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ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION
A projectile is an object upon which the only force acting is gravity. There are a variety of examples of projectiles. An object dropped from rest is a projectile (provided that the influence of air resistance is negligible). An object that is thrown vertically upward is also a projectile (provided that the influence of air resistance is negligible). And an object which is thrown upward at an angle to the horizontal is also a projectile (provided that the influence of air resistance is negligible). A projectile is any object that once projected or dropped continues in motion by its own inertia and is influenced only by the downward force of gravity. By definition, a projectile has a single force that acts upon it - the force of gravity. If there were any other force acting upon an object, then that object would not be a projectile. Thus, the freebody diagram of a projectile would show a single force acting downwards and labeled force of gravity (or simply Fgrav). Regardless of whether a projectile is moving downwards, upwards, upwards and rightwards, or downwards and leftwards, the free-body diagram of the projectile is still as depicted in the diagram at the right. By definition, a projectile is any object upon which the only force is gravity.

OBJECTIVES
To determine the horizontal range of a projectile at varying angle of projection To determine the optimum parameter to get the maximum range of a projectile To verify that the time of fall is the same in any circumstances

PROCEDURE
A. Effect of angle of projection and range
Mark any point on the ground as the initial position of the toy gun. Make it sure that the landing point is the same elevation as the initial position. Position the toy gun at 15. Fire the toy gun and mark the landing point. Measure the time of projection and the horizontal range. Compute the initial velocity of the projectile. Make three trials and get the average. Repeat the steps 1-5 with increasing angle of projectile: 30, 45, 60, and 75.

B. Time of fall
Get a ball and position it to a height of the same level of the top of the table. Drop the ball and measure the time of fall. Make five trials of it. Using the same ball, have it roll horizontally above the table and let it fall. Measure the time of fall from the edge of the table to the ground. Again, make five trials and then record the data gathered.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION A. Effect of angle of projection and range Angle of Projection 15 30 45 60 75 B. Time of fall TRIALS 1 2 3 4 5 Average Percent Difference Time of fall, sec Vertical (free fall) Horizontal (rolling) 0.75 s 0.71 s 0.72 s 0.68 s 0.72 s 0.65 s 0.71 s 0.75 s 0.71 s 0.71 s 0.72 s 0.70 s 2.82 % Horizontal Range, m Trial 2 Trial 3 4.40 m 4.64 m 4.39 m 3.83 m 4.09 m 3.92 m 4.04 m 3.65 m 2.37 m 2.32 m

Trial 1 4.28 m 4.63 m 3.80 m 3.83 m 1.95 m

Average 4.44 m 4.28 m 3.94 m 3.84 m 2.21 m

CONCLUSION

REFERENCE
Vectors: Motion and Forces in Two Dimensions - Lesson 2 Projectile Motion. (n.d.). In the Physics Classroom. Retrieved August 24, 2011, from http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/vectors/u3l2a.cfm

DE LA SALLE HEALTH SCIENCES INSTITUTE DASMARIAS CITY, CAVITE

GENERAL EDUCATION LABORATORY REPORT IN PYSICS 11OLP

EXPERIMENT NO. 6

PROJECTILE MOTION

DE LEON, JAMIE LAYNE H. PT 2-2

Date Performed: August 19, 2011

Date Submitted: August 26, 2011