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18AP.

The Teacher Educator


Volume 43 Issue 1 2008 (January)
Publication Frequency: 4 issues per year
The Wilson collection
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Section: 3

Title: The Role of Socially Constructed Shared Knowledge in Learning to Teach: Collaboration
and Reflection in a Computer-Mediated Environment.

Source: The Teacher Educator, Volume 43, Issue 1 January 2008 , pages 1 – 28.

Author:
H. Carol Greene

Keywords:
Shared knowledge
Learning to teach
Collaboration
Reflection
Computer-mediated environment
Computer-mediated communication

‫תמצית‬

This research examined the role of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in a


partnership that was formed between an educational psychology course for preservice
teachers, eight professors from the university's teacher education program, and eight
practicing teachers from diverse public schools from across two states. Participants
communicated via chat rooms and threaded discussion lists. The use of computer-mediated
communication as a viable means of supporting collaboration and
reflection in teacher education is described.

‫מאמר‬

Source: The Teacher Educator, Volume 43, Issue 1 January 2008 , pages 1 – 28.

This research examined the role of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in a


partnership that was formed between an educational psychology course for preservice
teachers, eight professors from the university's teacher education program, and eight
practicing teachers from diverse public schools from across two states.

Participants communicated via chat rooms and threaded discussion lists. The use of
computer-mediated communication as a viable means of supporting collaboration and
reflection in teacher education is described.

Results from qualitative and quantitative analyses support the notion that CMC enhanced
learning outcomes as measured by reflective capacity. Using the Developmental Model of
Reflection as a Cognitive Outcome Scale (Crotty, 2001), results from an ANOVA indicate
significant growth in the preservice teachers' reflective comments across the semester.
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Section: 1

Title: Field Placement Treatments: A Comparative Study

Source: The Teacher Educator, Volume 43, Issue 1, January 2008 , pages 29 - 45

Author:
Paul T. Parkison
Keywords:
Comparative study
Field placement treatments
Preservice teacher programs
Pedagogical methodologies
Elementary education
Secondary education

‫תמצית‬

Field placement within teacher education represents a topic of interest for all preservice
teacher programs. Present research addresses a set of important questions regarding field
placement: (1) What pedagogical methodologies facilitate deep learning during field
experiences? (2) Is there a significant difference in treatment effect for elementary education
majors as opposed to secondary education majors?

‫מאמר‬

Source: The Teacher Educator, Volume 43, Issue 1 January 2008 , pages 29 - 45

Field placement within teacher education represents a topic of interest for all preservice
teacher programs. Present research addresses a set of important questions regarding field
placement: (1) What pedagogical methodologies facilitate deep learning during field
experiences? (2) Is there a significant difference in treatment effect for elementary education
majors as opposed to secondary education majors?

By conducting a focused study of the current pedagogical methods being utilized in a Middle
Level Instruction and Curriculum course it was possible to evaluate treatment effect on the
enhancement of preservice teacher self-efficacy and dispositional preparation.

Utilizing a Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) experimental design with repeated-


measures, treatment effect on preservice teacher self-efficacy was evaluated based on the
Fuller Scale of Concerns. This research facilitates a more data-driven discussion of the
appropriate pedagogical methodology for the development of preservice teachers' attitudinal
orientation and dispositions.
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Section: 10

Title: Transitioning from Students to Professionals: Using a Writing Across The Curriculum
Model to Scaffold Portfolio Development

Source: The Teacher Educator, Volume 43, Issue 1 January 2008 , pages 46 - 58

Authors:
Lori Elliott
Nancy Lee Daily
Lori Fredricks
Meadow Sherrill Graham

Keywords:
Students
Professionals
Writing
Curriculum
Portfolio Development
Teacher educators

‫תמצית‬
This qualitative action research study was designed to explore the effects of incorporating
writing workshops built on Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) principles into the initial
portfolio process required of students during their first semester in an undergraduate middle-
grades teacher-education program. Findings indicate that the students approached the
portfolio requirement from a consumer perspective and that writing anxiety was a major
obstacle.

‫מאמר‬

Source: The Teacher Educator, Volume 43, Issue 1 January 2008 , pages 46 - 58

Teacher educators have found portfolios to be a valuable way to judge readiness for student-
teaching and initial certification as well as an effective means of examining and validating
teacher preparation programs. Tension exists between using the portfolio as a product for
evaluation and maintaining its focus as a personal examination, synthesis, and reflection on
becoming a teacher.

This qualitative action research study was designed to explore the effects of incorporating
writing workshops built on Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) principles into the initial
portfolio process required of students during their first semester in an undergraduate middle-
grades teacher-education program.

Findings indicate that the students approached the portfolio requirement from a consumer
perspective and that writing anxiety was a major obstacle. Implications of the study point to a
need for student writing support for the portfolio and a need to view the portfolio construction
process as a critical step in the transition from student to professional educator.
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Section: 10

Title: Using Listening Journals in Math Methods

Source: The Teacher Educator, Volume 43, Issue 1 January 2008 , pages 59 – 71.

Authors:
Shelly Sheats Harkness
Kimberly Wachenheim

Keywords:
Action research
Math methods
Preservice teachers
Listening
Reflections
Classroom discourse

‫תמצית‬

The purpose of this teacher action research was twofold: to learn more about preservice
teachers' preconceived notions related to listening and to investigate how a listening journal
assignment impacted preservice teachers' views of listening as an important aspect of
discourse.

‫מאמר‬

Source: The Teacher Educator, Volume 43, Issue 1 January 2008 , pages 59 – 71.

The purpose of this teacher action research was twofold: to learn more about preservice
teachers' preconceived notions related to listening and to investigate how a listening journal
assignment impacted preservice teachers' views of listening as an important aspect of
discourse.
The participants were enrolled in a mathematics methods course for PreK-3 (early childhood)
majors during their last semester of coursework prior to student teaching. Data in the form of
final reflections from participants' listening journals and researchers' field notes were
analyzed.

Findings suggest that the preservice teachers entered the course without truly considering
listening as an important component of teaching methods related to facilitating classroom
discourse. The listening journal assignment helped them begin to think more deeply about
listening and the different definitions and modes of listening; however, at the end of the
semester, many still wrote about their own personal journeys with listening and not about the
role of listening as a key element in promoting classroom discourse and learning.
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Section: 2

Title: Constructivism and Education: Misunderstandings and Pedagogical Implications

Source: The Teacher Educator, Volume 43, Issue 1 January 2008 , pages 72 - 86

Authors:
Emery J. Hyslop-Margison
Johannes Strobel

Keywords:
Constructivism
Education
Misunderstandings
Pedagogical implications
Teacher educators
Pedagogical applications

‫תמצית‬

This article employs Phillips' (1995) analytic framework that divides the pedagogical
applications of constructivism into three distinct categories: the good, the bad, and the ugly.
Reviewing the constructivist epistemologies of Dewey and Vygotsky also enables the
exploration of how constructivism might inform both our understanding of the impediments
students confront when learning new knowledge and our understanding of general
constructivist pedagogical practices.

‫מאמר‬

Source: The Teacher Educator, Volume 43, Issue 1 January 2008 , pages 72 - 86

Constructivism is a popular concept in contemporary teacher education programs. However, a


genuine concern arises with the concept's application because many teachers and teacher
educators claim that knowledge is constructed, without appreciating the epistemological and
pedagogical implications such a claim entails.

This article employs Phillips' (1995) analytic framework that divides the pedagogical
applications of constructivism into three distinct categories: the good, the bad, and the ugly.
Reviewing the constructivist epistemologies of Dewey and Vygotsky also enables the
exploration of how constructivism might inform both our understanding of the impediments
students confront when learning new knowledge and our understanding of general
constructivist pedagogical practices.

The primary objective in this article is to provide teacher educators and teachers with a richer
understanding of constructivism - its limitations and its strengths - while offering concrete
pedagogical strategies for its classroom application.
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