8-11

Sharing Default Directory Database Information

8-11

Cisco WebAttendant Redundancy

8-13

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Contents

Tips and Troubleshooting

8-14

Viewing Cisco WebAttendant Performance Monitors Troubleshooting 8-16

8-14

CHAPTER

9

Understanding the LDAP Directory

9-1

 

Cisco CallManager Directory Using the Embedded Directory

9-1

 

9-2

Scenario 1: Using the Embedded Directory

9-3

 

Using the Embedded Directory

9-3

Managing User Entries in the Embedded Directory

9-4

 

Scenario 2: Using the Embedded Directory on a Pilot System

9-4

 

Managing Users in the Pilot System

9-5

 

CHAPTER

10

Understanding Service Parameters

10-1

 

Cisco CallManager Service Parameters

10-2

 

Cisco TFTP Service Parameters

10-20

Cisco Messaging Interface Service Parameters

10-22

Cisco IP Voice Media Streaming Service Parameters

10-28

Cisco Database Layer Service Parameters

10-29

 

Cisco Telephony Call Dispatcher Service Parameters

10-30

PART

2

System Configuration

 

CHAPTER

11

Server

11-1

Adding a Server Updating a Server

Adding a Server Updating a Server

Deleting a Server

11-2

11-3

11-4

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Contents

CHAPTER

12

Configuring Cisco CallManager Adding a Cisco CallManager Updating a Cisco CallManager Deleting a Cisco CallManager

12-1

 

12-1

12-5

12-6

CHAPTER

13

Configuring Cisco CallManager Groups

13-1

 

Adding a Cisco CallManager Group Updating a Cisco CallManager Group Copying a Cisco CallManager Group Deleting a Cisco CallManager Group

13-2

13-4

13-5

13-6

CHAPTER

14

Configuring Date/Time Groups Adding a Date/Time Group Updating a Date/Time Group Deleting a Date/Time Group

14-2

14-1

 

14-3

14-4

CHAPTER

15

Setting Device Defaults Updating Device Defaults

15-1

15-2

 

CHAPTER

16

Configuring Regions

16-1

 

Understanding Regions

16-1

Adding a Region Updating a Region Deleting a Region

16-3

16-4

16-5

 

CHAPTER

17

Configuring Device Pools Adding a Device Pool

17-1

17-1

 

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Contents

Updating a Device Pool Deleting a Device Pool

Updating a Device Pool Deleting a Device Pool

17-3

17-4

CHAPTER

18

Understanding Enterprise Parameters

18-1

 

Updating Enterprise Parameters

18-4

CHAPTER

19

Configuring Locations

19-1

 

Understanding Locations

19-2

Locations and Regions

19-3

Bandwidth Calculations

19-4

 

Adding a Location Updating a Location Deleting a Location

19-5

19-7

19-7

 

CHAPTER

20

Starting and Stopping Cisco CallManager

20-1

 

Using the Control Center Using Windows Services

20-2

20-3

Using the Cisco CallManager Reset Button

20-4

PART

3

Route Configuration

CHAPTER

21

Configuring Partitions Adding a Partition Deleting a Partition

21-1

21-1

21-2

 
 

CHAPTER

22

Configuring Calling Search Spaces

22-1

 

Adding a Calling Search Space Updating a Calling Search Space

22-1

22-3

a Calling Search Space Updating a Calling Search Space 22-1 22-3 viii Cisco CallManager Administration Guide

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Contents

 

Copying a Calling Search Space Deleting a Calling Search Space

22-3

22-4

 

CHAPTER

23

Configuring Route Filters

23-1

 

Understanding Route Filter Tags

23-2

 

Adding a Route Filter Updating a Route Filter Copying a Route Filter

23-5

23-7

23-7

Adding Route Filter Clauses

23-9

Removing Route Filter Clauses

23-10

 

Deleting a Route Filter

23-11

CHAPTER

24

Configuring Route Groups

24-1

 

Understanding Route Groups

24-2

Adding a Route Group

24-2

Adding Devices to a Route Group

24-3

 

Removing Devices from a Route Group

24-5

Updating a Route Group Deleting a Route Group

24-6

24-7

CHAPTER

25

Configuring Route Lists

25-1

Understanding Calling Party Transform Settings

25-2

Understanding Called Party Transform Settings

25-4

Adding a Route List

Adding Route Groups to a Route List

Removing Route Groups from a Route List

Changing the Order of Route Groups in a Route List

25-6

25-8

25-10

25-11

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Contents

Deleting a Route List

25-12

CHAPTER

26

Configuring Route Patterns Adding a Route Pattern Updating a Route Pattern Copying a Route Pattern Deleting a Route Pattern

26-1

 

26-1

26-4

26-5

26-6

CHAPTER

27

Configuring Translation Patterns

27-1

 

Understanding Translation Patterns

27-1

Adding a Translation Pattern

27-2

 

Updating a Translation Pattern

27-4

27-5

 

Copying a Translation Pattern Deleting a Translation Pattern

27-6

CHAPTER

28

Using the External Route Plan Wizard

28-1

Creating an External Route Plan

Setting the Routing Options

28-2

28-2

Providing Tenant Information Entering Location Information

Providing Tenant Information Entering Location Information

28-4

28-5

Selecting Gateways

Providing Gateway Information

28-6

28-8

Generating the External Route Plan Confirming the External Route Plan Finishing the External Route Plan

Generating the External Route Plan Confirming the External Route Plan Finishing the External Route Plan
Generating the External Route Plan Confirming the External Route Plan Finishing the External Route Plan

28-9

28-10

28-11

Deleting an External Route Plan

28-11

28-9 28-10 28-11 Deleting an External Route Plan 28-11 x Cisco CallManager Administration Guide OL-1047-01

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Contents

CHAPTER

29

Using Route Plan Report

29-1

 

Viewing All Route Plan Records

29-2

Viewing Route Plan Reports in a File

29-3

 

PART

4

Service Configuration

CHAPTER

30

Cisco Messaging Interface

30-1

 

Most Commonly Changed CMI Service Parameters

30-2

Adding Cisco Messaging Interface Service on the Cisco CallManager

30-5

Deleting Cisco Messaging Interface Service From a Server Configuring Cisco Messaging Interface Service Parameters Configuring Cisco Messaging Interface Trace Parameters

30-6

30-8

30-10

 

CHAPTER

31

Configuring Cisco TFTP

31-1

 

Inserting Cisco TFTP Service on a Server Deleting Cisco TFTP Service From a Server

31-2

31-4

 

Configuring Cisco TFTP Command Line Parameters

31-5

Deleting Cisco TFTP Command Line Parameters

31-7

 

Configuring Cisco TFTP Trace Parameters

31-9

 

CHAPTER

32

Configuring Cisco WebAttendants

32-1

 

Configuring Pilot Points Adding a Pilot Point

32-2

32-2

Viewing, Updating, or Deleting a Pilot Point

32-4

 

Configuring Hunt Groups

32-5

Adding Hunt Group Members

Viewing, Updating, or Deleting Hunt Group Members

32-5

32-9

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Contents

Configuring Cisco WebAttendant Users Adding a Cisco WebAttendant User

32-10

32-10

Viewing, Updating, and Deleting Cisco WebAttendant Users

32-11

Installing the Cisco WebAttendant Client

32-13

Configuring Cisco WebAttendant Client Settings

32-14

Cisco WebAttendant Server Configuration

32-18

Setting Up the wauser Shared Directory for Cisco WebAttendant

32-19

Starting the Telephony Call Dispatcher

32-20

CHAPTER

33

Configuring Conference Bridges Understanding Conference Devices

33-1

33-2

 
 

Two Types of Conferences: Meet-Me and Ad-Hoc

33-3

Using an Ad-Hoc Conference Bridge Using a Meet-Me Conference Bridge Adding a Software Conference Device Adding a Hardware Conference Device

33-4

33-5

33-6

33-8

Updating a Conference Device Deleting a Conference Device

33-10

33-11

Updating Conference Bridge Parameters

33-12

Adding a Meet-Me Number Pattern Updating a Meet-Me Number Pattern Deleting a Meet-Me Number Pattern

33-14

33-15

33-17

CHAPTER

34

Configuring Media Termination Point

34-1

Planning Your MTP Configuration Avoiding Call Failure/User Alert Adding a Media Termination Point

34-3

34-4

34-5

Failure/User Alert Adding a Media Termination Point 34-3 34-4 34-5 xii Cisco CallManager Administration Guide OL-1047-01

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Contents

Updating a Media Termination Point

34-7

Deleting a Media Termination Point

34-8

CHAPTER

35

Configuring Service Parameters

35-1

 

Service Parameter Restart Conditions Adding a New Service on a Server

35-2

35-3

 

Deleting a Service From a Server Adding a New Service Parameter

35-4

35-5

Updating a Service Parameter Deleting a Service Parameter

35-7

35-9

CHAPTER

36

Configuring Trace

36-1

 

Understanding Trace Configuration

36-2

 

Trace Levels

36-2

Time 36-3

User Mask

36-3

Event Level

36-6

Components 36-7 Recommended Trace Settings

36-9

Adding a New Service and Trace Configuration

36-10

Updating a Trace Configuration Deleting a Trace Configuration

36-12

36-13

Deleting a Service

36-14

 

CHAPTER

37

Configuring Transcoder

37-1

 

37-3

 

Configuring a Transcoder Updating a Transcoder

37-4

 

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Contents

Copying a Transcoder

37-5

Deleting a Transcoder

37-6

CHAPTER

38

Starting and Stopping Services Using the Control Center

38-1

 

Starting and Stopping Services on a Single Server Selecting Services to Start and Stop for All Servers

38-2

38-3

 

PART

5

Feature Configuration

CHAPTER

39

Configuring Call Park

39-1

 

39-2

 

Adding a Call Park Number Updating a Call Park Number Deleting a Call Park Number

39-3

39-4

CHAPTER

40

Configuring Call Pickup Configuring Call Pickup

40-1

 
 

40-2

40-2

 

Adding a Call Pickup Group Number Updating a Call Pickup Group Number Deleting a Call Pickup Group Number

40-3

40-4

Assigning Directory Numbers to a Call Pickup Group

40-5

CHAPTER

41

Configuring Cisco IP Phone Services

41-1

 

Understanding Cisco IP Phone Services

Adding a Cisco IP Phone Service

Adding a Cisco IP Phone Service Parameter

41-2

41-3

41-5

Updating a Cisco IP Phone Service Deleting a Cisco IP Phone Service

Updating a Cisco IP Phone Service Deleting a Cisco IP Phone Service

41-6

41-7

Updating a Cisco IP Phone Service Parameter

41-8

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Contents

Deleting a Cisco IP Phone Service Parameter

41-9

PART

6

Configuring Devices in Cisco CallManager

 

CHAPTER

42

Configuring CTI Route Points Adding a CTI Route Point

42-1

 

42-2

Modifying a CTI Route Point Deleting a CTI Route Point

42-3

42-4

Finding and Listing CTI Route Points

42-5

 

Resetting a CTI Route Point

42-6

CHAPTER

43

Configuring Cisco uOne Voice Messaging

43-1

 

Cisco uOne Port Wizard

43-3

Adding a New Cisco uOne Server and Ports Adding Ports to an Existing Cisco uOne Server

43-3

43-6

 

Deleting Ports from an Existing Cisco uOne Server

43-7

Configuring Cisco CallManager Service Parameters for Cisco uOne

43-8

Setting up the MWI Device Adding Cisco uOne Ports Deleting a Cisco uOne Port Resetting a Cisco uOne Port Updating a Cisco uOne Port

43-11

43-12

43-16

43-17

43-18

Copying an Existing Cisco uOne Port

43-19

 

CHAPTER

44

Configuring a Gatekeeper Adding a Gatekeeper Deleting the Gatekeeper

44-1

44-1

 

44-6

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Contents

CHAPTER

45

Resetting or Restarting the Gatekeeper

Modifying the Gatekeeper

44-7

44-6

Configuring Gateways

45-1

Understanding Supported Gateways

45-2

Understanding Cisco Access Gateways Cisco Access Analog Gateways

Cisco Access Digital Trunk Gateways Understanding Catalyst 6000 Gateways

45-3

45-3

45-4

45-4

Catalyst 6000 Family Analog Line Card

45-4

Catalyst 6000 Family T1/E1 Line Cards

45-5

Catalyst 6000 Family DSP Services Card

45-5

Cisco VG200 Gateway

45-6

Understanding Other H.323 Devices

45-6

 

Adding Gateways to Cisco CallManager

45-7

Adding an Analog Gateway

45-7

Adding Digital Gateways

45-9

Adding an MGCP Gateway

45-21

Adding an H.323 Gateway

45-23

Configuring Gateway Ports in Cisco CallManager

45-27

Configuring Ports on Analog Gateways

45-27

Configuring POTS Ports

45-27

Configuring Loop Start Ports

45-31

 

Configuring Ports on a Cisco MGCP Gateway

45-35

Configuring FXS Ports on a Cisco MGCP Gateway Configuring FXO Ports on Cisco MGCP Gateways

Configuring FXS Ports on a Cisco MGCP Gateway Configuring FXO Ports on Cisco MGCP Gateways

45-35

45-38

Configuring Ground Start on an MGCP Gateway 45-38

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Contents

Configuring Loop Start on MGCP Gateways 45-40

CHAPTER

46

Modifying Gateways

Deleting Gateways Resetting Gateways Updating Gateways Finding Specific Gateways

45-41

45-42

45-42

45-43

45-44

Searching by Device Name Searching by Description

Searching by Directory Number

45-44

45-45

45-46

Configuring Cisco IP Phones in Cisco CallManager

46-1

Understanding Cisco IP Phones Cisco IP Phone 7900 Family Cisco IP Phone 7960 Cisco IP Phone 7940 Cisco IP Phone 7910

Understanding Cisco IP Phones Cisco IP Phone 7900 Family Cisco IP Phone 7960 Cisco IP Phone
Understanding Cisco IP Phones Cisco IP Phone 7900 Family Cisco IP Phone 7960 Cisco IP Phone
Understanding Cisco IP Phones Cisco IP Phone 7900 Family Cisco IP Phone 7960 Cisco IP Phone
Understanding Cisco IP Phones Cisco IP Phone 7900 Family Cisco IP Phone 7960 Cisco IP Phone

46-2

46-2

46-3

46-3

46-4

Cisco IP Phone 12 SP+

46-4

Cisco IP Phone 30 VIP

46-4

CTI Ports

H.323 Clients

46-5

46-5

Configuring Cisco IP Phones

46-5

Displaying the MAC Address of a Phone

Adding a Phone Deleting a Phone Resetting a Phone Updating a Phone

Adding a Phone Deleting a Phone Resetting a Phone Updating a Phone
Adding a Phone Deleting a Phone Resetting a Phone Updating a Phone
Adding a Phone Deleting a Phone Resetting a Phone Updating a Phone

46-7

46-11

46-12

46-13

Copying an Existing Phone

46-14

46-6

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Contents

Finding a Phone

46-15

Tips for Finding a Phone Configuring Phone Features Configuring Call Waiting Configuring Call Forward

Tips for Finding a Phone Configuring Phone Features Configuring Call Waiting Configuring Call Forward
Tips for Finding a Phone Configuring Phone Features Configuring Call Waiting Configuring Call Forward
Tips for Finding a Phone Configuring Phone Features Configuring Call Waiting Configuring Call Forward

46-16

46-16

46-17

46-17

Configuring Call Park Configuring Call Pickup

46-17

46-18

Configuring Directory Numbers

46-18

Adding a Directory Number

46-19

Deleting a Directory Number Updating a Directory Number

Deleting a Directory Number Updating a Directory Number

46-23

46-24

CHAPTER

47

Shared Line Appearances

46-25

Configuring Phone Button Templates

47-1

Understanding Default Phone Button Templates

47-1

Default Cisco IP Phone 7960 Template

47-2

Default Cisco IP Phone 7940 Templates

47-3

Default Cisco IP Phone 7910 Templates

47-3

Default Cisco IP Phone 30 SP+ Template

47-3

Default Cisco IP Phone 30 VIP Template

47-4

Default Cisco IP Phone 12-Series Template

47-4

Adding Phone Button Templates

47-5

Guidelines for Creating Custom Templates

47-7

Modifying Phone Button Templates

47-9

Renaming a Phone Button Template Deleting a Phone Button Template Updating a Phone Button Template

Renaming a Phone Button Template Deleting a Phone Button Template Updating a Phone Button Template
Renaming a Phone Button Template Deleting a Phone Button Template Updating a Phone Button Template

47-10

47-11

47-12

Updating a Phone Button Template 47-10 47-11 47-12 xviii Cisco CallManager Administration Guide OL-1047-01

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Contents

PART

7

User Configuration

CHAPTER

48

Adding a New User

48-1

 

How Cisco JTAPI uses the Directory Using the Embedded Directory

48-2

48-2

 

Adding a User

48-2

Assigning Devices to a User

48-3

CHAPTER

49

Searching the Global Directory

49-1

 

Using Basic User Search

49-1

Using Advanced User Search

49-3

PART

8

Appendices

APPENDIX

A

Cisco TAPI Service Provider Installation and Configuration

A-1

 

A-1

 

Installing the Cisco TAPI Service Provider Activating the Cisco TAPI Service Provider Configuring the Cisco TAPI Service Provider

A-3

A-4

Uninstalling the Cisco TAPI Service Provider

A-9

A-10

Installing the Wave Driver Uninstalling the Wave Driver

A-12

Verifying the Cisco TAPI Service Provider Installation

A-14

 

Setting up Client-Server Configuration

A-16

 

APPENDIX

B

Cisco JTAPI Installation and Configuration

B-1

Installing the Cisco JTAPI Software

Verifying the Installation

B-4

B-2

Cisco CallManager Administration Guide

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Contents

Configuring Cisco JTAPI Tracing

Trace Levels

B-5

B-4

Debug Levels

Log Destination

B-7

B-8

Cisco CallManager

Other JTAPI Preferences Settings

JTAPI Preferences on non-Microsoft environments

B-11

B-12

B-13

Administering User Information for JTAPI and TAPI Applications

B-14

APPENDIX

C

Creating Custom Cisco IP Phone Rings

C-1

 

Creating a Custom Phone Ring

C-2

RingList.xml File Format

C-2

PCM File Requirements for Custom Ring Types

C-3

INDEX

C-2 PCM File Requirements for Custom Ring Types C-3 INDEX xx Cisco CallManager Administration Guide OL-1047-01

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Preface This preface describes the purpose, audience, organization, and conventions of this guide, and provides

Preface

This preface describes the purpose, audience, organization, and conventions of this guide, and provides information on how to obtain related documentation.

The preface covers these topics:

Purpose, page xxi

Audience, page xxii

Organization, page xxii

Related Documentation, page xxv

Conventions, page xxvi

Obtaining Documentation, page xxvii

Obtaining Technical Assistance, page xxix

Purpose

The Cisco CallManager Administration Guide provides instructions for administering the Cisco CallManager system. This guide includes descriptions of procedural tasks you complete using Cisco CallManager. It also provides references for commands and conceptual information to assist you in using Cisco CallManager.

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Audience

Preface

Audience

The Cisco CallManager Administration Guide is written for network administrators responsible for managing the Cisco CallManager system. This guide requires knowledge of telephony and IP networking technology.

Organization

This guide is organized as shown in the following table:

Part

Description

Part 1

“System Description”

Contains the following chapters, which describe general topics related to the configuration and operation of Cisco CallManager:

Chapter 1, “Introduction”

Chapter 2, “Understanding Distributed Call Processing”

Chapter 3, “Understanding Redundancy”

Chapter 4, “Understanding Auto-Registration”

Chapter 5, “Understanding Call Admission Control”

Chapter 6, “Understanding Route Plans”

Chapter 7, “Understanding Device Support”

Chapter 8, “Understanding Cisco WebAttendant”

Chapter 9, “Understanding the LDAP Directory”

Chapter 10, “Understanding Service Parameters”

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Organization

Part

Description

Part 2

“System Configuration”

Contains the following chapters, which explain how to configure the system parameters used by Cisco CallManager:

Chapter 11, “Server”

Chapter 12, “Configuring Cisco CallManager”

Chapter 13, “Configuring Cisco CallManager Groups”

Chapter 14, “Configuring Date/Time Groups”

Chapter 15, “Setting Device Defaults”

Chapter 16, “Configuring Regions”

Chapter 17, “Configuring Device Pools”

Chapter 18, “Understanding Enterprise Parameters”

Chapter 19, “Configuring Locations”

Chapter 20, “Starting and Stopping Cisco CallManager”

Part 3

“Route Configuration”

Contains the following chapters, which explain how to configure route plans in Cisco CallManager:

Chapter 21, “Configuring Partitions”

Chapter 22, “Configuring Calling Search Spaces”

Chapter 23, “Configuring Route Filters”

Chapter 24, “Configuring Route Groups”

Chapter 25, “Configuring Route Lists”

Chapter 26, “Configuring Route Patterns”

Chapter 27, “Configuring Translation Patterns”

Chapter 28, “Using the External Route Plan Wizard”

Chapter 29, “Using Route Plan Report”

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Organization

Preface

Part

Description

Part 4

“Service Configuration”

Contains the following chapters, which explain how to configure services used in conjunction with Cisco CallManager:

Chapter 30, “Cisco Messaging Interface”

Chapter 31, “Configuring Cisco TFTP”

Chapter 32, “Configuring Cisco WebAttendants”

Chapter 33, “Configuring Conference Bridges”

Chapter 34, “Configuring Media Termination Point”

Chapter 35, “Configuring Service Parameters”

Chapter 36, “Configuring Trace”

Chapter 37, “Configuring Transcoder”

Chapter 38, “Starting and Stopping Services Using the Control Center”

Part 5

“Feature Configuration”

Contains the following chapters, which explain how to configure user features:

Chapter 39, “Configuring Call Park”

Chapter 40, “Configuring Call Pickup”

Part 6

“Configuring Devices in Cisco CallManager”

Contains the following chapters, which explain how to configure devices in Cisco CallManager:

Chapter 42, “Configuring CTI Route Points”

Chapter 43, “Configuring Cisco uOne Voice Messaging”

Chapter 44, “Configuring a Gatekeeper”

Chapter 45, “Configuring Gateways”

Chapter 46, “Configuring Cisco IP Phones in Cisco CallManager”

Chapter 47, “Configuring Phone Button Templates”

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Preface

Related Documentation

Part

Description

Part 7

“User Configuration”

Contains the following chapters, which explain how to configure user and directory information:

Chapter 48, “Adding a New User”

Chapter 49, “Searching the Global Directory”

Part 8

“Appendices”

Contains the following chapters, which include additional information related to Cisco CallManager and IP telephony:

Appendix A, “Cisco TAPI Service Provider Installation and Configuration”

Appendix B, “Cisco JTAPI Installation and Configuration”

Appendix C, “Creating Custom Cisco IP Phone Rings”

Related Documentation

Refer to the following documents for further information about related Cisco IP Telephony applications and products:

Installing Cisco CallManager on the Cisco Media Convergence Server

Release Notes for Cisco CallManager Release 3.0

Cisco CallManager v3.0 Remote Serviceability Users Guide

Hardware Configuration Guide for the Cisco Voice Gateway 200

Software Configuration Guide for the Cisco Voice Gateway 200

Cisco IP Phone 7900 Family Administration Guide

Cisco CallManager Administration Guide

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Conventions

Preface

Conventions

This document uses the following conventions:

Convention

Description

boldface font

Commands and keywords are in boldface.

italic font

Arguments for which you supply values are in italics.

[

]

Elements in square brackets are optional.

{

x | y

 

|

z }

Alternative keywords are grouped in braces and separated by vertical bars.

[ x

|

y

|

z ]

Optional alternative keywords are grouped in brackets and separated by vertical bars.

string

 

A nonquoted set of characters. Do not use quotation marks around the string or the string will include the quotation marks.

screen font

Terminal sessions and information the system displays are in screen font.

boldface screen

Information you must enter is in boldface screen font.

font

 

italic screen font

Arguments for which you supply values are in italic screen font.

 

This pointer highlights an important line of text in an example.

^

The symbol ^ represents the key labeled Control—for example, the key combination ^D in a screen display means hold down the Control key while you press the D key.

<

>

Nonprinting characters, such as passwords, are in angle brackets.

Notes use the following conventions:

are in angle brackets. Notes use the following conventions: Note Means reader take note . Notes

Note

Means reader take note. Notes contain helpful suggestions or references to material not covered in the publication.

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Obtaining Documentation

Timesavers use the following conventions:

Documentation Timesavers use the following conventions: Timesaver Means the described action saves time . You can

Timesaver

Means the described action saves time. You can save time by performing the action described in the paragraph.

Tips use the following conventions:

in the paragraph. Tips use the following conventions: Tips Means the information contains useful tips. Cautions

Tips

Means the information contains useful tips.

Cautions use the following conventions:

useful tips. Cautions use the following conventions: Caution Means reader be careful . In this situation,

Caution

Means reader be careful. In this situation, you might do something that could result in equipment damage or loss of data.

Warnings use the following conventions:

or loss of data. Warnings use the following conventions: Warning This warning symbol means danger. You

Warning

This warning symbol means danger. You are in a situation that could cause bodily injury. Before you work on any equipment, you must be aware of the hazards involved with electrical circuitry and familiar with standard practices for preventing accidents.

Obtaining Documentation

The following sections provide sources for obtaining documentation from Cisco Systems.

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Obtaining Documentation

Preface

World Wide Web

You can access the most current Cisco documentation on the World Wide Web at the following sites:

http://www.cisco.com

http://www-china.cisco.com

http://www-europe.cisco.com

Documentation CD-ROM

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available in a CD-ROM package, which ships with your product. The Documentation CD-ROM is updated monthly and may be more current than printed documentation. The CD-ROM package is available as a single unit or through an annual subscription.

Ordering Documentation

Cisco documentation is available in the following ways:

Registered Cisco Direct Customers can order Cisco Product documentation from the Networking Products MarketPlace:

http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/order/order_root.pl

Registered Cisco.com users can order the Documentation CD-ROM through the online Subscription Store:

http://www.cisco.com/go/subscription

Nonregistered Cisco.com users can order documentation through a local account representative by calling Cisco corporate headquarters (California, USA) at 408 526-7208 or, in North America, by calling 800

553-NETS(6387).

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Obtaining Technical Assistance

Documentation Feedback

If you are reading Cisco product documentation on the World Wide Web, you can submit technical comments electronically. Click Feedback in the toolbar and select Documentation. After you complete the form, click Submit to send it to Cisco.

You can e-mail your comments to bug-doc@cisco.com.

To submit your comments by mail, use the response card behind the front cover of your document, or write to the following address:

Attn Document Resource Connection Cisco Systems, Inc. 170 West Tasman Drive San Jose, CA 95134-9883

We appreciate your comments.

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco provides Cisco.com as a starting point for all technical assistance. Customers and partners can obtain documentation, troubleshooting tips, and sample configurations from online tools. For Cisco.com registered users, additional troubleshooting tools are available from the TAC website.

Cisco.com

Cisco.com is the foundation of a suite of interactive, networked services that provides immediate, open access to Cisco information and resources at anytime, from anywhere in the world. This highly integrated Internet application is a powerful, easy-to-use tool for doing business with Cisco.

Cisco.com provides a broad range of features and services to help customers and partners streamline business processes and improve productivity. Through Cisco.com, you can find information about Cisco and our networking solutions, services, and programs. In addition, you can resolve technical issues with online technical support, download and test software packages, and order Cisco learning materials and merchandise. Valuable online skill assessment, training, and certification programs are also available.

Cisco CallManager Administration Guide

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Obtaining Technical Assistance

Preface

Customers and partners can self-register on Cisco.com to obtain additional personalized information and services. Registered users can order products, check on the status of an order, access technical support, and view benefits specific to their relationships with Cisco.

To access Cisco.com, go to the following website:

http://www.cisco.com

Technical Assistance Center

The Cisco TAC website is available to all customers who need technical assistance with a Cisco product or technology that is under warranty or covered by a maintenance contract.

Contacting TAC by Using the Cisco TAC Website

If you have a priority level 3 (P3) or priority level 4 (P4) problem, contact TAC by going to the TAC website:

http://www.cisco.com/tac

P3 and P4 level problems are defined as follows:

P3—Your network performance is degraded. Network functionality is noticeably impaired, but most business operations continue.

P4—You need information or assistance on Cisco product capabilities, product installation, or basic product configuration.

In each of the above cases, use the Cisco TAC website to quickly find answers to your questions.

To register for Cisco.com, go to the following website:

http://www.cisco.com/register/

If you cannot resolve your technical issue by using the TAC online resources, Cisco.com registered users can open a case online by using the TAC Case Open tool at the following website:

http://www.cisco.com/tac/caseopen

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Obtaining Technical Assistance

Contacting TAC by Telephone

If you have a priority level 1(P1) or priority level 2 (P2) problem, contact TAC by telephone and immediately open a case. To obtain a directory of toll-free numbers for your country, go to the following website:

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/687/Directory/DirTAC.shtml

P1 and P2 level problems are defined as follows:

P1—Your production network is down, causing a critical impact to business operations if service is not restored quickly. No workaround is available.

P2—Your production network is severely degraded, affecting significant aspects of your business operations. No workaround is available.

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P ART

1

System Description

The following chapters describe general topics related to the configuration and operation of Cisco CallManager:

• Chapter 1, “Introduction”

• Chapter 2, “Understanding Distributed Call Processing”

• Chapter 3, “Understanding Redundancy”

• Chapter 4, “Understanding Auto-Registration”

• Chapter 5, “Understanding Call Admission Control”

• Chapter 6, “Understanding Route Plans”

• Chapter 7, “Understanding Device Support”

• Chapter 8, “Understanding Cisco WebAttendant”

• Chapter 9, “Understanding the LDAP Directory”

• Chapter 10, “Understanding Service Parameters”

Introduction

CHAPTER

1

Cisco CallManager is the software-based call-processing component of the Cisco IP Telephony solution, part of Cisco AVVID (Architecture for Voice, Video and Integrated Data). The Cisco Media Convergence Server serves as the high-availability server platform for Cisco CallManager call processing, services, and applications.

The Cisco CallManager system extends enterprise telephony features and functions to packet telephony network devices such as IP phones, media processing devices, Voice-over-IP (VoIP) gateways, and multimedia applications. Additional data, voice, and video services such as unified messaging, multimedia conferencing, collaborative contact centers, and interactive multimedia response systems interact through Cisco CallManager's open telephony application programming interface (API).

Key Features and Benefits

The Cisco CallManager system includes a suite of integrated voice applications that perform voice conferencing and manual attendant console functions. Because this suite of voice applications exists, there is no need for special-purpose voice processing hardware. Supplementary and enhanced services such as hold, transfer, forward, conference, multiple line appearances, automatic route selection, speed dial, last-number redial, and other features extend to IP phones and gateways. Because Cisco CallManager is a software application, enhancing its capabilities in production environments only requires upgrading software on the server platform, thereby avoiding expensive hardware upgrade costs.

Distribution of Cisco CallManager and all Cisco IP Phones, gateways, and applications across an IP network provides a distributed, virtual telephony network. This architecture improves system availability and scalability. Call

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Chapter 1

Introduction

admission control ensures that voice Quality of Service (QoS) is maintained across constricted WAN link, and automatically diverts calls to alternate Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) routes when WAN bandwidth is not available. Cisco CallManager comes preinstalled on the Cisco Media Convergence Server.

A web-browsable interface to the configuration database provides the capability

for remote device and system configuration. This interface also provides access to HTML-based online help for users and administrators.

New for Cisco CallManager Release 3.0

Cisco CallManager Release 3.0 significantly enhances the scalability, distributability, and availability of the enterprise IP telephony solution. Multiple Cisco CallManager servers are clustered and managed as a single entity.

Release 3.0 provides capability for up to 10,000 users on each cluster. By

interlinking multiple clusters, the system capacity increases to tens of thousands

of users for each multisite system. Clustering aggregates the power of multiple,

distributed Cisco CallManagers, enhancing the scalability and accessibility of the servers to phones, gateways, and applications. Triple server redundancy improves overall system availability.

Further enhancements in Cisco CallManager Release 3.0 include toll restriction by user group, database configuration changes without system restart, and system serviceability enhancements. Alterations to the Cisco CallManager Administration user interface reduce the administrative burden when managing a large network of devices and users.

Users benefit from the new call pickup-group feature as well as from the support

of the first of a new generation of Cisco IP phones, the Cisco IP Phone 7960.

Finally, software-only voice and multimedia applications such as the Cisco Low-End Interactive Voice Response system, Cisco IP Contact Center, Cisco Automated Attendant, and Cisco SoftPhone interact with the Cisco CallManager through telephony APIs. These applications extend the Cisco CallManager system’s capability and expand the applications space within Cisco AVVID. The benefits include readily available, distributed, next-generation applications that can interact with e-business applications.

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CHAPTER

2

Understanding Distributed Call Processing

Cisco CallManager (release 3.0 and later) provides the capability for distributed call processing. With this feature, you can distribute the call processing load of your system across multiple Cisco CallManagers in a cluster.

Use the following procedure to configure a distributed call processing system:

Configuring a Distributed System, page 2-3

Clusters

A cluster is a set of Cisco CallManagers that share the same database.

When you install the Cisco CallManager software on a server, you specify which servers and which Cisco CallManagers belong to the same cluster. You also specify which server is the publisher database for the cluster. The other servers in the cluster are all subscribers to the publisher database, but they also maintain their own backup copies of the publisher database. Figure 2-1 illustrates a simple cluster containing three Cisco CallManagers.

During normal operation, all of the Cisco CallManagers in the cluster read data from and write data to the publisher database. Periodically, the backup copies of the database are updated automatically from the publisher. If the publisher database becomes unavailable for any reason (for example, if the network connection is broken), the various Cisco CallManagers in the cluster can continue to operate from their local backup copies of the database. When the publisher database is restored, normal operation resumes.

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Clusters

Chapter 2

Understanding Distributed Call Processing

34031

Figure 2-1

Example of a Cluster with Three Cisco CallManagers

Server (Database Publisher)

Cisco

CallManager

Cisco CallManager Publisher database

Publisher

database

Cisco CallManager IP Network Subscriber database
Cisco
CallManager
IP Network
Subscriber
database

Server (Database Subscriber)

Server (Database Subscriber)

Cisco

CallManager

Subscriber

database

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Chapter 2

Understanding Distributed Call Processing

Configuring a Distributed System

Configuring a Distributed System

After installing the Cisco CallManagers that form a cluster, you must configure the publisher database to allow these Cisco CallManagers to work as a distributed system. This section describes some general steps and guidelines for configuring a distributed call processing system.

In general, you create a distributed system by distributing the devices (such as phones and gateways) among the various Cisco CallManagers in a cluster. To distribute the devices, you configure Cisco CallManager groups and device pools, and then assign the devices to the device pools in a way that achieves the type of distribution you want. Cisco CallManager groups and device pools are logical groupings that may or may not relate to the physical locations of the Cisco CallManagers and devices on your network.

You can use Cisco CallManager groups to establish redundancy (backup call processors) for the primary Cisco CallManager in the group. A Cisco CallManager group is an ordered list of up to three Cisco CallManager servers. During normal operation, all device pools and devices that use a particular Cisco CallManager group are controlled by the first (primary) Cisco CallManager in the group. If the primary Cisco CallManager in a group fails, control of the device pools and devices registered with the primary Cisco CallManager transfers to the next Cisco CallManager in the group list.

For example, assume a simplified system consisting of three Cisco CallManagers in a cluster, with 300 existing Cisco IP Phones and provisions to auto-register new phones as they are added later. Figure 2-2 shows one possible way to configure the Cisco CallManager groups and device pools to distribute the call processing load for this system.

Four Cisco CallManager groups are configured. Cisco CallManager group G1 is assigned to device pool DP1, group G2 is assigned to device pool DP2, group G3 is assigned to device pool DP3, and group G4 is assigned to device pool DP4. Group G4 is configured as the default group for devices that auto-register.

CCM1 serves as the primary Cisco CallManager for the devices in DP1 and DP2, first backup for DP3, and second backup for the devices in DP4.

CCM2 serves as the primary Cisco CallManager for the devices in DP3 and DP4, first backup for DP1, and second backup for the devices in DP4.

CCM3 is the first backup Cisco CallManager for the devices in DP2 and DP3, and second backup for the devices in DP1 and DP4.

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Figure 2-2

Example of Cisco CallManager Groups and Device Pools

DP1

G1

Cisco CallManager Group

 
CCM1 CCM2 CCM3

CCM1

CCM2

CCM3

G1 Cisco CallManager Group   CCM1 CCM2 CCM3 Device pool Primary First Second (100 phones)
G1 Cisco CallManager Group   CCM1 CCM2 CCM3 Device pool Primary First Second (100 phones)
G1 Cisco CallManager Group   CCM1 CCM2 CCM3 Device pool Primary First Second (100 phones)

Device pool

Primary

First

Second

(100 phones)

Backup

Backup

DP2

G2

Cisco CallManager Group

 
CCM1 CCM3 CCM2

CCM1

CCM3

CCM2

G2 Cisco CallManager Group   CCM1 CCM3 CCM2 Device pool Primary First Second (100 phones)
G2 Cisco CallManager Group   CCM1 CCM3 CCM2 Device pool Primary First Second (100 phones)
G2 Cisco CallManager Group   CCM1 CCM3 CCM2 Device pool Primary First Second (100 phones)

Device pool

Primary

First

Second

(100 phones)

Backup

Backup

DP3

G3

Cisco CallManager Group

 
CCM2 CCM1 CCM3

CCM2

CCM1

CCM3

G3 Cisco CallManager Group   CCM2 CCM1 CCM3 Device pool Primary First Second (100 phones)
G3 Cisco CallManager Group   CCM2 CCM1 CCM3 Device pool Primary First Second (100 phones)
G3 Cisco CallManager Group   CCM2 CCM1 CCM3 Device pool Primary First Second (100 phones)

Device pool

Primary

First

Second

(100 phones)

Backup

Backup

DP4

G4

Default Cisco CallManager Group

 
CCM2 CCM3 CCM1

CCM2

CCM3

CCM1

Cisco CallManager Group   CCM2 CCM3 CCM1 Device pool (Auto-registered phones) Primary First
Cisco CallManager Group   CCM2 CCM3 CCM1 Device pool (Auto-registered phones) Primary First
Cisco CallManager Group   CCM2 CCM3 CCM1 Device pool (Auto-registered phones) Primary First

Device pool (Auto-registered phones)

Primary

First

Second

Backup

Backup

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Understanding Distributed Call Processing

Configuring a Distributed System

The following procedure describes general steps for configuring Cisco CallManager groups and device pools. The example shown in Figure 2-2 focuses on the Cisco IP Phones, but similar steps apply to other devices such as gateways.

Before You Begin

Install the Cisco Media Convergence Servers and Cisco CallManager software to form a cluster of Cisco CallManagers. For details, refer to the installation instructions that shipped with your Cisco CallManager.

The example cluster in Figure 2-2 consists of Cisco CallManagers CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3.

Procedure

Step 1

In Cisco CallManager Administration, select System > Cisco CallManager, select a Cisco CallManager server, and enable its auto-registration option. This will allow new phones to auto-register with that Cisco CallManager as they are added to the system. In the example shown in Figure 2-2, auto-registration is enabled on CCM2.

a. Enter the starting and ending directory numbers for the new phones that auto-register with the selected Cisco CallManager.

b. If desired, enter the partition name and external phone number mask for the phones that auto-register.

c. Uncheck the “Auto-registration Disabled on this Cisco CallManager” option. This enables auto-registration for the selected Cisco CallManager.

auto-registration for the selected Cisco CallManager. Caution Auto-registration is disabled by default. Enabling

Caution

Auto-registration is disabled by default. Enabling auto-registration carries a security risk in that “rogue” phones can automatically register to the Cisco CallManager. Restrict your use of auto-registration to brief periods when bulk phone adds are required.

d. Click Update to save the changes.

For details, see the “Updating a Cisco CallManager” section on page 12-5 and the “Understanding Auto-Registration” section on page 4-1.

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Chapter 2

Understanding Distributed Call Processing

Step 2

In Cisco CallManager Administration, select System > Cisco CallManager Group to configure groups.

A Cisco CallManager group is a prioritized list of up to three Cisco CallManagers.

A Cisco CallManager group named Default is configured automatically when you install the Cisco CallManager software. This is the default group for devices that auto-register with Cisco CallManager. However, you can update this group to assign a particular Cisco CallManager to it, or you can select a different group as the default group for auto-registration.

There can be only one default Cisco CallManager group for auto-registration for the entire cluster.

In the example shown in Figure 2-2, four groups—G1, G2, G3, and G4—are configured, and G4 is the default Cisco CallManager auto-registration group.

For details, see the “Configuring Cisco CallManager Groups” section on page 13-1.

Step 3

In Cisco CallManager Administration, select System > Device Pool to configure the device pools for the system.

a. A device pool named Default is configured automatically when you install Cisco CallManager, and the Default Cisco CallManager group is assigned to it. This is the default device pool for devices that auto-register with Cisco CallManager. However, you can update this device pool to change its settings, or you can select a different device pool as the default for auto-registered devices.

b. Configure the other device pools and assign the Cisco CallManager groups to the appropriate device pools to achieve the desired load balancing and redundancy.

In the example shown in Figure 2-2, device pool DP4 is configured as the default device pool for auto-registered devices, Cisco CallManager group G1 is assigned to DP1, G2 is assigned to DP2, G3 is assigned to DP3, and G4 is assigned to DP4.

For details, refer to the “Configuring Device Pools” section on page 17-1 and the “Understanding Redundancy” section on page 3-1.

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Configuring a Distributed System

Step 4 In Cisco CallManager Administration, select System > Device Defaults to select the default device load, device pool, and template for each type of device. When a device auto-registers with a particular Cisco CallManager, it acquires the device defaults that apply to its device type on that Cisco CallManager.

Refer to the “Setting Device Defaults” section on page 15-1 for more information.

Step 5

In Cisco CallManager Administration, select Device > Phone to configure the Cisco IP Phones and assign them to the appropriate device pools. As new phones are connected to the system, they auto-register with the default device pool until all the auto-registration directory numbers are consumed (see Step 1).

directory numbers are consumed (see Step 1). Note After a phone auto-registers with a particular Cisco

Note

After a phone auto-registers with a particular Cisco CallManager, you can update its configuration and assign it to a different device pool (and a different Cisco CallManager group). Similarly, you can reconfigure any device and assign it to a different device pool to achieve better load balancing for your system.

Step 6

After making your configuration changes and saving them in the database, restart all devices affected by those changes.

Related Topics

Understanding Redundancy, page 3-1

Configuring Cisco CallManager Groups, page 13-1

Configuring Device Pools, page 17-1

Setting Device Defaults, page 15-1

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Configuring a Distributed System

Chapter 2

Understanding Distributed Call Processing

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CHAPTER

3

Understanding Redundancy

Cisco CallManager (release 3.0 and later) provides several forms of redundancy:

Database redundancy—The Cisco CallManagers in a cluster maintain backup copies of their shared database. See the “Clusters” section on page 2-1.

Call processing redundancy—Using Cisco CallManager groups, you can designate backup Cisco CallManagers to handle call processing for a disabled Cisco CallManager.

The following procedure describes how to configure call processing redundancy using Cisco CallManager groups:

Configuring Call Processing Redundancy, page 3-5

Groups and Clusters

Groups and clusters are logical collections of Cisco CallManagers and their associated devices. Groups and clusters are not necessarily related to the physical locations of any of their members.

A cluster is a set of Cisco CallManagers that share a common database. You specify which servers and which Cisco CallManagers belong to the same cluster and specify the publisher database location when you install and configure the Cisco CallManager software. For more information on clusters, refer to the installation and configuration instructions that shipped with your Cisco CallManager.

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Groups and Clusters

Chapter 3

Understanding Redundancy

A group is a list of Cisco CallManagers that is assigned to one or more device

pools to provide redundant call processing. You use Cisco CallManager Administration to define the groups, specify which Cisco CallManagers belong to each group, and to assign a Cisco CallManager group to each device pool.

Components of a Group

A Cisco CallManager group is a prioritized list of up to three

Cisco CallManagers. Each group must contain a primary Cisco CallManager, and

it may contain one or two standby Cisco CallManagers. The order that the

Cisco CallManagers are listed in a group determines the failover order.

Under normal operation, the primary Cisco CallManager in a group controls call processing for all the registered devices (such as phones and gateways) associated with a group.

If the primary Cisco CallManager fails for any reason, the first standby

Cisco CallManager takes control of the devices that were registered with the primary Cisco CallManager. If you specify a second standby Cisco CallManager for the group, it takes control of the devices if both the primary and the first standby Cisco CallManagers fail.

You associate devices to a Cisco CallManager group by using device pools. Each device belongs to one device pool, and each device pool is associated with one Cisco CallManager group. You can combine the groups and device pools in various ways to achieve the desired level of redundancy. For example, Figure 3-1 shows a simple system with three redundant Cisco CallManagers controlling 800 devices.

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Figure 3-1

Example of a Cisco CallManager Group

DP1

Device pool

(400 devices)

DP2

Device pool

(400 devices)

G1

Cisco CallManager Group

CCM1

CCM2

CCM3

CCM1 CCM2 CCM3 Primary First Second Backup Backup

Primary

First

Second

Backup

Backup

pool (400 devices) G1 Cisco CallManager Group CCM1 CCM2 CCM3 Primary First Second Backup Backup

In Figure 3-1, Cisco CallManager group G1 is assigned to two device pools, DP1 and DP2. CCM1, as the primary Cisco CallManager in group G1, controls all 800 devices in DP1 and DP2 under normal operation. If CCM1 fails, control of all 800 devices transfers to CCM2. If CCM2 also fails, then control of all 800 devices transfers to CCM3.

Combining Redundancy with Distributed Call Processing

The configuration in Figure 3-1 provides call processing redundancy, but it does not distribute the call processing load very well among the three Cisco CallManagers in the example. In most cases, you would want to distribute the devices in a way that prevents a single Cisco CallManager from becoming overloaded if one of the other Cisco CallManagers in the group fails. Figure 3-2 shows one possible way to configure the Cisco CallManager groups and device pools to achieve both distributed call processing and redundancy for a system of three Cisco CallManagers and 800 devices.

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Figure 3-2

Example of Redundancy Combined with Distributed Call Processing

 

G1

Cisco CallManager Group

 

DP1

CCM1

CCM2

CCM3

Device pool

Device pool
Device pool
Device pool

(100 devices)

Primary

First

Second

Backup

Backup

 

G2

Cisco CallManager Group

 

DP2

CCM1

CCM3

CCM2

Device pool

Device pool
Device pool
Device pool

(300 devices)

Primary

First

Second

Backup

Backup

 

G3

Cisco CallManager Group

 

DP3

CCM2

CCM1

CCM3

Device pool

Device pool
Device pool
Device pool

(100 devices)

Primary

First

Second

Backup

Backup

 

G4

Default Cisco CallManager Group

 

DP4

CCM2

CCM3

CCM1

Device pool

Device pool
Device pool
Device pool

(300 devices)

Primary

First

Second

Backup

Backup

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Configuring Call Processing Redundancy

In Figure 3-2, the Cisco CallManager groups are configured and assigned to device pools so that Cisco CallManager CCM1 is the primary controller in two groups, G1 and G2. If CCM1 fails, the 100 devices in device pool DP1 transfer to CCM2, and the 300 devices in DP2 transfer to CCM3. Similarly, CCM2 is the primary controller of groups G3 and G4. If CCM2 fails, the 100 devices in DP3 transfer to CCM1, and the 300 devices in DP4 transfer to CCM3. If CCM1 and CCM2 both fail, all devices transfer to CCM3.

For more information on distributed call processing, see the “Understanding Distributed Call Processing” section on page 2-1.

Configuring Call Processing Redundancy

This section describes the general steps for configuring Cisco CallManager groups to provide call processing redundancy and distributed call processing as illustrated by the example in Figure 3-2.

Before You Begin

Install the Cisco Media Convergence Servers and Cisco CallManager software to form a cluster of Cisco CallManagers. A cluster is a set of Cisco CallManagers that share the same database. In Figure 3-2, the cluster consists of Cisco CallManagers CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3. For details, refer to the installation instructions that shipped with your Cisco CallManager.

Procedure

Step 1

In Cisco CallManager Administration, select System > Cisco CallManager and update the configuration for the Cisco CallManagers in a cluster.

When you install the Cisco CallManager software, the database contains an initial configuration for each of the Cisco CallManagers in the cluster. However, you might want to update these configurations to change the settings for some of the parameters such as auto-registration. For details, see the “Updating a Cisco CallManager” section on page 12-5.

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Step 2

In Cisco CallManager Administration, select System > Cisco CallManager Group to configure Cisco CallManager groups for the cluster.

The Default group is configured automatically when you install the Cisco CallManager software, and devices that auto-register with Cisco CallManager are normally assigned to this Default group. However, you might want to change the configuration of the Default group or specify one of the other groups as the default group for auto-registration. For details, see the “Configuring Cisco CallManager Groups” section on page 13-1.

Step 3

In Cisco CallManager Administration, select System > Device Pool to configure device pools for your system.

a. The Default device pool is configured automatically when you install Cisco CallManager. However, you might want to update its configuration to set the parameters such as region and to assign this pool to the appropriate Cisco Call Manager group. Cisco CallManager normally assigns the Default device pool to devices that auto-register with it, unless you specify a different default device pool through the Device Defaults (see the “Setting Device Defaults” section on page 15-1).

b. Configure the other device pools and assign them to the appropriate Cisco CallManager groups. In this example, device pool DP1 is assigned to group G1, DP2 is assigned to G2, and so forth.

For details, see the “Configuring Device Pools” section on page 17-1.

Step 4

In Cisco CallManager Administration, select the desired options under Device to configure the devices on your network and to assign them to the appropriate device pools.

Step 5

After making your configuration changes and saving them in the database, restart the devices affected by those changes.

Related Topics

Cisco CallManager groups provide both call processing redundancy and distributed call processing. The way you distribute devices, device pools, and Cisco CallManagers among the groups is critical for maintaining the desired level of redundancy and load balancing in your system.

For more information on distributed call processing, see:

Understanding Distributed Call Processing, page 2-1.

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4

Understanding Auto-Registration

Use auto-registration if you want Cisco CallManager to assign directory numbers automatically to new devices when you plug these devices into your network.

new devices when you plug these devices into your network. Caution Auto-registration is disabled by default.

Caution

Auto-registration is disabled by default. Enabling auto-registration carries a security risk in that “rogue” phones can automatically register to the Cisco CallManager. Auto-registration should only be enabled for brief periods when bulk phone adds are required.

Auto-registration is disabled by default to prevent unauthorized connections to your network. Use the following procedures to enable or disable auto-registration and to reuse the auto-registration directory numbers:

Enabling Auto-Registration, page 4-2

Disabling Auto-Registration, page 4-6

Reusing Auto-Registration Numbers, page 4-7

When you enable auto-registration, you specify a range of directory numbers for Cisco CallManager to assign to new devices connected to your network. As new devices are connected to the network, Cisco CallManager assigns the next available directory number in the specified range. Once a directory number is assigned to an auto-registered device, you can move the device to a new location and its directory number remains the same. If all of the auto-registration directory numbers are consumed, no additional devices can auto-register with Cisco CallManager.

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Chapter 4 Understanding Auto-Registration Note New devices auto-register with the primary Cisco

Note

New devices auto-register with the primary Cisco CallManager in the Auto-Registration Cisco CallManager Group (see the “Configuring Cisco CallManager Groups” section on page 13-1). That Cisco CallManager automatically assigns each auto-registered device to a default device pool based on the device type (see the “Setting Device Defaults” section on page 15-1). After a device has auto-registered, you can update its configuration and assign it to a different device pool and a different Cisco CallManager (see the “Configuring Device Pools” section on page 17-1).

Related Topics

Enabling Auto-Registration, page 4-2

Disabling Auto-Registration, page 4-6

Reusing Auto-Registration Numbers, page 4-7