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MicroAutoBox 1401/1501, 1401/1504, 1401/1507, 1401/1505/1506 and 1401/1505/1507

Hardware Installation and Configuration


Release 6.4 June 2009

How to Contact dSPACE


Mail: dSPACE GmbH Technologiepark 25 33100 Paderborn Germany +49 5251 1638-0 +49 5251 66529 info@dspace.de http://www.dspace.com

Tel.: Fax: E-mail: Web:

How to Contact dSPACE Support


There are different ways to contact dSPACE Support: Visit our Web site at http://www.dspace.com/goto?support Send an e-mail or phone: General Technical Support: support@dspace.de +49 5251 1638-941 Use the dSPACE Support Wizard: On your dSPACE DVD at \Diag\Tools\dSPACESupportWizard.exe Via Start Programs dSPACE Tools (after installation of the dSPACE software) At http://www.dspace.com/goto?supportwizard You can always find the latest version of the dSPACE Support Wizard here. dSPACE recommends that you use the dSPACE Support Wizard to contact dSPACE Support.

Software Updates and Patches


dSPACE strongly recommends that you download and install the most recent patches for your current dSPACE installation. Visit http://www.dspace.com/goto?support for software updates and patches.

Important Notice
This document contains proprietary information that is protected by copyright. All rights are reserved. Neither the documentation nor software may be copied, photocopied, reproduced, translated, or reduced to any electronic medium or machine-readable form, in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of dSPACE GmbH. Copyright 1999 - 2009 by: dSPACE GmbH Technologiepark 25 33100 Paderborn Germany This publication and the contents hereof are subject to change without notice. AutomationDesk, CalDesk, ConfigurationDesk, ControlDesk, SystemDesk and TargetLink are registered trademarks of dSPACE GmbH in the United States or other countries, or both. Other brand names or product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies or organizations.

Contents

About This Document

9 Document Symbols and Conventions ..................................... 10 Accessing Online Help and PDF Files....................................... 11 Related Documents ................................................................ 12 13 Safety Precautions for Installing and Connecting the Hardware............................................................................... 13 Safety Precautions for Using MicroAutoBox in a Vehicle ......... 14 Safety Precautions for Using MicroAutoBox Break-Out Boxes . 15 17 Hardware............................................................................... 17 Software ................................................................................ 20 21 Installation and Configuration Overview ................................. 21 Checking the System Requirements........................................ 23

Safety Precautions

Introduction to MicroAutoBox

Before You Start

Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus 25


Connecting to a FlexRay Bus............................................................ 26 General Information on FlexRay Modules .................................... 26 Supported FlexRay Hardware.................................................. 26 How to Install or Uninstall the FlexRay Modules...................... 27 Using DS4340 Modules .............................................................. 29 Basics on DS4340 FlexRay Interface Modules.......................... 30 DS4340 Board Overview and Connector Pinouts .................... 31 FR_CAB1 FlexRay Interface Cable for MicroAutoBox ............... 33 DS4340 Connections in Different Topologies .......................... 37 Example of Connecting One DS4340 Module to a FlexRay Bus39 Example of Connecting Two DS4340 Modules to a FlexRay Bus ........................................................................................ 43 How to Wake Up MicroAutoBox by Activity on the FlexRay Bus ........................................................................................ 46

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

Contents

Using Third-Party FlexRay IP Modules .......................................... 50 Details on Third-Party FlexRay IP Modules............................... 50 Connecting to a LIN Bus.................................................................. 52 How to Configure MicroAutoBox as the LIN Master ............... 52

In-Vehicle Installation

57 How to Install MicroAutoBox in a Vehicle ............................... 57 59 Basics on Connecting to Power Supply ................................... 60 Connecting Sensor Ground Lines to MicroAutoBox ................ 66 Fulfilling the Requirements for CE Certification....................... 66 Using dSPACE MicroAutoBox Crimper Tool............................. 68 How to Crimp Contacts with the dSPACE Crimper Tool........... 69 How to Fasten the Wires and the ZIF Connector..................... 71

Building the I/O Connector

Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

73 Connecting MicroAutoBox to Power Supply .................................... 74 Preconfigurations by dSPACE ................................................. 74 How to Connect and Power MicroAutoBox ............................ 78 Connecting via Bus Interface........................................................... 79 Link Boards Variants............................................................... 79 Limitations With Link Boards .................................................. 80 How to Establish a Bus Connection DS813/DS817 <> MicroAutoBox .......................................... 81 How to Establish a Bus Connection DS815/DS821 <> MicroAutoBox .......................................... 81 DS815 Connector and PC Card Link ....................................... 83 Identifying the Connection Status .......................................... 85 Using dSPACE CardSafe .................................................................. 88 Introduction to dSPACE CardSafe ........................................... 89 How to Mount dSPACE CardSafe ........................................... 91 How to Remove dSPACE CardSafe for Transportation ............. 95 How to Remove dSPACE CardSafe Completely ....................... 96 Connecting dSPACE Boxes to the Host PC via DS830 ...................... 98 Features of DS830 MultiLink Panel ......................................... 98 How to Connect the DS830 ................................................. 101 DS830: Identifying the Connection Status ............................ 103 105 Notes and Tips on Working.................................................. 105

Working with MicroAutoBox in a Vehicle

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

Contents

Using MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

107 Features of MicroAutoBox Break-Out Boxes ......................... 108 Working Principles................................................................ 108 Connecting Examples ........................................................... 111 Terminating CAN Bus Lines................................................... 113 Terminating FlexRay Bus Lines............................................... 114 117 How to Remove the Hardware ............................................. 117

Uninstalling the System

Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

119 Connector Pinouts......................................................................... 120 Zero Insertion Force Connector............................................. 120 Pin Description .............................................................................. 122 Power Input and Output ...................................................... 122 Digital Input ......................................................................... 123 Digital Output ...................................................................... 125 Analog Input and Output ..................................................... 127 Interfaces ............................................................................. 128 Characteristics............................................................................... 129 Absolute Maximum Levels.................................................... 129 DC Characteristics ................................................................ 130 AC Characteristics ................................................................ 134 Interface Characteristics ....................................................... 135 Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface ......................... 136 I/O Circuits ........................................................................... 137 I/O Connector Characteristics ............................................... 139 Dimensions and Weights ...................................................... 140 Certifications........................................................................ 140 143 Connector Pinouts......................................................................... 144 Zero Insertion Force Connector............................................. 144 Pin Description .............................................................................. 146 Power Input and Output ...................................................... 146 Digital Input ......................................................................... 147 Digital Output ...................................................................... 149 Analog Input........................................................................ 151 Interfaces ............................................................................. 151 Characteristics............................................................................... 153 Absolute Maximum Levels.................................................... 153 DC Characteristics ................................................................ 154

Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

Contents

AC Characteristics ................................................................ 158 Interface Characteristics ....................................................... 159 Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface......................... 159 I/O Circuits ........................................................................... 161 I/O Connector Characteristics ............................................... 163 Dimensions and Weights...................................................... 163 Certifications........................................................................ 163 165 Connector Pinouts ........................................................................ 166 Sub-D I/O Connector............................................................ 166 ECU Interface Connector...................................................... 169 Power Input Connector ........................................................ 169 Pin Description.............................................................................. 171 Power Input and Output ...................................................... 171 Interfaces............................................................................. 172 Characteristics .............................................................................. 176 Absolute Maximum Levels.................................................... 176 DC Characteristics ................................................................ 177 Interface Characteristics ....................................................... 177 Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface......................... 178 I/O Connector Characteristics ............................................... 179 Dimensions and Weights...................................................... 179 Certifications........................................................................ 179

Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

181 Connector Pinouts ........................................................................ 182 Zero Insertion Force Connector ............................................ 182 Sub-D I/O Connector............................................................ 184 Pin Description.............................................................................. 188 Power Input and Output ...................................................... 188 Digital Input......................................................................... 189 Digital Output...................................................................... 191 Analog Input and Output..................................................... 193 Interfaces............................................................................. 193 Characteristics .............................................................................. 199 Absolute Maximum Levels.................................................... 199 DC Characteristics ................................................................ 200 AC Characteristics ................................................................ 204 Interface Characteristics ....................................................... 205 Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface......................... 206 I/O Circuits ........................................................................... 207 I/O Connector Characteristics ............................................... 209

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

Contents

Dimensions and Weights ...................................................... 210 Certifications........................................................................ 210

Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

213 Connector Pinouts......................................................................... 214 Zero Insertion Force Connector............................................. 214 Sub-D I/O Connector ............................................................ 216 ECU Interface Connector ...................................................... 219 Pin Description .............................................................................. 220 Power Input and Output ...................................................... 220 Digital Input ......................................................................... 221 Digital Output ...................................................................... 223 Analog Input and Output ..................................................... 225 Interfaces ............................................................................. 225 Characteristics............................................................................... 231 Absolute Maximum Levels.................................................... 231 DC Characteristics ................................................................ 232 AC Characteristics ................................................................ 236 Interface Characteristics ....................................................... 237 Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface ......................... 238 I/O Circuits ........................................................................... 239 I/O Connector Characteristics ............................................... 241 Dimensions and Weights ...................................................... 242 Certifications........................................................................ 242 245 Components and Their Functionality .................................... 246 Zero Insertion Force Connector............................................. 250 CAN/FlexRay Sub-D I/O Connectors ...................................... 251 CAN Sub-D I/O Connector (CAN 1 ... CAN 4) ........................ 252 FlexRay Sub-D I/O Connector (FlexRay 1 and FlexRay 2)......... 252 CAN/FlexRay Signal Mapping................................................ 253 Data Overview ..................................................................... 255 257 Characteristics...................................................................... 257 259 Checking MicroAutoBox....................................................... 260 Problems with Multiple Plug & Play Boards ........................... 261 Problems with the Flight Recorder ........................................ 263 Problems Related to the Firmware ........................................ 264

Data Sheet MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Data Sheet DS830 Multilink Panel Troubleshooting

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

Contents

Index

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

About This Document

Contents

This document will show you the installation and hardware configuration of MicroAutoBox 1401/1501, 1401/1504, 1401/1507, 1401/1505/1506 and 1401/1505/1507. It describes the hardware installation procedure and shows how to configure the hardware. It also gives you information about connecting external devices to the dSPACE system.

Required knowledge

Knowledge in handling computer hardware and Microsoft Windows operating systems is presupposed. Information in this section Document Symbols and Conventions Accessing Online Help and PDF Files Related Documents 10 11 12

Where to go from here

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

About This Document

Document Symbols and Conventions


Symbols

The following symbols may be used in this document. Indicates a general hazard that may cause personal injury of any kind if you do not avoid it by following the instructions given. Indicates the danger of electric shock which may cause death or serious injury if you do not avoid it by following the instructions given. Indicates a hazard that may cause material damage if you do not avoid it by following the instructions given. Indicates important information that should be kept in mind, for example, to avoid malfunctions. Indicates tips containing useful information to make your work easier.

Naming conventions

The following abbreviations and formats are used in this document: %name% Names enclosed in percent signs refer to environment variables for file and path names, for example, %DSPACE_ROOT% specifies the location of your dSPACE installation in the file system. < > Angle brackets contain wildcard characters or placeholders for variable file and path names, etc. Precedes the document title in a link that refers to another document.
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Indicates that a link refers to another document, which is available in dSPACE HelpDesk.

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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About This Document

Accessing Online Help and PDF Files


Objective

After you install your dSPACE software, the documentation for the installed products is available as online help and Adobe PDF files. You can access the online help dSPACE HelpDesk as follows: Windows Start menu dSPACE HelpDesk. Context-sensitive dSPACE software. Click Start Programs dSPACE Tools

Online help

Press the F1 key or click the Help button in the

Local installation on your host PC Double-click the dSPACEHelpDesk.chm file in %DSPACE_ROOT%\Doc\Online.


PDF Files

You can access the PDF files as follows: dSPACE HelpDesk document: Click the PDF link at the beginning of a

Local installation on your host PC %DSPACE_ROOT%\Doc\Print.

Double-click the PDF file in

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

11

About This Document

Related Documents
Recommended reading

Information in other documents Installation documents Software Installation and Management Guide Provides detailed instructions on installing and handling the dSPACE software. It also shows you how to manage dSPACE licenses. Getting started with MicroAutoBox dSPACE System First Work Steps Provides information on configuring dSPACE systems after you installed the dSPACE hardware. It shows you how to get started with your dSPACE system after installation. This document is aimed at users who have no experience with dSPACE systems. MicroAutoBox Features Provides feature-oriented access to the information you need to implement your control models on your real-time hardware.

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Safety Precautions

Objective

To avoid risk of injury and/or damage to the dSPACE hardware, read and ensure that you comply with the following safety precautions. Information in this section Safety Precautions for Installing and Connecting the Hardware Safety Precautions for Using MicroAutoBox in a Vehicle Safety Precautions for Using MicroAutoBox BreakOut Boxes 13 14 15

Where to go from here

Safety Precautions for Installing and Connecting the Hardware


Installation sequence
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Install the components of your system in exactly the order stated. Any other sequence may lead to unpredictable results or even damage the system. Read the instructions carefully before starting installation. Note all warnings given.

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Safety Precautions

Handling boards

dSPACE hardware contain sensitive electronic devices. Before unpacking, installing and removing them, take the following precautions to avoid damage caused by high electrostatic voltage:
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Make sure that you and all material the board comes in contact with are properly grounded. Do not touch the contacts of the connectors.

Installing hardware

Before doing any installation work, make sure that:


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The power supply (car engine) is switched off. No external devices are connected to the dSPACE system.

Connecting devices

To avoid risk of injury and prevent damage to the hardware:


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Do not connect any high-voltage devices to the I/O connectors of the hardware. Do not apply voltages/currents outside the specified ranges to the connector pins. Do not connect or disconnect any devices while the dSPACE system is powered up and/or external devices are switched on. Make sure that external devices are turned off beforehand.

Safety Precautions for Using MicroAutoBox in a Vehicle


Objective

To avoid damage to the MicroAutoBox and to achieve safe and trouble-free operation, the following special guidelines have to be observed.
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Guidelines

Turn off the engine while connecting or disconnecting the car battery. Even a brief disconnection of the battery while the engine is running results in a load dump of the car generator producing hazardous voltages of more than 100 V. Double-check the supply voltage polarity of MicroAutoBox. Reverse polarity might destroy parts of MicroAutoBox immediately under some circumstances, even if the remote control input is turned off.

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

Safety Precautions

Safety Precautions for Using MicroAutoBox Break-Out Boxes


Objective

To avoid risk of injury and/or damage to the hardware and to achieve safe and trouble-free operation, you must comply with the following guidelines. Depending on the connected devices there can be hazardous voltages on the contacts of the boxes caused by failures. To avoid risk of serious injury or death due to electric shock:
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Working with Break-Out Boxes

Do not touch bare contacts, connector pins or any connected terminals and devices while the system is powered.

Changing the existing cable harness via Break-Out Box can cause uncontrolled movements of and/or damage to connected devices. To avoid risk of injury and material damage:
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Before changing the cabling, think through the effects of the changes you are planning. Ensure that no one is in the potential danger zone of the device (test bench, etc.) when the changes first take effect.

Changing the termination of bus lines via termination switches can cause failures in bus communication. These failures might lead to uncontrolled movements of and/or damage to connected devices. To avoid risk of injury and material damage:
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Ensure that the termination change complies with the bus specification.

Connecting devices

To avoid risk of injury and damage to the MicroAutoBox:


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Do not connect any high-voltage devices to the I/O connectors of the Break-Out Box. Do not apply voltages/currents outside the specified ranges of the used MicroAutoBox to the terminal points of the Break-Out Boxes. Do not connect or disconnect sensors/actuators while the power supply of MicroAutoBox and all the devices is switched on. Observe all safety precautions described in the documentation of the connected devices.

Installation location

To avoid damage to the Break-Out Boxes:


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Do not use the Break-Out Boxes in the vehicle's engine compartment.

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

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Safety Precautions

Do not use the Break-Out Boxes in humid ambient conditions.

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Introduction to MicroAutoBox

Objective

The dSPACE system based on MicroAutoBox comprises hardware and software. Information in this section Hardware Software 17 20

Where to go from here

Hardware
Objective

MicroAutoBox combines the advantages of a rapid prototyping (RCP) system with those of an automotive electronic control unit (ECU). Therefore, it is ideally suited as hardware for dSPACE Prototyper in a vehicle. MicroAutoBox operates without user intervention, just like an ECU, and can be installed virtually anywhere in the vehicle. At the same time MicroAutoBox provides all the benefits of a dSPACE real-time system. A PC or notebook can be attached temporarily for program download, data analysis and calibration.

Variants

Different variants of standard MicroAutoBox are available. This document describes the installation and configuration of all variants:
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MicroAutoBox 1401/1501 MicroAutoBox 1401/1504 MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

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Introduction to MicroAutoBox

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MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506 MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507


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For detailed information on the different variants, refer to System Overview ( MicroAutoBox Features).
Content of the package

MicroAutoBox consists of two resp. three boards in a milled aluminum box. The package contains:
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MicroAutoBox containing a DS1401 Base Board and one or two I/O boards (DS1501, DS1504, DS1505, DS1506, DS1507) depending on the variant. A link board (DS815 or DS821) for insertion into the host PC and the cable to the MicroAutoBox. All variants with the exception of MicroAutoBox 1401/1507: 156-pin Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) connector for matching the corresponding connector at the MicroAutoBox. It grants access to the input and output signals provided by MicroAutoBox. The ZIF connector is pre-configured to connect the MicroAutoBox to the power supply.

Only MicroAutoBox 1401/1507, 1401/1505/1506, 1401/1505/1507: 78-pin, male Sub-D connector. It grants access to the I/O signals of CAN, FlexRay, LIN and the Serial Interfaces.

Only MicroAutoBox 1401/1507: Power input connector. It grants access to power supply of the MicroAutoBox. The power input connector is preconfigured to connect MicroAutoBox to a laboratory power supply.

A crimper, crimp contacts and a tool to remove the contacts are included to build the I/O connector according to your needs. An external 1000 F capacitor to be connected in parallel to the power supply output, to prevent the MABX inrush current from triggering the power supplys overcurrent protection. The image below shows a MicroAutoBox 1401/1504.

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

Introduction to MicroAutoBox

Additional I/O connectors are available from dSPACE upon request.

Optional accessories

MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box is supplied on demand. This box provides easy access to signals on the I/O connectors of all MicroAutoBox variants. It allows you to measure signals and to reconnect signals without changing an existing cable harness. For details, refer to Using MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box on page 107 and Data Sheet MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box on page 245.

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Introduction to MicroAutoBox

Software
Objective

The dSPACE software, such as the implementation and the experiment software, comes on DVD and has to be installed first. For information on the software package, the installation and license handling, refer to Introduction to dSPACE Software ( Software Installation and Management Guide).
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Further information

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Before You Start

Objective

Make yourself familiar with the installation and configuration procedures of MicroAutoBox and check if your system fulfills the system requirements. Information in this section Installation and Configuration Overview Checking the System Requirements 21 23

Where to go from here

Installation and Configuration Overview


Installation sequence

CAUTION
Changing the installation sequence may lead to unpredictable results or even damage the system.
n

Install the components of your system in exactly the order stated. Read the instructions carefully before starting installation. Consider all warnings given.

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

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Before You Start

Installing the MicroAutoBox requires the following steps in the specified order. 1. Check whether the software has been installed on the host PC. You must first install the software before installing any hardware component in the host PC and before connecting MicroAutoBox to it. For detailed instructions on installing the software, refer to Installing RCP and HIL Software, TargetLink, CalDesk, and Model Compare ( Software Installation and Management Guide).
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You need administrator rights to install dSPACE software.

2. Check whether your hardware meets the requirements for MicroAutoBox. Refer to Checking the System Requirements on page 23. 3. If you use MicroAutoBox 1401/1507, 1401/1505/1506 or 1401/1505/1507 it may be necessary to configure the DS1506 (DS1507) I/O board. For details, refer to:
o o

How to Install or Uninstall the FlexRay Modules on page 27 How to Configure MicroAutoBox as the LIN Master on page 52

4. Put MicroAutoBox into operation by connecting the power supply and the host PC. Refer to Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation on page 73. 5. If you want to install MicroAutoBox in a vehicle, refer to How to Install MicroAutoBox in a Vehicle on page 57. 6. You may connect a PC or notebook to MicroAutoBox at any time for program download, data analysis, and calibration. Refer to Working with MicroAutoBox in a Vehicle on page 105.
Configuration sequence

After you install your MicroAutoBox, you can configure it in the following steps: 1. Using MicroAutoBoxs flight recorder and its hot plug-in feature requires some preparatory steps. 2. Check if your platform is ready to run real-time applications. 3. The firmware of the MicroAutoBox can be updated if you install a new dSPACE Release.

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Before You Start

Installation problems

If you encounter any problems during installation and configuration:


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Check the description again. Contact dSPACE support using the dSPACE Support Wizard. It is available
o

On your dSPACE DVD at \Diag\Tools\dSPACESupportWizard.exe Via Start Programs dSPACE Tools (after installation of the dSPACE software)

Next steps

After you install and configure your system, you are ready to implement a model either via a Simulink model including blocks from dSPACEs Real-Time Interface (RTI) or via a handcoded algorithm and download the corresponding application to your real-time hardware. ControlDesk can be used to experiment with your real-time application. Refer to dSPACE System First Work Steps ( dSPACE System First Work Steps).
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If you use the real-time hardware with CalDesk, refer to Configuring Prototyping Platforms and Handling Real-Time Applications ( CalDesk Calibration Guide).
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Related topics

Basics Hardware on page 17 Installing RCP and HIL Software, TargetLink, CalDesk, and Model Compare ( Software Installation and Management Guide) Introduction to MicroAutoBox on page 17 Software on page 20
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Checking the System Requirements


Objective

Before installing dSPACEs hardware, you have to check whether your hardware meets the system requirements. Your host PC must fulfill the system requirements concerning:
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Host PC

The dSPACE software and other required third-party software, The hardware equipment. Your PC must fulfill the requirements for the hardware which is needed for connecting the host PC and MicroAutoBox.

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Before You Start

This connection has to be established via a bus interface. For details, refer to Appendix: System Requirements ( Installation and Management Guide).
Power supply
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Software

MicroAutoBox requires power supply within the range 6 40 V (30 W, 5 A peak). To prevent MicroAutoBox inrush current from triggering the power supplys overcurrent protection, a minimum output capacitance of 1000 F is required. If the output capacitance of your power supply is unknown, an external 1000 F capacitor can be connected in parallel to the power supply output.

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Where to go from here

Information in this section Connecting to a FlexRay Bus MicroAutoBox 1401/1507, 1401/1505/1506, and 1401/1505/1507 can be connected to a FlexRay bus if they are equipped with FlexRay modules. Connecting to a LIN Bus If you run MicroAutoBox in a LIN network, it is configured as a LIN slave by default. You must reconfigure MicroAutoBox if you want to use it as the LIN master. 26

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25

Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Connecting to a FlexRay Bus


Objective

MicroAutoBox 1401/1507, 1401/1505/1506, and 1401/1505/1507 can be connected to a FlexRay bus if they are equipped with FlexRay modules. Information in this section General Information on FlexRay Modules MicroAutoBox can be equipped with different types of FlexRay modules. Using DS4340 Modules MicroAutoBox can be equipped with up to two DS4340 FlexRay Interface Modules. Using Third-Party FlexRay IP Modules FlexRay IP modules are standard IP modules providing a FlexRay interface. 26

Where to go from here

29

50

General Information on FlexRay Modules


Where to go from here

Information in this section Supported FlexRay Hardware Providing information on the supported MicroAutoBox variants and which FlexRay modules can be used How to Install or Uninstall the FlexRay Modules Providing information on installing or uninstalling IP modules and DS4340 modules in MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506 and 1401/1505/1507. 26

27

Supported FlexRay Hardware


Objective

This topic provides information on which MicroAutoBox variants are supported and which FlexRay modules can be used. FlexRay modules can only be installed in
n

MicroAutoBox variants

MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

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MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506 MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

FlexRay modules

The following FlexRay modules can be installed in MicroAutoBox and are supported by dSPACE implementation software:
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FlexRay modules provided by dSPACE


o

DS4340 FlexRay Interface Module DECOMSYS::FlexIM(MFR4200) (DECOMSYS::FlexIM2+ or DECOMSYS::FlexIM4+, V9.x) DECOMSYS::FlexIM(V11 IP-Core) (DECOMSYS::FlexIM4+, V11.x) DECOMSYS::FlexIM(E-Ray)

FlexRay IP modules provided by a third-party


o

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Software support

The RTI FlexRay Configuration Blockset supports all the FlexRay modules listed above.
Basics Connecting Real-Time Systems to the FlexRay Bus (
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Related topics

FlexRay Configuration Features)

How to Install or Uninstall the FlexRay Modules


Objective

MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506 and 1401/1505/1507 These variants provide two slots (each with two AMP connectors) to install FlexRay IP modules (DS4340 or third party). The FlexRay IP modules must meet the IP module specification and must be installed on the DS1506 or DS1507 I/O board. MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 This variant provides only one slot for a FlexRay IP module (DS4340 or third party). The IP module must be installed in slot 2 of the DS1507.

CAUTION
Do not install/uninstall FlexRay modules to MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 by yourself. You may destroy parts of MicroAutoBox. If you want to use FlexRay IP modules (DS4340 or third party) with your MicroAutoBox 1401/1507, the modules must be installed by dSPACE.

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Supported modules

For information on which modules are supported, refer to Supported FlexRay Hardware on page 26. To avoid risk of injury and/or damage to the dSPACE hardware, read and ensure that you comply with the safety precautions, see Safety Precautions for Installing and Connecting the Hardware on page 13. To install or uninstall the FlexRay modules 1 Disconnect MicroAutoBox from the power supply. 2 Open the housing of MicroAutoBox. The DS1506 or DS1507 I/O board with the IP modules is on top. 3 Install or uninstall the IP modules.

Preconditions

Method

4 Close MicroAutoBox's enclosure.

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Result

If the modules are installed in MicroAutoBox, the FlexRay signals are available at the 78-pin Sub-D connector. Note that the pinouts differ depending on the FlexRay module used. See Sub-D I/O Connector on page 184 (for MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506) and Sub-D I/O Connector on page 216 (for MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507).

Using DS4340 Modules


Objective
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MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506 and 1401/1505/1507 can be equipped with up to two DS4340 FlexRay Interface Modules. MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 can be equipped only with one DS4340 FlexRay Interface Module.

Where to go from here

Information in this section Basics on DS4340 FlexRay Interface Modules Giving basic information on the DS4340's features, bus termination, feed-through lines, and connecting the bus lines. DS4340 Board Overview and Connector Pinouts The DS4340 FlexRay Interface Module additionally has FlexRay-bus connectors for connection to the FlexRay bus. Each connector provides only the FlexRay bus line plus and minus. FR_CAB1 FlexRay Interface Cable for MicroAutoBox The FR_CAB1 FlexRay Interface Cable for MicroAutoBox can be used to connect the FlexRay bus lines to the SubD I/O Connector. DS4340 Connections in Different Topologies You can terminate the DS4340 module's bus lines or use them unterminated. You can use feed-through pins to shorten the stub length if the DS4340 is used in a linear passive bus. Example of Connecting One DS4340 Module to a FlexRay Bus This example shows how one DS4340 module can be connected to a linear passive FlexRay bus using feedthrough bus lines. 30

31

33

37

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Example of Connecting Two DS4340 Modules to a FlexRay Bus This example shows how two DS4340 modules can be connected to a linear passive FlexRay bus using feedthrough bus lines. How to Wake Up MicroAutoBox by Activity on the FlexRay Bus You can configure MicroAutoBox with DS4340 modules to be woken up when the FlexRay comes alive.

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46

Basics on DS4340 FlexRay Interface Modules


Objective

Basic information on the DS4340's features, bus termination, feedthrough lines, and connecting the bus lines is given below. DS4340 modules are FlexRay communication modules provided by dSPACE. They have the following features:
n n n n

Features of DS4340 modules

Freescale MFR43x0 FlexRay Communication Controller Dual physical layer interface with TJA1080 Feed-through for FlexRay bus signals in passive-linear bus topology Switchable termination circuit

DS4340 modules are supported by the RTI FlexRay Configuration Blockset.


Bus termination

You can terminate the bus lines if the channels of the DS4340 module are connected at the end of the FlexRay bus. The termination resistance is switched via software in the RTIFLEXRAYCONFIG CONTROLLER SETUP block, refer to Options Page (RTIFLEXRAYCONFIG CONTROLLER SETUP) ( FlexRay Configuration RTI Reference). For a detailed description of bus termination, refer to DS4340 Connections in Different Topologies on page 37.
ST M

Feed-through lines

If the DS4340 is not connected at an end of the FlexRay bus and it is connected at a linear passive bus, you can use the feed-through bus lines to keep the stub length as short as possible. This improves the EMC robustness and FlexRay signal integrity, especially in a topology consisting of many nodes and long distances between the splices or ECUs. For details, refer to DS4340 Connections in Different Topologies on page 37.

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Pinout, pin description

If DS4340 modules are installed in MicroAutoBox, all their pins for the bus lines are connected to the Sub-D I/O connector. The bus lines (BP_ChX, BM_ChX) are also available at Molex connectors on the DS4340. For MicroAutoBox 1401/1507, refer to
n n

Sub-D I/O Connector on page 166 Interfaces on page 172

For MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506, refer to


n n

Sub-D I/O Connector on page 184 Interfaces on page 193

For MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507, refer to


n n

Sub-D I/O Connector on page 216 Interfaces on page 225

For Molex connectors, refer to


n

DS4340 Board Overview and Connector Pinouts on page 31

Related topics

HowTos How to Install or Uninstall the FlexRay Modules on page 27

DS4340 Board Overview and Connector Pinouts


Objective

The DS4340 FlexRay Interface Module additionally has FlexRay-bus connectors for connection to the FlexRay bus. Each connector provides only the FlexRay bus line plus and minus. Only one FlexRay channel is supported by the software yet.

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Overview illustration

The illustration shows the locations of connectors on the module. It is not to scale.
Host connector ChB Bus connector I/O connector

X12 X11 X21 X22

CHB

CHA

ChA Bus connector

Components

The DS4340 contains the following connectors:


n

ChA bus connector (CHA) for connection to the bus lines of channel A. The connector is a Molex connector with two pins. You can connect the bus lines to this connector or to the Sub-D I/O connector. ChB bus connector (CHB) for connection to the bus lines of channel B. The connector is a Molex connector with two pins. You can connect the bus lines to this connector or to the Sub-D I/O connector. Host connector for connecting the DS4340 module to the DS1506 or DS1507 I/O board of MicroAutoBox. The host connector has the signals for the real-time processor. I/O connector for connecting the DS4340 module to the DS1506 or DS1507 I/O board of MicroAutoBox. The I/O connector has the signals which are routed to the Sub-D I/O connector.

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Pinouts

ChA bus connector (CHA) The following table shows the pinout of the FlexRay-bus connector (CHA). Connector Pin 2 1 Signal BM_ChA BP_ChA Description Bus line minus of channel A Bus line plus of channel A

ChB bus connector (CHB) The following table shows the pinout of the ChB FlexRay-bus connector (CHB). Connector Pin 2 1 Signal BM_ChB BP_ChB Description Bus line minus of channel B Bus line plus of channel B

FR_CAB1 FlexRay Interface Cable for MicroAutoBox


Objective

The FR_CAB1 FlexRay Interface Cable for MicroAutoBox can be used to connect FlexRay bus lines to MicroAutoBox if it has DS4340 modules. The cable has two 9-pin D-Sub connectors to connect it to the FlexRay bus lines. The FlexRay Interface Cable provides the following features:
n n

Features

Connecting one FlexRay channel (A or B) to MicroAutoBox. Specially designed for using the feed-through functionality of the DS4340 (see DS4340 Connections in Different Topologies on page 37). Female 9-pin Sub-D connector for FlexRay Bus 1 (connector for incoming bus lines) Male 9-pin Sub-D connector for FlexRay Bus 2 (connector for outgoing (feed-through) bus lines)

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

4 3 5 2 1

FlexRay Bus 2

FlexRay Bus 1

The following illustration shows how the FlexRay Interface Cable is used. In this example, MicroAutoBox with two DS4340 modules is connected to a FlexRay bus. This requires four FlexRay Interface Cables because a cable can only connect one channel (A or B).
MicroAutoBox

FlexRay Bus Channel A

FlexRay Bus Channel A FlexRay Bus Channel B

FlexRay Bus Channel B

Connecting the cable to MicroAutoBox

The FlexRay Interface Cable has crimped contact plugs matching the Sub-D I/O Connector of MicroAutoBox. The following table shows the assignments of the signals to the connectors of the FlexRay Interface Cable.
Label
1 2 3 4

Color
Pink Green Pink Green

Signal
BP1) BM1) BP_FT2) BM_FT2)

Female Sub-D Connector


7 2 -

Male Sub-D Connector


7 2

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Label
5
1)

Color
Black

Signal
GND

Female Sub-D Connector


3

Male Sub-D Connector


3

The wires of BP and BM signals are twisted. 2) The wires of BP_FT and BM_FT signals are twisted.

MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 The pins for the bus lines are located at the Sub-D I/O connector of MicroAutoBox 1401/1507, refer to
n n

Sub-D I/O Connector on page 166 Interfaces on page 172

MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506 The pins for the bus lines are located at the Sub-D I/O connector of MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506, refer to
n n

Sub-D I/O Connector on page 184 Interfaces on page 193

MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507 The pins for the bus lines are located at the Sub-D I/O connector of MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507, refer to
n n

Sub-D I/O Connector on page 216 Interfaces on page 225

Connecting the cable to the FlexRay bus

Both Sub-D connectors are for the FlexRay bus lines. The female Sub-D connector connects the incoming bus lines. The male Sub-D connector connects the outgoing (feed-through) bus lines. Pin 5 of both connectors is connected to the shielding of the connectors. Pins 1, 4, 6, 8, 9 of both connectors are connected to the pins with the same number. The FlexRay bus 1 connector (female Sub-D connector) has the following pinout:
Connector Pin
1

Signal
Connected to pin 1 of male Sub-D connector BM GND Connected to pin 4 of male Sub-D connector Connected to shielding of connector

Pin

Signal

6
2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9

Connected to pin 6 of male Sub-D connector BP Connected to pin 8 of male Sub-D connector Connected to pin 9 of male Sub-D connector

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

The FlexRay bus 2 connector (male Sub-D connector) has the following pinout:
Connector Pin
5

Signal
Connected to shielding of connector Connected to pin 4 of female Sub-D connector GND BM_FT Connected to pin 1 of female Sub-D connector

Pin

Signal

9
4 3 2 1

9 8 7 6

Connected to pin 9 of female Sub-D connector Connected to pin 8 of female Sub-D connector BP_FT Connected to pin 6 of female Sub-D connector

If you want to build a linear FlexRay bus consisting of two or more FlexRay modules on one or more MicroAutoBoxes, connect the appropriate FlexRay channels of each module to their FlexRay Interface Cables. Then plug the Interface Cables into each other. Several FlexRay Interface Cables can be mounted directly next to each other.

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

DS4340 Connections in Different Topologies


Objective

You can terminate bus lines of the DS4340 FlexRay Interface module or use them unterminated. You can use feed-through pins to shorten the stub length if the DS4340 is used in a linear passive bus. This topic gives you information on the bus topology and termination. You can configure the termination in the RTIFLEXRAYCONFIG CONTROLLER SETUP block. If the DS4340 is connected at an end of the FlexRay bus, its bus lines must be terminated. The termination resistance is activated via software (see above).
DS4340 ECU Active star ECU DS4340 Bus driver TJA1080 ChannelX DS4340
Termination

Terminated cable end without feed-through

Linear passive bus

BM_FT_ChX

BP_FT_ChX BM_ChX BP_ChX

ECU

ECU

DS4340

Passive star

DS4340

= Unterminated cable end = Terminated cable end

Unterminated cable end without feed-through

If the DS4340 is not connected at an end of the FlexRay bus, its bus lines must be unterminated. The termination resistance is deactivated via software (see above).
ECU ECU Active star ECU DS4340 Bus driver TJA1080 ChannelA ECU
Termination

Linear passive bus

DS4340

DS4340

BM_FT_ChX

BP_FT_ChX

BM_ChX

BP_ChX

ECU

Passive star

ECU

= Unterminated cable end = Terminated cable end

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Un-terminated cable end with feed-through

If a DS4340 is connected at a linear passive bus, you can connect the feed-through bus lines to keep the stub length as short as possible. This improves the EMC robustness and FlexRay signal integrity, especially in topology consisting of many nodes and long distances between the splices or ECUs.
ECU DS4340 Active star DS4340 DS4340 Bus driver TJA1080 ChannelX ECU
Termination

Linear passive bus

ECU

ECU
BM_FT_ChX

BP_FT_ChX BM_ChX

BP_ChX

ECU

Passive star

ECU

= Unterminated cable end = Terminated cable end

dSPACE provides a special interface cable to support the feed-through functionality, refer to FR_CAB1 FlexRay Interface Cable for MicroAutoBox on page 33.

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Example of Connecting One DS4340 Module to a FlexRay Bus


Objective

This example shows how one DS4340 module of MicroAutoBox can be connected to a linear passive FlexRay bus. The DS4340 module is not connected at the end of the FlexRay bus. The termination resistor is therefore not set. To keep the stub length as short as possible, the feed-through bus lines are used. The following illustration shows the network that the DS4340 module of MicroAutoBox is connected to.
ECU ECU Active star DS4340 Real-time system

Topology

Linear passive bus

ECU

Critical stub length ECU ECU

ECU

Passive star

ECU

= Unterminated cable end = Terminated cable end

Circuit

The following illustration shows the connection of the FlexRay bus line plus and minus. The incoming bus lines are connected to the BP_ChA and BM_ChA pins (BP_ChB and BM_ChB respectively). The outgoing bus lines are connected to the feed-through pins BP_FT_ChA and BM_FT_ChA (BP_FT_ChB and BM_FT_ChB respectively). The incoming

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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39

Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

and outgoing bus lines are connected directly on the DS4340 module which results in a very short stub length from the connection to the transceiver. The switch for the connection is set via software (see RTIFLEXRAYCONFIG CONTROLLER SETUP ( FlexRay Configuration RTI Reference)).
ST M

DS4340 Bus driver TJA1080 ChannelA


RTIFLEXRAYCONFIG Controller setup bus lines are feed through

DS4340 Bus driver TJA1080 ChannelB Very short stub

Termination

Termination

BP_ChA

BP_FT_ChA BM_ChA BM_FT_ChA

ChannelA

BP_ChB

BP_FT_ChB BM_ChB BM_FT_ChB

ChannelB

Sub-D I/O connector

DS4340 installed in slot 1 The following illustration shows a part of the Sub-D I/O connector with the connected bus lines if the DS4340 is installed in slot 1.
Part of 1506 / 1507 Sub-D I/O connector
15 GND BP BM GND ChA_1 16 ChA_1 17 ChA_1 18 ChB_1 BP 19 ChB_1 BM ChB_1

20

ChannelA ChannelB

36

BP_FT BM_FT BP_FT BM_FT 37 38 39 ChB_1 ChB_1 ChA_1 ChA_1

ChannelA ChannelB

40

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

DS4340 installed in slot 2 The following illustration shows a part of the Sub-D I/O connector with the connected bus lines if the DS4340 is installed in slot 2.
Part of 1506 / 1507 Sub-D I/O connector ChannelB
GND 54 ChA_2 BP BM GND BP BM 59 57 56 58 55 ChA_2 ChA_2 ChB_2 ChB_2 ChB_2

ChannelA
BP_FT BM_FT 76 75 ChB_2 ChB_2 BP_FT BM_FT 78 77 ChA_2 ChA_2

ChannelA ChannelB

Valid for MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 The DS4340 Module can be only installed in slot 2 of MicroAutoBox 1401/1507.

FlexRay Interface Cable

If FR_CAB1 FlexRay Interface Cable for MicroAutoBox is used to connect the FlexRay bus lines to MicroAutoBox, two cables are required. One cable is used for channel A, another cable is used for channel B. The pins of the Sub-D I/O connector to be connected depend on the slot on which the DS4340 module is mounted. DS4340 installed in slot 1 The following table shows the pins of channel A if the DS4340 module is installed in slot 1.
Cable
1st Cable

Signal
BP_ChA_1 BM_ChA_1 BP_FT_ChA_1 BM_FT_ChA_1 GND

Label of Contact Pin at Cable


1 2 3 4 5

Pin at Sub-D I/O Connector


16 17 38 39 15

The following table shows the pins of channel B.


Cable
2nd Cable

Signal
BP_ChB_1 BM_ChB_1 BP_FT_ChB_1 BM_FT_ChB_1 GND

Label of Contact Pin at Cable


1 2 3 4 5

Pin at Sub-D I/O Connector


19 20 36 37 18

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

DS4340 installed in slot 2 The following table shows the pins of channel A if the DS4340 module is installed in slot 2.

Cable
1st Cable

Signal
BP_ChA_2 BM_ChA_2 BP_FT_ChA_2 BM_FT_ChA_2 GND

Label of Contact Pin at Cable


1 2 3 4 5

Pin at Sub-D I/O Connector


55 56 77 78 54

The following table shows the pins of channel B.


Cable
2nd Cable

Signal
BP_ChB_2 BM_ChB_2 BP_FT_ChB_2 BM_FT_ChB_2 GND

Label of Contact Pin at Cable


1 2 3 4 5

Pin at Sub-D I/O Connector


58 59 75 76 57

The incoming and outgoing FlexRay bus lines must be connected to the Sub-D connector of the FlexRay Interface Cable, see FlexRay Interface Cable on page 33.
Related topics
Basics FlexRay Interface Cable on page 33

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Example of Connecting Two DS4340 Modules to a FlexRay Bus


Objective

This example shows how two DS4340 modules of MicroAutoBox can be connected to a linear passive FlexRay bus. The DS4340 modules are not connected at the end of the FlexRay bus. The termination resistor is therefore not set. To keep the stub length as short as possible, the feed-through bus lines are used. The following illustration shows the topology that the DS4340 modules of MicroAutoBox are connected to.
Real-time system ECU DS4340 on Position 1 Active star DS4340 on Position 2

Topology

ECU Linear passive bus Critical stub length

ECU

ECU

ECU

Passive star

ECU

= Unterminated cable end = Terminated cable end

Circuit

The following illustration shows the connection to the FlexRay bus line plus and minus on both modules. The incoming bus lines are connected to the BP_ChA and BM_ChA pins (BP_ChB and BM_ChB respectively). The outgoing bus lines are connected to the feedthrough pins BP_FT_ChA and BM_FT_ChA (BP_FT_ChB and

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

BM_FT_ChB respectively). The incoming and outgoing bus lines are connected directly on the DS4340 module which results in a very short stub length from the connection to the transceiver. The switch for the connection is set via software (see RTIFLEXRAYCONFIG CONTROLLER SETUP ( FlexRay Configuration RTI Reference)).
ST M

Module position 1

DS4340 Bus driver TJA1080 ChannelA


RTIFLEXRAYCONFIG Controller setup bus lines are feed through

DS4340 Bus driver TJA1080 ChannelB Very short stub

Termination

Termination

BP_ChA

BP_FT_ChA BM_ChA BM_FT_ChA

ChannelA

BP_ChB

BP_FT_ChB BM_ChB BM_FT_ChB

ChannelB

Module position 2

DS4340 Bus driver TJA1080 ChannelA


RTIFLEXRAYCONFIG Controller setup bus lines are feed through

DS4340 Bus driver TJA1080 ChannelB Very short stub

Termination

Termination

BP_ChA

BP_FT_ChA BM_ChA BM_FT_ChA

ChannelA

BP_ChB

BP_FT_ChB BM_ChB BM_FT_ChB

ChannelB

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Sub-D I/O connector

The following illustration shows a part of the Sub-D I/O connector with the connected bus lines.
Part of 1506 / 1507 Sub-D I/O connector
15 GND BP BM GND ChA_1 16 ChA_1 17 ChA_1 18 ChB_1 BP 19 ChB_1 BM ChB_1

20

ChannelA ChannelB

36

BP_FT BM_FT BP_FT BM_FT 37 38 39 ChB_1 ChB_1 ChA_1 ChA_1

GND 54 ChA_2

BP BM GND BP BM 59 57 56 58 55 ChA_2 ChA_2 ChB_2 ChB_2 ChB_2

BP_FT BM_FT 76 75 ChB_2 ChB_2

BP_FT BM_FT 78 77 ChA_2 ChA_2

ChannelA ChannelB

FlexRay Interface Cable

If FR_CAB1 FlexRay Interface Cable for MicroAutoBox is used to connect the FlexRay bus lines to MicroAutoBox, two cables are required. One cable is used for channel A, another cable is used for channel B. The pins of the Sub-D I/O connector to be connected depend on the slot on which the DS4340 module is mounted. The following table shows the pins of channel A if the DS4340 modules are mounted in slots 1 and 2.
Cable
1st Cable

Signal
BP_ChA BM_ChA BP_FT_ChA BM_FT_ChA GND

Label of Contact Pin at Cable


1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5

Pin at Sub-D I/O Connector


16 17 38 39 15 55 56 77 78 54

2nd Cable

BP_ChA BM_ChA BP_FT_ChA BM_FT_ChA GND

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

The following table shows the pins of channel B.


Cable
3rd Cable

Signal
BP_ChB BM_ChB BP_FT_ChB BM_FT_ChB GND

Label of Contact Pin at Cable


1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5

Pin at Sub-D I/O Connector


19 20 36 37 18 58 59 75 76 57

4th Cable

BP_ChB BM_ChB BP_FT_ChB BM_FT_ChB GND

To connect the FlexRay bus lines of the DS4340 modules, the 1st cable must be connected to the 2nd cable and the 3rd cable must be connected to the 4th cable. The incoming and outgoing FlexRay bus lines must be connected to the Sub-D connector of the FlexRay Interface Cable, see FlexRay Interface Cable on page 33.
Related topics
Basics FlexRay Interface Cable on page 33

How to Wake Up MicroAutoBox by Activity on the FlexRay Bus


Objective

You can configure MicroAutoBox with DS4340 modules to be woken up when the FlexRay bus alives.

CAUTION
MicroAutoBox 1401/1507: Do not configure a FlexRay module by yourself. You may destroy parts of MicroAutoBox. If you want to use the wake-up function, the configuration must be done by dSPACE.

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Basics

The transceiver TJA1080 provides two inhibit signals (INH1 and INH2) which can be used for waking up MicroAutoBox. When the transceiver detects an activity on the FlexRay bus, the inhibit signals are set to UBAT voltage level. This starts MicroAutoBox if the inhibit signals are connected to the REMOTE pin of MicroAutoBox (Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) Connector, M 3 pin). For detailed information on the inhibit signals (INH1 and INH2), refer to the TJA1080 data sheet. The inhibit signals are not connected to the Sub-D I/O connector by default. To connect them, you must solder SMD resistors (resistance:0 , size: 1206) on the DS4340, see the following circuit.
Protection circuit BP_ChA BM_ChA PHY1 TJA1080 INH2 INH1 2 x 0R0 optional X12 INH1 INH2 X21 INH1 PHY2 TJA1080 INH2 BP_ChB BM_ChB X22 2 x 0R0 optional External IO connector UBAT

X11

Preconditions

Two SMD resistors are required (resistance: 0 , size: 1206).

MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Method

To wake up MicroAutoBox by activity on the FlexRay bus 1 If the DS4340 module is installed in MicroAutoBox, you must uninstall it first. Refer to How to Install or Uninstall the FlexRay Modules on page 27. 2 Solder the resistors on the soldering pads of the inhibit signals. The positions depend on the monitored channel and inhibit signal used, see the following table. Channel A A B B Inhibit Signal INH1 INH2 INH1 INH2 Solder Pad X11 X12 X21 X22

The following illustration shows the locations of the solder pads on the DS4340.
Host connector ChB Bus connector I/O connector

X12 X11 X21 X22

CHB

CHA

ChA Bus connector

3 Install the DS4340 module in MicroAutoBox, see How to Install or Uninstall the FlexRay Modules on page 27. 4 Connect the pins. The pins which must be connected depend on the selected inhibit signal (INH1 or INH2) and module (1 or 2).
n

Connect the inhibit pin of the Sub-D I/O connector to the REMOTE pin of the ZIF connector. Connect the battery voltage to the UBAT pins of the Sub-D I/O connector and ZIF connector.

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Connect ground to the GND pins of the Sub-D I/O connector and ZIF connector. Connect the FlexRay bus to the Sub-D I/O connector.

For general information on connecting MicroAutoBox, refer to Building the I/O Connector on page 59. For information on the pinouts, refer to
n

MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506: Connector Pinouts on page 182 MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507: Connector Pinouts on page 214

Result

When an activity is detected on the selected FlexRay channel, MicroAutoBox starts. The following illustration shows an example of how MicroAutoBox can be connected to the FlexRay bus. In this example channel A of module 1 is used for waking up. The inhibit signal INH2_1 (pin 34) is connected to the REMOTE pin.

Example

Sub-D I/O connector

15

17

20 Module 1 on MABX

60

34

35

78

+ Battery

UBAT (W3, W4)


1 2 3 4 5 6 c b a

Remote (M3)

GND (G3, G4)


1 2 3 4 5 6

Z Y X W V U T S R P

N M L K

J H G F

E D C B A

ZIF connector

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Using Third-Party FlexRay IP Modules


Objective
n

MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506 and 1401/1505/1507 can be equipped with up to two FlexRay IP modules provided by a thirdparty. MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 can be equipped only with one FlexRay IP module provided by a third-party.

For information on supported third-party modules, refer to Supported FlexRay Hardware on page 26.

Details on Third-Party FlexRay IP Modules


Objective

There follows some basic information on the pinout and pin description if third-party FlexRay IP modules are installed in MicroAutoBox. For detailed information, refer to the documentation provided with the third-party FlexRay IP module. If FlexRay IP modules are installed in MicroAutoBox, the pins for the bus lines are located at the 78-pin -Sub-D I/O connector:
Module/ Signal Slot
1 1) IP bus high/A1 IP bus low/B1 IP bus high/A2 IP bus low/B2 2 IP bus high/A3 IP bus low/B3 IP bus high/A4 IP bus low/B4
1)

Detailed information

Pinout, pin description

Description
Channel A, bus line plus, module 1 Channel A, bus line minus, module 1 Channel B, bus line plus, module 1 Channel B, bus line minus, module 1 Channel A, bus line plus, module 2 Channel A, bus line minus, module 2 Channel B, bus line plus, module 2 Channel B, bus line minus, module 2

Pin on Sub-D I/O Connector


16 17 19 20 55 56 58 59

On MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 slot 1 can not be equipped with a FlexRay IP module. Therefore the stated signals are not accessible at the I/O connector pins.

Third-party FlexRay IP modules have no feed-through lines and inhibit signals to wake up MicroAutoBox.

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

For details on the signals and pinouts of MicroAutoBox 1401/1507, refer to


n n

Sub-D I/O Connector on page 166 Interfaces on page 172

For details on the signals and pinouts of MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506, refer to


n n

Sub-D I/O Connector on page 184 Interfaces on page 193

For details on the signals and pinouts of MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507, refer to


n n

Sub-D I/O Connector on page 216 Interfaces on page 225

Related topics

Basics Supported FlexRay Hardware on page 26 HowTos How to Install or Uninstall the FlexRay Modules on page 27

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Connecting to a LIN Bus


How to Configure MicroAutoBox as the LIN Master
Default configuration

If you run MicroAutoBox within a LIN network, it is configured as a LIN slave by default. You must reconfigure MicroAutoBox if you want to use it as the LIN master. You can configure MicroAutoBox as the LIN master by adding a series connection consisting of a 1 k pull-up resistor and a diode. This circuit must be wired in parallel to the LIN transceiver. For detailed information, refer to the specification of the LIN transceiver used. Because LIN and K-line use the same circuits, wiring a 1 k pull-up resistor also affects the operation of the Kline.

Changing the default configuration

Possible methods

The configuration varies according to the MicroAutoBox variant.


n

For MicroAutoBox 1401/1507, you can add the pull-up resistor internally. The diode is already soldered on the DS1507. Refer to Method 1. For MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506 and 1401/1505/1507, you can add the pull-up resistor internally. The diode is already soldered on the DS1506. Refer to Method 2. For MicroAutoBox 1401/1501 and 1401/1504, you must add the series connection of the pull-up resistor and diode externally. Refer to Method 3.

Method 1

To configure MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 as LIN master 1 Disconnect MicroAutoBox from the power supply. 2 Open the enclosure of MicroAutoBox You will find the two CAN_TP1 modules on the bottom of the DS1507. You can solder 0805 SMD resistors at the marked positions (PAD) as the master pull-up.

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Pull-up resistor

Pull-up resistor

3 Solder the resistors at the positions marked in the above illustrations. 4 Close the enclosure of MicroAutoBox.
Method 2

To configure MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506 or MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507 as LIN master 1 Disconnect MicroAutoBox from the power supply. 2 Open the enclosure of MicroAutoBox and uninstall the DS1506 (DS1507) I/O board. You will find the two CAN_TP1 modules on the bottom of the DS1506 (DS1507). You can solder 0805 SMD resistors at the marked positions (PAD) as the master pull-up.

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53

Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

Pull-up resistor

Pull-up resistor

3 Solder the resistors at the positions marked in the above illustrations. 4 Install the DS1506 (DS1507) again. 5 Close the enclosure of MicroAutoBox.
Method 3

To configure MicroAutoBox 1401/1501 or 1401/1504 as LIN master 1 Disconnect MicroAutoBox from the power supply. 2 Solder the series connection of a diode and a 1 k resistor between the VBat and the LIN signal pins. See the following illustration.
MicroAutoBox

VBat

LIN

1 k

54

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

The following table gives the pin number for the signals of MicroAutoBox 1401/1501 or 1401/1504. Signal VBAT LIN Pin V3, V4, W3, W4, W5, X3, X4 U3

Result

MicroAutoBox is configured as the LIN master.

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Connecting MicroAutoBox to a FlexRay or LIN Bus

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

In-Vehicle Installation

How to Install MicroAutoBox in a Vehicle


Method

To install MicroAutoBox in a vehicle 1 Determine the place where you want to install MicroAutoBox and clean the surface. 2 Use the following illustration to determine the positions of the bolts. The illustration is not to scale.

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In-Vehicle Installation

222 mm 192.6 mm

5.5 mm dia.

3 Drill the four holes and prepare four threads. Use four bolts M5 is recommended to fasten MicroAutoBox to the vehicle.
Related topics
Basics Safety Precautions for Installing and Connecting the Hardware on page 13

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Building the I/O Connector

EMC precautions

To maintain compliance with CE directives, common EMC filter and shielding practices must be applied when wiring up MicroAutoBox. With long unshielded cables a common ferrite clamp surrounding all wires should be mounted as close as possible to the main connector of MicroAutoBox. Information in this section Connecting to power supply Basics on Connecting to Power Supply The connections to the power supply are provided by the I/O connector. Since it is only necessary to connect the pins (signals) needed in your application, dSPACE provides the female connector, a crimper tool and crimp contacts which allows you to build the connector yourself. Using dSPACE MicroAutoBox Crimper Tool How to Crimp Contacts with the dSPACE Crimper Tool How to Fasten the Wires and the ZIF Connector 68 69 71

Where to go from here

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Building the I/O Connector

Basics on Connecting to Power Supply


Objective

The connections to the power supply are provided by the I/O connector. You will have to change the preconfigured connector (refer to Preconfigurations by dSPACE on page 74).

Safety precautions

WA R N I N G
Even a brief disconnection of the battery while the engine is running results in a load dump of the car generator producing hazardous voltages of more than 100 V.
n

Turn off the engine while connecting or disconnecting the car battery.

WA R N I N G
Reverse polarity might destroy parts of MicroAutoBox immediately under some circumstances, even if the remote control input is turned off.
n

Double check the supply voltage polarity of MicroAutoBox.

Connections for MicroAutoBox variants with ZIF connector

To connect MicroAutoBox to the car battery, the following connections are required:
n

For the main power supply input, connect at least two of the following pins to the positive terminal of the car battery: V3, V4, W3, W4, W5, X3, and X4.
1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 5 6 c b a Z Y X W V U T S R P N M L K J H G F E D C B A

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Building the I/O Connector

For the main power supply return line, connect at least two of the following pins to the negative terminal of the car battery: F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, and H4. Unused pins should be used as a reference for the I/O signals.

1 2 3 4 5 6 c b a Z Y X W V U T S R P N M L K J H G F E D C B A

1 2 3 4 5 6

The REMOTE signal (pin M3) may be used for starting MicroAutoBox with a remote switch: KL15, for example (output of the ignition/driving switch). As an alternative, connect M3 to the signal KL30 (input from the positive terminal of the car battery).

1 2 3 4 5 6 c b a Z Y X W V U T S R P N M L K J H G F E D C B A

1 2 3 4 5 6

If you connect the remote pin to the car battery directly, MicroAutoBox will always be turned on, and the car battery will then soon run down if the engine does not operate. A switch is therefore highly recommended.

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Building the I/O Connector

Connections for MicroAutoBox variants with power input connector

To connect MicroAutoBox with power input connector to the car battery, the following connections are required:

Connector
A2 2 1 5 4 3 A1

Pin A2

Signal VBAT (8 V 40 V DC)

Pin

Signal

5 2 1 A1 Reserved Reserved GND 4 3

Reserved VREMOTE 1) Reserved

If you use the matching cable supplied by dSPACE VREMOTE is connected to VBAT within the connector shell. This cable is intended for use with a lab power supply only.

1)

The following table gives a description of the pins used for power input and output for MicroAutoBox 1401/1507: Pin A2 A1 Signal VBAT GND Description/Function Main power supply input. Connect this pin to the positive pole of your car battery. Main power supply return and reference for all input and output signals. Connect this pin to the minus pole of your car battery. This signal is also connected to the case of MicroAutoBox.
o

VREMOTE

The remote voltage may be used for starting MicroAutoBox with a remote switch: KL15, for example (output of the ignition/driving switch). If you connect the remote pin to the car battery directly, MicroAutoBox will always be turned on, and the car battery will soon be exhausted if the engine is not running. Thus, a switch is highly recommended. The remote voltage should not exceed the supply voltage.

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Building the I/O Connector

Wiring scheme

For MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 To connect MicroAutoBox with power input connector to the car battery, the following connections are required:
A1 To VBAT (+) or signal KL30 + VREMOTE to pin 4

Fuse (close to battery)

A2

For the wires the following values are recommended: AWG 20 21 22 24 25 26 Diameter (mm) 0.812 0.723 0.644 0.511 0.455 0.405 Cross section (mm2) 0.518 0.411 0.326 0.205 0.163 0.129

The ends of the wires should be stripped for 3 4 mm. It is highly recommended to insert a fuse into the main power supply input wire (close to battery). Choose the value of the fuse according to the maximum current. For standard MicroAutoBox a fuse within the range of 8 10 A is recommended. If VSENS or VBATprot are loaded the value of the fuse has to be higher.

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Building the I/O Connector

For MicroAutoBox with ZIF connector To connect MicroAutoBox to a car battery the wiring has to be performed according to the following illustration:
To VBAT (+) or signal KL30 + REMOTE to pin M3

Fuse (close to battery)

To at least two of the pins V3, V4, W3, W4, W5, X3, and X4

To at least two of the pins F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, and H4

For the wires the following values are recommended: AWG 20 21 22 24 25 26 Diameter (mm) 0.812 0.723 0.644 0.511 0.455 0.405 Cross section (mm2) 0.518 0.411 0.326 0.205 0.163 0.129

The ends of the wires should be stripped for 3 4 mm. It is highly recommended to insert a fuse into the main power supply input wire (close to battery). Choose the value of the fuse according to the maximum current. For standard MicroAutoBox a fuse within the range of 8 10 A is recommended. If VSENS or VBATprot are loaded the value of the fuse has to be higher.

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Building the I/O Connector

Input/output circuits

For the power supply of the input/output circuits the following connections are relevant (this does not apply to MicroAutoBox 1401/1507): Description/ Function This input supplies all digital input and output circuits. o Connect this input to VSENS to select TTL-compatible logic levels at the inputs/outputs. o Connect this input to VBATprot to select automotive-compatible logic levels at the inputs/outputs. o Do not connect this pin directly to VBAT, because the input and output circuits are not load dump or reverse voltage protected for this signal. o While MicroAutoBox is being powered down, the output stages have pullup behavior to VDRIVE. So the outputs may reach the level of VDRIVE. If this behavior is critical in your application, you have to power down your external devices or VDRIVE before MicroAutoBox is powered down. You can also use the REMOTE signal (Kl.15) with the power control software functionality to first switch off VDRIVE via a relay. Sensor supply output. Use this output to supply your sensors and/or VDRIVE. Protected VBAT output. Use this output to drive VDRIVE when automotive logic levels are needed. The signal levels depend on the MicroAutoBox variant. Refer to:
n n n

Pin E1

Signal VDRIVE

E2 c2

VSENS VBATprot

MicroAutoBox 1401/1501: Absolute Maximum Levels on page 129 MicroAutoBox 1401/1504: Absolute Maximum Levels on page 153 MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506: Absolute Maximum Levels on page 199 MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507: Absolute Maximum Levels on page 231

Related topics

Basics Safety Precautions for Installing and Connecting the Hardware on page 13

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Building the I/O Connector

Connecting Sensor Ground Lines to MicroAutoBox


Objective

The measurement result of sensor input signals can be corrupted by voltage drops caused by load current flow on the ground lines of the connected sensor. To reduce these effects, you have to perform ideal grounding. Ideal grounding as shown in the illustration below is strongly recommended if there are high load currents in your application and if you want to measure highly accurate values.

Ideal grounding

VSENS ADC MicroAutoBox I/O connector Sensor ground line Car battery GND + Sensor

To reduce the current flow on the sensor ground line, connect this line as near as possible to a GND pin of the I/O connector.

Fulfilling the Requirements for CE Certification


Affected MicroAutoBox variants

The requirements given below are valid only for:


n n n

MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506 MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

Other variants are not affected. Therefore these variants are not shipped with the required ferrites.

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Building the I/O Connector

Attaching ferrites

To fulfill the requirements for CE certification, you have to attach the enclosed ferrites to the cable harness, see the illustration below:
Sub-D I/O connector MicroAutoBox Ferrite 74271222

Ferrite 7427135

ZIF I/O connector


n

Attach the ferrite with part number 74271222 close to the Sub-D I/O connector. Attach the ferrite with part number 7427135 close to the ZIF I/O connector. Place the ferrites as close as possible to the related connector of the MicroAutoBox cable harness for optimum results.

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Building the I/O Connector

Using dSPACE MicroAutoBox Crimper Tool


Objective

dSPACE provides a crimper tool which is especially designed to crimp the contacts needed for the Sub-D connector (MicroAutoBox 1401/1507, MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506, and MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507) and the zero insertion force (ZIF) connector. The following illustration shows the crimper tool and the Sub-D and ZIF contacts which can be crimped with it. You can crimp contacts for different wire dimensions.
Inlets

Overview

Sub-D 24 - 28

ZIF 24 - 26

ZIF 20 - 22

Sub-D contact

ZIF contact

Precondition for a proper crimp

The precondition for a crimper contact being properly crimped to the wire is that the wire dimension, strip length, crimper contact, and crimper tool all fit.

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Building the I/O Connector

Possible wire dimensions

The crimper tool supplied by dSPACE supports the following wire dimensions: Inlet ZIF 20 22 AWG1) 20 21 22 ZIF 24 26 24 25 26 Sub-D 24 28 24 25 26 27 28
1)

Diameter (mm) 0.812 0.723 0.644 0.511 0.455 0.405 0.511 0.455 0.405 0.360 0.330

Cross Section (mm2) 0.518 0.411 0.326 0.205 0.163 0.129 0.205 0.163 0.129 0.096 0.080

AWG = American Wire Gauge

The AWG range for each feed hole is indicated on the crimper tool.

How to Crimp Contacts with the dSPACE Crimper Tool


Objective

The following instructions apply if you want to crimp with the dSPACE crimper tool for MicroAutoBox connectors. The end of the wire is stripped for 3 4 mm. To crimp contacts with the dSPACE crimper tool 1 To open the crimper tool, press the handles of the tool together. 2 Push up the locator a little to see the feed holes in the locator as shown in the illustration below.

Preconditions Method

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Building the I/O Connector

Feed holes

Locator

3 Hold the crimper contact with the open side facing upwards and insert it into its specific feed hole, so that the open side points towards the top as shown in the illustration below.
Contact open side facing upwards

Feed hole

4 Insert the wire. 5 To crimp the contact, close the crimper tool up to its end position, where it automatically reopens. If it does not reopen, it is not properly closed up to its end position.
Result

The contact and the wire are properly connected.

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Building the I/O Connector

How to Fasten the Wires and the ZIF Connector


Objective

Before connecting the ZIF connector to MicroAutoBox you have to fasten the wires. After connecting the ZIF connector you have to lock it at the MicroAutoBox socket. To fasten the wires and the connector 1 Insert the wires in the eye of the connector cover.

Method

Eye of the cover with screw to fasten the wires

Cover of the connector

2 Use the four screws to fasten the cover.

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Building the I/O Connector

Screws to fasten the cover to the connector

Handle to fasten the connector

3 Use the screw to fasten the wires in the eye. 4 Insert the connector into the socket of MicroAutoBox and turn the handle to the LOCK position.
Result

The connector is fastened against accidental disconnection.

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

Objective

Before working with MicroAutoBox in a vehicle you should put the system into operation in your laboratory to configure the dSPACE system and to get started with MicroAutoBox loading applications to the system. Information in this section Connecting MicroAutoBox to Power Supply To set MicroAutoBox into operation for the first time in your laboratory you have to connect the box to the power supply. Connecting via Bus Interface You have to connect MicroAutoBox to your host PC via a bus interface. To do this, you have to install one of dSPACEs link boards (DS813, DS815, DS817, DS819, DS821) in your host PC. Using dSPACE CardSafe Connecting dSPACE Boxes to the Host PC via DS830 dSPACEs DS830 MultiLink Panel allows you to connect up to 16 dSPACE boxes to one host PC. With the DS830, you need to install only one link board (PC) in the host PC. 74

Where to go from here

79

88 98

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

Connecting MicroAutoBox to Power Supply


Where to go from here

Information in this section Preconfigurations by dSPACE dSPACE preconfigured the matching I/O connector with the wires for the power supply. So you can easily start using the system in the laboratory. How to Connect and Power MicroAutoBox 74

78

Preconfigurations by dSPACE
MicroAutoBox 1401/1501 and 1401/1504

The following illustration shows MicroAutoBox 1401/1501 respectively 1401/1504 and the position of the I/O connector, the status LED (if installed) and the serial connector to the PC (to the left of the I/O connector).

Status LED

ZIF I/O connector Host interface connector

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

June 2009

Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

The following illustration shows MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 and the positions of the I/O connector, the power input connector, the ECU interface connector and the serial connector (host interface) to the PC.
Power input connector

ECU interface connector

Host interface connector

Sub-D I/O connector

MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

The following illustration shows MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506 and the positions of the I/O connectors, the status LED and the serial connector (host interface) to the PC.
Sub-D I/O connector

Status LED

ZIF I/O connector Host interface connector

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

The following illustration shows MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507 and the positions of the I/O connectors, the status LED and the serial connector (host interface) to the PC.
Sub-D I/O connector

ECU interface connector Status LED

ZIF I/O connector Host interface connector

I/O connectors

The matching ZIF I/O connector is preconfigured with the wires for the power supply. The Sub-D I/O connector of DS1401/1507, DS1401/1505/1506, and DS1401/1505/1507 is used to connect CAN, LIN, FlexRay and the IP modules. The matching power input connector is preconfigured with the wires for the power supply (only available for MicroAutoBox 1401/1507). dSPACE preconfigured the matching ZIF connector and the power input connector as follows so that you can get started with the system without any problems.

Preconfigured matching ZIF connector

Pin W3, W4

Signal VBAT

Meaning Main power supply input (red wire)

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

Pin G3, G4 M3

Signal GND REMOTE connected to V4 (VBAT)

Meaning Main power supply return line (black wire) MicroAutoBox starts automatically when power is supplied (yellow wire). For the meaning of the REMOTE signal, refer to Basics on Connecting to Power Supply on page 60. Selects TTL-compatible logic levels at the input/output signals (green wire).

E1 connected to E2

VSENS

The following illustration shows the I/O connector as pre-configured by dSPACE:


VBAT GND VSENS 1 2 3 4 5 6 c b a Z Y X W V U T S R P OPEN 1 2 3 4 5 6 N M L K J H G F E D C B A

LOCK

Preconfigured matching power input connector

A preconfigured cable for the supply voltage is provided by dSPACE. This cable is intended to operate MicroAutoBox with a laboratory power supply during development. Therefore, the VREMOTE input (pin 4) is shorted to VBAT (pin A2) inside the connector in order to save a separate switch. Do not use this cable in the vehicle. Otherwise, MicroAutoBox will always be turned on. The VBAT wire (red) contains a melting fuse (4.0 A, time lag). Each wire has a cross-section of 1.5 mm2. The following illustration shows the power input connector:

A1

A2

VREMOTE shorted to VBAT

Related topics

Basics Basics on Connecting to Power Supply on page 60

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

How to Connect and Power MicroAutoBox


Objective

To set MicroAutoBox into operation for the first time in your laboratory you have to connect the box to the power supply. To power MicroAutoBox 1 Switch off the PCs power supply. 2 Connect the wire for the main power supply input (VBAT) to the positive terminal of the power supply.
n n

Method

MicroAutoBox 1401/1507: A2 All other variants: At least two of the following pins have to be connected: V3, V4, W3, W4, W5, X3, and X4.

3 Connect the wire for the main power supply return line (GND) to the negative terminal of the power supply.
n n

MicroAutoBox 1401/1507: A1 All other variants: At least two of the following pins have to be connected: F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, and H4.

Unused pins should be used as a reference for the I/O signals.


Status LED

The status LED of MicroAutoBox shows you different working modes and potential malfunctions (MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 does not provide a status LED). If batterie power is switched on and the REMOTE signal/KL15 is used (see Basics on Connecting to Power Supply on page 60), the status LED shows two states: Red LED Reset state, power suppply is switched on, no application is downloaded to the real-time processor. Green LED Application is running.

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

Connecting via Bus Interface


Objective

You have to connect MicroAutoBox to your host PC via a bus interface. To do this, you have to install one of dSPACEs link boards (DS813, DS815, DS817, DS819, DS821) in your host PC. Information in this section Before using link boards you should familiarize yourself with the alternatives and limitations that apply to dSPACEs link boards. Link Boards Variants Limitations With Link Boards Establishing a bus connection via link boards How to Establish a Bus Connection DS813/DS817 <> MicroAutoBox How to Establish a Bus Connection DS815/DS821 <> MicroAutoBox Status LED for connection indication Identifying the Connection Status The link boards have LEDs on the bracket to indicate the current status of the connection. Information in other sections Connecting dSPACE Boxes to the Host PC via DS830 dSPACEs DS830 MultiLink Panel allows you to connect up to 16 dSPACE boxes to one host PC. With the DS830, you need to install only one link board (PC) in the host PC. 98 85 81 81 79 80

Where to go from here

Link Boards Variants


Overview of alternatives

You have five alternatives to establish a bus connection between MicroAutoBox and your host PC. The DS813 to be installed in the host PC is an ISA bus interface, and requires a free 16-bit ISA slot in the host PC.

DS813 Link Board (PC)

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

DS815 Link Board (PC)

The DS815 to be installed in the host PC (usuallay a notebook) is a PC Card, and requires a free PC card slot in the host PC. The DS817 to be installed in the host PC is a PCI interface, and requires a free PCI slot in the host PC. The DS819 to be installed in the host PC is a PCI Express x1 interface, and requires a free PCI Express slot (x1 x32) in the host PC. The DS821 to be installed in the host PC (usually a notebook) is an ExpressCard/54, and requires a free ExpressCard/54 slot in the host PC.

DS817 Link Board (PC)

DS819 Link Board (PC)

DS821 Link Board (PC)

Limitations With Link Boards


Objective

The following limitations currently apply for the link boards DS813, DS815, DS817, DS819, and DS821. The DS819 and DS821 link boards are supported as of dSPACE Release 5.2.
n

Required software

Number of link boards (PC)

You can install only up to eight DS813, DS817, or DS819 boards in one host PC. Windows 2000, Windows XP and Windows Vista allow only one DS815. This limitation also applies to DS815 boards which are installed in the host PC via a PCI-to-PC Card adapter. If you want to work with more than one MicroAutoBox use the DS813, DS817, DS819, DS821, or DS830.

Other limitations

The default setting of the rotary switches of the DS813 must be 000(plug & play). The length of the cable between a link board (PC) and MicroAutoBox is limited to 10 m. You cannot connect the dSPACE hardware that are currently being offered to the host PC via DS811 and DS812 Link Board. The DS815 and DS821 link boards do not support Hot-Plug mode (= installing and uninstalling the boards while the PC is powered). After installing a DS815 or DS821, your host PC cannot switch to stand-by mode.

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How to Establish a Bus Connection DS813/DS817 <> MicroAutoBox


Objective

The following instructions apply if you want to install a bus connection with the link boards DS813/DS817/DS819. Use only the crossed-over patch cable which comes with the hardware package.
n n

Cable

Preconditions

The system is switched off. A link board (DS813, DS817 or DS819) is installed in your host PC.

Method

To establish the bus connection via crossed-over patch cable 1 Connect the DS813, DS817 or the DS819 to the MicroAutoBox. Do not connect the crossed-over patch cable to an Ethernet LAN or the LAN connectors of a PC or a notebook. 2 Switch on the system.

Next steps

The dSPACE system is now ready to run real-time applications. To check the proper installation and the board properties, and to get started with the system, refer to the dSPACE System First Work Steps document.

How to Establish a Bus Connection DS815/DS821 <> MicroAutoBox


Objective

The following instructions apply if you want to establish a bus connection with the DS815 and DS821 link boards.
n

Cable

Use only the crossed-over patch cable which comes with the hardware package. DS815 Link Boards (PC) delivered before November 2001 are equipped with other connectors. You need a matching link cable. For details, refer to DS815 Connector and PC Card Link on page 83.

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

To connect the DS815 with a standard patch cable an adapter cable is available from dSPACE. For details, refer to DS815-RJ45 adapter cable on page 85.

dSPACE CardSafe

To hold the DS815 or DS821 firmly in a notebook slot, you can use the dSPACE CardSafe. The dSPACE CardSafe protects a card against unwanted removal from the host PC. It is highly recommended to use the DS821 only in combination with the dSPACE CardSafe.

For details, refer to Using dSPACE CardSafe on page 88.


Preconditions
n n

The system is switched off. A DS815 or DS821 is inserted in your host PC.

Method

To establish a bus connection DS815/DS821 <> MicroAutoBox 1 Attach the connector of the DS815 or DS821 to MicroAutoBox with the crossed-over patch cable. Do not connect the crossed-over patch cable to an Ethernet LAN or the LAN connectors of a PC or a notebook. 2 Switch on the system.

Next steps

MicroAutoBox is now ready to run real-time applications. To check the proper installation and the board properties, and to get started with the system, refer to the dSPACE System First Work Steps document.

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

DS815 Connector and PC Card Link


DS815 Link Boards (PC) delivered as of November 2001 are equipped with a new connector and come with a new matching link cable. The PC card link cables of DS815 boards delivered before November 2001 are not compatible with the new cables.

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

Old PC card link cable ...

New PC card link cable

... without strain-relief clamp

... with strain-relief clamp

Old DS815 connector

New DS815 connector

DS815 boards delivered before November 2001 have a blue label. Boards delivered later have a red label, or a blue label with Vs. 2.0.

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DS815-RJ45 adapter cable

An adapter cable is available for the new DS815 connector to adapt the DS815 to a standard patch cable with an RJ45 connector. The adapter cable is labeled DS815-RJ45 Vs 2.0.

LED (yellow)

LED (green)

For the connection between the DS815-RJ45 adapter cable and the DS814 Link Board (Box), you must use a crossed-over patch cable.

Identifying the Connection Status


DS813, DS817, DS819

Three LEDs on the brackets of the DS813, DS817 andDS819 indicate the current status of the connection.
Yellow Green Red

Patch cable connector

Fiber-optic connector

Yellow LED A lit yellow LED indicates that the connection between the host PC and MicroAutoBox is ready for communication.

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

Red LED The red LED indicates a fiber-optic connection. MicroAutoBox cannot be connected via fiber-optic cable. Green LED received.
DS815

A lit green LED indicates that data is being sent or

The DS815 is not equipped with optical status indicators. Using the DS815-RJ45 adapter cable, you can identify the current status of the connection by the two LEDs integrated in the shell of the RJ45 connector. Two LEDs indicate the current status of the connection.

DS815-RJ45 adapter cable

LED (yellow)

LED (green)

Yellow LED A lit yellow LED indicates that the connection between the host PC and the expansion box is ready for communication. Green LED received. A lit green LED indicates that data is being sent or

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

DS821

Two LEDs indicate the current status of the connection.


Status LEDs: Yellow Green

Yellow LED A lit yellow LED indicates that the connection between the host PC and the expansion box is ready for communication. Green LED received. A lit green LED indicates that data is being sent or

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

Using dSPACE CardSafe


Objective

To hold the DS815 or DS821 firmly in a notebook slot, you can use the dSPACE CardSafe. The dSPACE CardSafe protects the inserted dSPACE link boards, cables, or connectors against unwanted removal from the notebook and against damage. Information in this section Introduction to dSPACE CardSafe How to Mount dSPACE CardSafe How to Remove dSPACE CardSafe for Transportation How to Remove dSPACE CardSafe Completely 89 91 95 96

Where to go from here

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MicroAutoBox Hardware Installation and Configuration

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

Introduction to dSPACE CardSafe


Overview

The dSPACE CardSafe consists of a base plate and a card holder. The base plate is fixed to the underside of the notebook and does not have to be removed for transportation. The card holder must be plugged into the base plate. The height of the clamp plates can be adapted to the notebook slot via bolt spacers. The illustration below shows the main components of dSPACE CardSafe with a DS821.

Base plate

DS821 Clamp plates

Card holder

Notebook

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

Required mouting area

The illustration below shows the position and the space required for mounting the base plate on the underside of the nodebook. You can level out an uneven surface on the underside with acrylic foam tapes, which are part of the delivery. You can level out the gap between the underside of the notebook and the notebook slot via bolt spacers. The max. gap is approx. 20 mm (see below).

Required area for mounting the base plate

65 mm Notebook (side view) 85 mm Notebook slot with PC card Max. gap: approx. 20 mm Notebook slot

Notebook (bottom view)

Items delivered

dSPACE CardSafe comes as a mounting kit with the following components: Item Acrylic foam tape Illustration

Number 1x

1x

Mounting template

dSPACE

Template for mounting the dSPACE CardSafe Schablone zum Anbringen des dSPACE CardSafe

1x

Base plate with velcro tape

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Number 2x

Item Card fixture

Illustration

Card fixture for DS821 Link Board 2x Clamp plate

Card fixture for DS815 Link Board

6x 2x 10 x 4x

Screw (different lengths) Knurled nut Bolt spacer (different lengths) Rubber feet

1x

Mounting instructions

The items deliverd are subject to change without notice.

How to Mount dSPACE CardSafe


Method

To mount dSPACE CardSafe

CAUTION
Do not mount the CardSafe over any ventilation slots at the bottom of the notebook. This could cause overheating and possibly destroy the notebook processor.

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

Step 1

Illustration

Instruction Only if the surface of the notebook at the mounting position is not smooth: Remove the protective foil and put the acrylic foam tapes on the notebook so that there is a smooth surface at the mounting position.

Fold and then cut the template for mounting the dSPACE CardSafe.

Center the template on the underside of the notebook with a partially inserted link board.

Remove the protective foil from the velcro tape.

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Step 5

Illustration

Instruction Press the complete CardSafe (as delivered) to the underside of the notebook in the opening of the template. The procedure is the same if the card fixture for the DS821 Link Board and/or other spacers/screws are mounted.

Card fixture for DS821 Link Board 6

Card fixture for DS815 Link Board Push a small coin on the spring of the base plate to release the card fixture. To avoid injury, do not use your fingernail to unlock the connector fixture.

While pressing the spring, unplug the card fixture. The base plate stays in position. After this remove the template.

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

Step 8

Illustration

Instruction Fix the four rubber feet to the underside of the notebook. This is to compensate the height of the CardSafe and ensure the stability of the notebook.

Plug in the card fixture. Use the card fixture corresponding to your link board.

10

Adjust the bottom clamp plate with spacers as needed.

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Step 11

Illustration

Instruction Plug in the link board and mount the other clamp plate.

12

Fix the link board/connector with the knurled nuts.

How to Remove dSPACE CardSafe for Transportation


Objective

To transport the notebook in a bag, you have to remove only the card fixture of the CardSafe.
n

Preconditions

DS815: The connector of the DS815 Link Board is removed. The link board can remain in the notebook. DS821: The DS821 Link Board is removed from the notebook.

Method

To remove dSPACE CardSafe for transportation Step 1 Illustration Instruction Push a small coin on the spring of the base plate. To avoid injury, do not use your fingernail to unlock the connector fixture.

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

Step 2

Illustration

Instruction Remove the card fixture.

How to Remove dSPACE CardSafe Completely


Objective

Some notebooks with an installed CardSafe may no longer fit in docking stations. In such cases the CardSafe must be removed completely.
n

Preconditions

DS815: The connector of the DS815 Link Board is removed. The link board can remain in the notebook. DS821: The DS821 Link Board is removed from the notebook.

Method

To remove dSPACE CardSafe completely

CAUTION
The base plate is fixed by velcro tape. Remove the base plate carefully when peeling the tape off, as the bottom of a notebook is very thin and sensitive.

Step 1

Illustration

Instruction Push a small coin on the spring of the base plate. To avoid injury, do not use your fingernail to unlock the connector fixture.

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Step 2

Illustration

Instruction Remove the card fixture.

Carefully remove the base plate with a screwdriver.

Leave the velcro tapes on the notebook at the mounting positions.

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

Connecting dSPACE Boxes to the Host PC via DS830


Objective

dSPACEs DS830 MultiLink Panel allows you to connect up to 16 dSPACE boxes to one host PC. With the DS830, you need to install only one link board (PC) in the host PC. Information in this section Features of DS830 MultiLink Panel How to Connect the DS830 DS830: Identifying the Connection Status 98 101 103

Where to go from here

Features of DS830 MultiLink Panel


Situation without DS830

You can connect several dSPACE boxes expansion boxes and/or MicroAutoBoxes to one host PC. Each connection requires a separate link board (PC) installed in the PC. The number of dSPACE boxes you can connect to the PC is limited by the number of free slots for link boards. As an example, the following illustration shows how you can connect four boxes to your PC. You require four link boards (PC) in the PC.
Box 1 Box 2 Box 3 Box 4 Host PC

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Situation with DS830

dSPACEs DS830 MultiLink Panel allows you to connect up to 16 dSPACE boxes to one host PC. With the DS830, you need to install only one link board (PC) in the host PC. As an example, the following illustration shows how to connect the DS830 to the host PC and four dSPACE boxes.
Box 1 Box 2 Box 3 DS830 Host PC Box 4

You can connect any combination of expansion boxes and MicroAutoBoxes to the DS830. You can connect several DS830 panels to one host PC. Each DS830 has to be connected to the PC via a separate link board (PC). To install your dSPACE system in a vehicle, you can use the car battery as the power supply for the DS830.

Connecting and installing the DS830

To connect the DS830 to the host PC as well as to the dSPACE boxes, you can use any combination of crossed-over patch cables and fiber-optic cables. For example, you can connect the DS830 to the host PC and an expansion box via a fiber-optic cable, and to a MicroAutoBox via a patch cable. The DS830 can be used in a laboratory or in vehicle. The cables required to supply power to the DS830 via a mains socket or a car battery are part of the DS830 hardware package. The cable for the mains socket includes a power supply unit (15.0 V, 4.0 A). For instructions on the installation, see How to Connect the DS830 on page 101.

Limitations

The following limitations currently apply to the DS830:


n

Up to 4 (DS830/4), 8 (DS830/8) or 16 (DS830/16) dSPACE boxes can be connected to one panel. The length of each connection is limited to
o

10 m (crossed-over patch cable), and

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

100 m (fiber-optic cable).

Therefore, the maximum distance between a host PC and a box is 200 m (DS830 connected to both the PC and the box via fiber-optic cables).
n

DS830 panels cannot be cascaded, which means that you cannot connect one DS830 to another. Each DS830 must be connected directly to a link board (PC).

Data sheet

For the specifications of the DS830, refer to Data Sheet DS830 Multilink Panel on page 257. The DS830 is equipped with status LEDs: see DS830: Identifying the Connection Status on page 103.
Basics DS830: Identifying the Connection Status on page 103 HowTos How to Connect the DS830 on page 101 References Data Sheet DS830 Multilink Panel on page 257

Status LEDs

Related topics

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How to Connect the DS830


Objective

To install the DS830, you have to connect it to the host PC and the dSPACE boxes, and supply power to the panel. The front of the DS830 panel provides all the connectors required for installation. The following illustration shows the front of the DS830/8.

Panel front

Fiber-optic connectors

Patch-cable connectors

Connection to host PC

Connection to dSPACE boxes

Connection to power supply

Cables

Use only the cable (fiber-optic or patch cable) supplied with the dSPACE hardware package.

The DS830 hardware package also includes the cables for connecting the DS830 to the power supply.
Possible methods

You can supply power to the DS830 Multilink Panel:


n n

Via mains socket. Refer to Method 1. Via car battery. Refer to Method 2.

Method 1

To connect the DS830 via mains socket 1 Connect the DS830 to the host PC. 2 Connect the DS830 to the dSPACE boxes (expansion box and/or MicroAutoBoxes). 3 Use the cable with the integrated power supply unit. Plug the power supply cable into the LEMO connector of the DS830.

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Method 2

To connect the DS830 via car battery 1 Connect the DS830 to the host PC. 2 Connect the DS830 to the dSPACE boxes (expansion box and/or MicroAutoBoxes). 3 Use the cable with the unterminated end and connect this end to the car battery. Use a 5 A fuse to protect the DS830. The illustration below shows how to supply power to the DS830 if installed in a vehicle.
DS830/x + Red wire 5 A fuse
(close to battery)

Car battery (12 V)

Black wire

It is highly recommended to insert a fuse into the main power supply wire. The fuse should be installed close to the battery. If you connect the red wire to the car battery directly, the DS830 will always be turned on, and the car battery will soon run down if the engine does not operate. Thus, a switch is highly recommended. Use only a switch and wires that are designed for at least 5 A.

Related topics

Basics DS830: Identifying the Connection Status on page 103

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DS830: Identifying the Connection Status


Objective

The front of the DS830 panel has several LEDs, which indicate the current status of the connection to the host PC and the connected dSPACE boxes (expansion boxes or MicroAutoBoxes), as well as the status of the panels power supply. The illustration below shows the status LEDs for one pair of fiber-optic and patch cable connectors.

Status LEDs

PC
Fiber-optic connector

Box1

Yellow LED (fiber-optic connector) Red LED Green LED Yellow LED (patch cable connector) Patch cable connector Green power LEDs LEMO connector

Yellow LED (fiber-optic connector) Lit if the host PC and the corresponding dSPACE box are currently used for communication. Red LED Green LED Lit if a fiber-optic cable is used. Lit when data is being sent or received.

Yellow LED (patch cable connector) Lit if the connection to the host PC or a connected dSPACE box is ready for communication. Green power LEDs the DS830.
Related topics
HowTos How to Connect the DS830 on page 101

Lit both when power is supplied correctly to

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Putting MicroAutoBox into Operation

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Working with MicroAutoBox in a Vehicle

Notes and Tips on Working


Objective

MicroAutoBox operates as a stand-alone system in a vehicle. You have to download the control model to the flash memory of MicroAutoBox. Connect MicroAutoBox as described in Basics on Connecting to Power Supply on page 60 to start MicroAutoBox when starting the engine.

Connecting MicroAutoBox

Safety precautions

WA R N I N G
Even a brief disconnection of the battery while the engine is running results in a load dump of the car generator producing hazardous voltages of more than 100 V.
n

Turn off the engine while connecting or disconnecting the car battery.

CAUTION
Reverse polarity might destroy parts of MicroAutoBox immediatly under some circumstances, even if the remote control input is turned off.
n

Double check the supply voltage polartiy of MicroAutoBox.

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Working with MicroAutoBox in a Vehicle

Working steps

The following list shows one of several strategies for working with MicroAutoBox in a vehicle.
n

Prepare your application as usual on your PC in a laboratory. You may integrate the flight recorder function for data acquisition. Connect MicroAutoBox to the host PC, load the application to the global memory of MicroAutoBox, and use ControlDesk to check the application. Load the application to the flash memory of MicroAutoBox. Thus, the application will be started automatically on power-up. Install MicroAutoBox in the vehicle, connect MicroAutoBox to the power supply and to the I/O signals. Perform the tests with the vehicle: MicroAutoBox operates automatically and the flight recorder will collect the data. Connect a notebook to MicroAutoBox at any time:
o o o o

To save flight recorder data to disk, To load new versions of the application, To observe the behavior of the model with ControlDesk, and To change the parameters of the model with ControlDesk. The notebook may remain connected to MicroAutoBox as long as you like.

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Using MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Objective

The MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box is a helpful tool for development with MicroAutoBox. It provides easy access to all the signals of MicroAutoBox. For example, you can:
n

Check and/or reconnect signals without changing the existing cable harness Connect sensors and/or actuators Connect measurement devices

n n

You can also terminate bus line signals via termination switches.
Where to go from here

Information in this section Features of MicroAutoBox Break-Out Boxes Working Principles Connecting Examples Terminating CAN Bus Lines Terminating FlexRay Bus Lines Information in other sections Data Sheet MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box 245 108 108 111 113 114

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Using MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Features of MicroAutoBox Break-Out Boxes


Main features

MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box provides the following main features:


n

Easily to connect to all MicroAutoBox variants. A connecting cable with zero insertion force (ZIF) connectors belongs to the Break-Out Box.

One labeled terminal for each signal of the ZIF connector. Via terminals, you can:
o o

Break the signal path with a knife disconnector. Connect test plug(s) and/or stripped wires on 5 points on each terminal.

All the CAN and FlexRay bus lines are connected to 9-pin Sub-D connectors. CAN and FlexRay buses can be terminated easily and quickly via termination switches. These buses have to be terminated according to their specifications to prevent wave reflections at the end. CAN bus lines can be terminated with 120 , FlexRay bus lines with 94 or 47 (47 for test purposes).

More features

For a complete overview of the features, refer to Data Overview on page 255.

Working Principles
Objective

You can connect signals to the terminal points of MicroAutoBox BreakOut Box either with test plugs or with stripped wires. The signal paths can be interrupted via the knife disconnectors without disconnecting a test plug or wire.

Notes

WA R N I N G
Risk of serious injury or death due to electric shock Depending on the connected devices, there can be hazardous voltages on the contacts of the boxes caused by failures. Do not touch bare contacts.

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Using MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

WA R N I N G
Risk of serious injury or death Changing the existing cable harness via a Break-Out Box can cause uncontrolled movements and/or damage to connected devices.
n

Before changing the cabling, think through the effects of the changes you are planning. Ensure that no one is in the potential danger zone of the device (test bench, etc.) when the changes first take effect.

Connecting/disconnecting stripped wires

Push down the spring-cage connection release mechanism to connect or disconnect the stripped end of a single wire as shown in the illustration below:
Screwdriver

2. Stripped wire

1. Terminal Spring-cage release mechanism

Use a 3 mm (0.12 in.) slotted screwdriver to push down the spring-cage connection release mechanism.

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Using MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Wire dimensions The spring-cage connection supports cable dimensions in the range AWG16 ... AWG24, as shown in the following table: AWG1) Diameter mm 16 24
1)

Cross-Section inch 0.05 0.2 mm2 1.3 0.205 inch2 0.002 0.0003

1.29 0.511

AWG = American Wire Gauge

Connecting test plugs

You can connect the terminals with test plugs (banana plugs) that have a metal pin of 2.0 mm (0.08 in.) diameter. Each terminal provides a knife disconnector to interrupt a signal path, for example, for measuring purposes. The following illustration shows how to open a knife disconnector:
Screwdriver

Interrupting the signal path

Knife disconnector

Terminal

Use a 3 mm (0.12 in.) slotted screwdriver to lift the knife disconnector.

Move the knife disconnector to its upper position until it locks in place to ensure signal interruption.

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Using MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Connecting Examples
Changing signal paths

You can change signal paths if you open the knife disconnectors of the signal terminals and reconnect the signals with test plugs or wires, as shown in the illustration below:
MicroAutoBox side

Device side

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Using MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Current measuring

Open the knife disconnector of a signal terminal and connect an amperemeter for current measuring, as shown in the illustration below:
MicroAutoBox side

A Amperemeter

Device side

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Using MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Terminating CAN Bus Lines


Note

WA R N I N G
Risk of injury and material damage Changing the termination of bus lines via termination switches can cause failures in bus communication. These failures might lead to uncontrolled movements of and/or damage to connected devices. To avoid risk of injury and material damage, ensure that the termination change complies with the bus specification.

Terminating the CAN bus lines

You can easily terminate all CAN bus lines via termination switches. Each switch connects a 120 resistor between the CAN high and low lines to terminate one end of a CAN bus with the recommended resistance value. The following illustration shows an example of a terminating circuit.
CAN/FlexRay MABX-Side CAN 3 CAN/FlexRay Device-Side

Term. On/Off

120

The switches are located next to the Sub-D CAN connectors as the illustration shows below.
Term. On Off

Push the termination switch to the On position to terminate the CAN bus lines.

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Using MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Terminating FlexRay Bus Lines


Note

WA R N I N G
Risk of injury and material damage Changing the termination of bus lines via termination switches can cause failures in bus communication. These failures might lead to uncontrolled movements of and/or damage to connected devices. To avoid risk of injury and material damage, ensure that the termination change complies with the bus specification.

Terminating the FlexRay bus lines

You can easily terminate all FlexRay bus lines via termination switches. To terminate one end of the bus lines, the termination switches connect a resistor between the FlexRay high and low lines. You can select between the following values for terminating:
n

94 This value is the recommended value to terminate the end of a FlexRay bus.

47 This value is used for test purposes.

The following illustration shows an example of a terminating circuit.


CAN/FlexRay MABX-Side FlexRay 1 CAN/FlexRay Device-Side

94

Low On/Off

47

High On/Off

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The switches are located next to the Sub-D FlexRay connectors as the illustration shows below.
Termination On Off

94R 47R

The following table shows the positions of the switches to configure the FlexRay bus lines termination. Switch Positions
ON OFF ON OFF

Configured Termination Not terminated

94R 47R
ON OFF

94R 47R

Terminated with 94

94R 47R ON OFF

Terminated with 47

94R 47R

All other combinations are not recommended.

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Using MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

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Uninstalling the System

Uninstallation order

All components of a dSPACE system, software and hardware, can be removed from the host PC in the following order: 1. You have first to remove the software. 2. Afterwards you can remove the hardware from the host PC.

Where to go from here

Information in other sections Removing dSPACE Software ( Software Installation and Management Guide)
ST M

How to Remove the Hardware


Objective

Uninstalling the hardware means to remove MicroAutoBox from the vehicle. To remove MicroAutoBox from a vehicle

Method

WA R N I N G
Even a brief disconnection of the battery while the engine is running results in a load dump of the car generator producing hazardous voltages of more than 100 V.
n

Turn off the engine while connecting or disconnecting the car battery.

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Uninstalling the System

1 Turn off the car engine. 2 Disconnect the MicroAutoBox from the power supply. 3 Disconnect the I/O wiring. 4 Remove the four bolts and remove the box from the vehicle.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Where to go from here

Information in this section Connector Pinouts Pin Description Characteristics 120 122 129

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Connector Pinouts
Objective

MicroAutoBox 1401/1501 provides one Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) connector to access the different I/O signals of MicroAutoBox. For the pinout see below.

Zero Insertion Force Connector


Objective

The I/O connector is a 156-pin Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) connector giving access to the input and output signals provided by MicroAutoBox. The following illustration shows the pin numbering of the I/O connector (front view of MicroAutoBox):
1 2 3 4 5 6 c b a Z Y X W V U T S R P N M L K J H G F E D C B A 1 2 3 4 5 6

There are pins identified via capital letters (A, B, C, ...) and pins identified via small letters (a, b, c).

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

The following table shows the signals of the I/0 connector:


1
DAC 7 DAC 5 DAC 3 DAC 1 VDRIVE Group 6 ch 6 TPU ch 2 TPU ch 5 TPU ch 9 TPU ch 15 Group 2 ch 5 Group 3 ch 3 Group 6 ch 1 out out out out in out out out out out out out in

2
DAC 8 DAC 6 DAC 4 DAC 2 VSENS Group 6 ch 7 TPU ch 3 TPU ch 6 TPU ch 10 TPU ch 16 Group 2 ch 6 CTM ch 1 Group 6 ch 2 out out out out out out out out out out out in in

3
Group 1 ch 1 Group 1 ch 5 CTM ch 2 CTM ch 8 Group 6 ch 2 GND GND GND TPU ch 11 Group 2 ch 1 Group 2 ch 7 REMOTE Group 6 ch 3 out out out out out in in in out out out in in

4
Group 1 ch 2 Group 1 ch 6 CTM ch 5 CTM ch 3 Group 6 ch 3 GND GND GND TPU ch 12 Group 2 ch 2 Group 2 ch 8 CTM ch 2 Group 6 ch 4 out out out out out in in in out out out in in

5
Group 1 ch 3 Group 1 ch 7 CTM ch 6 CTM ch 4 Group 6 ch 4 Group 6 ch 8 GND TPU ch 7 TPU ch 13 Group 2 ch 3 Group 3 ch 1 CTM ch 3 Group 6 ch 5 out out out out out out in out out out out in in

6
Group 1 ch 4 CTM ch 1 CTM ch 7 Group 6 ch 1 Group 6 ch 5 TPU ch 1 TPU ch 4 TPU ch 8 TPU ch 14 Group 2 ch 4 Group 3 ch 2 CTM ch 4 Group 6 ch 6 out out out out out out out out out out out in in A B C D E F G H J K L M N

Group 6 ch 7 TPU ch 5 TPU ch 11 Group 2 ch 1 Group 2 ch 7 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 1 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 1

in in in in in in in in in in in in in

Group 6 ch 8 TPU ch 6 TPU ch 12 Group 2 ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 1 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 1 VBAT prot

in in in in in in in in in in in in out

TPU ch 1 TPU ch 7 TPU ch 13 Group 2 ch 3 Serial 2 K / LIN VBAT VBAT VBAT Group 4 ch 1 Group 4 ch 4 Group 4 ch 7 Group 5 ch 2 Group 5 ch 5

in in in in i/o in in in in in in in in

TPU ch 2 TPU ch 8 TPU ch 14 Group 2 ch 4 Serial 2 L VBAT VBAT VBAT Group 4 ch 2 Group 4 ch 5 Group 4 ch 8 Group 5 ch 3 Group 5 ch 6

in in in in in in in in in in in in in

TPU ch 3 TPU ch 9 TPU ch 15 Group 2 ch 5 Serial 1 TXD CAN 1 low VBAT CAN 2 low ECU / IF RX+ ECU / IF RXECU / IF TXECU / IF TX+ Group 5 ch 7

in in in in out i/o in i/o in in out out in

TPU ch 4 TPU ch 10 TPU ch 16 Group 2 ch 6 Serial 1 RXD CAN 1 high Group 2 ch 8 CAN 2 high Group 4 ch 3 Group 4 ch 6 Group 5 ch 1 Group 5 ch 4 Group 5 ch 8

in in in in in i/o in i/o in in in in in

P R S T U V W X Y Z a b c

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Pin Description
Objective Where to go from here

The pin description is divided into several categories. Information in this section Power Input and Output Digital Input Digital Output Analog Input and Output Interfaces 122 123 125 127 128

Power Input and Output


Pin description

The following table gives a description of the pins used for power input and output: Signal VBAT GND Description/Function Main power supply input. Connect at least 2 pins to the plus of your car battery. Main power supply return and reference for all input and output signals. Connect at least 2 pins to the minus of your car battery. Use unused pins to reference your signals. This signal is also connected to the case of MicroAutoBox.

Pins V3, V4, W3, W4, W5, X3, X4 F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Pins E1

Signal VDRIVE

Description/Function This input supplies all digital input and output circuits. o Connect this input to VSENS to get TTL-compatible logic levels to your inputs/outputs. o Connect this input to VBATprot to get automotivecompatible logic levels to your inputs/outputs. o Do not connect this pin directly to VBAT, because the input and output circuits are not load dump or reverse voltage protected at this signal. o While MicroAutoBox is being powered down, the output stages have pull-up behavior to VDRIVE. So the outputs may reach the level of VDRIVE. If this behavior is critical in your application, you have to power down your external devices or VDRIVE before MicroAutoBox is powered down. You can also use the REMOTE signal (Kl.15) with the power control software functionality to first switch off VDRIVE via a relay. Sensor Supply output. Use this output to supply your sensors and/or VDRIVE. Protected VBAT output. Use this output to supply VDRIVE when automotive logic levels are needed.

E2

VSENS

c2

VBAT prot

Digital Input
Pin description

Most digital signals have separate input and output pins. If your software defines a signal for output, the corresponding input has no function. If the software defines a signal as input the corresponding output pin has the same level as the corresponding input pin. When software does not control the digital I/O signals (during reset or before correct initialization) each output will be in the same state as the corresponding input. This allows you to define the default (reset) state of each output by driving the input with an external signal. If you use this feature ensure that your software initializes your output signal to the same state you defined for the input.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

The following table gives a description of the digital input pins: Pins M3 M2, M4, M5, M6 N1 ... P2 P3 Signal REMOTE CTM ch 1 4 Group 6 ch 1 ... 8 TPU ch 1 Module DIO DIO DIO Description/Function Start signal of entire system (active high) with pull-down. Capture/compare inputs with pull-up. Inputs for frequency or pulse-width measurement. Standard discrete digital input with pull-up. This input drives the first channel of the internal Time Processing Unit of the DIO module, which is useful for motor management. Therefore, the signal is conditioned by an adaptive Schmitt trigger, which generates one single impulse whenever the input voltage crosses 0 V to negative voltages. This single impulse is also used for driving the main CPU INT13. - also drives the main CPU INT4 (see Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

P4

TPU ch 2

DIO

P5

TPU ch 3

DIO

- also drives the main CPU INT5 (see Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

P6

TPU ch 4

DIO

- also drives the main CPU INT6 (see Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R1

TPU ch 5

DIO

- also drives the main CPU INT7 (see Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R2

TPU ch 6

DIO

- also drives the main CPU INT8 (see Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R3

TPU ch 7

DIO

- also drives the main CPU INT9 even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up - can generate external interrupt (see Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features))
ST M

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Pins R4

Signal TPU ch 8

Module DIO

Description/Function - also drives the main CPU INT11 (see Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R5

TPU ch 9

DIO

- also drives the main CPU INT15 (see Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R6 ... S6 T1 ... U1, W6 a6, b3, b4, b6, c3 ... c6 Y3, Y4, Y6, Z3, Z4, Z6, a3, a4

TPU ch 10 ... 16 Group 2 ch 1 ... 8 Group 5 ch 1 ... 8

DIO DIO DIO

Like TPU ch 2 ... 9 in, but no additional function. TPU ch 10 ... 16 in have pull-ups. Standard discrete digital input with pull-up Standard discrete digital input with no pull-up/pulldown In the second function these signals can be analog to digital converted (10-bit resolution) by the DIO module.

Group 4 ch 1 ... 8

DIO

Due to the limitations of the DIO slave application, not all functions may be available at all times. These functions are not independent from each other.

Digital Output
General behavior of digital signals

Most digital signals have separate input and output pins. If your software defines a signal for output, the corresponding input has no function. If the software defines a signal as input the corresponding output pin has the same level as the corresponding input pin. When software does not control the digital I/O signals (during reset or before correct initialization) each output will be in the same state as the corresponding input. This allows you to define the default (reset) state of each output by driving the input with an external signal.

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If you use this feature ensure that your software initializes your output signal to the same state you defined for the input.

Pin description

The following table gives a description of the digital output pins: Signal Group 1 ch 1 ... 7 Module DIO Type 1 Default state low Description/Function Standard discrete digital output. Group 1 is for output only. You cannot change the default state of the signal because there is no corresponding input pin. PWM outputs of the DIOCapture/Compare unit. Standard discrete digital output.

Pins A3 ... A6, B3 ... B5

B6, C3 ... C6, D3 ... D5 D6, E3 ... F2, F5 F6

CTM ch 1 ... 8

DIO Type 1

high

Group 6 ch 1 ... 8

DIO Type 1

high

TPU ch 1

DIO Type 1

high

DIO-Time Processing Unit output 1. Due to the special "TPU ch 1 input" this signal will not directly follow its input. It rather shows the single impulse created by this input signal conditioning. DIO-Time Processing Unit output 2 ... 16. Depending on the DIO TPU firmware the TPU outputs can perform a complete motor management or simply generate PWM or discrete output signals. Standard discrete digital output. While resetting the DIO module this signal is high, independent from the state of "Group 2 ch 1 in".

G1, G2, G6 ... H2, H5 ... K2

TPU ch 2 ... 16

DIO Type 1

high

K3

Group 2 ch 1

DIO Type 1

high

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Pins K4 ... L4 L5 ... M1

Signal Group 2 ch 2 ... 8 Group 3 ch 1 3

Module DIO Type 1 DIO Type 1

Default state high low

Description/Function Standard discrete digital output. Standard discrete digital output. Group 3 is for output only. You cannot change the default state of the signal because there is no corresponding input pin.

Default state means the state of the signal without any connection to the corresponding input and/or without any output action by the software.

Analog Input and Output


Pin description

The following table gives a description of the analog input and output pins: Signal ADC Type 1 (all 16 channels) Module ADC Type 1 Default state Description/Function Standard analog inputs These inputs are analog to 12-bit digital converted by the ADC module. Due to factory calibration the offset and gain errors are almost eliminated.

Pins c1, a1 Y1, W1 b1, Z1 b2, Z2 X1, V1 b2, Z2 X2, V2 a2, Y2 W2, U2 D1, D2 C1, C2 B1, B2 A1, A2

DAC1 DAC8

DAC Type 1

0V

Standard analog outputs These outputs are 12-bit digital to analog converted by the DAC module.

Default state means the state of the signal during reset.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Interfaces
Pin description

The following table gives a description of the interface pins: Module Type ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 LIN or ISO 9141 interface The K line/LIN interface is bidirectional. The L line is input only. Both lines have no pull-up. For proper function of the K line connect an external pull-up resistor (4.7 k) from this line to VBAT. Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error (refer to Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface on page 136). RS232 interface Description/Function ECU-bypassing interface. This reflective memory-based ECU-bypassing interface is proprietary to dSPACE. Please connect the MicroAutoBox-RX pair to the ECUTX pair and the MicroAutoBox-TX pair to the ECU-RX pair. Always use a CAT5 twisted-pair cable for this connection.
o o o o

Pins Y5 Z5 b5 a5 V5 V6 X5 X6 U6 U5 U3 U4

Signal ECU / IF RX + ECU / IF RX ECU / IF TX + ECU / IF TX CAN 1 low CAN 1 high CAN 2 low CAN 2 high Serial 1 RXD Serial 1 TXD Serial 2 K / LIN Serial 2 L

CAN 1 high = CAN high of CAN controller 1 CAN 2 high = CAN high of CAN controller 2 ISO 11898 interface These two CAN busses are not terminated.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Characteristics
Where to go from here

Information in this section Absolute Maximum Levels DC Characteristics AC Characteristics Interface Characteristics Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface I/O Circuits I/O Connector Characteristics Dimensions and Weights Certifications 129 130 134 135 136 137 139 140 140

Absolute Maximum Levels


Avoiding damage to the system

CAUTION
Do not exceed these levels since this may permanently damage the system.

Levels

To guarantee proper operation of MicroAutoBox do not exceed the maximum levels (for example, voltage, temperature) that are shown in the following table: Levels 40 V ... +100 V 0 V ... +45 V 40 V ... +45 V (VDRIVE 45 V) ... +45 V 40 V ... +40 V 30 V ... +40 V 0 V ... +40 V 0 V ... +45 V 30 V ... +30 V but not more than VBAT Meaning Load dump protection

Parameter VBAT to GND VDRIVE to GND All digital output voltages to GND All digital input voltages to GND All analog input voltages All analog output voltages VSENS output to GND VBATprot output to GND RS232 transceiver output

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Parameter RS232 transceiver input Serial 2 K/LIN Serial 2 L All outputs short circuit to GND Continuous power dissipation (TA = +85C) Operating temperature Storage temperature

Levels 30 V ... +30 V 20 V ... +32 V 24 V ... +30 V continuous max. 20 W 40 C ... +85 C 55 C ... +125 C

Meaning

but not more than VBAT but not more than VBAT

CASE temperature

DC Characteristics
Data

The DC characteristics are specified for the following conditions: VBAT=+12 V; TCASE=+25 C; all voltages are referenced to GND pin F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4, unless otherwise noted.
Symbol
VBAT VBAT IVBAT IVBAT IVBAT inrush VDRIVE IVDRIVE no load IVDRIVE maximum load

Parameter
Operating voltage Operating current Inrush current Input circuit and output circuit voltage

Conditions / Comments
For start-up Operating REMOTE ViHRemote REMOTE ViLRemote All inputs/outputs unconnected Supply for digital input/output circuits All inputs/outputs unconnected All outputs shorted to GND Input high voltage Input low voltage Input impedance Input high voltage Input low voltage Input hysteresis voltage Pull-up resistor to VDRIVE Input capacitance Input impedance TPU1 is signal conditioned by an adaptive sense amplifier optimized for automotive crankshaft sensors

Min
6 4

Typ

Max
40 40

Units
V V A mA A

1 5 2.6 45 10 500 3.9 0.8 100 3.5 1.2 0.5 17 0.9 19 1 18 1 19 1.1

V mA mA V V k V V V k nF k

Digital Inputs Group 4 & Group 5 & CTM & Group 2 & Group 6 & TPU 2 ... 16 ViHG45 ViLG45 RinG45 ViH ViL ViHys Rdigin Cdigin TPU1 RinTPU1

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Parameter
REMOTE

Symbol
ViHRemote ViLRemote ViHysRemote RRemote

Conditions / Comments
Input high voltage Input low voltage Input hysteresis voltage Pull-down resistor to GND Full scale No missing codes Errors eliminated by software compensation TCASE = 40C ... +85C Input impedance Full scale Errors eliminated by software compensation TCASE = 40C ... +85C Input impedance IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 12V IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 12V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 12V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 12V Output current high TCASE = 40C ... +85C Output current low TCASE = 40C ... +85C Full scale Full monotonic Errors eliminated by software compensation TCASE = 40C ... +85C max. sink/ source current Output voltage when sinking IDACout = 5mA and CODE = 000H Output voltage Temperature caused voltage drift TCASE = 40C ... +85C Maximum output current

Min
4.7

Typ

Max
0.8

Units
V V V k V bit LSB LSB

0.5 21 4.84 12

1 22 5.00 0.5 0.5 23 5.16

Analog Inputs ADC Type 1 (all 16 channels) VmaxADC Resolution Offset error Gain error Offset error Gain error ZinADC Group 4 & Group 5 VmaxADCG45 Resolution Offset error Gain error Offset error Gain error RinG45 Digital Outputs CTM & Group 1 & Group 2 & Group 3 & Group 6 & TPU VoH VoL VoH VoL VoH VoL VoH VoL | IOHmax | | IOLmax | Analog Outputs DAC1 DAC8 VDAC Resolution Offset error Gain error Offset error Gain error IDACout VDACSAT Other Outputs Sensor supply VSENS VSENS = f(T) IVSENS, max 4.84 2 750 5.046 5.25 2 V % mA 4.44 12 2 0.5 10 20 5 +10 +20 5 0.3 4.50 4.56 V bit mV LSB LSB LSB mA V 3.1 3.1 10.1 10.1 5 5 4.5 0.2 3.4 0.6 11.5 0.25 10.4 0.6 12.5 13 0.85 0.85 0.85 0.85 V V V V V V V V mA mA

10 50 150k + 75k||220pF 4.7 10 0.5 0.5 10 50 100 5.0

+10 +50 5.3

LSB LSB typ. V bit LSB LSB

+10 +50

LSB LSB k

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Parameter
Protected VBAT

Symbol
VBATprot IVBATprot, max IProtPeak t(overload)

Conditions / Comments
IL = 1A; VBAT = 12V Maximum output current overload current limit (40C ... 85C) time to shut off IProtPeak

Min
11.56 4

Typ
11.78

Max
12 1000 9 5

Units
V mA A ms

Since May 2000, all shipped MicroAutoBoxes provide calibration values to increase the accuracy of the analog inputs and outputs. For further information, refer to How to Check Whether MicroAutoBox is Calibrated ( MicroAutoBox Features).
ST M

The following illustrations show the maximum output current of a digital output circuit as a function of ambient temperature (VDRIVE = 12 V; output is shorted to 6 V):
n

Output high

Iout
16mA

15mA

14mA

13mA

12mA

11mA

10mA -40C -20C 0C 20C 40C 60C 80C

T/C

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Output low

Iout
-10mA

-12mA

-14mA

-16mA

-17mA -40C -20C 0C 20C 40C 60C 80C

T/C

The following illustrations show the typical digital output voltage as a function of the output current (VDRIVE = 12V):
n

Output high

Vout
12.0V

11.5V

11.0V

85C

10.5V

25C -40C
10.0V

9.5V

9.0V 0mA 1mA 2mA 3mA 4mA 5mA 6mA 7mA 8mA 9mA 10mA

Iout

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Output low

Vout
1.0V

0.8V

-40C 25C

0.6V

85C

0.4V

0.2V

0V -10mA -9mA -8mA -7mA -6mA -5mA -4mA -3mA -2mA -1mA 0A

Iout

AC Characteristics
Data

The AC characteristics are specified for the following conditions: VBAT=+12 V; TCASE=+25 C; all voltages are referenced to GND pins F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4, unless otherwise noted.
Symbol
Conversion time fgADC

Parameter
Analog Inputs ADC Type 1 (all 16 channels)

Conditions / Comments
For all 16 channels (simultaneous sample) Low-pass cutoff frequency (3dB) Per channel (sequentially sample);

MIN
6.6 9.1 10

TYP

MAX

UNITS
s

9.6

10.2 17

kHz s

Group 4 & 5 Analog Outputs DAC1 DAC8

Conversion time

No low-pass filter implemented Settling time fgDAC Digital Inputs and Outputs Inputs (except Group 4 & 5) tPDInLH tPDInHL Inputs Group 4 & 5 Outputs tPDInG45LH tPDInG45HL tPDOutLH tPDOutHL Low-high propagation delay of input signals High-low delay of input signals Low-high delay of input signals High-low delay of input signals Low-high delay of output signals High-low delay of output signals 0.5 0.5 1 1 1 1 1 1 s s s s s s Settling time of output (to 1 LSB) Low-pass cutoff frequency of reconstruction filter (3dB) 10.2 10.8 150 11.4 s kHz

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Interface Characteristics
Data

The interface characteristics are specified for the following conditions: VBAT = +12V; TCASE = +25C; all voltages are referenced to GND pins F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4, unless otherwise noted.
Symbol
Bit rate Bit rate Cable length Cable type Full duplex data rate RAM size FIFO size Transmit buffer 3 k load RX input threshold low RX input threshold high RKO = 510 ; CK 1.3 nF 2.0 5 5 5 5 Word is 16-bit wide 16 256 5 5 9 1.4 1.4 8 50k 8 20k 0.8 115.2k 2-paired twisted pair CAT5 5 MW/s KW W Baud V V V bit Baud bit Baud

Parameter
CAN ECU

Conditions / Comments
ISO 11898 interface

Min

Typ
250

Max
1 5

Units
MBaud MBaud m

Serial 1 RS232-Interface

Bit rate TX output voltage swing VRxinLow VRxinHigh Word length

Serial 2 ISO9141-Interface Serial 2 LIN Interface

Bit rate Word length Bit rate

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error (refer to Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface on page 136).

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface


Objective

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error. The UART baud rate generator provides several baud rates: To calculate the divisor T for a chosen baud rate
T = Round 230400 BR (chosen)

Baud rate calculation

BR (chosen) = The baudrate to be generated T = The baudrate generator divisor (2 T 65535)

To calculate the real baud rate from a given divisor T


230400 BR (real) = T Baud BR (real) = The baudrate you get T = The baudrate generator divisor (2 T 65535)

To calculate the resulting error


ErrorBR BR (real) BR (chosen) = BR (chosen) 100%

If ErrorBR 2%, messages will be transferred and received correctly.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

I/O Circuits
Circuit diagrams

The following table shows simplified diagrams of the I/O circuitry of the various inputs and outputs: I/O Circuit Group 4 & Group 5
100 k TTL Dig IN

Signal Digital inputs

Group 2 & Group 6 & CTM & TPU2 TPU16

VDRIVE

18 k 100 k

5 V CMOS Dig IN

TPU1

20 k

Zero detect Rin 20 k 47 k

Remote
100 k

5 V CMOS Dig IN

22 k

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Signal Analog inputs ADC Type 1 Channel 1 16

I/O Circuit
150 k ADC 75 k

Group 4 & Group 5

100 k ADC

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Signal Digital outputs Group 1 & Group 2 & Group 3 & Group 6 & CTM & TPU

I/O Circuit
VDRIVE

47

0.3 V Dig OUT 0.3 V

47

Analog outputs

DAC1 DAC8

18 k

DAC

100 mA

10 k

I/O Connector Characteristics


Technical data

The following table shows the characteristics of the I/O connector: Contact resistance max. 15 m

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Durability Continuous current per pin (TA = +85C)

10,000 cycles max. 2.5 A

Dimensions and Weights


Technical data

The following table shows the mechanical characteristics of MicroAutoBox: Case width Case height Case depth Weight 200 mm (7.87 in.) 50 mm (1.97 in.) 225 mm (8.86 in.) about 2 kg (4.4 lb.) without external cables

Certifications
CE compliance

MicroAutoBox meets the requirements of the European directive 89/336/ECC (Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive) for CE marking. To verify the reliability of MicroAutoBox under realistic operating conditions, it was exposed to extreme vibration and shock tests. During the tests, MicroAutoBox executed a program without any failures. The characteristics of MicroAutoBox were tested according to the standards shown in the following table: Applied Standard EN 61000-6-2 EN 61000-6-4 Description Immunity standard for industrial environments Emission standard for industrial environments
o o

Vibration and shock tests

Applied standards

Tested Characteristics Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) Vibration

EN 60068-2-6

Mechanical test of resistance to vibration Test conditions: Sinusoidal vibration, 3-axis test, 5 2000 Hz, up to 5 g, 30 minutes per axis

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

Tested Characteristics Shock

Applied Standard EN 60068-2-27

Description
o o

Mechanical test of shock resistance Test conditions: Shock, 3-axis test, 11 ms at 15 g, 5 ms at 100 g

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1501

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

Where to go from here

Information in this section Connector Pinouts Pin Description Characteristics 144 146 153

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Connector Pinouts
Objective

MicroAutoBox 1401/1504 provides one Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) connector to access the different I/O signals of MicroAutoBox. For the pinout see below.

Zero Insertion Force Connector


Objective

The I/O connector is a 156-pin Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) connector giving access to the input and output signals provided by MicroAutoBox. The following illustration shows the pin numbering of the I/O connector (front view of MicroAutoBox):
1 2 3 4 5 6 c b a Z Y X W V U T S R P N M L K J H G F E D C B A 1 2 3 4 5 6

There are pins identified via capital letters (A, B, C, ...) and pins identified via small letters (a, b, c).

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

The following table shows the signals of the I/0 connector:


1
ADC Type 3 Con 1 Ch 4 ADC Type 3 Con 1 Ch 3 ADC Type 3 Con 1 Ch 2 ADC Type 3 Con 1 Ch 1 VDRIVE Group 6 ch 6 TPU ch 2 TPU ch 5 TPU ch 9 TPU ch 15 Group 2 ch 5 Group 3 ch 3 Group 6 ch 1 in in in in in out out out out out out out in

2
ADC Type 3 Con 2 Ch 4 ADC Type 3 Con 2 Ch 3 ADC Type 3 Con 2 Ch 2 ADC Type 3 Con 2 Ch 1 VSENS Group 6 ch 7 TPU ch 3 TPU ch 6 TPU ch 10 TPU ch 16 Group 2 ch 6 CTM ch 1 Group 6 ch 2 in in in in out out out out out out out in in

3
Group 1 ch 1 Group 1 ch 5 CTM ch 2 CTM ch 8 Group 6 ch 2 GND GND GND TPU ch 11 Group 2 ch 1 Group 2 ch 7 REMOTE Group 6 ch 3 out out out out out in in in out out out in in

4
Group 1 ch 2 Group 1 ch 6 CTM ch 5 CTM ch 3 Group 6 ch 3 GND GND GND TPU ch 12 Group 2 ch 2 Group 2 ch 8 CTM ch 2 Group 6 ch 4 out out out out out in in in out out out in in

5
Group 1 ch 3 Group 1 ch 7 CTM ch 6 CTM ch 4 Group 6 ch 4 Group 6 ch 8 GND TPU ch 7 TPU ch 13 Group 2 ch 3 Group 3 ch 1 CTM ch 3 Group 6 ch 5 out out out out out out in out out out out in in

6
Group 1 ch 4 CTM ch 1 CTM ch 7 Group 6 ch 1 Group 6 ch 5 TPU ch 1 TPU ch 4 TPU ch 8 TPU ch 14 Group 2 ch 4 Group 3 ch 2 CTM ch 4 Group 6 ch 6 out out out out out out out out out out out in in A B C D E F G H J K L M N

Group 6 ch 7 TPU ch 5 TPU ch 11 Group 2 ch 1 Group 2 ch 7 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 1 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 1

in in in in in in in in in in in in in

Group 6 ch 8 TPU ch 6 TPU ch 12 Group 2 ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 1 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 1 VBAT prot

in in in in in in in in in in in in out

TPU ch 1 TPU ch 7 TPU ch 13 Group 2 ch 3 Serial 2 K / LIN VBAT VBAT VBAT Group 4 ch 1 Group 4 ch 4 Group 4 ch 7 Group 5 ch 2 Group 5 ch 5

in in in in i/o in in in in in in in in

TPU ch 2 TPU ch 8 TPU ch 14 Group 2 ch 4 Serial 2 L VBAT VBAT VBAT Group 4 ch 2 Group 4 ch 5 Group 4 ch 8 Group 5 ch 3 Group 5 ch 6

in in in in in in in in in in in in in

TPU ch 3 TPU ch 9 TPU ch 15 Group 2 ch 5 Serial 1 TXD CAN 1 low VBAT CAN 2 low CAN 3 high CAN 3 low CAN 4 low CAN 4 high Group 5 ch 7

in in in in out i/o in i/o i/o i/o i/o i/o in

TPU ch 4 TPU ch 10 TPU ch 16 Group 2 ch 6 Serial 1 RXD CAN 1 high Group 2 ch 8 CAN 2 high Group 4 ch 3 Group 4 ch 6 Group 5 ch 1 Group 5 ch 4 Group 5 ch 8

in in in in in i/o in i/o in in in in in

P R S T U V W X Y Z a b c

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

Pin Description
Objective Where to go from here

The pin description is divided into several categories. Information in this section Power Input and Output Digital Input Digital Output Analog Input Interfaces 146 147 149 151 151

Power Input and Output


Pin description

The following table gives a description of the pins used for power input and output: Signal VBAT GND Description/Function Main power supply input. Connect at least 2 pins to the plus of your car battery. Main power supply return and reference for all input and output signals. Connect at least 2 pins to the minus of your car battery. Use unused pins to reference your signals. This signal is also connected to the case of MicroAutoBox.

Pins V3, V4, W3, W4, W5, X3, X4 F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4

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Pins E1

Signal VDRIVE

Description/Function This input supplies all digital input and output circuits. o Connect this input to VSENS to get TTL-compatible logic levels to your inputs/outputs. o Connect this input to VBATprot to get automotivecompatible logic levels to your inputs/outputs. o Do not connect this pin directly to VBAT, because the input and output circuits are not load dump or reverse voltage protected at this signal. o While MicroAutoBox is being powered down, the output stages have pull-up behavior to VDRIVE. So the outputs may reach the level of VDRIVE. If this behavior is critical in your application, you have to power down your external devices or VDRIVE before MicroAutoBox is powered down. You can also use the REMOTE signal (Kl.15) with the power control software functionality to first switch off VDRIVE via a relay. Sensor Supply output. Use this output to supply your sensors and/or VDRIVE. Protected VBAT output. Use this output to supply VDRIVE when automotive logic levels are needed.

E2

VSENS

c2

VBAT prot

Digital Input
Pin description

Most digital signals have separate input and output pins. If your software defines a signal for output, the corresponding input has no function. If the software defines a signal as input the corresponding output pin has the same level as the corresponding input pin. When software does not control the digital I/O signals (during reset or before correct initialization) each output will be in the same state as the corresponding input. This allows you to define the default (reset) state of each output by driving the input with an external signal. If you use this feature ensure that your software initializes your output signal to the same state you defined for the input.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

The following table gives a description of the digital input pins: Pins M3 M2, M4, M5, M6 N1 ... P2 P3 Signal REMOTE CTM ch 1 4 Group 6 ch 1 ... 8 TPU ch 1 Module DIO Type 1 DIO Type 1 DIO Type 1 Description/Function Start signal of entire system (active high) with pull-down. Capture/compare inputs with pull-up. Inputs for frequency or pulse-width measurement. Standard discrete digital input with pull-up. This input drives the first channel of the internal Time Processing Unit of the DIO module, which is useful for motor management. Therefore, the signal is conditioned by an adaptive Schmitt trigger, which generates one single impulse whenever the input voltage crosses 0 V to negative voltages. This single impulse is also used for driving the main CPU INT13. - also drives the main CPU INT4 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

P4

TPU ch 2

DIO Type 1

P5

TPU ch 3

DIO Type 1

- also drives the main CPU INT5 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

P6

TPU ch 4

DIO Type 1

- also drives the main CPU INT6 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R1

TPU ch 5

DIO Type 1

- also drives the main CPU INT7 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R2

TPU ch 6

DIO Type 1

- also drives the main CPU INT8 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R3

TPU ch 7

DIO Type 1

- also drives the main CPU INT9 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

Pins R4

Signal TPU ch 8

Module DIO Type 1

Description/Function also drives the main CPU INT11 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R5

TPU ch 9

DIO Type 1

- also drives the main CPU INT15 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R6 ... S6 T1 ... U1, W6 a6, b3, b4, b6, c3 ... c6 Y3, Y4, Y6, Z3, Z4, Z6, a3, a4

TPU ch 10 ... 16 Group 2 ch 1 ... 8 Group 5 ch 1 ... 8

DIO Type 1 DIO Type 1 DIO Type 1

Like TPU ch 2 ... 9 in, but no additional function. TPU ch 10 ... 16 in have pull-ups. Standard discrete digital input with pull-up Standard discrete digital input with no pullup/pull-down. In the second function these signals can be analog to digital converted (10-bit resolution) by the DIO module.

Group 4 ch 1 ... 8

DIO Type 1

Due to the limitations of the DIO slave application, not all functions may be available at all times. These functions are not independent from each other.

Digital Output
Pin description

Most digital signals have separate input and output pins. If your software defines a signal for output, the corresponding input has no function. If the software defines a signal as input the corresponding output pin has the same level as the corresponding input pin. When software does not control the digital I/O signals (during reset or before correct initialization) each output will be in the same state as the corresponding input. This allows you to define the default (reset) state of each output by driving the input with an external signal.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

If you use this feature ensure that your software initializes your output signal to the same state you defined for the input. The following table gives a description of the digital output pins: Pins A3 ... A6, B3 ... B5 Signal Group 1 ch 1 ... 7 Module DIO Default state low Description/Function Standard discrete digital output. Group 1 is for output only. You cannot change the default state of the signal because there is no corresponding input pin. PWM outputs of the DIOCapture/Compare unit. Standard discrete digital output.

B6, C3 ... C6, D3 ... D5 D6, E3 ... F2, F5 F6

CTM ch 1 ... 8

DIO

high

Group 6 ch 1 ... 8

DIO

high

TPU ch 1

DIO

high

DIO-Time Processing Unit output 1. Due to the special "TPU ch 1 input" this signal will not directly follow its input. It rather shows the single impulse created by this input signal conditioning. DIO-Time Processing Unit output 2 ... 16. Depending on the DIO TPU firmware the TPU outputs can perform a complete motor management or simply generate PWM or discrete output signals. Standard discrete digital output. While resetting the DIO module this signal is high, independent from the state of "Group 2 ch 1 in". Standard discrete digital output. Standard discrete digital output. Group 3 is for output only. You cannot change the default state of the signal because there is no corresponding input pin.

G1, G2, G6 ... H2, H5 ... K2

TPU ch 2 ... 16

DIO

high

K3

Group 2 ch 1

DIO

high

K4 ... L4 L5 ... M1

Group 2 ch 2 ... 8 Group 3 ch 1 3

DIO DIO

high low

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

Default state means the state of the signal without any connection to the corresponding input and/or without any output action by the software.

Analog Input
Pin description

The following table gives a description of the analog input pins: Module ADC Type 1 Description/Function Standard analog inputs These inputs are analog to 12-bit digital converted by the first ADC module (type 1). Due to factory calibration the offset and gain error can almost be eliminated.

Pins c1, a1 Y1, W1 b1, Z1 b2, Z2 X1, V1 X2, V2 a2, Y2 W2, U2 D1, C1 B1, A1 D2, C2 B2, A2

Signal ADC Type 1 Con 1 ... 4 Ch 1 ... 4

ADC Type 3 Con 1 ... 2 Ch 1 ... 4

ADC Type 3

Standard analog inputs These inputs are analog to 12-bit digital converted by the second ADC module (type 3).

Interfaces
Pin description

The following table gives a description of the interface pins: Module Type CAN Type 1 Module 1 CAN Type 1 Module 1 CAN Type 1 Module 1 CAN Type 1 Module 1 CAN Type 1 Module 2 CAN Type 1 Module 2 CAN Type 1 Module 2 CAN Type 1 Module 2 Description/Function
o o o o

Pins V5 V6 X5 X6 Z5 Y5 a5 b5

Signal CAN 1 low CAN 1 high CAN 2 low CAN 2 high CAN 3 low CAN 3 high CAN 4 low CAN 4 high

CAN 1 high = CAN high of CAN controller 1 CAN 2 high = CAN high of CAN controller 2 ... ISO 11898 interface These two CAN busses are not terminated.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

Pins U6 U5 U3 U4

Signal Serial 1 RXD Serial 1 TXD Serial 2 K/LIN Serial 2 L

Module Type CAN Type 1 Module 1 CAN Type 1 Module 1 CAN Type 1 Module 1 CAN Type 1 Module 1

Description/Function RS232 interface LIN or ISO 9141 interface The K line/LIN interface is bidirectional. The L line is input only. Both lines have no pull-up. For proper function of the K line connect an external pull-up resistor (4.7 k) from this line to VBAT.

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error (refer to Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface on page 159).

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

Characteristics
Where to go from here

Information in this section Absolute Maximum Levels DC Characteristics AC Characteristics Interface Characteristics Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface I/O Circuits I/O Connector Characteristics Dimensions and Weights Certifications 153 154 158 159 159 161 163 163 163

Absolute Maximum Levels


Avoiding damage to the system

CAUTION
Do not exceed these levels since this may permanently damage the system.

Levels

To guarantee proper operation of MicroAutoBox do not exceed the maximum levels (for example, voltage, temperature) that are shown in the following table: Levels 40 V ... +100 V 0 V ... +45 V 40 V ... +45 V (VDRIVE 45 V) ... +45 V 40 V ... +40 V 30 V ... +40 V 0 V ... +40 V 0 V ... +45 V 30 V ... +30 V but not more than VBAT Meaning Load dump protection

Parameter VBAT to GND VDRIVE to GND All digital output voltages to GND All digital input voltages to GND All analog input voltages All analog output voltages VSENS output to GND VBATprot output to GND RS232 transceiver output

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

Parameter RS232 transceiver input Serial 2 K / LIN Serial 2 L All outputs short circuit to GND Continuous power dissipation (TA = +85C) Operating temperature Storage temperature

Levels 30 V ... +30 V 20 V ... +32 V 24 V ... +30 V continuous max. 20 W 40 C ... +85 C 55 C ... +125 C

Meaning

but not more than VBAT but not more than VBAT

CASE temperature

DC Characteristics
Data

The DC characteristics are specified for the following conditions: VBAT=+12 V; TCASE=+25 C; all voltages are referenced to GND pin F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4, unless otherwise noted.
Symbol
VBAT VBAT IVBAT IVBAT IVBAT inrush VDRIVE IVDRIVE no load IVDRIVE maximum load

Parameter
Operating voltage Operating current Inrush current Input circuit and output circuit voltage

Conditions / Comments
For start-up Operating REMOTE ViHRemote REMOTE ViLRemote All inputs/outputs unconnected Supply for digital input/output circuits All inputs/outputs unconnected All outputs shorted to GND Input high voltage Input low voltage Input impedance Input high voltage Input low voltage Input hysteresis voltage Pull-up resistor to VDRIVE Input capacitance Input impedance TPU1 is signal conditioned by an adaptive sense amplifier optimized for automotive crankshaft sensors

Min
6 4

Typ

Max
40 40

Units
V V A mA A

1 5 2.6 45 10 500 3.9 0.8 100 3.5 1.2 0.5 17 0.9 19 1 18 1 19 1.1

V mA mA V V k V V V k nF k

Digital Inputs Group 4 & Group 5 & CTM & Group 2 & Group 6 & TPU 2 ... 16 ViHG45 ViLG45 RinG45 ViH ViL ViHys Rdigin Cdigin TPU1 RinTPU1

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

Parameter
REMOTE

Symbol
ViHRemote ViLRemote ViHysRemote RRemote

Conditions / Comments
Input high voltage Input low voltage Input hysteresis voltage Pull-down resistor to GND Full scale No missing codes Errors eliminated by software compensation TCASE = 40C ... +85C Input impedance Full scale Errors eliminated by software compensation TCASE = 40C ... +85C Input impedance IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 12V IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 12V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 12V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 12V Output current high TCASE = 40C ... +85C Output current low TCASE = 40C ... +85C Output voltage Temperature caused voltage drift TCASE = 40C ... +85C Maximum output current IL = 1A; VBAT = 12V Maximum output current overload current limit (40C ... 85C) time to shut off IProtPeak

Min
4.7

Typ

Max
0.8

Units
V V V k V bit LSB LSB

0.5 21 4.84 12

1 22 5.00 0.5 0.5 23 5.16

Analog Inputs ADC Type 1 (all 16 channels) ADC Type 3 (all 8 channels) VmaxADC Resolution Offset error Gain error Offset error Gain error ZinADC Group 4 & Group 5 VmaxADCG45 Resolution Offset error Gain error Offset error Gain error RinG45 Digital Outputs CTM & Group 1 & Group 2 & Group 3 & Group 6 & TPU VoH VoL VoH VoL VoH VoL VoH VoL | IOHmax | | IOLmax | Other Outputs Sensor supply VSENS VSENS = f(T) IVSENS, max Protected VBAT VBATprot IVBATprot, max IProtPeak t(overload) 4.84 2 750 11.56 4 11.78 12 1000 9 5 5.046 5.25 2 V % mA V mA A ms 3.1 3.1 10.1 10.1 5 5 4.5 0.2 3.4 0.6 11.5 0.25 10.4 0.6 12.5 13 0.85 0.85 0.85 0.85 V V V V V V V V mA mA

10 50 150k + 75k||220pF 4.7 10 0.5 0.5 10 50 100 5.0

+10 +50 5.3

LSB LSB typ. V bit LSB LSB

+10 +50

LSB LSB k

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

Since May 2000, all shipped MicroAutoBoxes provide calibration values to increase the accuracy of the analog inputs. For further information, refer to How to Check Whether MicroAutoBox is Calibrated ( MicroAutoBox Features).
ST M

The following illustrations show the maximum output current of a digital output circuit as a function of ambient temperature (VDRIVE = 12 V; output is shorted to 6 V):
n

Output high

Iout
16mA

15mA

14mA

13mA

12mA

11mA

10mA -40C -20C 0C 20C 40C 60C 80C

T/C

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

Output low

Iout
-10mA

-12mA

-14mA

-16mA

-17mA -40C -20C 0C 20C 40C 60C 80C

T/C

The following illustrations show the typical digital output voltage as a function of the output current (VDRIVE = 12V):
n

Output high

Vout
12.0V

11.5V

11.0V

85C

10.5V

25C -40C
10.0V

9.5V

9.0V 0mA 1mA 2mA 3mA 4mA 5mA 6mA 7mA 8mA 9mA 10mA

Iout

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

Output low

Vout
1.0V

0.8V

-40C 25C

0.6V

85C

0.4V

0.2V

0V -10mA -9mA -8mA -7mA -6mA -5mA -4mA -3mA -2mA -1mA 0A

Iout

AC Characteristics
Data

The AC characteristics are specified for the following conditions: VBAT=+12 V; TCASE=+25 C; all voltages are referenced to GND pins F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4, unless otherwise noted.
Symbol
Conversion time fgADC Conversion time

Parameter
Analog Inputs ADC Type 1 (all 16 channels) ADC Type 3 (all 8 channels) Group 4 & 5

Conditions / Comments
For all channels of one module (simultaneous sample) Low-pass cutoff frequency (3dB) Per channel (sequentially sample)

Min
6.6 9.1 10

Typ

Max

Units
s

9.6

10.2 17

kHz s

No low-pass filter implemented Digital Inputs and Outputs Inputs (except Group 4 & 5) Inputs Group 4 & 5 Outputs tPDInLH tPDInHL tPDInG45LH tPDInG45HL tPDOutLH tPDOutHL Low-high propagation delay of input signals High-low delay of input signals Low-high delay of input signals High-low delay of input signals Low-high delay of output signals High-low delay of output signals 0.5 0.5 1 1 1 1 1 1 s s s s s s

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

Interface Characteristics
Data

The interface characteristics are specified for the following conditions: VBAT = +12V; TCASE = +25C; all voltages are referenced to GND pins F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4, unless otherwise noted.
Symbol
Bit rate Bit rate TX output voltage swing VRxinLow VRxinHigh Word length 3 k load RX input threshold low RX input threshold high RKO = 510 ; CK 1.3 nF 2.0 5 5 5 5

Parameter
CAN Serial 1 RS232-Interface

Conditions / Comments
ISO 11898 interface

Min
5 5

Typ

Max
1 115.2k

Units
MBaud Baud V

9 1.4 1.4 8 50k 8 20k 0.8

V V bit Baud bit Baud

Serial 2 ISO9141-Interface Serial 2 LIN Interface

Bit rate Word length Bit rate

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error (refer to Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface on page 159).

Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface


Objective

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error. The UART baud rate generator provides several baud rates: To calculate the divisor T for a chosen baud rate
T = Round 230400 BR (chosen)

Baud rate calculation

BR (chosen) = The baudrate to be generated T = The baudrate generator divisor (2 T 65535)

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

To calculate the real baud rate from a given divisor T


230400 BR (real) = T Baud BR (real) = The baudrate you get T = The baudrate generator divisor (2 T 65535)

To calculate the resulting error


ErrorBR BR (real) BR (chosen) = BR (chosen) 100%

If ErrorBR 2%, messages will be transferred and received correctly.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

I/O Circuits
Circuit diagrams

The following table shows simplified diagrams of the I/O circuitry of the various inputs and outputs: I/O Circuit Group 4 & Group 5
100 k TTL Dig IN

Signal Digital inputs

Group 2 & Group 6 & CTM & TPU2 TPU16

VDRIVE

18 k 100 k

5 V CMOS Dig IN

TPU1

20 k

Zero detect Rin 20 k 47 k

Remote
100 k

5 V CMOS Dig IN

22 k

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

Signal Analog inputs ADC Type 1 ADC Type 3

I/O Circuit
150 k ADC 75 k

Group 4 & Group 5

100 k ADC

Digital outputs

Group 1 & Group 2 & Group 3 & Group 6 & CTM & TPU

VDRIVE

47

0.3 V Dig OUT 0.3 V

47

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

I/O Connector Characteristics


Technical data

The following table shows the characteristics of the I/O connector: Contact resistance Durability Continuous current per pin (TA = +85C) max. 15 m 10,000 cycles max. 2.5 A

Dimensions and Weights


Technical data

The following table shows the mechanical characteristics of MicroAutoBox: Case width Case height Case depth Weight 200 mm (7.87 in.) 50 mm (1.97 in.) 225 mm (8.86 in.) about 2 kg (4.4 lb.) without external cables

Certifications
CE compliance

MicroAutoBox meets the requirements of the European directive 89/336/ECC (Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive) for CE marking. To verify the reliability of MicroAutoBox under realistic operating conditions, it was exposed to extreme vibration and shock tests. During the tests, MicroAutoBox executed a program without any failures. The characteristics of MicroAutoBox were tested according to the standards shown in the following table: Applied Standard EN 61000-6-2 EN 61000-6-4 Description Immunity standard for industrial environments Emission standard for industrial environments

Vibration and shock tests

Applied standards

Tested Characteristics Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC)

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1504

Tested Characteristics Vibration

Applied Standard EN 60068-2-6

Description
o o

Mechanical test of resistance to vibration Test conditions: Sinusoidal vibration, 3-axis test, 5 2000 Hz, up to 5 g, 30 minutes per axis Mechanical test of shock resistance Test conditions: Shock, 3-axis test, 11 ms at 15 g, 5 ms at 100 g

Shock

EN 60068-2-27

o o

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

Where to go from here

Information in this section Connector Pinouts Pin Description Characteristics 166 171 176

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

Connector Pinouts
Objective

MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 provides three connectors to access the different inputs and outputs of MicroAutoBox. Information in this section Sub-D I/O Connector ECU Interface Connector Power Input Connector 166 169 169

Where to go from here

Sub-D I/O Connector


Objective

MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 provides a 78-pin, male Sub-D connector that grants access to various I/O signals provided by the DS1507 I/O board, such as CAN, LIN, and FlexRay signals. Which I/O signals are available depends on the FlexRay IP module you use (DS4340 or thirdparty). The table below shows the pinout if you use third-party FlexRay IP modules. Pin Signal Pin
20

Pinout for using thirdparty FlexRay IP modules

Pin
1

Signal

Signal

Pin

Signal

60

78

1 2 3 4 5 6

CAN 1 high CAN 1 low GND CAN 2 high CAN 2 low GND 21 22 23 24 25 GND GND GND GND GND

40 41 42 43 44 45

CAN 3 high CAN 3 low GND CAN 4 high CAN 4 low GND 60 61 62 63 64 GND GND GND GND GND

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

Pin 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Signal Serial 1 TXD Serial 1 RXD GND Serial 2 K/LIN Serial 2 L GND Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved

Pin 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

Signal GND GND GND GND GND GND GND Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved

Pin 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59

Signal Serial 3 TXD Serial 3 RXD GND Serial 4 K/LIN Serial 4 L GND IP wakeup 2 IP reset 2 IP GND 3 IP bus high/A 3 IP bus low/B 3 IP GND 4 IP bus high/A 4 IP bus low/B 4

Pin 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78

Signal GND GND GND GND GND GND GND Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved

Pinout for using DS4340 FlexRay Interface Module

The table below shows the pinout if you use DS4340 FlexRay Interface Modules. Pin Signal Pin
20

Pin
1

Signal

Signal

Pin

Signal

60

78

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

CAN 1 high CAN 1 low GND CAN 2 high CAN 2 low GND Serial 1 TXD Serial 1 RXD 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 GND GND GND GND GND GND GND

40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47

CAN 3 high CAN 3 low GND CAN 4 high CAN 4 low GND Serial 3 TXD Serial 3 RXD 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 GND GND GND GND GND GND GND

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

Pin 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Signal GND Serial 2 K/LIN Serial 2 L GND Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved

Pin 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

Signal GND GND GND GND GND Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved

Pin 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59

Signal GND Serial 4 K/LIN Serial 4 L GND Wake-up_2 Reserved GND_ChA_2 BP_ChA_2 BM_ChA_2 GND_ChB_2 BP_ChB_2 BM_ChB_2

Pin 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78

Signal GND GND GND GND GND INH1_2 INH2_2 UBAT_2 BP_FT_ChB_2 BM_FT_ChB_2 BP_FT_ChA_2 BM_FT_ChA_2

Signal names The signal names of the bus lines consist of four parts separated by an underscore:
n n n n

Bus line plus (BP) or bus line minus (BM) Normal bus line (" ") or feed-through line (FT) FlexRay channel (ChA or ChB) Module position (1 or 2)

For example, BP_FT_ChB_2 means: bus line plus, feed-through line, channel B, 2nd module slot. For pin descriptions, refer to Interfaces on page 172.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

ECU Interface Connector


Objective

MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 provides a 4pin LEMO connector that grants access to the signals of the ECU interface (LVDS interface), for example, to connect MicroAutoBox to the RapidPro system. Connector Pin 1 2
2 3 1 4

Signal ECU / IF TX ECU / IF TX+ ECU / IF RX+ ECU / IF RX

3 4

Matching cable

If you require a cable with a matching LEMO connector, you can order it from dSPACE.

Power Input Connector


Objective

MircoAutoBox 1401/1507 provides a power input connector. It is a 7pin, male connector with two high-current pins. It is adapted from a 15-pin Sub-D connector. The following illustration shows the pinout (front view). Pin A2
A2 5 4 3 A1

Pinout

Connector

Signal VBAT (8 V 40 V DC)

Pin

Signal

2 1

5 2 1 A1 Reserved Reserved GND 4 3

Reserved VREMOTE 1) Reserved

1)

If you use the matching cable supplied by dSPACE VREMOTE is connected to VBAT within the connector shell. This cable is intended for use with a lab power supply only.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

For pin descriptions, refer to Power Input and Output on page 171.
Matching cable

A preconfigured cable for the supply voltage is provided by dSPACE. This cable is intended to operate MicroAutoBox with a laboratory power supply during development. Therefore, VREMOTE (pin 4) is shorted to VBAT (pin A2) inside the connector in order to save a separate switch. Do not use this cable in the vehicle. Otherwise, MicroAutoBox will always be turned on. The VBAT wire (red) contains a melting fuse (4.0 A, time lag). Each wire has a cross-section of 1.5 mm.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

Pin Description
Objective Where to go from here

The pin description is divided into two categories. Information in this section Power Input and Output Interfaces 171 172

Power Input and Output


Pin description

The following table gives a description of the pins used for power input and output for MicroAutoBox 1401/1507: Signal VBAT GND Description/Function Main power supply input. Connect this pin to the positive pole of your car battery. Main power supply return and reference for all input and output signals. Connect this pin to the minus pole of your car battery. This signal is also connected to the case of MicroAutoBox.
o

Pin A2 A1

VREMOTE

The remote voltage may be used for starting MicroAutoBox with a remote switch: KL15, for example (output of the ignition/driving switch). If you connect the remote pin to the car battery directly, MicroAutoBox will always be turned on, and the car battery will soon be exhausted if the engine is not running. Thus, a switch is highly recommended. The remote voltage should not exceed the supply voltage.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

Interfaces
Pin description

The following table gives a description of the pins of the ECU interface which can be accessed via the ECU interface connector, and a description of the pins of the 78-pin Sub-D I/O connector. Which I/O signals are available depends on the FlexRay IP module you use (DS4340 or third-party). The following table gives a description of the interface pins which can be accessed via ECU interface connector: Module ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 Description/Function ECU interface (also called LVDS interface). You can also use this interface to connect a RapidPro system to MicroAutoBox. This reflective memory-based ECU-bypassing interface is proprietary to dSPACE. Connect the MicroAutoBox-RX pair to the ECUTX pair and the MicroAutoBox-TX pair to the ECU-RX pair. Always use a CAT5 twisted-pair cable for this connection. For the ECU interface connector, use mass-produced cables provided by dSPACE.

ECU interface connector

Pins 1 2 3 4

Signal ECU / IF TX ECU / IF TX + ECU / IF RX + ECU / IF RX -

Sub-D I/O connector

The following tables give a description of the interface pins provided by the 78-pin Sub-D I/O connector. CAN_TP1 Module 1 pins: The CAN_TP1 Module 1 has the following

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error (refer to Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface on page 178).

Pin
1 2 4 5 7 8

Signal
CAN 1 high CAN 1 low CAN 2 high CAN 2 low Serial 1 TXD Serial 1 RXD

Module

Description/Function
CAN 1 high = CAN high of CAN controller 1 CAN 2 high = CAN high of CAN controller 2 ISO 11898 interface These two CAN busses are not terminated.

CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1

CAN Type 1 RS232 interface

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

Pin
10 11

Signal

Module

Description/Function

Serial 2 K/LIN CAN Type 1 LIN or ISO 9141 interface Serial 2 L CAN Type 1 The K line/LIN interface is bidirectional. The L line is input only. Both lines have no pull-up. For proper function of the K line connect an external pull-up resistor (4.7 k) from this line to VBAT.

CAN_TP1 Module 2 pins:

The CAN_TP1 Module 2 has the following

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error (refer to Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface on page 178).

Pin
40 41 43 44 46 47 49 50

Signal
CAN 3 high CAN 3 low CAN 4 high CAN 4 low Serial 3 TXD Serial 3 RXD

Module

Description/Function
CAN 3 high = CAN high of CAN controller 3 CAN 4 high = CAN high of CAN controller 4 ISO 11898 interface These two CAN busses are not terminated.

CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1

CAN Type 1 RS232 interface

Serial 4 K/LIN CAN Type 1 LIN or ISO 9141 interface Serial 4 L CAN Type 1 The K line/LIN interface is bidirectional. The L line is input only. Both lines have no pull-up. For proper function of the K line connect an external pull-up resistor (4.7 k) from this line to VBAT.

(FlexRay) IP Module and DS4340 Module Different module types can be installed on the DS1507 (slot 2 only) by dSPACE: A standard IP module, a third-party FlexRay IP module or a DS4340 module. The table describes the pins when a third-party FlexRay IP module or a DS4340 is installed. The Sub-D connector can also be used for access to the signals of a standard IP module installed on the DS1507. Because the connector is primarily used for FlexRay, not all signals of the IP modules are available. See Sub-D I/O Connector on page 166.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

Pin

(FlexRay) IP Module Signal Module Description/Function


IP_Type1 You do not need to connect this pin because wake-up functionality is not supported.

DS4340 Module Signal


Wake-up_2

Module Description/Function
DS4340 Connection to an external wake-up signal for module 2 The WakeUp pin is connected to the WAKE input of TJA1080 devices. This Pin has no pull-up resistor. To set the wake flag on the TJA1080, a falling edge is needed. See the TJA1080 manual for the functionality of the WAKE pin.

52

IP wakeup 2

53

IP reset 2

IP_Type1

Only valid for third-party IP modules You do not need to connect this pin because MicroAutoBox handles reset functionality itself. Connection to GND FlexRay 1 high in/out (FlexRayH/RS485 A) FlexRay 1 low in/out (FlexRayL/RS485 B) Connection to GND FlexRay 2 high in/out (FlexRayH/RS485 A) FlexRay 2 low in/out (FlexRayL/RS485 B) Do not connect Do not connect

Reserved

DS4340

54 55 56 57 58 59 72 73

IP GND 3

IP_Type1

GND_ChA_2 BP_ChA_2 BM_ChA_2 GND_ChB_2 BP_ChB_2 BM_ChB_2 INH1_2 INH2_2

DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340

Ground for FlexRay channel A, module 2 FlexRay channel A, bus line plus, module 2 FlexRay channel A, bus line minus, module 2 Ground for FlexRay channel B, module 2 FlexRay channel B, bus line plus, module 2 FlexRay channel B, bus line minus, module 2 Inhibit outputs from TJA1080 to switch external voltage regulator of module 2. They can be used to wake up MicroAutoBox. The outputs are on the voltage level of UBAT and can be connected directly to the KL15IN (Remote) pin of MicroAutoBox. The pins are not connected by default. If you want to use the pins, the hardware of your MicroAutoBox must be adapted, see How to Wake Up MicroAutoBox by Activity on the FlexRay Bus on page 46. To power the TJA1080 transceivers of module 2. FlexRay channel B, feed-through bus line plus, module 2 Feed-through lines are useful to keep the stub length in a linear passive bus as short as possible, see DS4340 Connections in Different Topologies on page 37. FlexRay channel B, feed-through bus line minus, module 2

IP bus high/A 3 IP_Type1 IP bus low/B 3 IP GND 4 IP_Type1 IP_Type1

IP bus high/A 4 IP_Type1 IP bus low/B 4 Reserved Reserved IP_Type1 -

74 75

Reserved Reserved

Do not connect Do not connect

UBAT_2 BP_FT_ChB_2

DS4340 DS4340

76

Reserved

Do not connect

BM_FT_ChB_2

DS4340

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

Pin

(FlexRay) IP Module Signal Module Description/Function


Do not connect Do not connect

DS4340 Module Signal


BP_FT_ChA_2 BM_FT_ChA_2

Module Description/Function
DS4340 DS4340 FlexRay channel A, feedthrough bus line plus, module 2 FlexRay channel A, feedthrough bus line minus, module 2

77 78

Reserved Reserved

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

Characteristics
Where to go from here

Information in this section Absolute Maximum Levels DC Characteristics Interface Characteristics Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface I/O Connector Characteristics Dimensions and Weights Certifications 176 177 177 178 179 179 179

Absolute Maximum Levels


Avoiding damage to the system

CAUTION
Do not exceed these levels since this may permanently damage the system.

Levels

To guarantee proper operation of MicroAutoBox do not exceed the maximum levels (for example, voltage, temperature) that are shown in the following table: Levels 40 V ... +100 V 40 V ... +100 V 30 V ... +30 V 30 V ... +30 V 20 V ... +32 V 24 V ... +30 V continuous max. 20 W 40 C ... +85 C 55 C ... +125 C CASE temperature But not more than VBAT But not more than VBAT Meaning Load dump protection

Parameter VBAT to GND VREMOTE to GND RS232 transceiver output RS232 transceiver input Serial K/ LIN Serial L All outputs short circuit to GND Continuous power dissipation (TA = +85C) Operating temperature Storage temperature

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

DC Characteristics
Data

The DC characteristics are specified for the following conditions: VBAT=+12 V; TCASE=+25 C
Symbol
VBAT VBAT IVBAT IVBAT IVBAT inrush ViHRemote ViLRemote RRemote

Parameter
Operating voltage Operating current Inrush current REMOTE

Conditions / Comments
For start-up Operating REMOTE ViHRemote REMOTE ViLRemote All inputs/outputs unconnected Input high voltage Input low voltage Pull-down resistor to GND

Min
6 4

Typ

Max
40 40

Units
V V A mA A V

1.2 5 3 4.7 0.8 100

V k

Interface Characteristics
Data

The interface characteristics are specified for the following conditions: VBAT = +12 V; TCASE = +25 C; all voltages are referenced to the A1 pin (GND) on the power input connector, unless otherwise noted.
Symbol
Bit rate Bit rate Cable length Cable type Full duplex data rate RAM size FIFO size Transmit buffer 3 k load RX input threshold low RX input threshold high RKO = 510 ; CK 1.3 nF 2.0 5 5 5 1 30 k resistor for LIN slave 1 k pull-up resistor for LIN master 2 x 10 12 MBaud byte Word is 16-bit wide 16 256 5 5 9 1.4 1.4 8 50k 8 20k 0.8 115.2k 2-paired twisted pair CAT5 5 MW/s KW W Baud V V V bit Baud bit Baud

Parameter
CAN ECU

Conditions / Comments
ISO 11898 interface

Min

Typ
250

Max
1 5

Units
MBaud MBaud m

Serial 1 RS232-Interface

Bit rate TX output voltage swing VRxinLow VRxinHigh Word length

Serial 2 ISO9141-Interface LIN ISO9141-Interface FlexRay

Bit rate Word length Bit rate Node type Bit rate Frame length

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

Parameter
IP module carrier

Symbol
Clocking Access type

Conditions / Comments

Min
8

Typ
byte/wo rd

Max
32

Units
MHz

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error (refer to Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface on page 178).

Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface


Objective

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error. The UART baud rate generator provides several baud rates: To calculate the divisor T for a chosen baud rate
T = Round 230400 BR (chosen)

Baud rate calculation

BR (chosen) = The baudrate to be generated T = The baudrate generator divisor (2 T 65535)

To calculate the real baud rate from a given divisor T


230400 BR (real) = T Baud BR (real) = The baudrate you get T = The baudrate generator divisor (2 T 65535)

To calculate the resulting error


ErrorBR BR (real) BR (chosen) = BR (chosen) 100%

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If ErrorBR 2%, messages will be transferred and received correctly.

I/O Connector Characteristics


Technical data

The following table shows the characteristics of the I/O connectors: Contact resistance Durability Continuous current per pin (TA = +85C) max. 15 m 10,000 cycles max. 2.5 A

Dimensions and Weights


Technical data

The following table shows the mechanical characteristics of MicroAutoBox 1401/1507: Case width Case height Case depth Weight 200 mm (7.87 in.) 50 mm (1.97 in.) 225 mm (8.86 in.) about 2 kg (4.4 lb.) without external cables

Certifications
CE compliance

MicroAutoBox meets the requirements of the European directive 89/336/ECC (Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive) for CE marking. To verify the reliability of MicroAutoBox under realistic operating conditions, it was exposed to extreme vibration and shock tests. During the tests, MicroAutoBox executed a program without any failures.

Vibration and shock tests

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1507

Applied standards

The characteristics of MicroAutoBox were tested according to the standards shown in the following table: Applied Standard EN 61000-6-2 EN 61000-6-4 Description Immunity standard for industrial environments Emission standard for industrial environments
o o

Tested Characteristics Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) Vibration

EN 60068-2-6

Mechanical test of resistance to vibration Test conditions: Sinusoidal vibration, 3-axis test, 5 2000 Hz, up to 5 g, 30 minutes per axis Mechanical test of shock resistance Test conditions: Shock, 3-axis test, 11 ms at 15 g, 5 ms at 100 g

Shock

EN 60068-2-27

o o

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Where to go from here

Information in this section Connector Pinouts Pin Description Characteristics 182 188 199

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Connector Pinouts
Objective

MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506 provides 2 connectors to access the different I/O signals of MicroAutoBox. Information in this section Zero Insertion Force Connector Sub-D I/O Connector 182 184

Where to go from here

Zero Insertion Force Connector


Objective

The I/O connector is a 156-pin Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) connector giving access to the input and output signals provided by MicroAutoBox. The following illustration shows the pin numbering of the I/O connector (front view of MicroAutoBox):
1 2 3 4 5 6 c b a Z Y X W V U T S R P N M L K J H G F E D C B A 1 2 3 4 5 6

There are pins identified via capital letters (A, B, C, ...) and pins identified via small letters (a, b, c).

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

The following table shows the signals of the I/0 connector:


1
DAC 7 DAC 5 DAC 3 DAC 1 VDRIVE Group 6 ch 6 TPU ch 2 TPU ch 5 TPU ch 9 TPU ch 15 Group 2 ch 5 Group 3 ch 3 Group 6 ch 1 out out out out in out out out out out out out in

2
DAC 8 DAC 6 DAC 4 DAC 2 VSENS Group 6 ch 7 TPU ch 3 TPU ch 6 TPU ch 10 TPU ch 16 Group 2 ch 6 CTM ch 1 Group 6 ch 2 out out out out out out out out out out out in in

3
Group 1 ch 1 Group 1 ch 5 CTM ch 2 CTM ch 8 Group 6 ch 2 GND GND GND TPU ch 11 Group 2 ch 1 Group 2 ch 7 REMOTE Group 6 ch 3 out out out out out in in in out out out in in

4
Group 1 ch 2 Group 1 ch 6 CTM ch 5 CTM ch 3 Group 6 ch 3 GND GND GND TPU ch 12 Group 2 ch 2 Group 2 ch 8 CTM ch 2 Group 6 ch 4 out out out out out in in in out out out in in

5
Group 1 ch 3 Group 1 ch 7 CTM ch 6 CTM ch 4 Group 6 ch 4 Group 6 ch 8 GND TPU ch 7 TPU ch 13 Group 2 ch 3 Group 3 ch 1 CTM ch 3 Group 6 ch 5 out out out out out out in out out out out in in

6
Group 1 ch 4 CTM ch 1 CTM ch 7 Group 6 ch 1 Group 6 ch 5 TPU ch 1 TPU ch 4 TPU ch 8 TPU ch 14 Group 2 ch 4 Group 3 ch 2 CTM ch 4 Group 6 ch 6 out out out out out out out out out out out in in A B C D E F G H J K L M N

Group 6 ch 7 TPU ch 5 TPU ch 11 Group 2 ch 1 Group 2 ch 7 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 1 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 1

in in in in in in in in in in in in in

Group 6 ch 8 TPU ch 6 TPU ch 12 Group 2 ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 1 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 1 VBAT prot

in in in in in in in in in in in in out

TPU ch 1 TPU ch 7 TPU ch 13 Group 2 ch 3 Serial 2 K / LIN VBAT VBAT VBAT Group 4 ch 1 Group 4 ch 4 Group 4 ch 7 Group 5 ch 2 Group 5 ch 5

in in in in i/o in in in in in in in in

TPU ch 2 TPU ch 8 TPU ch 14 Group 2 ch 4 Serial 2 L VBAT VBAT VBAT Group 4 ch 2 Group 4 ch 5 Group 4 ch 8 Group 5 ch 3 Group 5 ch 6

in in in in in in in in in in in in in

TPU ch 3 TPU ch 9 TPU ch 15 Group 2 ch 5 Serial 1 TXD CAN 1 low VBAT CAN 2 low ECU / IF RX+ ECU / IF RXECU / IF TXECU / IF TX+ Group 5 ch 7

in in in in out i/o in i/o in in out out in

TPU ch 4 TPU ch 10 TPU ch 16 Group 2 ch 6 Serial 1 RXD CAN 1 high Group 2 ch 8 CAN 2 high Group 4 ch 3 Group 4 ch 6 Group 5 ch 1 Group 5 ch 4 Group 5 ch 8

in in in in in i/o in i/o in in in in in

P R S T U V W X Y Z a b c

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

The following signals are available on the ZIF (zero insertion force) as well as on the Sub-D I/O connector:
n n n n

CAN channel 1 (CAN 1 low, CAN 1 high) CAN channel 2 (CAN 2 low, CAN 2 high) Serial channel 1 (Serial 1 TXD, Serial 1 RXD) Serial channel 2 (Serial 2K/LIN, Serial 2 L)

The accompanying pins are internally connected on the MicroAutoBox. Use these pins only on one connector. Do not use them at the same time on both connectors.

Sub-D I/O Connector


Objective

MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506 provides a 78-pin, male Sub-D connector that grants access to various I/O signals provided by the DS1506 I/O board, such as CAN, LIN, and FlexRay signals. Which I/O signals are available depends on the FlexRay IP module you use (DS4340 or third-party). The table below shows the pinout if you use third-party FlexRay IP modules. Pin Signal Pin
20

Pinout for using thirdparty FlexRay IP modules

Pin
1

Signal

Signal

Pin

Signal

60

78

1 2 3 4 5 6

CAN 1 high CAN 1 low GND CAN 2 high CAN 2 low GND 21 22 23 24 25 GND GND GND GND GND

40 41 42 43 44 45

CAN 3 high CAN 3 low GND CAN 4 high CAN 4 low GND 60 61 62 63 64 GND GND GND GND GND

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Pin 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Signal Serial 1 TXD Serial 1 RXD GND Serial 2 K/LIN Serial 2 L GND IP wakeup 1 IP reset 1 IP GND 1 IP bus high/A 1 IP bus low/B 1 IP GND2 IP bus high/A 2 IP bus low/B 2

Pin 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

Signal GND GND GND GND GND GND GND Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved

Pin 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59

Signal Serial 3 TXD Serial 3 RXD GND Serial 4 K/LIN Serial 4 L GND IP wakeup 2 IP reset 2 IP GND 3 IP bus high/A 3 IP bus low/B 3 IP GND 4 IP bus high/A 4 IP bus low/B 4

Pin 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78

Signal GND GND GND GND GND GND GND Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved

The following signals are available on the Sub-D I/O connector as well as on the ZIF (zero insertion force) connector:
n n n n

CAN channel 1 (CAN 1 low, CAN 1 high) CAN channel 2 (CAN 2 low, CAN 2 high) Serial channel 1 (Serial 1 TXD, Serial 1 RXD) Serial channel 2 (Serial 2K/LIN, Serial 2 L)

The accompanying pins are internally connected on MicroAutoBox. Use these pins only on one connector. Do not use them at the same time on both connectors.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Pinout for using DS4340 FlexRay Interface Modules

The table below shows the pinout if you use DS4340 FlexRay Interface Modules. Pin Signal Pin
20

Pin
1

Signal

Signal

Pin

Signal

60

78

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

CAN 1 high CAN 1 low GND CAN 2 high CAN 2 low GND Serial 1 TXD Serial 1 RXD GND Serial 2 K/LIN Serial 2 L GND Wake-up_1 Reserved GND_ChA_1 BP_ChA_1 BM_ChA_1 GND_ChB_1 BP_ChB_1 BM_ChB_1 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND INH1_1 INH2_1 UBAT_1 BP_FT_ChB_1 BM_FT_ChB_1 BP_FT_ChA_1 BM_FT_ChA_1

40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59

CAN 3 high CAN 3 low GND CAN 4 high CAN 4 low GND Serial 3 TXD Serial 3 RXD GND Serial 4 K/LIN Serial 4 L GND Wake-up_2 Reserved GND_ChA_2 BP_ChA_2 BM_ChA_2 GND_ChB_2 BP_ChB_2 BM_ChB_2 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND INH1_2 INH2_2 UBAT_2 BP_FT_ChB_2 BM_FT_ChB_2 BP_FT_ChA_2 BM_FT_ChA_2

Signal names The signal names of the bus lines consist of four parts separated by an underscore:
n n

Bus line plus (BP) or bus line minus (BM) Normal bus line (" ") or feed-through line (FT)

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

n n

FlexRay channel (ChA or ChB) Module position (1 or 2)

For example, BP_FT_ChB_2 means: bus line plus, feed-through line, channel B, 2nd module slot. For pin descriptions, refer to Interfaces on page 193. The following signals are available on the Sub-D I/O connector as well as on the ZIF (zero insertion force) connector:
n n n n

CAN channel 1 (CAN 1 low, CAN 1 high) CAN channel 2 (CAN 2 low, CAN 2 high) Serial channel 1 (Serial 1 TXD, Serial 1 RXD) Serial channel 2 (Serial 2K/LIN, Serial 2 L)

The accompanying pins are internally connected on MicroAutoBox. Use these pins only on one connector. Do not use them at the same time on both connectors.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Pin Description
Objective Where to go from here

The pin description is divided into several categories. Information in this section Power Input and Output Digital Input Digital Output Analog Input and Output Interfaces 188 189 191 193 193

Power Input and Output


Pin description

The following table gives a description of the pins used for power input and output for MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506: Signal VBAT GND Description/Function Main power supply input. Connect at least 2 pins to the plus of your car battery. Main power supply return and reference for all input and output signals. Connect at least 2 pins to the minus of your car battery. Use unused pins to reference your signals. This signal is also connected to the case of MicroAutoBox.

Pins V3, V4, W3, W4, W5, X3, X4 F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Pins E1

Signal VDRIVE

Description/Function This input supplies all digital input and output circuits. o Connect this input to VSENS to get TTL-compatible logic levels to your inputs/outputs. o Connect this input to VBATprot to get automotivecompatible logic levels to your inputs/outputs. o Do not connect this pin directly to VBAT, because the input and output circuits are not load dump or reverse voltage protected at this signal. o While MicroAutoBox is being powered down, the output stages have pull-up behavior to VDRIVE. So the outputs may reach the level of VDRIVE. If this behavior is critical in your application, you have to power down your external devices or VDRIVE before MicroAutoBox is powered down. You can also use the REMOTE signal (Kl.15) with the power control software functionality to first switch off VDRIVE via a relay. Sensor Supply output. Use this output to supply your sensors and/or VDRIVE. Protected VBAT output. Use this output to supply VDRIVE when automotive logic levels are needed.

E2

VSENS

c2

VBAT prot

Digital Input
Pin description

Most digital signals have separate input and output pins. If your software defines a signal for output, the corresponding input has no function. If the software defines a signal as input the corresponding output pin has the same level as the corresponding input pin. When software does not control the digital I/O signals (during reset or before correct initialization) each output will be in the same state as the corresponding input. This allows you to define the default (reset) state of each output by driving the input with an external signal. If you use this feature ensure that your software initializes your output signal to the same state you defined for the input.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

The following table gives a description of the digital input pins: Pins M3 M2, M4, M5, M6 N1 ... P2 P3 Signal REMOTE CTM ch 1 4 Group 6 ch 1 ... 8 TPU ch 1 Module DIO DIO DIO Description/Function Start signal of entire system (active high) with pull-down. Capture/compare inputs with pull-up. Inputs for frequency or pulse-width measurement. Standard discrete digital input with pull-up. This input drives the first channel of the internal Time Processing Unit of the DIO module, which is useful for motor management. Therefore, the signal is conditioned by an adaptive Schmitt trigger, which generates one single impulse whenever the input voltage crosses 0 V to negative voltages. This single impulse is also used for driving the main CPU INT13. - also drives the main CPU INT4 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

P4

TPU ch 2

DIO

P5

TPU ch 3

DIO

- also drives the main CPU INT5 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

P6

TPU ch 4

DIO

- also drives the main CPU INT6 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R1

TPU ch 5

DIO

- also drives the IP module 1 interrupt event Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R2

TPU ch 6

DIO

- also drives the main CPU INT8 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R3

TPU ch 7

DIO

- also drives the IP module 2 interrupt Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Pins R4

Signal TPU ch 8

Module DIO

Description/Function - also drives the main CPU INT11 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R5

TPU ch 9

DIO

- drives only the CAN 2 communication interrupt Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) - provides a pull-up
ST M

R6 ... S6 T1 ... U1, W6 a6, b3, b4, b6, c3 ... c6 Y3, Y4, Y6, Z3, Z4, Z6, a3, a4

TPU ch 10 ... 16 Group 2 ch 1 ... 8 Group 5 ch 1 ... 8

DIO DIO DIO

Like TPU ch 2 ... 9 in, but no additional function. TPU ch 10 ... 16 in have pull-ups. Standard discrete digital input with pull-up Standard discrete digital input with no pull-up/pulldown In the second function these signals can be analog to digital converted (10-bit resolution) by the DIO module.

Group 4 ch 1 ... 8

DIO

Due to the limitations of the DIO slave application, not all functions may be available at all times. These functions are not independent from each other.

Digital Output
Pin description

Most digital signals have separate input and output pins. If your software defines a signal for output, the corresponding input has no function. If the software defines a signal as input the corresponding output pin has the same level as the corresponding input pin. When software does not control the digital I/O signals (during reset or before correct initialization) each output will be in the same state as the corresponding input. This allows you to define the default (reset) state of each output by driving the input with an external signal. If you use this feature ensure that your software initializes your output signal to the same state you defined for the input.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

The following table gives a description of the digital output pins: Pins A3 ... A6, B3 ... B5 Signal Group 1 ch 1 ... 7 Module DIO Type 1 Default state low Description/Function Standard discrete digital output. Group 1 is for output only. You cannot change the default state of the signal because there is no corresponding input pin. PWM outputs of the DIOCapture/Compare unit. Standard discrete digital output.

B6, C3 ... C6, D3 ... D5 D6, E3 ... F2, F5 F6

CTM ch 1 ... 8

DIO Type 1

high

Group 6 ch 1 ... 8

DIO Type 1

high

TPU ch 1

DIO Type 1

high

DIO-Time Processing Unit output 1. Due to the special "TPU ch 1 input" this signal will not directly follow its input. It rather shows the single impulse created by this input signal conditioning. DIO-Time Processing Unit output 2 ... 16. Depending on the DIO TPU firmware the TPU outputs can perform a complete motor management or simply generate PWM or discrete output signals. Standard discrete digital output. While resetting the DIO module this signal is high, independent from the state of "Group 2 ch 1 in". Standard discrete digital output. Standard discrete digital output. Group 3 is for output only. You cannot change the default state of the signal because there is no corresponding input pin.

G1, G2, G6 ... H2, H5 ... K2

TPU ch 2 ... 16

DIO Type 1

high

K3

Group 2 ch 1

DIO Type 1

high

K4 ... L4 L5 ... M1

Group 2 ch 2 ... 8 Group 3 ch 1 3

DIO Type 1 DIO Type 1

high low

Default state means the state of the signal without any connection to the corresponding input and/or without any output action by the software.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Analog Input and Output


Pin description

The following table gives a description of the analog input and output pins: Signal ADC Type 1 (all 16 channels) Module ADC Type 1 Default state Description/Function Standard analog inputs These inputs are analog to 12-bit digital converted by the ADC module. Due to factory calibration the offset and gain errors are almost eliminated.

Pins c1, a1 Y1, W1 b1, Z1 b2, Z2 X1, V1 X2, V2 a2, Y2 W2, U2 D1, D2 C1, C2 B1, B2 A1, A2

DAC1 DAC8

DAC Type 1

0V

Standard analog outputs These outputs are 12-bit digital to analog converted by the DAC module.

Default state means the state of the signal during reset.

Interfaces
Pin description

The following table gives a description of the interface pins for the ECU interface which can be accessed via the ZIF connector and 78-pin Sub-D connector. Which I/O signals are available depends on the FlexRay IP module you use (DS4340 or third-party).
ZIF connector on page 194 78-pin Sub-D connector on page 194 (FlexRay) IP Module 1 and DS4340 Module 1 on page 195 (FlexRay) IP Module 2 and DS4340 Module 2 on page 196 CAN_TP1 Module 1 on page 194 CAN_TP1 Module 2 on page 194

Information in this topic

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

ZIF connector

The following table gives a description of the interface pins for the ECU interface which can be accessed via the ZIF connector: Module Type ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 Description/Function ECU-bypassing interface. This reflective memory-based ECU-bypassing interface is proprietary to dSPACE. Please connect the MicroAutoBox-RX pair to the ECUTX pair and the MicroAutoBox-TX pair to the ECU-RX pair. Always use a CAT5 twisted-pair cable for this connection.

Pins Y5 Z5 b5 a5

Signal ECU / IF RX + ECU / IF RX ECU / IF TX + ECU / IF TX -

78-pin Sub-D connector

The following tables give a description of the interface pins provided by the 78-pin Sub-D connector. CAN_TP1 Module 1 pins: The CAN_TP1 Module 1 has the following

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error (refer to Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface on page 206).

Pins Signal
1 2 4 5 7 8 10 11 CAN 1 high CAN 1 low CAN 2 high CAN 2 low Serial 1 TXD Serial 1 RXD Serial 2 L

Module

Description/Function
CAN 1 high = CAN high of CAN controller 1 CAN 2 high = CAN high of CAN controller 2 ISO 11898 interface These two CAN busses are not terminated.

CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1

CAN Type 1 RS232 interface

Serial 2 K/LIN CAN Type 1 LIN or ISO 9141 interface CAN Type 1 The K line/LIN interface is bidirectional. The L line is input only. Both lines have no pull-up. For proper function of the K line connect an external pull-up resistor (4.7 k) from this line to VBAT.

CAN_TP1 Module 2 pins:

The CAN_TP1 Module 2 has the following

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error (refer to Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface on page 206).

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Pins Signal
40 41 43 44 46 47 49 50 CAN 3 high CAN 3 low CAN 4 high CAN 4 low Serial 3 TXD Serial 3 RXD

Module

Description/Function
CAN 3 high = CAN high of CAN controller 3 CAN 4 high = CAN high of CAN controller 4 ISO 11898 interface These two CAN busses are not terminated.

CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1

CAN Type 1 RS232 interface

Serial 4 K/LIN CAN Type 1 LIN or ISO 9141 interface Serial 4 L CAN Type 1 The K line/LIN interface is bidirectional. The L line is input only. Both lines have no pull-up. For proper function of the K line connect an external pull-up resistor (4.7 k) from this line to VBAT.

(FlexRay) IP Module 1 and DS4340 Module 1 Different module types can be installed on the DS1506: A standard IP module, a thirdparty FlexRay IP module, or a DS4340 module. The table describes the pins when a third-party FlexRay IP module or a DS4340 is installed. The Sub-D connector can also be used for access to the signals of a standard IP module installed on the DS1506. Because the connector is primarily used for FlexRay, not all signals of the IP modules are available. See Sub-D I/O Connector on page 184.
Pins (FlexRay) IP Module 1 Signal
13 IP wakeup 1

DS4340 Module 1 Signal


Wake-up_1

Module Description/Function
IP_Type1 You do not need to connect this pin because wake-up functionality is not supported.

Module Description/Function
DS4340 Connection to an external wake-up signal for module 1 The WakeUp pin is connected to the WAKE input of TJA1080 devices. This Pin has no pull-up resistor. To set the wake flag on the TJA1080, a falling edge is needed. See the TJA1080 manual for the functionality of the WAKE pin.

14

IP reset 1

IP_Type1

Only valid for third-party IP modules You do not need to connect this pin because MicroAutoBox handles reset functionality itself. Connection to GND FlexRay 1 high in/out (FlexRayH/RS485 A) FlexRay 1 low in/out (FlexRayL/RS485 B) Connection to GND

Reserved

DS4340

15 16 17 18

IP GND 1

IP_Type1

GND_ChA_1 BP_ChA_1 BM_ChA_1 GND_ChB_1

DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340

Ground for the FlexRay channel A, module 1 FlexRay channel A, bus line plus, module 1 FlexRay channel A, bus line minus, module 1 Ground for the FlexRay channel B, module 1

IP bus high/A 1 IP_Type1 IP bus low/B 1 IP GND 2 IP_Type1 IP_Type1

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Pins

(FlexRay) IP Module 1 Signal Module Description/Function


FlexRay 2 high in/out (FlexRayH/RS485 A) FlexRay 2 low in/out (FlexRayL/RS485 B) Do not connect Do not connect

DS4340 Module 1 Signal


BP_ChB_1 BM_ChB_1 INH1_1 INH2_1

Module Description/Function
DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 FlexRay channel B, bus line plus, module 1 FlexRay channel B, bus line minus, module 1 Inhibit outputs from TJA1080 to switch external voltage regulator of module 1. They can be used to wake up MicroAutoBox. The outputs are on the voltage level of UBAT and can be connected directly to the KL15IN (Remote) pin of MicroAutoBox. The pins are not connected by default. If you want to use the pins, the hardware of your MicroAutoBox must be adapted, see How to Wake Up MicroAutoBox by Activity on the FlexRay Bus on page 46. To power the TJA1080 transceivers of module 1. FlexRay channel B, feed-through bus line plus, module 1. Feed-through lines are useful to keep the stub length in a linear passive bus as short as possible, see DS4340 Connections in Different Topologies on page 37. FlexRay channel B, feed-through bus line minus, module 1 FlexRay channel A, feedthrough bus line plus, module 1 FlexRay channel A, feedthrough bus line minus, module 1

19 20 33 34

IP bus high/A 2 IP_Type1 IP bus low/B 2 Reserved Reserved IP_Type1 -

35 36

Reserved Reserved

Do not connect Do not connect

UBAT_1 BP_FT_ChB_1

DS4340 DS4340

37 38 39

Reserved Reserved Reserved

Do not connect Do not connect Do not connect

BM_FT_ChB_1 BP_FT_ChA_1 BM_FT_ChA_1

DS4340 DS4340 DS4340

(FlexRay) IP Module 2 and DS4340 Module 2 Different module types can be installed on the DS1506: A standard IP module, a thirdparty FlexRay IP module or a DS4340 module. The table describes the pins when a third-party FlexRay IP module or a DS4340 is installed. The Sub-D connector can also be used for access to the signals of a standard IP module installed on the DS1506. Because the connector is primarily used for FlexRay, not all signals of the IP modules are available. See Sub-D I/O Connector on page 184.

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Pins

(FlexRay) IP Module 2 Signal Module Description/Function


IP_Type1 You do not need to connect this pin because wake-up functionality is not supported.

DS4340 Module 2 Signal


Wake-up_2

Module Description/Function
DS4340 Connection to an external wake-up signal for module 2 The WakeUp pin is connected to the WAKE input of TJA1080 devices. This Pin has no pull-up resistor. To set the wake flag on the TJA1080, a falling edge is needed. See the TJA1080 manual for the functionality of the WAKE pin.

52

IP wakeup 2

53

IP reset 2

IP_Type1

Only valid for third-party IP modules You do not need to connect this pin because MicroAutoBox handles reset functionality itself. Connection to GND FlexRay 1 high in/out (FlexRayH/RS485 A) FlexRay 1 low in/out (FlexRayL/RS485 B) Connection to GND FlexRay 2 high in/out (FlexRayH/RS485 A) FlexRay 2 low in/out (FlexRayL/RS485 B) Do not connect Do not connect

Reserved

DS4340

54 55 56 57 58 59 72 73

IP GND 3

IP_Type1

GND_ChA_2 BP_ChA_2 BM_ChA_2 GND_ChB_2 BP_ChB_2 BM_ChB_2 INH1_2 INH2_2

DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340

Ground for FlexRay channel A, module 2 FlexRay channel A, bus line plus, module 2 FlexRay channel A, bus line minus, module 2 Ground for FlexRay channel B, module 2 FlexRay channel B, bus line plus, module 2 FlexRay channel B, bus line minus, module 2 Inhibit outputs from TJA1080 to switch external voltage regulator of module 2. They can be used to wake up MicroAutoBox. The outputs are on the voltage level of UBAT and can be connected directly to the KL15IN (Remote) pin of MicroAutoBox. The pins are not connected by default. If you want to use the pins, the hardware of your MicroAutoBox must be adapted, see How to Wake Up MicroAutoBox by Activity on the FlexRay Bus on page 46. To power the TJA1080 transceivers of module 2. FlexRay channel B, feed-through bus line plus, module 2 Feed-through lines are useful to keep the stub length in a linear passive bus as short as possible, see DS4340 Connections in Different Topologies on page 37. FlexRay channel B, feed-through bus line minus, module 2

IP bus high/A 3 IP_Type1 IP bus low/B 3 IP GND 4 IP_Type1 IP_Type1

IP bus high/A 4 IP_Type1 IP bus low/B 4 Reserved Reserved IP_Type1 -

74 75

Reserved Reserved

Do not connect Do not connect

UBAT_2 BP_FT_ChB_2

DS4340 DS4340

76

Reserved

Do not connect

BM_FT_ChB_2

DS4340

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Pins

(FlexRay) IP Module 2 Signal Module Description/Function


Do not connect Do not connect

DS4340 Module 2 Signal


BP_FT_ChA_2 BM_FT_ChA_2

Module Description/Function
DS4340 DS4340 FlexRay channel A, feedthrough bus line plus, module 2 FlexRay channel A, feedthrough bus line minus, module 2

77 78

Reserved Reserved

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Characteristics
Where to go from here

Information in this section Absolute Maximum Levels DC Characteristics AC Characteristics Interface Characteristics Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface I/O Circuits I/O Connector Characteristics Dimensions and Weights Certifications 199 200 204 205 206 207 209 210 210

Absolute Maximum Levels


Avoiding damage to the system

CAUTION
Do not exceed these levels since this may permanently damage the system.

Levels

To guarantee proper operation of MicroAutoBox do not exceed the maximum levels (for example, voltage, temperature) that are shown in the following table: Levels 40 V ... +100 V 0 V ... +45 V 40 V ... +45 V (VDRIVE 45 V) ... +45 V 40 V ... +40 V 30 V ... +40 V 0 V ... +40 V 0 V ... +45 V 30 V ... +30 V but not more than VBAT Meaning Load dump protection

Parameter VBAT to GND VDRIVE to GND All digital output voltages to GND All digital input voltages to GND All analog input voltages All analog output voltages VSENS output to GND VBATprot output to GND RS232 transceiver output

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Parameter RS232 transceiver input Serial K/ LIN Serial L All outputs short circuit to GND Continuous power dissipation (TA = +85 C) Operating temperature Storage temperature

Levels 30 V ... +30 V 20 V ... +32 V 24 V ... +30 V continuous max. 20 W 40 C ... +85 C 55 C ... +125 C

Meaning

but not more than VBAT but not more than VBAT

CASE temperature

DC Characteristics
Data

The DC characteristics are specified for the following conditions: VBAT=+12 V; TCASE=+25 C; all voltages are referenced to GND pin F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4, unless otherwise noted.
Symbol
VBAT VBAT IVBAT IVBAT IVBAT inrush VDRIVE IVDRIVE no load IVDRIVE maximum load

Parameter
Operating voltage Operating current Inrush current Input circuit and output circuit voltage

Conditions / Comments
For start-up Operating REMOTE ViHRemote REMOTE ViLRemote All inputs/outputs unconnected Supply for digital input/output circuits All inputs/outputs unconnected All outputs shorted to GND Input high voltage Input low voltage Input impedance Input high voltage Input low voltage Input hysteresis voltage Pull-up resistor to VDRIVE Input capacitance Input impedance TPU1 is signal conditioned by an adaptive sense amplifier optimized for automotive crankshaft sensors

Min
6 4

Typ

Max
40 40

Units
V V A mA A

1.2 5 3 45 10 500 3.9 0.8 100 3.5 1.2 0.5 17 0.9 19 1 18 1 19 1.1

V mA mA V V k V V V k nF k

Digital Inputs Group 4 & Group 5 & CTM & Group 2 & Group 6 & TPU 2 ... 16 ViHG45 ViLG45 RinG45 ViH ViL ViHys Rdigin Cdigin TPU1 RinTPU1

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Parameter
REMOTE

Symbol
ViHRemote ViLRemote ViHysRemote RRemote

Conditions / Comments
Input high voltage Input low voltage Input hysteresis voltage Pull-down resistor to GND Full scale No missing codes Errors eliminated by software compensation TCASE = 40C ... +85C Input impedance Full scale Errors eliminated by software compensation TCASE = 40C ... +85C Input impedance IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 12V IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 12V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 12V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 12V Output current high TCASE = 40C ... +85C Output current low TCASE = 40C ... +85C Full scale Full monotonic Errors eliminated by software compensation TCASE = 40C ... +85C max. sink/ source current Output voltage when sinking IDACout = 5mA and CODE = 000H Output voltage Temperature caused voltage drift TCASE = 40C ... +85C Maximum output current

Min
4.7

Typ

Max
0.8

Units
V V V k V bit LSB LSB

0.5 21 4.84 12

1 22 5.00 0.5 0.5 23 5.16

Analog Inputs ADC Type 1 (all 16 channels) VmaxADC Resolution Offset error Gain error Offset error Gain error ZinADC Group 4 & Group 5 VmaxADCG45 Resolution Offset error Gain error Offset error Gain error RinG45 Digital Outputs CTM & Group 1 & Group 2 & Group 3 & Group 6 & TPU VoH VoL VoH VoL VoH VoL VoH VoL | IOHmax | | IOLmax | Analog Outputs DAC1 DAC8 VDAC Resolution Offset error Gain error Offset error Gain error IDACout VDACSAT Other Outputs Sensor supply VSENS VSENS = f(T) IVSENS, max 4.84 2 750 5.046 5.25 2 V % mA 4.44 12 2 0.5 10 20 5 +10 +20 5 0.3 4.50 4.56 V bit mV LSB LSB LSB mA V 3.1 3.1 10.1 10.1 5 5 4.5 0.2 3.4 0.6 11.5 0.25 10.4 0.6 12.5 13 0.85 0.85 0.85 0.85 V V V V V V V V mA mA

10 50 150k + 75k||220pF 4.7 10 0.5 0.5 10 50 100 5.0

+10 +50 5.3

LSB LSB typ. V bit LSB LSB

+10 +50

LSB LSB k

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Parameter
Protected VBAT

Symbol
VBATprot IVBATprot, max IProtPeak t(overload)

Conditions / Comments
IL = 1A; VBAT = 12V Maximum output current overload current limit (40C ... 85C) time to shut off IProtPeak

Min
11.56 4

Typ
11.78

Max
12 1000 9 5

Units
V mA A ms

Since May 2000, all shipped MicroAutoBoxes provide calibration values to increase the accuracy of the analog inputs and outputs. For further information, refer to How to Check Whether MicroAutoBox is Calibrated ( MicroAutoBox Features).
ST M

The following illustrations show the maximum output current of a digital output circuit as a function of ambient temperature (VDRIVE = 12 V; output is shorted to 6 V):
n

Output high

Iout
16mA

15mA

14mA

13mA

12mA

11mA

10mA -40C -20C 0C 20C 40C 60C 80C

T/C

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Output low

Iout
-10mA

-12mA

-14mA

-16mA

-17mA -40C -20C 0C 20C 40C 60C 80C

T/C

The following illustrations show the typical digital output voltage as a function of the output current (VDRIVE = 12V):
n

Output high

Vout
12.0V

11.5V

11.0V

85C

10.5V

25C -40C
10.0V

9.5V

9.0V 0mA 1mA 2mA 3mA 4mA 5mA 6mA 7mA 8mA 9mA 10mA

Iout

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Output low

Vout
1.0V

0.8V

-40C 25C

0.6V

85C

0.4V

0.2V

0V -10mA -9mA -8mA -7mA -6mA -5mA -4mA -3mA -2mA -1mA 0A

Iout

AC Characteristics
Data

The AC characteristics are specified for the following conditions: VBAT=+12 V; TCASE=+25 C; all voltages are referenced to GND pins F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4, unless otherwise noted.
SymbolL
Conversion time fgADC

Parameter
Analog Inputs ADC Type 1 (all 16 channels) Group 4 & 5 Analog Outputs DAC1 DAC8

Conditions / Comments
For all 16 channels (simultaneous sample) Low-pass cutoff frequency (3dB) Per channel (sequentially sample);

Min
6.6 9.1 10

TypP

Max

Units
s

9.6

10.2 17

kHz s

Conversion time

No low-pass filter implemented Settling time fgDAC Digital Inputs and Outputs Inputs (except Group 4 & 5) tPDInLH tPDInHL Inputs Group 4 & 5 Outputs tPDInG45LH tPDInG45HL tPDOutLH tPDOutHL Low-high propagation delay of input signals High-low delay of input signals Low-high delay of input signals High-low delay of input signals Low-high delay of output signals High-low delay of output signals 0.5 0.5 1 1 1 1 1 1 s s s s s s Settling time of output (to 1 LSB) Low-pass cutoff frequency of reconstruction filter (3dB) 10.2 10.8 150 11.4 s kHz

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Interface Characteristics
Data

The interface characteristics are specified for the following conditions: VBAT = +12V; TCASE = +25C; all voltages are referenced to GND pins F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4, unless otherwise noted.
Symbol
Bit rate Bit rate Cable length Cable type Full duplex data rate RAM size FIFO size Transmit buffer 3 k load RX input threshold low RX input threshold high RKO = 510 ; CK 1.3 nF 2.0 5 5 5 1 30 k resistor for LIN slave 1 k pull-up resistor for LIN master 2 x 10 12 8 byte/wo rd 32 MBaud byte MHz Word is 16-bit wide 16 256 5 5 9 1.4 1.4 8 50k 8 20k 0.8 115.2k 2-paired twisted pair CAT5 5 MW/s KW W Baud V V V bit Baud bit Baud

Parameter
CAN ECU

Conditions / Comments
ISO 11898 interface

Min

Typ
250

Max
1 5

Units
MBaud MBaud m

Serial 1 RS232-Interface

Bit rate TX output voltage swing VRxinLow VRxinHigh Word length

Serial 2 ISO9141-Interface LIN ISO9141-Interface FlexRay IP module carrier

Bit rate Word length Bit rate Node type Bit rate Frame length Clocking Access type

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error (refer to Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface on page 206).

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface


Objective

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error. The UART baud rate generator provides several baud rates: To calculate the divisor T for a chosen baud rate
T = Round 230400 BR (chosen)

Baud rate

BR (chosen) = The baudrate to be generated T = The baudrate generator divisor (2 T 65535)

To calculate the real baud rate from a given divisor T


230400 BR (real) = T Baud BR (real) = The baudrate you get T = The baudrate generator divisor (2 T 65535)

To calculate the resulting error


ErrorBR BR (real) BR (chosen) = BR (chosen) 100%

If ErrorBR 2%, messages will be transferred and received correctly.

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I/O Circuits
Circuit diagram

The following table shows simplified diagrams of the I/O circuitry of the various inputs and outputs: I/O Circuit Group 4 & Group 5
100 k TTL Dig IN

Signal Digital inputs

Group 2 & Group 6 & CTM & TPU2 TPU16

VDRIVE

18 k 100 k

5 V CMOS Dig IN

TPU1

20 k

Zero detect Rin 20 k 47 k

Remote
100 k

5 V CMOS Dig IN

22 k

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Signal Analog inputs ADC Type 1 Channel 1 16

I/O Circuit
150 k ADC 75 k

Group 4 & Group 5

100 k ADC

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Signal Digital outputs Group 1 & Group 2 & Group 3 & Group 6 & CTM & TPU

I/O Circuit
VDRIVE

47

0.3 V Dig OUT 0.3 V

47

Analog outputs

DAC1 DAC8

18 k

DAC

100 mA

10 k

I/O Connector Characteristics


Technical data

The following table shows the characteristics of the I/O connectors: Contact resistance max. 15 m

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Durability Continuous current per pin (TA = +85C)

10,000 cycles max. 2.5 A

Dimensions and Weights


Technical data

The following table shows the mechanical characteristics of MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506: Case width Case height Case depth Weight 200 mm (7.87 in.) 95 mm (3.74 in.) 225 mm (8.86 in.) about 2.5 kg (5.5 lb.) without external cables

Certifications
CE compliance

MicroAutoBox meets the requirements of the European directive 89/336/ECC (Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive) for CE marking. To verify the reliability of MicroAutoBox under realistic operating conditions, it was exposed to extreme vibration and shock tests. During the tests, MicroAutoBox executed a program without any failures. The characteristics of MicroAutoBox were tested according to the standards shown in the following table: Applied Standard EN 61000-6-2 EN 61000-6-4 Description Immunity standard for industrial environments Emission standard for industrial environments
o o

Vibration and shock tests

Applied standards

Tested Characteristics Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) Vibration

EN 60068-2-6

Mechanical test of resistance to vibration Test conditions: Sinusoidal vibration, 3-axis test, 5 2000 Hz, up to 5 g, 30 minutes per axis

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

Tested Characteristics Shock

Applied Standard EN 60068-2-27

Description
o o

Mechanical test of shock resistance Test conditions: Shock, 3-axis test, 11 ms at 15 g, 5 ms at 100 g

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

Where to go from here

Information in this section Connector Pinouts Pin Description Characteristics 214 220 231

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

Connector Pinouts
Objective

MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507 provides 2 connectors to access the different I/O signals of MicroAutoBox. Information in this section Zero Insertion Force Connector Sub-D I/O Connector ECU Interface Connector 214 216 219

Where to go from here

Zero Insertion Force Connector


Objective

The I/O connector is a 156-pin Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) connector giving access to the input and output signals provided by MicroAutoBox. The following illustration shows the pin numbering of the I/O connector (front view of MicroAutoBox):
1 2 3 4 5 6 c b a Z Y X W V U T S R P N M L K J H G F E D C B A 1 2 3 4 5 6

There are pins identified via capital letters (A, B, C, ...) and pins identified via small letters (a, b, c).

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The following table shows the signals of the I/0 connector:


1
DAC 7 DAC 5 DAC 3 DAC 1 VDRIVE Group 6 ch 6 TPU ch 2 TPU ch 5 TPU ch 9 TPU ch 15 Group 2 ch 5 Group 3 ch 3 Group 6 ch 1 out out out out in out out out out out out out in

2
DAC 8 DAC 6 DAC 4 DAC 2 VSENS Group 6 ch 7 TPU ch 3 TPU ch 6 TPU ch 10 TPU ch 16 Group 2 ch 6 CTM ch 1 Group 6 ch 2 out out out out out out out out out out out in in

3
Group 1 ch 1 Group 1 ch 5 CTM ch 2 CTM ch 8 Group 6 ch 2 GND GND GND TPU ch 11 Group 2 ch 1 Group 2 ch 7 REMOTE Group 6 ch 3 out out out out out in in in out out out in in

4
Group 1 ch 2 Group 1 ch 6 CTM ch 5 CTM ch 3 Group 6 ch 3 GND GND GND TPU ch 12 Group 2 ch 2 Group 2 ch 8 CTM ch 2 Group 6 ch 4 out out out out out in in in out out out in in

5
Group 1 ch 3 Group 1 ch 7 CTM ch 6 CTM ch 4 Group 6 ch 4 Group 6 ch 8 GND TPU ch 7 TPU ch 13 Group 2 ch 3 Group 3 ch 1 CTM ch 3 Group 6 ch 5 out out out out out out in out out out out in in

6
Group 1 ch 4 CTM ch 1 CTM ch 7 Group 6 ch 1 Group 6 ch 5 TPU ch 1 TPU ch 4 TPU ch 8 TPU ch 14 Group 2 ch 4 Group 3 ch 2 CTM ch 4 Group 6 ch 6 out out out out out out out out out out out in in A B C D E F G H J K L M N

Group 6 ch 7 TPU ch 5 TPU ch 11 Group 2 ch 1 Group 2 ch 7 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 2 Ch 1 ADC Type 1 Con 1 Ch 1

in in in in in in in in in in in in in

Group 6 ch 8 TPU ch 6 TPU ch 12 Group 2 ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 4 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 3 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 2 ADC Type 1 Con 4 Ch 1 ADC Type 1 Con 3 Ch 1 VBAT prot

in in in in in in in in in in in in out

TPU ch 1 TPU ch 7 TPU ch 13 Group 2 ch 3 Serial 2 K / LIN VBAT VBAT VBAT Group 4 ch 1 Group 4 ch 4 Group 4 ch 7 Group 5 ch 2 Group 5 ch 5

in in in in i/o in in in in in in in in

TPU ch 2 TPU ch 8 TPU ch 14 Group 2 ch 4 Serial 2 L VBAT VBAT VBAT Group 4 ch 2 Group 4 ch 5 Group 4 ch 8 Group 5 ch 3 Group 5 ch 6

in in in in in in in in in in in in in

TPU ch 3 TPU ch 9 TPU ch 15 Group 2 ch 5 Serial 1 TXD CAN 1 low VBAT CAN 2 low ECU / IF1 RX+ ECU / IF1 RXECU / IF1 TX-

in in in in out i/o in i/o in in out

TPU ch 4 TPU ch 10 TPU ch 16 Group 2 ch 6 Serial 1 RXD CAN 1 high Group 2 ch 8 CAN 2 high Group 4 ch 3 Group 4 ch 6 Group 5 ch 1 Group 5 ch 4 Group 5 ch 8

in in in in in i/o in i/o in in in in in

P R S T U V W X Y Z a b c

ECU / IF1 TX+ out Group 5 ch 7 in

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

The following signals are available on the ZIF (zero insertion force) as well as on the Sub-D I/O connector:
n n n n

CAN channel 1 (CAN 1 low, CAN 1 high) CAN channel 2 (CAN 2 low, CAN 2 high) Serial channel 1 (Serial 1 TXD, Serial 1 RXD) Serial channel 2 (Serial 2K/LIN, Serial 2 L)

The accompanying pins are internally connected on the MicroAutoBox. Use these pins only on one connector. Do not use them at the same time on both connectors.

Sub-D I/O Connector


Objective

MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507 provides a 78-pin, male Sub-D connector that grants access to various I/O signals provided by the DS1507 I/O board, such as CAN, LIN, and FlexRay signals. Which I/O signals are available depends on the FlexRay IP module you use (DS4340 or third-party). The table below shows the pinout if you use third-party FlexRay IP modules. Pin Signal Pin
20

Pinout for using thirdparty FlexRay IP modules

Pin
1

Signal

Signal

Pin

Signal

60

78

1 2 3 4 5 6

CAN 1 high CAN 1 low GND CAN 2 high CAN 2 low GND 21 22 23 24 25 GND GND GND GND GND

40 41 42 43 44 45

CAN 3 high CAN 3 low GND CAN 4 high CAN 4 low GND 60 61 62 63 64 GND GND GND GND GND

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Pin 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Signal Serial 1 TXD Serial 1 RXD GND Serial 2 K/LIN Serial 2 L GND IP wakeup 1 IP reset 1 IP GND 1 IP bus high/A 1 IP bus low/B 1 IP GND2 IP bus high/A 2 IP bus low/B 2

Pin 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

Signal GND GND GND GND GND GND GND Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved

Pin 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59

Signal Serial 3 TXD Serial 3 RXD GND Serial 4 K/LIN Serial 4 L GND IP wakeup 2 IP reset 2 IP GND 3 IP bus high/A 3 IP bus low/B 3 IP GND 4 IP bus high/A 4 IP bus low/B 4

Pin 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78

Signal GND GND GND GND GND GND GND Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved

The following signals are available on the Sub-D I/O connector as well as on the ZIF (zero insertion force) connector:
n n n n

CAN channel 1 (CAN 1 low, CAN 1 high) CAN channel 2 (CAN 2 low, CAN 2 high) Serial channel 1 (Serial 1 TXD, Serial 1 RXD) Serial channel 2 (Serial 2K/LIN, Serial 2 L)

The accompanying pins are internally connected on MicroAutoBox. Use these pins only on one connector. Do not use them at the same time on both connectors.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

Pinout for using DS4340 FlexRay Interface Module

The table below shows the pinout if you use DS4340 FlexRay Interface Modules. Pin Signal Pin
20

Pin
1

Signal

Signal

Pin

Signal

60

78

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

CAN 1 high CAN 1 low GND CAN 2 high CAN 2 low GND Serial 1 TXD Serial 1 RXD GND Serial 2 K/LIN Serial 2 L GND Wake-up_1 Reserved GND_ChA_1 BP_ChA_1 BM_ChA_1 GND_ChB_1 BP_ChB_1 BM_ChB_1 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND INH1_1 INH2_1 UBAT_1 BP_FT_ChB_1 BM_FT_ChB_1 BP_FT_ChA_1 BM_FT_ChA_1

40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59

CAN 3 high CAN 3 low GND CAN 4 high CAN 4 low GND Serial 3 TXD Serial 3 RXD GND Serial 4 K/LIN Serial 4 L GND Wake-up_2 Reserved GND_ChA_2 BP_ChA_2 BM_ChA_2 GND_ChB_2 BP_ChB_2 BM_ChB_2 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND GND INH1_2 INH2_2 UBAT_2 BP_FT_ChB_2 BM_FT_ChB_2 BP_FT_ChA_2 BM_FT_ChA_2

Signal names The signal names of the bus lines consist of four parts separated by an underscore:
n n

Bus line plus (BP) or bus line minus (BM) Normal bus line (" ") or feed-through line (FT)

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n n

FlexRay channel (ChA or ChB) Module position (1 or 2)

For example, BP_FT_ChB_2 means: bus line plus, feed-through line, channel B, 2nd module slot. For pin descriptions, refer to Interfaces on page 225. The following signals are available on the Sub-D I/O connector as well as on the ZIF (zero insertion force) connector:
n n n n

CAN channel 1 (CAN 1 low, CAN 1 high) CAN channel 2 (CAN 2 low, CAN 2 high) Serial channel 1 (Serial 1 TXD, Serial 1 RXD) Serial channel 2 (Serial 2K/LIN, Serial 2 L)

The accompanying pins are internally connected on MicroAutoBox. Use these pins only on one connector. Do not use them at the same time on both connectors.

ECU Interface Connector


Objective

MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507 provides a 4pin LEMO connector that grants access to the signals of ECU channel 2. Connector Pin 1 2
2 3 1 4

Signal ECU / IF2 TX ECU / IF2 TX+ ECU / IF2 RX+ ECU / IF2 RX

3 4

ECU channel 1 can be accessed via the respective pins on the Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) connector.

Matching cable

If you require a cable with a matching LEMO connector, you can order it from dSPACE.

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Pin Description
Objective Where to go from here

The pin description is divided into several categories. Information in this section Power Input and Output Digital Input Digital Output Analog Input and Output Interfaces 220 221 223 225 225

Power Input and Output


Pin description

The following table gives a description of the pins used for power input and output for MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507: Signal VBAT GND Description/Function Main power supply input. Connect at least 2 pins to the positive pole of your car battery. Main power supply return and reference for all input and output signals. Connect at least 2 pins to the minus of your car battery. Use unused pins to reference your signals. This signal is also connected to the case of MicroAutoBox.

Pins V3, V4, W3, W4, W5, X3, X4 F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4

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Pins E1

Signal VDRIVE

Description/Function This input supplies all digital input and output circuits. o Connect this input to VSENS to get TTL-compatible logic levels to your inputs/outputs. o Connect this input to VBATprot to get automotivecompatible logic levels to your inputs/outputs. o Do not connect this pin directly to VBAT, because the input and output circuits are not load dump or reverse voltage protected at this signal. o While MicroAutoBox is being powered down, the output stages have pull-up behavior to VDRIVE. So the outputs may reach the level of VDRIVE. If this behavior is critical in your application, you have to power down your external devices or VDRIVE before MicroAutoBox is powered down. You can also use the REMOTE signal (Kl.15) with the power control software functionality to first switch off VDRIVE via a relay. Sensor Supply output. Use this output to supply your sensors and/or VDRIVE. Protected VBAT output. Use this output to supply VDRIVE when automotive logic levels are needed.

E2

VSENS

c2

VBAT prot

Digital Input
Pin description

Most digital signals have separate input and output pins. If your software defines a signal for output, the corresponding input has no function. If the software defines a signal as input the corresponding output pin has the same level as the corresponding input pin. When software does not control the digital I/O signals (during reset or before correct initialization) each output will be in the same state as the corresponding input. This allows you to define the default (reset) state of each output by driving the input with an external signal. If you use this feature ensure that your software initializes your output signal to the same state you defined for the input.

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The following table gives a description of the digital input pins: Pins M3 M2, M4, M5, M6 N1 ... P2 P3 Signal REMOTE CTM ch 1 4 Group 6 ch 1 ... 8 TPU ch 1 Module DIO DIO DIO Description/Function Start signal of entire system (active high) with pull-down. Capture/compare inputs with pull-up. Inputs for frequency or pulse-width measurement. Standard discrete digital input with pull-up. This input drives the first channel of the internal Time Processing Unit of the DIO module, which is useful for motor management. Therefore, the signal is conditioned by an adaptive Schmitt trigger, which generates one single impulse whenever the input voltage crosses 0 V to negative voltages. This single impulse is also used for driving the main CPU INT13. - also drives the main CPU INT4 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

P4

TPU ch 2

DIO

P5

TPU ch 3

DIO

- also drives the main CPU INT5 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

P6

TPU ch 4

DIO

- also drives the main CPU INT6 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R1

TPU ch 5

DIO

- also drives the IP module 1 interrupt Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R2

TPU ch 6

DIO

- also drives the main CPU INT8 Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

R3

TPU ch 7

DIO

- also drives the IP module 2 interrupt Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) even when a corresponding out is used - provides a pull-up
ST M

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Pins R4

Signal TPU ch 8

Module DIO

Description/Function - drives only the ECU 2 communication interrupt Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) - provides a pull-up
ST M

R5

TPU ch 9

DIO

- drives only the CAN 2 communication interrupt Interrupt Handling ( MicroAutoBox Features)) - provides a pull-up
ST M

R6 ... S6 T1 ... U1, W6 a6, b3, b4, b6, c3 ... c6 Y3, Y4, Y6, Z3, Z4, Z6, a3, a4

TPU ch 10 ... 16 Group 2 ch 1 ... 8 Group 5 ch 1 ... 8

DIO DIO DIO

Like TPU ch 2 ... 9 in, but no additional function. TPU ch 10 ... 16 in have pull-ups. Standard discrete digital input with pull-up Standard discrete digital input with no pull-up/pulldown In the second function these signals can be analog to digital converted (10-bit resolution) by the DIO module.

Group 4 ch 1 ... 8

DIO

Due to the limitations of the DIO slave application, not all functions may be available at all times. These functions are not independent from each other.

Digital Output
Pin description

Most digital signals have separate input and output pins. If your software defines a signal for output, the corresponding input has no function. If the software defines a signal as input the corresponding output pin has the same level as the corresponding input pin. When software does not control the digital I/O signals (during reset or before correct initialization) each output will be in the same state as the corresponding input. This allows you to define the default (reset) state of each output by driving the input with an external signal. If you use this feature ensure that your software initializes your output signal to the same state you defined for the input.

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The following table gives a description of the digital output pins: Pins A3 ... A6, B3 ... B5 Signal Group 1 ch 1 ... 7 Module DIO Type 1 Default state low Description/Function Standard discrete digital output. Group 1 is for output only. You cannot change the default state of the signal because there is no corresponding input pin. PWM outputs of the DIOCapture/Compare unit. Standard discrete digital output.

B6, C3 ... C6, D3 ... D5 D6, E3 ... F2, F5 F6

CTM ch 1 ... 8

DIO Type 1

high

Group 6 ch 1 ... 8

DIO Type 1

high

TPU ch 1

DIO Type 1

high

DIO-Time Processing Unit output 1. Due to the special "TPU ch 1 input" this signal will not directly follow its input. It rather shows the single impulse created by this input signal conditioning. DIO-Time Processing Unit output 2 ... 16. Depending on the DIO TPU firmware the TPU outputs can perform a complete motor management or simply generate PWM or discrete output signals. Standard discrete digital output. While resetting the DIO module this signal is high, independent from the state of "Group 2 ch 1 in". Standard discrete digital output. Standard discrete digital output. Group 3 is for output only. You cannot change the default state of the signal because there is no corresponding input pin.

G1, G2, G6 ... H2, H5 ... K2

TPU ch 2 ... 16

DIO Type 1

high

K3

Group 2 ch 1

DIO Type 1

high

K4 ... L4 L5 ... M1

Group 2 ch 2 ... 8 Group 3 ch 1 3

DIO Type 1 DIO Type 1

high low

Default state means the state of the signal without any connection to the corresponding input and/or without any output action by the software.

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Analog Input and Output


Pin description

The following table gives a description of the analog input and output pins: Signal ADC Type 1 (all 16 channels) Module ADC Type 1 Default state Description/Function Standard analog inputs These inputs are analog to 12-bit digital converted by the ADC module. Due to factory calibration the offset and gain errors are almost eliminated.

Pins c1, a1 Y1, W1 b1, Z1 b2, Z2 X1, V1 X2, V2 a2, Y2 W2, U2 D1, D2 C1, C2 B1, B2 A1, A2

DAC1 DAC8

DAC Type 1

0V

Standard analog outputs These outputs are 12-bit digital to analog converted by the DAC module.

Default state means the state of the signal during reset.

Interfaces
Pin description

The following table gives a description of the interface pins for the ECU interface which can be accessed via the ZIF connector, ECU interface connector, and 78-pin Sub-D connector. Which I/O signals are available depends on the FlexRay IP module you use (DS4340 or third-party).
ZIF connector and ECU interface connector on page 226 78-pin Sub-D connector on page 226 (FlexRay) IP Module 1 and DS4340 Module 1 on page 227 (FlexRay) IP Module 2 and DS4340 Module 2 on page 229 CAN_TP1 Module 1 on page 226 CAN_TP1 Module 2 on page 227

Information in this topic

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

ZIF connector and ECU interface connector

The following table gives a description of the interface pins for the two ECU interfaces which can be accessed channelwise via ZIF connector and ECU interface connector: Pins a5 b5 Y5 Z5 Signal ECU / IF1 TX ECU / IF1 TX + ECU / IF1 RX + ECU / IF1 RX ECU / IF2 TX ECU / IF2 TX + ECU / IF2 RX + ECU / IF2 RX Module ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 ECU Type 1 Description/Function ECU-bypassing interface. This reflective memory-based ECUbypassing interface is proprietary to dSPACE. Connect the MicroAutoBox-RX pair to the ECU-TX pair and the MicroAutoBox-TX pair to the ECU-RX pair. Always use a CAT5 twisted-pair cable for this connection. For the ECU interface connector, use massproduced cables provided by dSPACE.

Connector ZIF connector

Channel 1

ECU interface connector

1 2 3 4

78-pin Sub-D connector

The following tables give a description of the interface pins provided by the 78-pin Sub-D connector. CAN_TP1 Module 1 pins: The CAN_TP1 Module 1 has the following

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error (refer to Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface on page 238).

Pins Signal
1 2 4 5 7 8 10 11 CAN 1 high CAN 1 low CAN 2 high CAN 2 low Serial 1 TXD Serial 1 RXD Serial 2 L

Module

Description/Function
CAN 1 high = CAN high of CAN controller 1 CAN 2 high = CAN high of CAN controller 2 ISO 11898 interface These two CAN busses are not terminated.

CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1

CAN Type 1 RS232 interface

Serial 2 K/LIN CAN Type 1 LIN or ISO 9141 interface CAN Type 1 The K line/LIN interface is bidirectional. The L line is input only. Both lines have no pull-up. For proper function of the K line connect an external pull-up resistor (4.7 k) from this line to VBAT.

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CAN_TP1 Module 2 pins:

The CAN_TP1 Module 2 has the following

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error (refer to Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface on page 238).

Pins Signal
40 41 43 44 46 47 49 50 CAN 3 high CAN 3 low CAN 4 high CAN 4 low Serial 3 TXD Serial 3 RXD

Module

Description/Function
CAN 3 high = CAN high of CAN controller 3 CAN 4 high = CAN high of CAN controller 4 ISO 11898 interface These two CAN busses are not terminated.

CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1 CAN Type 1

CAN Type 1 RS232 interface

Serial 4 K/LIN CAN Type 1 LIN or ISO 9141 interface Serial 4 L CAN Type 1 The K line/LIN interface is bidirectional. The L line is input only. Both lines have no pull-up. For proper function of the K line connect an external pull-up resistor (4.7 k) from this line to VBAT.

(FlexRay) IP Module 1 and DS4340 Module 1 Different module types can be installed on the DS1506: A standard IP module, a thirdparty FlexRay IP module, or a DS4340 module. The table describes the pins when a third-party FlexRay IP module or a DS4340 is installed. The Sub-D connector can also be used for access to the signals of a standard IP module installed on the DS1506. Because the connector is primarily used for FlexRay, not all signals of the IP modules are available. See Sub-D I/O Connector on page 216.

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Pins

(FlexRay) IP Module 1 Signal Module Description/Function


IP_Type1 You do not need to connect this pin because wake-up functionality is not supported.

DS4340 Module 1 Signal


Wake-up_1

Module Description/Function
DS4340 Connection to an external wake-up signal for module 1 The WakeUp pin is connected to the WAKE input of TJA1080 devices. This Pin has no pull-up resistor. To set the wake flag on the TJA1080, a falling edge is needed. See the TJA1080 manual for the functionality of the WAKE pin.

13

IP wakeup 1

14

IP reset 1

IP_Type1

Only valid for third-party IP modules You do not need to connect this pin because MicroAutoBox handles reset functionality itself. Connection to GND FlexRay 1 high in/out (FlexRayH/RS485 A) FlexRay 1 low in/out (FlexRayL/RS485 B) Connection to GND FlexRay 2 high in/out (FlexRayH/RS485 A) FlexRay 2 low in/out (FlexRayL/RS485 B) Do not connect Do not connect

Reserved

DS4340

15 16 17 18 19 20 33 34

IP GND 1

IP_Type1

GND_ChA_1 BP_ChA_1 BM_ChA_1 GND_ChB_1 BP_ChB_1 BM_ChB_1 INH1_1 INH2_1

DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340

Ground for FlexRay channel A, module 1 FlexRay channel A, bus line plus, module 1 FlexRay channel A, bus line minus, module 1 Ground for FlexRay channel B, module 1 FlexRay channel B, bus line plus, module 1 FlexRay channel B, bus line minus, module 1 Inhibit outputs from TJA1080 to switch external voltage regulator of module 1. They can be used to wake up MicroAutoBox. The outputs are on the voltage level of UBAT and can be connected directly to the KL15IN (Remote) pin of MicroAutoBox. The pins are not connected by default. If you want to use the pins, the hardware of your MicroAutoBox must be adapted, see How to Wake Up MicroAutoBox by Activity on the FlexRay Bus on page 46. To power the TJA1080 transceivers of module 1. FlexRay channel B, feed-through bus line plus, module 1. Feed-through lines are useful to keep the stub length in a linear passive bus as short as possible, see DS4340 Connections in Different Topologies on page 37. FlexRay channel B, feed-through bus line minus, module 1

IP bus high/A 1 IP_Type1 IP bus low/B 1 IP GND 2 IP_Type1 IP_Type1

IP bus high/A 2 IP_Type1 IP bus low/B 2 Reserved Reserved IP_Type1 -

35 36

Reserved Reserved

Do not connect Do not connect

UBAT_1 BP_FT_ChB_1

DS4340 DS4340

37

Reserved

Do not connect

BM_FT_ChB_1

DS4340

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Pins

(FlexRay) IP Module 1 Signal Module Description/Function


Do not connect Do not connect

DS4340 Module 1 Signal


BP_FT_ChA_1 BM_FT_ChA_1

Module Description/Function
DS4340 DS4340 FlexRay channel A, feedthrough bus line plus, module 1 FlexRay channel A, feedthrough bus line minus, module 1

38 39

Reserved Reserved

(FlexRay) IP Module 2 and DS4340 Module 2 Different module types can be installed on the DS1506: A standard IP module, a thirdparty FlexRay IP module or a DS4340 module. The table describes the pins when a third-party FlexRay IP module or a DS4340 is installed. The Sub-D connector can also be used for access to the signals of a standard IP module installed on the DS1506. Because the connector is primarily used for FlexRay, not all signals of the IP modules are available. See Sub-D I/O Connector on page 216.
Pins (FlexRay) IP Module 2 Signal
52 IP wakeup 2

DS4340 Module 2 Signal


Wake-up_2

Module Description/Function
IP_Type1 You do not need to connect this pin because wake-up functionality is not supported.

Module Description/Function
DS4340 Connection to an external wake-up signal for module 2 The WakeUp pin is connected to the WAKE input of TJA1080 devices. This Pin has no pull-up resistor. To set the wake flag on the TJA1080, a falling edge is needed. See the TJA1080 manual for the functionality of the WAKE pin.

53

IP reset 2

IP_Type1

Only valid for third-party IP modules You do not need to connect this pin because MicroAutoBox handles reset functionality itself. Connection to GND FlexRay 1 high in/out (FlexRayH/RS485 A) FlexRay 1 low in/out (FlexRayL/RS485 B) Connection to GND FlexRay 2 high in/out (FlexRayH/RS485 A) FlexRay 2 low in/out (FlexRayL/RS485 B)

Reserved

DS4340

54 55 56 57 58 59

IP GND 3

IP_Type1

GND_ChA_2 BP_ChA_2 BM_ChA_2 GND_ChB_2 BP_ChB_2 BM_ChB_2

DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340 DS4340

Ground for FlexRay channel A, module 2 FlexRay channel A, bus line plus, module 2 FlexRay channel A, bus line minus, module 2 Ground for FlexRay channel B, module 2 FlexRay channel B, bus line plus, module 2 FlexRay channel B, bus line minus, module 2

IP bus high/A 3 IP_Type1 IP bus low/B 3 IP GND 4 IP_Type1 IP_Type1

IP bus high/A 4 IP_Type1 IP bus low/B 4 IP_Type1

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

Pins

(FlexRay) IP Module 2 Signal Module Description/Function


Do not connect Do not connect

DS4340 Module 2 Signal


INH1_2 INH2_2

Module Description/Function
DS4340 DS4340 Inhibit outputs from TJA1080 to switch external voltage regulator of module 2. They can be used to wake up MicroAutoBox. The outputs are on the voltage level of UBAT and can be connected directly to the KL15IN (Remote) pin of MicroAutoBox. The pins are not connected by default. If you want to use the pins, the hardware of your MicroAutoBox must be adapted, see How to Wake Up MicroAutoBox by Activity on the FlexRay Bus on page 46. To power the TJA1080 transceivers of module 2. FlexRay channel B, feed-through bus line plus, module 2 Feed-through lines are useful to keep the stub length in a linear passive bus as short as possible, see DS4340 Connections in Different Topologies on page 37. FlexRay channel B, feed-through bus line minus, module 2 FlexRay channel A, feedthrough bus line plus, module 2 FlexRay channel A, feedthrough bus line minus, module 2

72 73

Reserved Reserved

74 75

Reserved Reserved

Do not connect Do not connect

UBAT_2 BP_FT_ChB_2

DS4340 DS4340

76 77 78

Reserved Reserved Reserved

Do not connect Do not connect Do not connect

BM_FT_ChB_2 BP_FT_ChA_2 BM_FT_ChA_2

DS4340 DS4340 DS4340

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Characteristics
Where to go from here

Information in this section Absolute Maximum Levels DC Characteristics AC Characteristics Interface Characteristics Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface I/O Circuits I/O Connector Characteristics Dimensions and Weights Certifications 231 232 236 237 238 239 241 242 242

Absolute Maximum Levels


Avoiding damage to the system

CAUTION
Do not exceed these levels since this may permanently damage the system.

Levels

To guarantee proper operation of MicroAutoBox do not exceed the maximum levels (for example, voltage, temperature) that are shown in the following table: Levels 40 V ... +100 V 0 V ... +45 V 40 V ... +45 V (VDRIVE 45 V) ... +45 V 40 V ... +40 V 30 V ... +40 V 0 V ... +40 V 0 V ... +45 V 30 V ... +30 V but not more than VBAT Meaning Load dump protection

Parameter VBAT to GND VDRIVE to GND All digital output voltages to GND All digital input voltages to GND All analog input voltages All analog output voltages VSENS output to GND VBATprot output to GND RS232 transceiver output

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Parameter RS232 transceiver input Serial K/ LIN Serial L All outputs short circuit to GND Continuous power dissipation (TA = +85C) Operating temperature Storage temperature

Levels 30 V ... +30 V 20 V ... +32 V 24 V ... +30 V continuous max. 20 W 40 C ... +85 C 55 C ... +125 C

Meaning

but not more than VBAT but not more than VBAT

CASE temperature

DC Characteristics
Data

The DC characteristics are specified for the following conditions: VBAT=+12 V; TCASE=+25 C; all voltages are referenced to GND pin F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4, unless otherwise noted.
Symbol
VBAT VBAT IVBAT IVBAT IVBAT inrush VDRIVE IVDRIVE no load IVDRIVE maximum load

Parameter
Operating voltage Operating current Inrush current Input circuit and output circuit voltage

Conditions / Comments
For start-up Operating REMOTE ViHRemote REMOTE ViLRemote All inputs/outputs unconnected Supply for digital input/output circuits All inputs/outputs unconnected All outputs shorted to GND Input high voltage Input low voltage Input impedance Input high voltage Input low voltage Input hysteresis voltage Pull-up resistor to VDRIVE Input capacitance Input impedance TPU1 is signal conditioned by an adaptive sense amplifier optimized for automotive crankshaft sensors

Min
6 4

Typ

Max
40 40

Units
V V A mA A

1.2 5 3 45 10 500 3.9 0.8 100 3.5 1.2 0.5 17 0.9 19 1 18 1 19 1.1

V mA mA V V k V V V k nF k

Digital Inputs Group 4 & Group 5 & CTM & Group 2 & Group 6 & TPU 2 ... 16 ViHG45 ViLG45 RinG45 ViH ViL ViHys Rdigin Cdigin TPU1 RinTPU1

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

Parameter
REMOTE

Symbol
ViHRemote ViLRemote ViHysRemote RRemote

Conditions / Comments
Input high voltage Input low voltage Input hysteresis voltage Pull-down resistor to GND Full scale No missing codes Errors eliminated by software compensation TCASE = 40C ... +85C Input impedance Full scale Errors eliminated by software compensation TCASE = 40C ... +85C Input impedance IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 5V IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 12V IL = 0mA; VDRIVE = 12V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 12V IL = 5mA; VDRIVE = 12V Output current high TCASE = 40C ... +85C Output current low TCASE = 40C ... +85C Full scale Full monotonic Errors eliminated by software compensation TCASE = 40C ... +85C max. sink/ source current Output voltage when sinking IDACout = 5mA and CODE = 000H Output voltage Temperature caused voltage drift TCASE = 40C ... +85C Maximum output current

Min
4.7

Typ

Max
0.8

Units
V V V k V bit LSB LSB

0.5 21 4.84 12

1 22 5.00 0.5 0.5 23 5.16

Analog Inputs ADC Type 1 (all 16 channels) VmaxADC Resolution Offset error Gain error Offset error Gain error ZinADC Group 4 & Group 5 VmaxADCG45 Resolution Offset error Gain error Offset error Gain error RinG45 Digital Outputs CTM & Group 1 & Group 2 & Group 3 & Group 6 & TPU VoH VoL VoH VoL VoH VoL VoH VoL | IOHmax | | IOLmax | Analog Outputs DAC1 DAC8 VDAC Resolution Offset error Gain error Offset error Gain error IDACout VDACSAT Other Outputs Sensor supply VSENS VSENS = f(T) IVSENS, max 4.84 2 750 5.046 5.25 2 V % mA 4.44 12 2 0.5 10 20 5 +10 +20 5 0.3 4.50 4.56 V bit mV LSB LSB LSB mA V 3.1 3.1 10.1 10.1 5 5 4.5 0.2 3.4 0.6 11.5 0.25 10.4 0.6 12.5 13 0.85 0.85 0.85 0.85 V V V V V V V V mA mA

10 50 150k + 75k||220pF 4.7 10 0.5 0.5 10 50 100 5.0

+10 +50 5.3

LSB LSB typ. V bit LSB LSB

+10 +50

LSB LSB k

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

Parameter
Protected VBAT

Symbol
VBATprot IVBATprot, max IProtPeak t(overload)

Conditions / Comments
IL = 1A; VBAT = 12V Maximum output current overload current limit (40C ... 85C) time to shut off IProtPeak

Min
11.56 4

Typ
11.78

Max
12 1000 9 5

Units
V mA A ms

Since May 2000, all shipped MicroAutoBoxes provide calibration values to increase the accuracy of the analog inputs and outputs. For further information, refer to How to Check Whether MicroAutoBox is Calibrated ( MicroAutoBox Features).
ST M

The following illustrations show the maximum output current of a digital output circuit as a function of ambient temperature (VDRIVE = 12 V; output is shorted to 6 V):
n

Output high

Iout
16mA

15mA

14mA

13mA

12mA

11mA

10mA -40C -20C 0C 20C 40C 60C 80C

T/C

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Output low

Iout
-10mA

-12mA

-14mA

-16mA

-17mA -40C -20C 0C 20C 40C 60C 80C

T/C

The following illustrations show the typical digital output voltage as a function of the output current (VDRIVE = 12V):
n

Output high

Vout
12.0V

11.5V

11.0V

85C

10.5V

25C -40C
10.0V

9.5V

9.0V 0mA 1mA 2mA 3mA 4mA 5mA 6mA 7mA 8mA 9mA 10mA

Iout

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Output low

Vout
1.0V

0.8V

-40C 25C

0.6V

85C

0.4V

0.2V

0V -10mA -9mA -8mA -7mA -6mA -5mA -4mA -3mA -2mA -1mA 0A

Iout

AC Characteristics
Data

The AC characteristics are specified for the following conditions: VBAT=+12 V; TCASE=+25 C; all voltages are referenced to GND pins F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4, unless otherwise noted.
Symbol
Conversion time fgADC

Parameter
Analog Inputs ADC Type 1 (all 16 channels) Group 4 & 5 Analog Outputs DAC1 DAC8

Conditions / Comments
For all 16 channels (simultaneous sample) Low-pass cutoff frequency (3dB) Per channel (sequentially sample);

Min
6.6 9.1 10

Typ

Max

Units
s

9.6

10.2 17

kHz s

Conversion time

No low-pass filter implemented Settling time fgDAC Digital Inputs and Outputs Inputs (except Group 4 & 5) tPDInLH tPDInHL Inputs Group 4 & 5 Outputs tPDInG45LH tPDInG45HL tPDOutLH tPDOutHL Low-high propagation delay of input signals High-low delay of input signals Low-high delay of input signals High-low delay of input signals Low-high delay of output signals High-low delay of output signals 0.5 0.5 1 1 1 1 1 1 s s s s s s Settling time of output (to 1 LSB) Low-pass cutoff frequency of reconstruction filter (3dB) 10.2 10.8 150 11.4 s kHz

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

Interface Characteristics
Data

The interface characteristics are specified for the following conditions: VBAT = +12V; TCASE = +25C; all voltages are referenced to GND pins F3, F4, G3, G4, G5, H3, H4, unless otherwise noted.
Symbol
Bit rate Bit rate Cable length Cable type Full duplex data rate RAM size FIFO size Transmit buffer 3 k load RX input threshold low RX input threshold high RKO = 510 ; CK 1.3 nF 2.0 5 5 5 1 30 k resistor for LIN slave 1 k pull-up resistor for LIN master 2 x 10 12 8 byte/wo rd 32 MBaud byte MHz Word is 16-bit wide 16 256 5 5 9 1.4 1.4 8 50k 8 20k 0.8 115.2k 2-paired twisted pair CAT5 5 MW/s KW W Baud V V V bit Baud bit Baud

Parameter
CAN ECU

Conditions / Comments
ISO 11898 interface

Min

Typ
250

Max
1 5

Units
MBaud MBaud m

Serial 1 RS232-Interface

Bit rate TX output voltage swing VRxinLow VRxinHigh Word length

Serial 2 ISO9141-Interface LIN ISO9141-Interface FlexRay IP module carrier

Bit rate Word length Bit rate Node type Bit rate Frame length Clocking Access type

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error (refer to Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface on page 238).

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

Baud Rate Limitations of the Serial Interface


Objective

Due to the limitations of the UART baud rate generator, not all baud rates can be programmed exactly to the desired baud rate without error. The UART baud rate generator provides several baud rates: To calculate the divisor T for a chosen baud rate
T = Round 230400 BR (chosen)

Baud rate calculation

BR (chosen) = The baudrate to be generated T = The baudrate generator divisor (2 T 65535)

To calculate the real baud rate from a given divisor T


230400 BR (real) = T Baud BR (real) = The baudrate you get T = The baudrate generator divisor (2 T 65535)

To calculate the resulting error


ErrorBR BR (real) BR (chosen) = BR (chosen) 100%

If ErrorBR 2%, messages will be transferred and received correctly.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

I/O Circuits
Circuit diagrams

The following table shows simplified diagrams of the I/O circuitry of the various inputs and outputs: I/O Circuit Group 4 & Group 5
100 k TTL Dig IN

Signal Digital inputs

Group 2 & Group 6 & CTM & TPU2 TPU16

VDRIVE

18 k 100 k

5 V CMOS Dig IN

TPU1

20 k

Zero detect Rin 20 k 47 k

Remote
100 k

5 V CMOS Dig IN

22 k

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

Signal Analog inputs ADC Type 1 Channel 1 16

I/O Circuit
150 k ADC 75 k

Group 4 & Group 5

100 k ADC

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

Signal Digital outputs Group 1 & Group 2 & Group 3 & Group 6 & CTM & TPU

I/O Circuit
VDRIVE

47

0.3 V Dig OUT 0.3 V

47

Analog outputs

DAC1 DAC8

18 k

DAC

100 mA

10 k

I/O Connector Characteristics


Technical data

The following table shows the characteristics of the I/O connectors: Contact resistance max. 15 m

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

Durability Continuous current per pin (TA = +85C)

10,000 cycles max. 2.5 A

Dimensions and Weights


Technical data

The following table shows the mechanical characteristics of MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507: Case width Case height Case depth Weight 200 mm (7.87 in.) 95 mm (3.74 in.) 225 mm (8.86 in.) about 2.5 kg (5.5 lb.) without external cables

Certifications
CE compliance

MicroAutoBox meets the requirements of the European directive 89/336/ECC (Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive) for CE marking. To verify the reliability of MicroAutoBox under realistic operating conditions, it was exposed to extreme vibration and shock tests. During the tests, MicroAutoBox executed a program without any failures. The characteristics of MicroAutoBox were tested according to the standards shown in the following table: Applied Standard EN 61000-6-2 EN 61000-6-4 Description Immunity standard for industrial environments Emission standard for industrial environments
o o

Vibration and shock tests

Applied standards

Tested Characteristics Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) Vibration

EN 60068-2-6

Mechanical test of resistance to vibration Test conditions: Sinusoidal vibration, 3-axis test, 5 2000 Hz, up to 5 g, 30 minutes per axis

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

Tested Characteristics Shock

Applied Standard EN 60068-2-27

Description
o o

Mechanical test of shock resistance Test conditions: Shock, 3-axis test, 11 ms at 15 g, 5 ms at 100 g

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox BreakOut Box

Objective

The MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box provides easy access to signals on the I/O connectors of all MicroAutoBox variants. Information in this section Components and Their Functionality Zero Insertion Force Connector CAN/FlexRay Sub-D I/O Connectors CAN Sub-D I/O Connector (CAN 1 ... CAN 4) FlexRay Sub-D I/O Connector (FlexRay 1 and FlexRay 2) CAN/FlexRay Signal Mapping Data Overview Information in other sections Using MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box 107 246 250 251 252 252 253 255

Where to go from here

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Components and Their Functionality


Schematic

Components of the MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box:


Ground socket Female ZIF connector to MicroAutoBox

Male CAN/FlexRay connector to MicroAutoBox

CAN 1

CAN 2 Terminal with knife disconnector

CAN 3

CAN 4 Termination switch:


Terminating CAN bus lines

FlexRay 1

FlexRay 2 Termination switches:


Terminating FlexRay bus lines

Adhesive label with board type and serial number Female CAN/FlexRay connector to devices Female ZIF connector to devices

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Block diagram

The block diagram shows the functional units, their functionality, and the signal paths in a simplified form.
CAN/FlexRay MicroAutoBox side

CAN1

Terminal with knife disconnector

CAN2
Termination switch

Terminal points MicroAutoBox side Terminal points device side

CAN3

CAN4

FlexRay1

FlexRay2

CAN/FlexRay

Device side

The signals at the I/O connector pins on the MicroAutoBox side are routed to the same pins on the device side. This means that the BreakOut Box itself does not affect the cable harness. In addition to the same pinout, the ZIF I/O connectors also have the same orientation on the board.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Terminals

The terminals are labeled according to the ZIF I/O connector pin numbering. Terminal points You can connect stripped wires and test plugs to the signal path via terminal points. Knife disconnector Each signal terminal provides a switch, called a knife disconnector. This is to interrupt the signal between the cable harness and MicroAutoBox. Terminal grouping The terminals are grouped according to ZIF connector. The illustration below shows the grouping scheme.
MicroAutoBox side
1 2 3 4 5 6 D C B A

A1 A2 A3 Terminal A4 A5 A6 . . .

I/O connectors

I/O connectors make it easy to insert the Break-Out Box in the existing cable harness and to add additional devices and measurement tools. Zero insertion force (ZIF) connector The main I/O connectors are 156-pin ZIF connectors, the same like the ZIF I/O connector of MicroAutoBox. Both ZIF connectors have the same pinout and orientation on the board. For details, refer to Zero Insertion Force Connector on page 250.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Sub-D I/O connectors for CAN and FlexRay buses The 9-pin Sub-D I/O connectors make it easy to connect CAN/FlexRay devices and/or measurement tools. The table below gives you an overview how they are used and the MicroAutoBox variant they are intended for.
Connector
CAN 1, CAN 2

MicroAutoBox Variant
All variants

Usage
CAN bus I/O connectors for additional devices/measurement tools CAN bus I/O connectors for additional devices/measurement tools FlexRay bus I/O connectors for additional devices/measurement tools

CAN 3, CAN 4

Intended for: 1401/1507 1401/1505/1506 1401/1505/1507 Intended for: 1401/1507 (FlexRay 2 only) 1401/1505/1506 1401/1505/1507 Intended for: 1401/1507 1401/1505/1506 1401/1505/1507 Intended for: 1401/1507 1401/1505/1506 1401/1505/1507

FlexRay 1, FlexRay 2

CAN/FlexRay MicroAutoBox side

I/O connector to connect the Break-Out Box with the 78-pin Sub-D connector of MicroAutoBox I/O connector.1) I/O connector to connect the Break-Out Box with devices.

CAN/FlexRay device side

1) To connect the Break-Out Box with MicroAutoBox, you have to build an adapter cable according to the configuration and the pinout of MicroAutoBox.

For details, refer to CAN/FlexRay Signal Mapping on page 253. Ground socket The ground socket provides a common ground. Test plugs (banana plugs) with 4.0 mm (0.16 in.) diameter fit in the ground socket.
Termination switches

Termination switches enable you to terminate all CAN and FlexRay buses. For details, refer to Terminating CAN Bus Lines on page 113 and Terminating FlexRay Bus Lines on page 114.
References Working Principles on page 108

Related topics

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Zero Insertion Force Connector


Pin numbering

The main I/O connectors are 156-pin zero insertion force (ZIF) connectors, the same like the ZIF I/O connector of MicroAutoBox. Both ZIF connectors have the same pin numbering and orientation on the board. The following illustration shows the pin numbering of the female ZIF connector (front view):
1 2 3 4 5 6 c b a Z Y X W V U T S R P N M L K J H G F E D C B A 1 2 3 4 5 6

There are pins identified by capital letters (A, B, C, ...) and pins identified by small letters (a, b, c).

The terminals are grouped according to ZIF connector. For details, refer to Components and Their Functionality on page 246.
Pinout

The signals available at the different pins depend on the MicroAutoBox variant. For the pinout of the
n

MicroAutoBox 1401/1501, refer to Zero Insertion Force Connector on page 120. MicroAutoBox 1401/1504, refer to Zero Insertion Force Connector on page 144. MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506, refer to Zero Insertion Force Connector on page 182. MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507, refer to Zero Insertion Force Connector on page 214.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

CAN/FlexRay Sub-D I/O Connectors


Objective

The CAN/FlexRay I/O connectors are used with MicroAutoBox variants 1401/1507, 1401/1505/1506, and 1401/1505/1507. You have to build an adapter to connect the Break-Out Box with the 78-pin Sub-D connector of MicroAutoBox. Note that the pinout of the MicroAutoBox Sub-D connector differs depending on the FlexRay module used. The Break-Out Box provides two 9-pin Sub-D CAN/FlexRay I/O connectors:
n

One male connector on the MicroAutoBox (MABX) side to connect the Break-Out Box with MicroAutoBox. One female connector on the device side to connect the Break-Out Box with devices.

Pinout of the male connector (MicroAutoBox side)

The pin numbering used for Sub-D connectors is not standardized. The following illustration shows the numbering used (front view). CAN/FlexRay Connector
5 9

Pin 5 4 3 2 1

Signal Ground FlexRay2 Low FlexRay1 Low CAN3 Low CAN4 Low

Pin

Signal

9 8 7 6

FlexRay2 High FlexRay1 High CAN3 High CAN4 High

Pinout of the female connector (device side)

The pin numbering used for Sub-D connectors is not standardized. The following illustration shows the numbering used (front view). CAN/FlexRay Connector
1 6

Pin 1 2 3 4 5

Signal CAN4 Low CAN3 Low FlexRay1 Low FlexRay2 Low Ground

Pin

Signal

6 7 8 9

CAN4 High CAN3 High FlexRay1 High FlexRay2 High

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Related topics

References CAN/FlexRay Signal Mapping on page 253

CAN Sub-D I/O Connector (CAN 1 ... CAN 4)


Objective

The female 9-pin Sub-D I/O connectors make it easy to connect CAN devices and/or measurement tools to the CAN bus lines of CAN 1 ... CAN 4. CAN 3 and CAN 4 are only used with MicroAutoBox variants 1401/1507, 1401/1505/1506, and 1401/1505/1507.

Pinout

The pin numbering used for Sub-D connectors is not standardized. The following illustration shows the numbering used (front view). CAN Connector
1 6

Pin 1 2 3 4 5

Signal NC1) CAN(x)2) Low Ground NC NC

Pin

Signal

6 7 8 9

NC CAN(x)2) High NC NC

1)

Not connected 2) (x) refers to the CAN channel number and is in the range 1 ... 4

FlexRay Sub-D I/O Connector (FlexRay 1 and FlexRay 2)


Objective

The female 9-pin Sub-D I/O connectors make it easy to connect FlexRay devices and/or measurement tools to the FlexRay bus lines of FlexRay 1 and FlexRay 2. FlexRay bus lines are only used with MicroAutoBox variants 1401/1507, 1401/1505/1506, and 1401/1505/1507.

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Pinout

The pin numbering used for Sub-D connectors is not standardized. The following illustration shows the numbering used (front view). FlexRay Connector
1 6

Pin 1 2 3 4 5

Signal NC1) FlexRay(x)2) Low Ground NC NC

Pin

Signal

6 7 8 9

NC FlexRay(x)2) High NC NC

1) 2)

Not connected (x) refers to the FlexRay channel number and is 1 or 2.

CAN/FlexRay Signal Mapping


Signal mapping of the CAN/FlexRay buses

All the CAN and FlexRay bus lines of MicroAutoBox are mapped to 9-pin Sub-D connectors. This makes it easy to connect CAN/FlexRay devices and/or measurement tools. MicroAutoBox variants 1401/1507, 1401/1505/1506, and 1401/1505/1507 have additional CAN and FlexRay buses: CAN 3, CAN 4, FlexRay 1 (not 1401/1507), and FlexRay 2. These buses are only available at a 78-pin Sub-D I/O connector on the MicroAutoBox and are not available at a terminal of the MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box. The MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box has Sub-D CAN/FlexRay connectors for inserting it between the Sub-D connector of MicroAutoBox and the connected devices. The table below shows CAN/FlexRay signals and the connectors and pins they are mapped to.

Signal

MicroAutoBox Pin Number ZIF Connector Sub-D Connector


1 2 4 5 40

MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box Sub-D Connector Pin Number1) CAN/FlexRay


7

CAN 1 CAN 2 CAN 3 CAN 4 FlexRay 1 FlexRay 2


7 2 7 2 7

CAN1 High CAN1 Low CAN2 High CAN2 Low CAN3 High2)

V6 V5 X6 X5

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Signal

MicroAutoBox Pin Number ZIF Connector Sub-D Connector


41 43 44 16 or 554) 17 or 564) 19 or 584) 20 or 594)

MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box Sub-D Connector Pin Number1) CAN/FlexRay


2 6 1 8 3 9 4

CAN 1 CAN 2 CAN 3 CAN 4 FlexRay 1 FlexRay 2


2 7 2 7 2 7 2

CAN3 Low2) CAN4 High2) CAN4 Low2) FlexRay1 High3) FlexRay1 Low3) FlexRay2 High2) FlexRay2 Low2)
1)

The pin numbering used for Sub-D connectors is not standardized. Do not rely on the numbers written on Sub-D connectors. 2) Available only with MicroAutoBox variants 1401/1507, 1401/1505/1506, and 1401/1505/1507. 3) Available only with MicroAutoBox variants 1401/1505/1506, and 1401/1505/1507. Not available with 1401/1507. 4) Pin number depends on the FlexRay module used.

Related topics

References CAN Sub-D I/O Connector (CAN 1 ... CAN 4) on page 252 CAN/FlexRay Sub-D I/O Connectors on page 251 FlexRay Sub-D I/O Connector (FlexRay 1 and FlexRay 2) on page 252 Zero Insertion Force Connector on page 250

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Data Overview
Characteristics

The following table shows the technical characteristics of the MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box. Specification dSPACE number: DS5374
o

Parameter Identification I/O connectors

2 zero insertion force (ZIF) connectors to insert the Break-Out Box in an existing cable harness. 8 Sub-D connectors 1) o 2 CAN/FlexRay connectors to insert the Break-Out Box in a cable harness of CAN 3, CAN 4, FlexRay 12) , and FlexRay 2. o 4 CAN connectors to connect CAN devices and/or measurement tools to the CAN bus lines of CAN 1 ... CAN 43). 1) connectors to connect FlexRay devices o 2 FlexRay and/or measurement tools to the FlexRay bus lines of FlexRay 12) and FlexRay 2. One ground socket for test plugs (banana plugs) with 4 mm (0.16 inch.) diameter. One terminal for each signal of the ZIF I/O connector: o 5 terminal points for each signal o 2 on the MicroAutoBox side o 3 on the device side o Knife disconnectors to interrupt the signal path The ground potential cannot be interrupted.

Terminals

Termination switches

12 termination switches to terminate each CAN and FlexRay bus line. o 1 termination switch for each CAN bus (CAN 1 ... CAN 4) to terminate the bus lines with 120 . o 4 termination switches for each FlexRay bus (FlexRay 1 and FlexRay 2) to terminate the bus lines either with 94 or 47 (47 for test purposes).
o

Connection cables

1 cable to connect to the ZIF I/O connector of MicroAutoBox

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Data Sheet MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box

Parameter Mechanical characteristics Physical size


h l w

Specification
o o o

l: 341 mm (13.43 in.) w: 224 mm (8.82 in.) h: 61 mm (2.40 in.)

Weight Environmental conditions


1) 2)

Approx. 2.6 kg (5.7 lb.) 0 +70 C (+32 +158 F)

Ambient temperature

Only used with MicroAutoBox variants 1401/1507, 1401/1505/1506, and 1401/1505/1507. Can not be used with MicroAutoBox variant 1401/1507 3) CAN 3 and CAN 4 only used with MicroAutoBox variants 1401/1507, 1401/1505/1506, and 1401/1505/1507.

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Data Sheet DS830 Multilink Panel

Characteristics
Technical data

The following table shows the technical characteristics of the DS830 Multilink Panel. Specification Aluminium box (not waterproof) Up to 4 (DS830-4), 8 (DS830-8) or 16 (DS830-16) expansion boxes and/or MicroAutoBoxes DS813, DS814, DS815, DS817, DS819, DS821, MicroAutoBox In any combination: Crossed-over patch cable: twisted pair (CAT5 STP) o Fiber-optic cable: multimode (50/125 m)
o o o

Parameter Enclosure Connectable boxes Supported link interfaces Physical connection

Cable length per connection Protocol Max. transfer rate Status LEDs

Max. 10 m (crossed-over patch cable) Max. 100 m (fiber-optic cable)

High-speed serial link (proprietary) 100 MBit/s 1) Various LEDs displaying the current status of each connection and the power supply

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Data Sheet DS830 Multilink Panel

Parameter Power supply

Specification
o o

+6 V +58 V DC Overvoltage protection and protection against reverse polarity ( 80 V) Power supply via mains socket or a car battery (power supply cables are part of the hardware package) Mains socket cable includes a power supply unit (15.0 V, 4.0 A)

Power consumption

DS830-4 DS830-8 DS830-16

16 W 24 W 40 W 201.6 x 56.0 x 108.6 mm ( 7.9 x 2.2 x 4.3 in.) 288.0 x 56.0 x 108.6 mm (11.3 x 2.2 x 4.3 in.) 460.8 x 56.0 x 108.6 mm (18.1 x 2.2 x 4.3 in.) 0.75 kg (1.65 lb.) 1.10 kg (2.43 lb.) 1.70 kg (3.75 lb.)
o o

Physical size (length x depth x height)

DS830-4 DS830-8 DS830-16 DS830-4 DS830-8 DS830-16

Approx. weight

Ambient temperature
1)

0 50 C (32 122 F) Active cooling (fan)

The transfer rate describes the capabilities of the hardware components and circuits of dSPACE products. Depending on the software complexity the attainable overall performance can deviate significantly from the hardware specification.

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Troubleshooting

Objective

If any problem related to the installation and configuration of your MicroAutoBox comes up, refer to the information given in this section. If the information in this section does not help you solve the problem, you should check the support section of our Web site http://www.dspace.com/goto?support. This might help you solve the problem on your own. The FAQ section especially might be of help. If you cannot solve the problem, contact dSPACE Support. There are different ways to contact dSPACE Support:
n n

Getting further support

Visit our Web site at http://www.dspace.com/goto?support Send an e-mail or phone:


o

General Technical Support: support@dspace.de +49 5251 1638-941

Use the dSPACE Support Wizard:


o o

On your dSPACE DVD at \Diag\Tools\dSPACESupportWizard.exe Via Start Programs dSPACE Tools (after installation of the dSPACE software) At http://www.dspace.com/goto?supportwizard You can always find the latest version of the dSPACE Support Wizard here.

dSPACE recommends that you use the dSPACE Support Wizard to contact dSPACE Support.

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Troubleshooting

Where to go from here

Information in this section Checking MicroAutoBox Problems with Multiple Plug & Play Boards Problems with the Flight Recorder Problems Related to the Firmware 260 261 263 264

Checking MicroAutoBox
Check list

Perform the following checks if MicroAutoBox does not operate correctly:


n

Check the power supply of the system (see Basics on Connecting to Power Supply on page 60). Check whether the I/O signals are connected to the power supply (refer to Input/output circuits on page 65). Check the connection from the host PC to MicroAutoBox. Use ControlDesk to check the board properties (see How to Run ControlDesk ( ControlDesk Experiment Guide)).
ST M

n n

Status LED

The status LED of the MicroAutoBox indicates the following malfunctions (MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 does not provide a status LED): Behavior LED lights not Problem The power supply is not connected correctly. Measure Check the power supply of the system (see Basics on Connecting to Power Supply on page 60).

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Troubleshooting

Problems with Multiple Plug & Play Boards


Objective

Working with more than one dSPACE board in plug & play configuration presents us with two problems. The first is that the logical name of a board as assigned by the software must be associated with a physical board. The second is that under certain conditions, assignment of the names to the boards may change unexpectedly. It is vital to detect this situation, because otherwise an application to be loaded to a certain board might be loaded to another board of the same type by mistake. For example, assume you have one board connected to the engine ECU and another connected to the ESP system of a vehicle. In order to avoid severe damage to the car, you must avoid loading the program intended for the ECU-related board to the ESP-related board, and vice versa.

Affected boards

The problem described always applies to DS1104 boards (and MicroAutoBox via DS815 or DS817) because plug & play mode cannot be disabled. It also applies to DS1103 and DS1005 boards if they are configured to plug & play mode. For these boards, plug & play mode can be used only if they are installed in a PC directly. This might be the case with an industrial PC with many ISA slots and a built-in PC. The problem can be avoided for DS1103 and DS1005 boards installed in a PC simply by disabling the plug & play mode. This means, however, that you must set up a configuration free of I/O address conflicts by setting the I/O address switches of the boards manually.

Not affected boards

The problem never applies to DS1006 boards, because these boards do not support the plug & play mode. The problem never applies to DS1103 and DS1005 boards installed in a dSPACE expansion box independently of the type of interface used to connect the box to the PC, because when they are installed in expansion boxes, the plug & play mode must be disabled.

Handling plug & play boards in ControlDesk

ControlDesks Platform Manager handles the boards by detecting their type (DS1005, DS1103, DS1104, MicroAutoBox via DS815 or DS817) and their actual I/O address. For plug & play boards, the actual I/O address is dynamically assigned by the PC BIOS or the plug & play components of the operating system. If you add hardware

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Troubleshooting

components to your host PC or remove them from it, or enable or disable motherboard components, the PC's BIOS and/or the operating system's plug & play components assign new resources such as I/O addresses to all plug & play components, including dSPACE boards in plug & play mode. This may result in different I/O addresses being assigned to the same board without even touching any of the dSPACE boards! This situation cannot be automatically corrected by the Platform Manager. It does, however, detect a change in the configuration, that is a change in the names assigned to the boards and the particular board. Detection is based on the board serial numbers. The Platform Manager detects such a change if at least one board was allocated a different name by the device driver. The affected board is removed from the dSPACE configuration and cannot be accessed by the Platform Manager to avoid confusion when loading applications and to prevent damage to external devices connected to the board. The Platform Manager displays an error message and requires the user to reregister all the hardware before all boards can be used again.
Method

To restore a consistent dSPACE board configuration 1 From ControlDesks menu bar, choose Platform Initialization Clear System. Boards setup in plug & play mode are then reregistered automatically. 2 In the Platform Navigator, double-click the corresponding board icon to open the Platform Properties dialog. 3 Compare the serial number of each dSPACE board (label on each boards bracket) with the one shown in the boards property page of the Platform Manager to make sure that your applications are still loaded to the correct dSPACE boards.

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Troubleshooting

After using the Clear System command, you must reregister all installed dSPACE boards that do not support plug & play or where plug & play mode is disabled by means of the address switches. It is your responsibility to check and ensure that all applications are still loaded to the correct board. Since this is not under complete control of the dSPACE software it might even be necessary to change external connections to the boards! In a subsequent release of the Platform Manager it will be possible to assign board names to the particular boards as needed.

Property pages

The following table displays the affected dSPACE boards and the property pages showing the boards serial numbers: dSPACE Board DS1005 DS1006 DS1103 DS1104 DS1401 (MicroAutoBox) Property Page DS1005 Properties page DS1006 Properties page DS1103 Properties page Board Properties page DS1401 Properties page

For details, see Properties: Platform Properties ( Reference).

ST M

ControlDesk

Problems with the Flight Recorder


Troubleshooting

One of the following error messages may come up when you use the flight recorder. Cause You did not use the flight recorder. You tried to convert a file that contains no flight recorder data. Remedy Select a BIN file with flight recorder data.

Error Message The flight recorder has saved no data The file '<filename>' contains no flight recorder data

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Troubleshooting

Error Message Overrun during flight recording detected (data incomplete)

Cause During data saving, the bit rate was so high that some data could not be recorded. Reasons: o Too many variables are saved in too short a period, or o Data is written to the flash too fast. The flash of MicroAutoBox has a bit rate of approx. 700 KByte/s. If this bit rate overruns, data is lost. During data saving or conversion, failures in the data structure occurred. The BIN file or the data in the flash memory is corrupt.

Remedy Reduce the variables or the cycle time of the model/program, so that the flash has a longer period to save the data.

Detected incomplete or faulty flight recorder data

Contact dSPACE support for further measures.

Problems Related to the Firmware


Corrupt firmware

You should not switch off MicroAutoBoxs power supply or disconnect MicroAutoBox from the host PC while loading an application to the box. This may be the reason for a corrupted firmware.

Error messages

One of the following error messages may come up when you try to download an application to MicroAutoBox. The application is not executed.
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<board_name>: Startup code has not been executed correctly after loading <application>. <board_name>: No firmware (bootstrap code) found. Please load the firmware again. There is not enough global memory while loading <application> to board <board_name>

If the error messages are caused by a corrupted bootstrap loader which is included in the firmware, you have to re-program the firmware.

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Troubleshooting

Method

To re-program the firmware 1 Update the boot firmware as described in Updating the Firmware ( dSPACE System First Work Steps).
ST M

2 Download the application again. If the application does not start, you have to proceed with the following steps. 3 Re-install your dSPACE software probably on a second PC. 4 Write any application to the flash memory. 5 Clear the flash memory.

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Troubleshooting

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Index

Index

data sheet DS830 MultiLink Panel 257 adapter cable MicroAutoBox 1401/1501 119 DS815-RJ45 85 MicroAutoBox 1401/1504 143 MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506 181 B MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507 213 MicroAutoBox Break-Out Box 245 board overview de-installation 117 DS4340 32 DS4340 bracket LEDs on bus interface 85 board overview 32 Break-Out Box bus termination 30 banana plug 110 features 30 block diagram 247 feed-through lines 30 CAN Sub-D I/O connectors 252 FlexRay-bus connector 33 CAN/FlexRay signal mapping 253 CAN/FlexRay Sub-D I/O connector 251 DS813 79 DS813 Link Board connecting examples 111 bracket LEDs 85 connecting test plugs 110 connection 81 connecting/disconnecting stripped wires 109 limitations 80 data overview 255 DS814 Link Board data sheet 245 limitations 80 FlexRay Sub-D I/O connectors 252 DS815 80 I/O connectors 248 DS815 Link Board interrupting the signal path 110 limitations 80 knife disconnector 110 DS815-RJ45 main features 108 adapter cable 85 schematic overview 246 DS817 80 DS817 Link Board terminals 248 bracket LEDs 85 terminating CAN bus lines 113 connection 81 terminating FlexRay bus lines 114 limitations 80 wire dimensions 110 DS819 80 zero insertion force connector 250 DS819 Link Board bus interface 79 bracket LEDs 85 available combinations 79 connection 81 bracket LEDs 85 limitations 80 DS813 79 DS821 80 DS815 80 DS821 Link Board DS817 80 limitations 80 DS821 80 DS830 bus termination 37 data sheet 257 bus topology 37 DS830 MultiLink Panel 99 connection 101 C data sheet 257 limitations 99 connecting MABX to host PC 79 to supply power 101, 102 bus interfaces 79 dSPACE board configuration connection restore 262 DS817/DS814 interface 81 dSPACE CardSafe DS830 MultiLink Panel 101 introduction 89 ControlDesk mounting 91 plug & play 261 removing completely 96 removing for transportation 95 D required mounting area 90 data sheet dSPACE FlexRay Interface Module 30 DS830 257

dSPACE Prototyper for RCP 17

F
features of DS4340 30 FlexRay hardware supported 26 FlexRay Interface Cable 33 FlexRay IP modules DS4340 30 third-party 50 FlexRay modules installing 27 FlexRay-bus connector DS4340 33 flight recorder error messages 263 FR_CAB1 FlexRay Interface Cable for MicroAutoBox 33

H
host PC requirements 23

I
I/O circuits MicroAutoBox 1401/1501 137 MicroAutoBox 1401/1504 161 MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507 239 I/O connector 76 installing FlexRay modules 27

K
KL15 60 KL30 60

L
LIN master configuring MicroAutoBox 52 link boards available combinations 79 host PC 79

M
MicroAutoBox hardware package 18 important notes 14 power supply 24 safety precautions 14 status LED 78 MicroAutoBox 1401/1501 absolute maximum levels 129

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Index

MicroAutoBox 1401/1501 certifications 140 DC characteristics 130 dimensions and weights 140 I/O circuits 137 I/O connector characteristics 139 interface characteristics 135 pin description analog input and output 127 digital input 123 digital output 125 interfaces 128 power input and output 122 zero insertion force connector 120 MicroAutoBox 1401/1504 absolute maximum levels 153 AC characteristics 158 certifications 163 DC characteristics 154 dimensions and weights 163 I/O circuits 161 I/O connector characteristics 163 pin description analog input 151 digital input 147 digital output 149 interfaces 151 power input and output 146 zero insertion force connector 144 MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1506 absolute maximum levels 199 certifications 210 DC characteristics 200 dimensions and weights 210 I/O circuits I/O circuits 207 I/O connector characteristics 209 interface characteristics 205 pin description analog input and output 193 digital input 189 digital output 191 interfaces 193 power input and output 188 Sub-D I/O connector 184 zero insertion force connector 182 MicroAutoBox 1401/1505/1507 absolute maximum levels 231 certifications 242 DC characteristics 232 dimensions and weights 242 ECU interface connector 219 I/O circuits 239 I/O connector characteristics 241 interface characteristics 237

pin description analog input and output 225 digital input 221 digital output 223 interfaces 225 power input and output 220 Sub-D I/O connector 216 zero insertion force connector 214 MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 absolute maximum levels 176 certifications 179 DC characteristics 177 dimensions and weights 179 ECU interface connector 169 I/O connector characteristics 179 interface characteristics 177 pin description interfaces 172 power input and output 171 power input connector 169 Sub-D I/O connector 166

U
using MicroAutoBox as LIN master 52

W
wiring scheme 63

P
PC card link cables 83 plug & play board configuration 262 ControlDesk 261 multiple plug & play boards 261 power input connector MicroAutoBox 1401/1507 169 power supply 78 MicroAutoBox 24

R
requirements host PC 23 power supply 24 rule for naming signals 168, 186, 218

S
signal names naming rule 168, 186, 218 status LED DS1401 78 status LEDs DS830 103 supported FlexRay hardware 26 system requirements 23

T
termination 37 third-party FlexRay IP modules 50 troubleshooting 259

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