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AMI5P

Section: 10 TE & INSTRUCTION

Title: Creating Mathematical Futures through an Equitable Teaching Approach: The Case of
Railside School

Source: Teachers College Record Volume 110 Number 3, 2008, p. 8-9.

January

Authors:
Jo Boaler
Megan Staples (megan.staples@uconn.edu)

Keywords:
Mathematical futures
Equitable teaching approach
School tracking practices
Students’ identity development
Students’ attainment
High school mathematics classes

‫תמצית‬

One of the findings of the study was the success of Railside school, where the mathematics
department taught heterogeneous classes using a reform-oriented approach. Compared with
the other two schools in the study, Railside students learned more, enjoyed mathematics
more and progressed to higher mathematics levels. This paper presents large-scale evidence
of these important achievements and provides detailed analyses of the ways that the Railside
teachers brought them about, with a focus on the teaching and learning interactions within the
classrooms.

‫מאמר‬

Source: Teachers College Record Volume 110 Number 3, 2008, p. 8-9.

Background/Context: School tracking practices have been documented repeatedly as having


negative effects on students’ identity development and attainment, particularly for those
students placed in lower tracks.

Despite this documentation, tracking persists as a normative practice in American high


schools, perhaps in part because we have few models of how departments and teachers can
successfully organize instruction in heterogeneous, high school mathematics classes. This
paper offers one such model through a qualitative and quantitative analysis.

Focus of Study: In an effort to better the field’s understanding of equitable and successful
teaching, we conducted a longitudinal study of three high schools. At one school, Railside,
students demonstrated greater gains in achievement than students at the other two schools
and higher overall achievement on a number of measures.

Furthermore, achievement gaps among various ethnic groups at Railside that were present
on incoming assessments disappeared in nearly all cases by the end of the second year. This
paper provides an analysis of Railside’s success and identifies factors that contributed to this
success.

Participants: Participants included approximately 700 students as they progressed through


three California high schools. Railside was an urban high school with an ethnically,
linguistically, and economically diverse student body. Greendale was situated in a coastal
community with a more homogeneous, primarily White student body. Hilltop was a rural high
school with primarily White and Latino/a students.
Research Design: This longitudinal, multiple case study employed mixed methods. Three
schools were chosen to offer a range of curricular programs and varied student populations.
Student achievement and attitudinal data were evaluated using statistical techniques,
whereas teacher and student practices were documented using qualitative analytic
techniques such as coding.

Findings/Results: One of the findings of the study was the success of Railside school, where
the mathematics department taught heterogeneous classes using a reform-oriented
approach. Compared with the other two schools in the study, Railside students learned more,
enjoyed mathematics more and progressed to higher mathematics levels. This paper
presents large-scale evidence of these important achievements and provides detailed
analyses of the ways that the Railside teachers brought them about, with a focus on the
teaching and learning interactions within the classrooms.
---------------------------------------------
Section: 4 TEACHING ASSESSMENT

Title: Embracing Contraries: Combining Assistance and Assessment in New Teacher


Induction

Source: Teachers College Record Volume 110 Number 5, 2008, p. -

Authors:
Brian Yusko (b.yusko@csuohio.edu)
Sharon Feiman-Nemser (snemser@brandeis.edu)

Keywords:
Assistance
Assessment
New teacher induction
Teacher quality
Accountability
Comparative analysis

‫תמצית‬

A comparative analysis reveals that assistance and assessment can coexist. Participating in
assessment and evaluation did not prevent mentors from forming trustworthy relationships,
although it sometimes made that more challenging. In both programs mentors were highly
regarded teachers, carefully chosen, with extensive professional expertise. They earned
respect by establishing credibility as useful support providers. Mentors addressed novices’
concerns, but they also assessed how new teachers were meeting students’ learning needs.
In both programs, new teachers set professional goals and were expected to demonstrate
progress towards those goals.

‫מאמר‬

Source: Teachers College Record Volume 110 Number 5, 2008, p. –.


‫בעתיד אוסיף את מספר הדף כאשר הגיליון יתווסף למאגר וילסון‬.

Background/Context:
Although the induction literature has traditionally recommended separating assistance and
assessment, there has been growing recognition that assessment is integral to promoting and
gauging teacher quality. This has led to increased interest in approaches to new teacher
induction that meld support, development, assessment and accountability.

Focus of Study:
This article provides images of mentoring from two well-regarded induction programs that
integrate assistance and assessment to promote quality teaching. The programs are the Peer
Assistance and Evaluation Program (PAEP) in Cincinnati, and the Santa Cruz New Teacher
Project (SCNTP). The article highlights the possibilities and pitfalls of each approach.

Research Design:
The research uses a qualitative case study design involving multiple layers of data collection.
Program level data included interviews with program leaders, analysis of program
documentation, and observations of staff meetings and mentor training. We observed
program implementation by shadowing experienced mentors as they worked with new
teachers and asked each mentors in our sample to submit documentation of one year’s work
with one successful and one struggling new teacher.

Conclusions:
A comparative analysis reveals that assistance and assessment can coexist. Participating in
assessment and evaluation did not prevent mentors from forming trustworthy relationships,
although it sometimes made that more challenging. In both programs mentors were highly
regarded teachers, carefully chosen, with extensive professional expertise.

They earned respect by establishing credibility as useful support providers. Mentors


addressed novices’ concerns, but they also assessed how new teachers were meeting
students’ learning needs. In both programs, new teachers set professional goals and were
expected to demonstrate progress towards those goals.

Mentoring conversations structured around “records of practice” provided opportunities to


move beyond self-report and personal opinion. Mentoring can be most educative when
mentors engage in assistance and assessment structured by appropriate frameworks and
processes, get support from a professional community that upholds professional teaching
standards, and receive training and ongoing professional development to carry out their
important responsibility.