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Curriculum Inquiry
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/CURI
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For 2007 there are 3 issues: Sep., June, March
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September 2007 (Vol. 37 Issue 3 Page 199-298)

Section 11

Title: Contesting the Curriculum: An Examination of Professionalism as Defined and Enacted


by Australian History Teachers

Source: Curriculum Inquiry 37 (3), 2007, pp. 239–261.

September 2007

Author:
Fiona Hilferty (Australia)

Keywords:
Australia
Curriculum
Professionalism
History teachers
Science
Professional teacher community

‫תמצית‬

In this article, I present an analysis of professionalism as defined and enacted by the History
Teachers' Association of New South Wales (HTANSW). This analysis was part of a larger
doctoral project (2000–2005) in which I employed critical qualitative inquiry to compare and
contrast the contribution that two subject teaching associations (science and history) make to
the project of teacher professionalism in Australia.

‫מאמר‬

Source: Curriculum Inquiry 37 (3), 2007, pp. 239–261.

In this article, I present an analysis of professionalism as defined and enacted by the History
Teachers' Association of New South Wales (HTANSW). This analysis was part of a larger
doctoral project (2000–2005) in which I employed critical qualitative inquiry to compare and
contrast the contribution that two subject teaching associations (science and history) make to
the project of teacher professionalism in Australia.

My aim for this project was to explore what professionalism means in practice for a unique
group of teachers: those who have made an active and fundamental commitment to their
subject community by voluntarily serving on the executive committee of their subject-based
professional association.

In this article, I present findings from the case account of the HTANSW—an organization that
operates locally as a professional teacher community and a representative organization for
school-based history teachers. This case account details the manoeuvrings of an association
that powerfully asserts an expansive role for history teachers as both contributors to, and
critical commentators on, curriculum policy.

In this article, I conceptualise the actions of this association as an enacted form of teacher
professionalism. Drawing on study findings, I explicate my conception of professionalism as
an enacted discourse of power and I show how this discourse is enacted in subject-specific
ways.
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‫ כי אחרת‬,‫ אסור להכניס אותו‬.2007 ‫ שהשתרבב כנראה בטעות למאמרים של‬2006 ‫המאמר הבא הוא מ‬
‫זה ישמש כתקדים מסוכן‬.
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Section 10

ALISON COOK-SATHER (2006 (

Title: Sound, Presence, and Power: "Student Voice" in Educational Research and Reform

Source: Curriculum Inquiry 36 (4), 2006, pp. 359–390.

Sound, Presence, and Power: "Student Voice" in Educational Research and Reform
ALISON COOK-SATHER

Curriculum Inquiry, Volume 36, Issue 4, Page 359-390, Dec 2006, doi: 10.1111/j.1467-
873X.2006.00363.x

· *Bryn Mawr College


Bryn Mawr, PA, USA

Keywords:

‫תמצית‬

‫מאמר‬

Source: Curriculum Inquiry 36 (4), 2006, pp. 359–390.

Every way of thinking is both premised on and generative of a way of naming that reflects
particular underlying convictions. Over the last 15 years, a way of thinking has reemerged that
strives to reposition students in educational research and reform.

Best documented in Australia, Canada, England, and the United States, this way of thinking is
premised on the following convictions: that young people have unique perspectives on
learning, teaching, and schooling; that their insights warrant not only the attention but also the
responses of adults; and that they should be afforded opportunities to actively shape their
education.

Although these convictions mean different things to different people and take different forms
in practice, a single term has emerged to capture a range of activities that strive to reposition
students in educational research and reform: "student voice."

In this discussion the author explores the emergence of the term "student voice," identifies
underlying premises signaled by two particular words associated with the term, "rights" and
"respect," and explores the many meanings of a word that surfaces repeatedly across
discussions of student voice efforts but refers to a wide range of practices: "listening."

The author offers this discussion not as an exhaustive or definitive analysis but rather with the
goal of looking across discussions of work that advocates, enacts, and critically analyzes the
term "student voice."
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Section 10

Title: Transforming the Subject Matter: Examining the Intellectual Roots of Pedagogical
Content Knowledge
Source: Curriculum Inquiry 37 (3), 2007, pp. 279–295.

September 2007

Author:
Zongyi Deng (Hong Kong)

Keywords:
Hong Kong
Subject matter
Intellectual roots
Pedagogical content knowledge
Curricular task
Curriculum research

‫תמצית‬

This article questions the basic assumptions of pedagogical content knowledge by analyzing
the ideas of Jerome Bruner, Joseph Schwab, and John Dewey concerning transforming the
subject matter. It argues that transforming the subject matter is not only a pedagogical but
also a complex curricular task in terms of developing a school subject or a course of study.
This curricular task, however, has been obscured by the concept of pedagogical content
knowledge that construes transformation as primarily a pedagogical task in terms of
transforming the subject matter of an academic discipline into pedagogical forms.

‫מאמר‬

Source: Curriculum Inquiry 37 (3), 2007, pp. 279–295.

This article questions the basic assumptions of pedagogical content knowledge by analyzing
the ideas of Jerome Bruner, Joseph Schwab, and John Dewey concerning transforming the
subject matter.

It argues that transforming the subject matter is not only a pedagogical but also a complex
curricular task in terms of developing a school subject or a course of study. This curricular
task, however, has been obscured by the concept of pedagogical content knowledge that
construes transformation as primarily a pedagogical task in terms of transforming the subject
matter of an academic discipline into pedagogical forms.

The article further argues that what constitutes the subject matter of a school subject is an
essential issue of curriculum research and inquiry—an issue that is crucial yet largely
underexplored in Shulman and associate's conceptualization of teachers’ specialized subject
matter knowledge.