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AMI1P

‫ המאמרים האלו הוכנסו גם לפורטל בעברית‬: ) 1 ( ‫מאמרים חשובים שאני ממליץ לפורטל הבינלאומי‬
‫ ממליץ מאד לשלבם‬. ‫ אני חושב שאלו כתבי עת חשובים שאנו לא מכסים בהכרח בפורטל הבינלאומי‬.‫עמי סלנט‬
.‫בהקדם‬
Section: 4 Teaching Assessment

Title: Fast and effective feedback: are model answers the answer?

Source: Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, Vol. 32, Iss. 6; Dec 2007, pg. 601.

Author: Mark Huxham

Keywords:
Effective feedback
Model feedback
Personal feedback
Effective learning
UK

‫תמצית‬

This study compares student responses and performance after receiving two types of
feedback, that provided by model answers and that provided by personal comments.
In 2004 and 2005, a total of 183 students in first and honours years biology courses were
provided with both types of feedback, and their perceptions and preferences were explored
using a questionnaire. Questionnaire results showed that a majority of students wanted both
kinds of feedback, but that there was a preference for personal over model feedback.

‫מאמר‬

Source: Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, Vol. 32, Iss. 6; Dec 2007, pg. 601.

Feedback to students is essential for effective learning, but there is little empirical information
on what kind of feedback is best. This study compares student responses and performance
after receiving two types of feedback, that provided by model answers and that provided by
personal comments.

In 2004 and 2005, a total of 183 students in first and honours years biology courses were
provided with both types of feedback, and their perceptions and preferences were explored
using a questionnaire.

The examination marks of 155 students were analysed, comparing scores in questions
relating to personal and model feedback given earlier in the course. Questionnaire results
showed that a majority of students wanted both kinds of feedback, but that there was a
preference for personal over model feedback.

However, there were highly significant differences between the mean marks achieved in
examinations, with students performing better in model answer questions in both 2004 and
2005. These results suggest that the best approach might be a hybrid one, drawing on the
strengths of both kinds of feedback.
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Section: 4 Teaching Assessment

Title: Are they the same? Comparing the instructional quality of online and face-to-face
graduate education courses

Source: Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, Vol. 32, Iss. 6; Dec 2007 pg. 681.

Author: Andrew Topper


Keywords:
Web-based learning
Online learning
Face-to-face learning
Instruction quality
Instruction effectiveness
Course evaluations

‫תמצית‬

This study looks at response rates and compares instructional quality, using student course
evaluations along with additional data from online and face-to-face graduate education
courses, to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction. A statistical analysis of students' course
evaluations showed no significant difference in instructional quality based on the format used.
Together with comparisons of student work, these results provide additional evidence in
support of the finding of no significant difference between formats in the area of instructional
quality.

‫מאמר‬

Source: Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, Vol. 32, Iss. 6; Dec 2007 pg. 681.

As instructors adopt web-based learning environments, they must consider how students'
evaluations of learning reflect the overall quality of instruction. Traditional course evaluations
are used for faculty retention, tenure and promotion decisions, but also provide instructors
with valuable information on the quality of their instruction.

This study looks at response rates and compares instructional quality, using student course
evaluations along with additional data from online and face-to-face graduate education
courses, to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction.

A statistical analysis of students' course evaluations showed no significant difference in


instructional quality based on the format used. Together with comparisons of student work,
these results provide additional evidence in support of the finding of no significant difference
between formats in the area of instructional quality.
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Section: 4 Teaching Assessment

Tiltle: Portfolio assessment of an undergraduate group project

Source: Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, Vol. 32, Iss. 5; Oct 2007, pg. 557

Author:
Raija Kuisma

Keywords:
Research
Team work
Collaboration
Students' involvement
Students’ participation
Portfolio assessment

‫תמצית‬

Students in the Physiotherapy Programme carried out a group project in their final year of
studies. The objectives of the project were that the students learn and appreciate the process
and activities involved in research, acquire deeper understanding of a topic in their
professional interest, learn to work as a team, manage their own time, collaborate with others
and produce a meaningful report. In the case of group work, usually the written report is
assessed and the same mark is given to all members.

‫מאמר‬

Source: Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, Vol. 32, Iss. 5; Oct 2007, pg. 557

Students in the Physiotherapy Programme carried out a group project in their final year of
studies. The objectives of the project were that the students learn and appreciate the process
and activities involved in research, acquire deeper understanding of a topic in their
professional interest, learn to work as a team, manage their own time, collaborate with others
and produce a meaningful report. In the case of group work, usually the written report is
assessed and the same mark is given to all members.

Sometimes the supervisors' and group members' assessment of the members' involvement
and participation in the project, oral presentation or viva voce contributes a small portion to
the final grade of each student. This practice is limited to the assessment of the outcome of
the group effort and does not reflect the process of learning by individual members.

Portfolio assessment of learning involves the students themselves reflecting on and


evaluating their learning and also allows teachers to evaluate individual students' learning in
group tasks. In this paper, the implementation of the portfolio assessment, the criteria for the
assessment of the portfolios and the students' opinions on the portfolio assessment are
discussed.
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Section: 4 Teaching Assessment

Enhancing curriculum and delivery: linking assessment to learning objectives


Source: Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, Vol. 33, Iss. 1; Feb 2008, pg. 87.

Authors:
Kathryn L. Combs
Sharon K. Gibson
Julie M. Hays
Jane Saly
John T. Wendt

Keywords:
Curricula
Curriculum development
Educational evaluation
Learning
Colleges & universities
Higher education

‫תמצית‬

Typical university-wide course evaluations do not provide instructors with sufficient


information on the effectiveness of their courses. This article describes a course assessment
and enhancement model where student feedback can be used to improve courses and/or
programs. The model employs an assessment tool that measures student perceptions of
importance and their current competence in course-specific learning objectives both pre- and
post-course.

‫מאמר‬

Source: Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, Vol. 33, Iss. 1; Feb 2008, pg. 87.

Typical university-wide course evaluations do not provide instructors with sufficient


information on the effectiveness of their courses. This article describes a course assessment
and enhancement model where student feedback can be used to improve courses and/or
programs.

The model employs an assessment tool that measures student perceptions of importance and
their current competence in course-specific learning objectives both pre- and post-course.
Information gained from this assessment enables course improvement over time and also
allows for modification in delivery and/or content of the current course.

This model is intended to augment traditional course evaluation mechanisms based on


specific and actionable feedback on learning objectives.
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Section: 4 Teaching Assessment

Title: Designing ePortfolio 2.0: Integrating and Coordinating Web 2.0 Services with ePortfolio
Systems for enhancing Users' Learning

Source: Journal of Information Systems Education. . Vol. 18, Iss. 2, Summer 2007, ; pg. 203.

Authors:
Sonya Xuesong Zhang
Lorne Olfman
Peter Ractham

Keywords:
EPortfolio
Personal learning
Communities of practice
Social learning
Web 2.0
Community interaction

‫תמצית‬

In this paper, we propose a new design that integrates and coordinates emerging Web 2.0
services into ePortfolio systems to enable community-wide annotation, interaction, and
collaboration, with the goal of enhancing the learning experience for individuals as well as the
community. We review relevant literatures, theories, and development of traditional ePortfolio
systems. We conduct a preliminary survey study to explore users' perceived values in
ePortfolio and Web 2.0 services.

‫מאמר‬

Source: Journal of Information Systems Education. . Vol. 18, Iss. 2, Summer 2007, ; pg. 203.

An educational ePortfolio usually contains work that a student has collected, reflected,
designed, and published to demonstrate personal learning and growth over time. However,
previous studies have shown that traditional ePortfolio systems lack flexibility, peer review,
and group collaboration.

Without these features, ePortfolios do not have the benefits of social learning or Communities
of Practice. In this paper, we propose a new design that integrates and coordinates emerging
Web 2.0 services into ePortfolio systems to enable community-wide annotation, interaction,
and collaboration, with the goal of enhancing the learning experience for individuals as well as
the community.

We review relevant literatures, theories, and development of traditional ePortfolio systems.


We conduct a preliminary survey study to explore users' perceived values in ePortfolio and
Web 2.0 services. The survey results show opportunities to design a new generation of
ePortfolio systems enabled with Web 2.0. We illustrate and discuss an ePortfolio 2.0
conceptual model, and a system prototype.
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Section: 10 TE & INSTRUCTION

Title: Possibilities for pedagogy in further education: harnessing the abundance of literacy.

Source: British Educational Research Journal. Vol. 33, Iss. 5; , pg. 703, Oct 2007.

Authors:
Roz Ivanic
Richard Edwards
Candice Satchwell
June Smith

Keywords:
Literacy
Pedagogy
Students' communicative resources
Case Studies
Further education
UK

‫תמצית‬

In this report, it is argued that the most salient factor in the contemporary communicative
landscape is the sheer abundance and diversity of possibilities for literacy, and that the extent
and nature of students' communicative resources is a central issue in education. The text
outlines the conceptual underpinnings of the Literacies for Learning in Further Education
project in a social view of literacy, and the associated research design, methodology and
analytical framework.

‫מאמר‬

Source: British Educational Research Journal. Vol. 33, Iss. 5; , pg. 703, Oct 2007.

In this report, it is argued that the most salient factor in the contemporary communicative
landscape is the sheer abundance and diversity of possibilities for literacy, and that the extent
and nature of students' communicative resources is a central issue in education.

The text outlines the conceptual underpinnings of the Literacies for Learning in Further
Education project in a social view of literacy, and the associated research design,
methodology and analytical framework. It elaborates on the notion of the abundance of
literacies in students' everyday lives, and on the potential for harnessing these as resources
for the enhancement of learning.

It provides case studies of changes in practice that have been undertaken by further
education staff in order to draw upon students' everyday literacy practices on Travel and
Tourism and Multimedia courses. It ends with some of the broad implications for
conceptualising learning that arise from researching through the lens of literacy practices.