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Juliette Gordon Low

These items were collected on the Web and various print materials.

Meet Our Founder, Juliette Gordon Low


My Life I was born in Savannah, Georgia, on October 31, 1860. I am the second of six children in my familyI have three sisters and two brothers. When I was young, I went to a boarding school in Virginia. When I got older, I went to a French School in New York City. I loved the artsI designed my own clothes, painted china, and performed skits with my friends. But I was also a tomboyroughhousing with my brothers, getting my hair braided with taffy, even cementing my ngers to a soap dish! I always loved animalsI was always coming home with a stray cat or dog. Well, to be honest, they werent always strayssome belonged to people, but I felt that they were being neglected, so I took them home. Momma always made me take them back.

A Turkey Tale When I was a girl, cooking was very different from what it is like now. If you wanted a turkey dinner, youd have to go outside and get a live turkeythen cut its head off, pluck off the feathers, and cook it. That was the only way to get fresh meat! We only had cold storage, but no real refrigerator or freezer. When our ice melted, food went bad. One year for Thanksgiving, we raised a turkey and we all became very fond of himeven called him old Tom. When the day came for Tom to become Thanksgiving dinner, I begged my papa for the turkeys life, and, if not, then at least for anesthesia. So we got some chloroform, put poor Tom to sleep, plucked him, and put him in the cold storage. We did not, however, cut off his head. So the next morning when we went to get him for cooking, he was very much alive and very, very mad. He chased Mama and the cook round and round, until nally he was caught, and had to lose his head. It really was a Thanksgiving to remember!

How Girl Scouts Began: An Important Friendship I married William Low when I was 26 years old. He was an Englishman, so we lived in Great Britain during most of our years of marriage. While I was in Scotland in 1911, I met two very important peopleSir Robert Baden-Powell and his sister Agnes. We became very close and remained friends for the next 16 years. Sir Robert started the Boy Scouts in England and it seemed like such a purposeful activity that girls would be interested in it too. And so they started the Girl Guides. I ran my own Girl Guide troop that year.

My Own Girl Guide Troop in Scotland My original idea was that girls could learn the same things boys were learningknot tying, signaling, rst aid, etc. But while people saw such military skills as being benecial to boys, they viewed them as frivolous for girls. The area where I lived was very poor, and many girls had to leave their homes and go into the cities for work in order to help their families make a living. City factories were very lthy and unsafe back then. I thought that there ought to be some way the girls could help their families earn money without having to leave home. I thought that they might raise poultry to feed the rich people who stayed at the nearby hunting lodges. This was very successful. We branched out and learned how to spin wool which the girls went on to sell.

How I Started Girl Scouting in the U.S. When I came back to America, I called my cousin and told her that I had something for the girls of Savannah, and all America, and all the world and that we had to get started on it right away. And we did! It wasnt easypeople seemed convinced that this would be one more thing Id start and then lose interest. And money was always a concern. At one point I even sold my pearls to nance the organization. But I never had any doubts that it would be successful. After all, I knew that girls could do anything they set their minds to. What started out as a group of girls meeting to study nature or learn to play basketball in my backyard grew quickly. When America entered into World War I, I wrote to President Wilson and offered him the Girl Scouts services. Girls went to help out the Red Cross, planted victory gardens, and helped to sell millions of war bonds.

Watching the Seed Grow I had 15 years to watch my program grow. In January 1927, I lost my battle to cancer. I had been ghting it for the last few years, and had kept it a secret from all but my closest friends. I found that I had to spend less and less time actually running the Girl Scouts, and more time creating an organizational structure that would ensure that the Movement didnt die with me. I guess I succeeded. In 1927 there were 167,925 Girl Scouts and now there are over 3.7 million girls and adults! If you want to learn more, come visit the house I grew up in! Its called the Birthplace. Its a national center in Savannah, Georgia. When Girl Scouts visit the Birthplace they can try things I did when I was their age. Source: http://www.gogirlsonly.org/spotlight/juliette/default.asp

Juliette Low Quotes


This quote attributed to a letter written by Juliette Low in 1925 I realize that each year it has changed and grown until I know that, a decade from now, what I might say of it would seem like an echo of what has been instead of what is. The work of today is the history of tomorrow, and we are its makers. My Purpose... ...to go on with my heart and soul, devoting all my energies to Girl Scouts, and heart and hand with them, we will make our lives and the lives of the future girls happy, healthy and holy. My Watch I had my favorite watch on most days. The fact that it only had one hand, and couldnt really tell the time, never really bothered me. Ear Problems I had a series of ear infections and was losing patience with traditional medicine. I had heard that silver nitrate was the newest treatment, and I insisted that the doctor use it on me. Unfortunately, it was too powerful a mixture, and it caused me to go deaf in that ear. Later on at my wedding, a truly freaky thing happened; some of the rice people threw got caught in my other ear. I didnt want to take the time to see a doctor, since I was leaving on my honeymoon. Well, the rice festered in my ear and caused quite an infection. When it was nally removed, the instrument they used to take it out made me deaf in that ear too. The Wrong Fish I was out trout shing one night and felt a tug on my line. I fought hard for quite a while to try and land my catch. What I didnt realize was that I hadnt hooked a sh - rather, I had hooked one of my guests straight through the ear. I was too deaf to hear his screams, and I was so determined to land the sh I never noticed that it was a human being instead. No? When I returned to the States and wanted to start the Girl Scouts, I knew I needed some help. The rst woman I approached tried to tell me she wasnt interested. I pretended that my deafness prevented me from hearing her refusals. And told her, Then thats settled. Ive told my girls you will take the meeting next Thursday. I never heard a word of argument from her again! Fishing with Kipling I was bored at one of the parties I was attending, and so pulled Kipling away from his friends and took him shing. He kept complaining that we werent dressed for it (we were both in formal attire), but I never saw what difference our clothes made - it wasnt as if they were the bait we were using! Turkey Dinner When I was little, people fattened and then slaughtered their own Thanksgiving turkeys. Just before they cut off our turkeys head, I convinced my family that brutal decapitation was inhuman. I argued that he could be chloroformed rst, and then wouldnt feel anything. They nally gave in and agreed to do just that. Then they plucked the turkey and put him in the icebox. When they opened the icebox the next day, the bird was wide awake and bolted out of his frozen cage. The cook, thinking the bird had been dead, became hysterical and jumped up on top of the stove. Baby Rabbit Once I showed up at my sisters with a baby rabbit I had bought from some children because its ears were cold. I put the rabbit on a hot water bottle and massaged its ears for quite a while. After all, I knew that all healthy animals had warm ears.

A Battle of Wills When my husband died, I found that he had willed his entire estate to another woman. No one was going to get away with that! Against the advice of my friends, I decided to contest the will. and eventually I won a $500,000 settlement. Strays I always loved animals. I was constantly coming home with stray dogs, cats and even horses. Sometimes they werent strays, but I felt that their owners were neglecting them. From Juliette Lows Notes on the Laws, 1912 HONOR. This means that a girl is not satised with keeping the letter of the law when she really breaks it in spirit. LOYAL. This means that she is true to her country, to the city or village where she is a citizen, to her family, her church, her school, and those for whom she may work or who may work for her. HELPFUL. The simplest way of saying this for the very young Scout is to do a good turn to someone every day: that is, to be a giver and not a taker. This is the spirit that makes the older Scout into a ne, useful, dependable woman. THRIFTY. The most valuable thing we have in this life is time, and most girls are apt to be rather stupid about getting the most out of it. Health is probably a womans greatest capital, and a Girl Scout.....doesnt waste it in poor diet.....so that she goes bankrupt before she is thirty. Money is a very useful thing to have....A Girl Scout saves, as she spends, on some system. FRIEND TO ANIMALS. All Girl Scouts take particular care of our dumb friends, the animals, and protect them from stupid neglect or hard usage. PURE. A good housekeeper cannot endure dust and dirt; a well-cared-for body cannot endure grime and soot; a pure mind cannot endure doubtful thoughts that cannot be freely aired and ventilated. This quote is taken from page 305 in the book Lady from Savannah: The Life of Juliette Low written by Gladys Denny Shultz and Daisy Gordon Lawrence. Added note: Daisy Gordon Lawrence was the rst Girl Scout of the United States

One hundred years ago Juliette Gordon Low made a historical phone call to Miss Nina Anderson Pape, a distant cousin, and the Principal of a local girls school Come right over, Ive got something for the girls of Savannah and all America and all the world and were going to start it tonight! Now one hundred years later you are carrying on her dream. Right is right, even if no one else does it. When asked what the girls should do, Juliette responded What do the girls WANT to do? Every badge you earn is tied up to your motto. This badge is not a reward for something you have done once or for an examination you have passed. Badges are not medals to wear on your sleeve to show what a smart girl you are. A badge is a symbol that you have done the thing it stands for often enough, thoroughly enough, and well enough to BE PREPARED to give service in it. You wear the badge to let people know that you are prepared and willing to be called on because you are a Girl Scout. And Girl Scouting is not just knowing.....but doing.....not just doing, but being.

Why should my daughter become a Girl Scout - FUN If you asked her daughter, she would probably reply because the Girl Scouts have real fun, but if I were to analyze the results of Scouting I would tell that mother that the most valuable asset her girl would gain is a sense of Individual Responsibility. She makes her Promise (1) To do her duty to God and Country (2) To help others at all times (3) To obey the Scout Laws. This promise is taken seriously and the individual responsibility is brought about by Team Work. Every girl living up to a standard and seeing that her [comrades] in her patrol live up to it also. Ours is a circle of friends united by ideals.

A Tree for the Future Every spring The sap rises in the trees From root to branch And makes a tree that looks dead Blossom with green leaves And life. So it is that the Scouting Spirit Rises within you and Inspires you to put forth Your best. By Juliette Gordon Low

Juliette Gordon Lows Chicago Connection


One of the founders of the city of Chicago was Juliette Lows great-grandfather, John Kinzie. Arriving in 1804, he purchased the original home built by Jean Baptiste Point Du Sable on the north bank of the Chicago River. Kinzie, his wife Eleanor, and their children survived the massacre of Fort Dearborn in 1812. Their oldest son, John Harris Kinzie and his wife Juliette Magill, were prominent citizens of the growing new city and their only daughter was Juliette Gordon Lows mother, Nellie. The Kinzies are buried in Graceland Cemetery in Chicago. Source: Daisys Chicago Heritage by Gert Schriner and Peggy Rogers

Juliette Low and the World Friendship Fund


Juliette Gordon Low, known to everyone as Daisy, was a joyous, lively, talented and inspiring young woman. After she worked with the Girl Guide movement in England, Daisy knew the program was important to bring to the girls of the United States. On March 12, 1912, Girl Scouts was founded: Juliette organized the rst troop with 18 members in Savannah, Georgia. From the start, one of Juliette Lows aims was to bring an international aspect to Girl Scouting. She enjoyed working with Girl Scouts and Girl Guides from many lands. She attended international meetings abroad and even helped to pay for the expenses of other delegates from countries where Girl Guiding was just starting. Part of her dream of international friendship was to hold an international Girl Scout and Girl Guide gathering in the United States. In 1926, Girl Scouts from all parts of the USA and delegates from 29 countries came together at the newly-formed Camp Edith Macy near New York City. For Daisy, the international encampment was her dream come true; even Lord and Lady Baden-Powell, the founder of Boy Scouts and his wife, were in attendance. At this gathering, the delegates decided to make February 22nd, the birthday of both Lord and Lady Baden-Powell, a special Girl Scout and Girl Guide day called Thinking Day. After Daisy Lows death in 1927, her Girl Scout and Girl Guide friends wanted to do something special to honor her memory. It should be something, they felt, that would express her ideals and hopes, something that would keep on growing. At last it was decided to start a memorial fund to promote Girl Scouting and Girl Guiding throughout the world as a contribution to peace and good will, and the Juliette Low World Friendship Fund (JLWFF) was begun. The Funds main purpose is to promote global understanding and friendship. The JLWFF helps to pay travel costs for United States Girls and adults to go to other countries for conferences, encampments, International Destinations, and service activities. The Fund also pays for girls and adults in Girl Guiding or Girl scouting in other countries to visit in the United States. Other moneys are sent to the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) so this international organization can provide training and development in other countries. Some money is also used to help in emergencies, such as replacing a national office washed away in a ood. Many troops decide to give to the JLWFF on either Juliette Lows birthday (October 31), or on Thinking Day (February 22) or on Girl Scouts birthday (March 12th).

NOTE: Before contributing to the Fund, explain what it is to your girls (age appropriate) and decide together how you will give money.

Juliette Low Birthday Action Story (Short Daisy Version)


Katie Cox, USA Girl SCOUTS Kuwait Everyone does all of these, as the words below are said: SCOUTS or GUIDES stand up, make the Girl SCOUT sign (hold up 3 ngers in sign) DAISY - stand up and say I love DAISIES! JULIETTE LOW - stand up, raise arms, shake open hands and yell Adventure! WORLD stand up, turn around, and sit down

Once upon a time, there was a young girl named JULIETTE LOW, who lived in Savannah, Georgia and whose birthday was on Halloween. As a young girl she liked to do many of the things you and I and other young girls all around the WORLD like to do. There were no Girl SCOUTS then but JULIETTE LOW had 5 brothers and sisters and had lots of fun playing with them. JULIETTE LOWs nickname when she was a young girl was DAISY. Thats where the name of DAISY Girl SCOUTS came from. DAISY loved to play games, swim, play outdoors, make crafts, and write and act in her own plays and she did these even though there were no Girl SCOUTS at the time. JULIETTE LOW loved animals and used to SCOUT for strays including dogs, cats, and one time, even a horse, just like many other young girls. DAISY was very adventurous as well. She was willing to try almost anything, lots more than most young girls all over the WORLD would try. JULIETTE LOW loved to travel around the WORLD and started to travel by reading travel GUIDES and by going to boarding school in Virginia when she was 13. In her travels around the WORLD, JULIETTE LOW met Sir Robert Baden-Powell, who had started an organization called the Boy SCOUTS in England. DAISY liked the idea and started a troop of Girl GUIDES in Scotland, of all places in the WORLD. Soon after that, JULIETTE LOW returned to her home in Georgia and started the very rst Girl SCOUT troop on March 12, 1912, which we now call the Girl SCOUT birthday. The young girls went on hikes, formed basketball teams and learned how to camp. These are some of the same things you might wish to do with your Girl SCOUT troop, just like other young girls all over the WORLD. So, DAISIES, arent you glad that JULIETTE LOW, who we call DAISY, started Girl SCOUTS in our part of the WORLD, so we could have fun being together, just like other Girl GUIDES and Girl SCOUTS and all over the WORLD!

Juliette Lows Birthday Action Story (Long Older Girl Version)


Katie Cox, USA Girl SCOUTS Kuwait Divide up group into 3 groups to do each of these actions when the following words are said: YOUNG GIRLS stand up, throw a punch up in the air with one rst and say Girl Power SCOUTS or GUIDES stand up, make the Girl SCOUT sign, and say On my Honor DAISY stand up and say I love DAISIES! Everyone does these: JULIETTE LOW - stand up, raise arms, shake open hands and yell Adventure! WORLD stand up, turn around, and sit down BIRTHDAY - stand up and Sing Happy BIRTHDAY to you (not the whole song, just one line)

Once upon a time, there was a YOUNG GIRL named JULIETTE LOW, who lived in Savannah, Georgia and whose BIRTHDAY was on Halloween. As a YOUNG GIRL she liked to do many of the things you and I and other YOUNG GIRLS all around the WORLD like to do. There were no Girl SCOUTS then but JULIETTE LOW had 5 brothers and sisters and had lots of fun playing with them, especially on her BIRTHDAY. JULIETTE LOWs nickname when she was a YOUNG GIRL was DAISY. Thats where the name of DAISY Girl SCOUTS came from. DAISY loved to play games, swim, play outdoors, make crafts, and write and act in her own plays and she did these even though there were no Girl SCOUTS at the time. JULIETTE LOW loved animals and used to SCOUT for strays including dogs, cats, and one time, even a horse, just like many other YOUNG GIRLS. DAISY loved animals so much, that one time, near her BIRTHDAY, she was worried about the family cow, much like other YOUNG GIRLS would be all over the WORLD, so she took her mothers bedspread and pinned it around the cow during the night so that it would stay warm and not get a cold. DAISYS mother was not happy when she found her muddy bedspread in the barn the next morning! JULIETTE LOW was very adventurous as well. She was willing to try almost anything, lots more than most YOUNG GIRLS all over the WORLD would try. One time her cousin suggested they braid some sticky taffy candy in with DAISYS hair to see how it would look. DAISY thought this was a fun idea, too. Unfortunately, DAISYS mother had to cut her hair very short because she couldnt get all of the candy out of her hair. JULIETTE LOW loved to travel around the WORLD and started to travel by reading travel GUIDES and by going to boarding school in Virginia when she was 13. Later, DAISYS WORLD travels took her to Europe for the rst time when she was 22. DAISY married when she was 26 and then began to travel throughout the WORLD even more, especially near her BIRTHDAY. In her travels around the WORLD, JULIETTE LOW met Sir Robert Baden-Powell, who had started an organization called the Boy SCOUTS in England. His sister had started the Girl GUIDES in England because many YOUNG GIRLS in that part of the WORLD wanted to belong to a club like the Boy SCOUTS. DAISY liked the idea and started a troop of Girl GUIDES in Scotland, of all places in the WORLD. Soon after that, JULIETTE LOW returned to her home in Georgia and started the very rst Girl SCOUT troop on March 12, 1912, which we now call the Girl SCOUT BIRTHDAY. The YOUNG GIRLS went on hikes, formed basketball teams and learned how to camp. These are some of the same things you might wish to do with your Girl SCOUT troop, just like other YOUNG GIRLS all over the WORLD. So, YOUNG GIRLS, arent you glad that JULIETTE LOW, who we call DAISY, started Girl SCOUTS so that we could celebrate her BIRTHDAY even in our part of the WORLD, and have fun being together, just like other Girl SCOUTS and all over the WORLD! Happy BIRTHDAY, JULIETTE LOW!

Juliette Action Story


As the story is read, players do the action described as the following words are read. Practice the motions rst so everyone understands.

JULIETTE LOW BADEN-POWELL GEORGIA DAISY SCOUT or SCOUTING WORLD

Curtsey and say Be my friend. Bow and say How do you do. Say Hey, yall Sing Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer do. Smile and give salute Stand up, spin around once, and sit down

On October 30, 1860, a little girl named JULIETTE LOW was born in Savannah, GEORGIA. She was a very curious child, and loved animals. When she was a baby, her uncle gave her the nickname DAISY. He looked at her one day and said I bet shes going to be a DAISY! He thought she was some baby! Ever since then people called her DAISY. As a young girl, DAISY did many things. She liked to climb trees, play with her brothers, sisters and cousins, take care of animals, start and run clubs, write stories, draw pictures, tell jokes, write and be in plays, explore places, and do many other things. Later on, DAISY grew up and married a man named William Low. They went to live in England and Scotland, countries on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean. In 1912, JULIETTE LOW became interested in SCOUTING while visiting her friends, Lord and Lady BADEN-POWELL, who lived in England and who started Boy SCOUTING and Girl SCOUTING in their part of the WORLD. After leading a few troops of Girl Guides in Scotland with her friend Lady BADEN-POWELL, she came back to the United States and started Girl SCOUTS. When JULIETTE LOW came back to America, she decided to start the rst Girl SCOUT troop in her own home town of Savannah, GEORGIA. This she did on March 12th, 1912, and this rst little troop of eight girls was the rst Girl SCOUT troop in this part of the WORLD. This rst Girl SCOUT troop was so successful that JULIETTE LOW wanted to see SCOUT troops all over the world because she knew that SCOUTING would help girls all over the world to become friends and to help build WORLD peace and good will. Girl SCOUTING grew and grew until now you are not only a member of your own little troop but also a member of the Girl SCOUTS of America and the WORLD Association of Girl Guides and Girl SCOUTS (WAGGGS).

The Story of Juliette Low


Divide into eight groups; these will be Little Girls, Juliette Low, Georgia, Horses, London, Lord Baden-Powell, Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts. Sound effects: LITTLE GIRLS Stand and giggle JULIETTE LOW Curtsy and say Be my friend GEORGIA Say Hey, you all! HORSES Say Neiighhh LORD BADEN-POWELL Bow formally and say How dya do LONDON Sing London Bridges Falling Down BOY SCOUTS Make the Scout sign and say Be Prepared GIRL SCOUTS Sing one line of Girl Scouts Together

Once upon a time there was a LITTLE GIRL named JULIETTE LOW who lived in GEORGIA and loved to ride HORSES. After she grew up she went to LONDON where she met LORD BADENPOWELL who founded the BOY SCOUTS. She was fascinated by the work he was doing. She studied with him a while and decided to found a troop of GIRL SCOUTS for her little friends who liked to ride HORSES in GEORGIA. So JULIETTE LOW said goodbye to the BOY SCOUTS in LONDON and came home with the idea that LORD BADEN-POWELL gave her. She formed a group of LITTLE GIRLS, who liked to ride HORSES and be together, into a troop of GIRL SCOUTS. And they loved it so much that the idea spread and now there are troops all over the world. Arent we glad that a (speed up here) LITTLE GIRL named JULIETTE LOW from GEORGIA who liked HORSES went to LONDON and met LORD BADEN-POWELL, founder of the BOY SCOUTS, and came home to start the wonderful world of GIRL SCOUTS.

Juliette Low and Girl Scouting Action Story


Girl Scout Resource Center GSSWPA As the story is read, players do the following actions on the following words. Practice the motions rst so everyone understands. JULIETTE LOW Say the Girl Scout slogan Do a Good Turn Daily. SCOUT OR SCOUTING Give salute and say Be Prepared. WORLD Stand up, spin around once, and sit down.

Girl SCOUTING in the United States was founded by a most remarkable woman named JULIETTE LOW. JULIETTE LOW was born into the wealthy Gordon family of Savannah, Georgia, on Halloween October 31, 1860. JULIETTE LOW was known to her family and friends as Daisy. JULIETTE LOW married and moved to England. After the death of her rst husband, she met Lord Baden-Powell, an English general and war hero who had founded the Boy SCOUT movement only three years earlier. The Boy SCOUT movement caught on rapidly and girls wanted a similar organization. Lord Baden-Powell asked his sister, Agnes, to give them an organization of their own. So Agnes officially established an association of Girl Guides in 1910. The Girl Guides or SCOUTS quickly spread to many other countries. The new movement was just the sort of thing that appealed to JULIETTE LOW, and she wanted to bring it to America. She thought Girl SCOUTING was so wonderful that she decided to start the rst Girl SCOUT troop in her own home town of Savannah, Georgia. This she did on March 12, 1912, and this rst troop of girls was the rst Girl SCOUT troop in this part of the WORLD. JULIETTE LOW believed that girls could and should plan their own program, make their own decisions, run their own troop. She saw their adult leaders as helpers and advisers, never as directors. JULIETTE LOW died on January 27, 1927. A few months later the JULIETTE LOW WORLD Friendship Fund was started to honor her and her vision of the worldwide friendship. Every year, Girl SCOUTS throughout the United States give money to this fund usually on her birthday, October 31, or on Thinking Day, February 22. Part of the money is used to send Girl SCOUTS to countries in other parts of the WORLD and to bring Girl Guides and Girl SCOUTS from other countries to the United States. Part of the money also goes to the Thinking Day Fund set by the WORLD Association of the Girl Guides and Girl SCOUTS. JULIETTE LOW is remembered as a woman who worked for peace and goodwill. Her dream was to have young people make the WORLD a friendly, peaceful place. JULIETTE LOW never had any children of her own, but her adopted family of Girl SCOUTS numbered 167,925 at the time of her death.

Juliette Low World Friendship Fund Action Story


As the story is read, all girls should perform the following actions at the appropriate times. On the word WORLD, stand up and spin around once. On the words JULIETTE LOW, join hands with persons on right and left. On the words GIRL SCOUT, GIRL SCOUTING, or GIRL GUIDING, give a big smile and clap. (Practice motions rst so everyone understands what to do.) The Story Once upon a time there was a lady whose name was JULIETTE LOW. She became interested in GIRL SCOUTING through her friends Lord and Lady Baden-Powell when she visited them in England. They started Boy Scouting and GIRL GUIDING there. JULIETTE LOW thought GIRL SCOUTING was a wonderful idea. When she returned to America, she decided to start a GIRL SCOUT troop. So, on March 12, 1912, in her home town, Savannah, Georgia, JULIETTE LOW started the rst GIRL SCOUT troop in this part of the WORLD. After that she traveled all over our country, helping to start more GIRL SCOUT troops. JULIETTE LOW believed GIRL SCOUTING was such a ne thing that she wanted to see GIRL SCOUT troops all over the WORLD. She knew that GIRL SCOUTING would help toward WORLD peace and goodwill. After JULIETTE LOW died in 1927, her friends decided that the greatest tribute that could be paid to such a charming lady would be to continue working toward the realization of her dream of WORLD friendship. A memorial fund was started. It is called the JULIETTE LOW WORLD Friendship Fund. Each year, all GIRL SCOUTS in the United States are given the opportunity to bring money for this fund, which helps GIRL SCOUTING all over the WORLD. When you GIRL SCOUTS drop money into your JULIETTE LOW WORLD Friendship Fund box, you can imagine the far places of the WORLD to which this money will travel and the ways it will help GIRL SCOUTS. Maybe your money will help buy a GIRL SCOUT uniform for a girl in Belgium who cant afford one. Maybe your money will help send some older GIRL SCOUTS from our country to Our Chalet, an international camp in Switzerland, where GIRL SCOUTS from all over the WORLD get together to learn more about each other. Or maybe you will be helping, with your money, to start new GIRL SCOUT troops in other countries. No one knows to what parts of the WORLD this money may travel. No one knows the way in which it will one day come back to us in new friends. But we all know that as we give our money to the JULIETTE LOW WORLD Friendship Fund, we are helping to spread GIRL SCOUTING around the WORLD. Reprinted by permission of GSUSA. Ceremonies in Girl Scouting 1990 by Girl Scouts of the USA. All rights reserved.

How Juliette Low Started Girl Scouts


CHARACTERS: Juliette Gordon Low (Daisy) Elinor Gordon, her sister Mrs. Gordon Mr. Gordon Lord Robert Baden-Powell Narrator Janet Cindy Cathy Katie

(Scene 1) Juliette Lows Living Room; Mrs. Low and Lord Robert Baden-Powell chatting as Mrs. Low works on clay gure. NARRATOR: The scene is a castle in Scotland, the time, several years after the death of Juliette Lows husband. When Mrs. Lows husband died, she felt that everything was over for her. She tried to do the things that she and her husband had done, but she didnt enjoy the riding, the hunting or the parties. Her friends told her she needed a new interest. One weekend one of her guests was Lord Robert Baden-Powell. At this moment they are in Mrs. Lows living room. Lord Baden-Powell is admiring the gure Mrs. Low is sculpting. Oh, its good enough. But my heart isnt in it. How I wish there was something new to do!

JULIETTE:

LORD POWELL: New things are not always easy and pleasant. Ive discovered that in my work to establish the Boy Scouts in England. JULIETTE: Oh, Ive heard about the program, Robert. People are calling it a great game for boys. Tell me about it.

LORD POWELL: You are really interested? JULIETTE: Very much. I love young people and this sounds like such a splendid thing for boys. Lord Baden-Powell told Juliette how the idea had come to him when he was in the army stationed in South Africa. The new soldiers he had to train knew little about nature or outdoor living, and could not stand the hard life. He described the games and activities he used to teach the boys how to be self-reliant and resourceful. He explained how his program would build character, promote friendship and an understanding love for the outdoors. Juliette is obviously very interested. Suddenly she interrupts Lord Baden-Powell. Robert, why should a program of this kind be limited to boys? Girls could benet from the same program. I would like to begin such a program for Scottish lassies here!

NARRATOR:

JULIETTE:

LORD POWELL: Funny, my sister Agnes felt the same way. She has already organized the sisters of the boys in our troop. They call themselves Girl Guides. JULIETTE: Thats splendid! I could start a troop here in Glen Lyon. Robert, I could even take Scouting across the ocean to America. I know eight or nine little girls in Savannah who would adore it.

(Scene 2 ) The Gordon Living Room. Mr. and Mrs. Gordon and Elinor, Juliettes parents and sister, reading letter. NARRATOR: Our scene changes to Savannah, Georgia, Juliettes hometown. When Juliette announced her plan to her family, they wondered if she would be successful in carrying it out. But Daisy is so impractical. She isnt really impractical. She just does things differently than most people. Wont her deafness be a handicap in such a project? I dont think Daisys deafness has been a handicap to her when she has wanted to complete a specic task. Anyway, she will never hear the word no even when it is shouted very loudly. Daisys always been willing to give a great deal of herself to make young people happy. I think it is a splendid idea for her to start this work with girls. We mustnt discourage her.

ELINOR: MRS. GORDON: ELINOR: MRS. GORDON:

MR. GORDON:

(Scene 3) Juliette with a group of girls at tea. NARRATOR: On reaching Savannah, Juliette wasted no time getting her plans underway. First she phoned several of her friends, told them what she wanted to do and asked for their assistance and support. A few days later she invited the girls from a nearby school to tea. She showed them pictures of the English Girl Guides and told them about the organization as she had seen it working. The Savannah girls were enthusiastic and eager to form a troop. So many girls asked to join Juliette Lows Girl Guides that two troops were formed on that afternoon of March 12th, 1912. Soon there were 6 active troops in Savannah. That fall it became necessary for Juliette Low to return to England. While she was gone, the Savannah troops worked hard.

(Scene 4) A Girl Scout meeting. JANET: KATIE: CINDY: Do you suppose this is the right blue for our uniforms? No, I think this is closer to the blue in this picture. I really like this color best, and I think the material would make a better looking uniform. All right, lets get material and try to make a uniform just like the one in the

CATHY: picture. NARRATOR:

So with the help of the picture given them by Juliette Low, uniforms were made. They also used the English Girl Guide handbook to plan their meetings. We can start our meeting by saying our Promise and the Girl Guide Laws. We can plan to go on hikes, as the English girls do, and Id like to keep a notebook of the birds we see on our hikes.

KATIE: CINDY:

JANET:

Maybe we can meet with some of the other troops once in a while. This handbook has some games that would be good for us to try with other troops in Savannah. The girls had a great deal to report when Juliette Low returned. She attended their meetings and with great interest she watched the activities of her rst troops of Girl Guides. She saw that they had their rst experience at camping out ve days of sleeping under the stars, cooking over open res, ghting mosquitoes and avoiding poison ivy. In 1913, Juliette Low changed the name to Girl Scouts. Soon girls from other parts of America heard of the Girl Guides and asked Mrs. Low for information to start troops. Other people who had learned about Scouting in England brought Girl Scouting to their neighborhoods. A national Headquarters was set up in Washington, D.C. and the name, Girl Scouts of the United States of America, was adopted. So Juliette Lows dream of bringing Girl Scouting to the United States came true.

NARRATOR:

To Juliette Low
Adapted from the poem by Birdsall Otis Edey More than a score of years ago, a torch was lit. A beacon whose glow shone for the joy of youth, And you, sensing its brilliancy, beneath your roof Kindled a kindred ame, that girlhood in your land Should live within its light and with your hand You tended it and kept its whiteness pure; Prayed that its bright promise might endure And waked yourself uprightly in its gleam. And we who have had faith in this your dream And come to give account of our brief stewardship. Millions of girls share your ideals today, Millions of women walk with them your lighted way. With lives enriched and broadened from its treasury And glad hearts consecrated to your memory.

Recompense
To Juliette Low Hers was a golden vision; for looking down the years She understood the questions and needs that would arise In the lives of little girls and big girls growing to womanhood, And clothed her understanding in adventurous disguise, Taking as recompense the laughter in their eyes.

Girl Scouts Founders Day, October 31


In 1924, Juliette Low sent a message to her Girl Scouts. It is appropriate today as it was then. Dear Girl Scouts, I am thinking of you today, and in spirit I am with you especially on Halloween, which is my birthday. I shall be joining in your games for Girl Scouting is a game, too. I hope that during the coming year, we shall all remember the rules of this Girl Scouting game of ours. They are to play fair, to play in your place, to play for your side and not for yourself, and as for the score, the best thing in a game is fun and not the result. Girl Scouts, I salute you. Your friend and founder, Juliette Low