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English 11

EN 312 and EN 322


2 Semesters
Syllabus for Teachers, Administrators, and Parents

Instructor: (JoeAnne Peterson)


Email: petersonj@grps.k12.mi.us Phone #:819-3926
Conference Period: Sixth Block Room #:01

Course Description
What does the future hold for you? Who controls your destiny? Will your
destiny will be determined by the practical, realistic expectations and goals you set?
Through American literature, we will examine decisions we are making now that
will affect the rest of our lives. We will explore themes of non-conformity, self-
reliance, and opportunity. The English language arts are the vehicles of communication
by which we live, work, share and build ideas and understandings of the present,
reflect on the past, and imagine the future. Through the English language arts, we
learn to appreciate, integrate and apply what is learned for real purposes in our
homes, schools, communities, and workplaces. The ultimate goal for all English language
arts learners is personal, social, occupational and civic literacy. Literacy combines the
skills of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and viewing. It goes beyond the ability to
read and write at basic levels. Literate individuals understand the different functions
of language arts for personal, social, political and cultural purposes.

Objectives
• All students will examine decisions and the resulting consequences through examination of
themes and concepts.
• All students will examine pivotal moments in life and literature, anticipating outcomes and
processing what to do differently when a similar experience presents itself again.
• All students will explore the idea of the American Dream and the realities of modern America.
• All students will study the cultural values expressed in past literature and their connections to
present and future opportunities.
• All students will practice the writing process as it relates to the above objectives.

All students will communicate this understanding through media, reading, writing, self
reflection, discussion and presentation in school, the home, community and workplace.
Students will explore ways in which to connect knowledge from all curriculum areas to
enhance their understanding of their place in the world.

*The English 11 course is in alignment with the course content expectations as defined by
the Michigan Department of Education. See www.michigan.gov/mde for details.

Materials/Resources
Textbook: Elements of Literature 5th Course, includes The Crucible
*The Scarlet Letter , and other pieces of literature in 11th grade English.

1
Novels for Eleventh Grade
Scarlet Letter Poe
The Crucible The Red Badge of
Courage
No Exit TBA
--Teachers must get approval from English Dept. Chair to use a
different novel.
--Teachers may not use novels from another grade.

English 11 will include non-fiction. The instructor will identify


vocabulary words for each unit.
Grammar instruction will be integrated. High School English
Language Arts Companion Document: Power of Language Module Part 1:
ACT English (Grammar and Rhetoric) www.michigan.gov/mde
Free On-line Resources for Teaching & Practicing Grammar:
http://www.grammarbook.com
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/interact/esladjadvEX1.html
http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar

Unit Literature Topic Writing Pacing


1 Early American lit. A Dream is Born Persuasive & 2 weeks
Early American Personal Narrative
speeches and essays
2 The Crucible Questioning Persuasive &/or 5 weeks
The Scarlet Letter Authority Compare/Contrast
3 American Finding My Voice Persuasive Writing 4 weeks
Romanticism & Imagining Dreams & & Speaking
Transcendentalism Possibilities Poetic Analysis
4 Short stories or novel Loss & Redemption Poetry 2-3 week
5 Short stories or novel Chasing Dreams Novels & 2 weeks
Presentations
6 Short stories or novel Dreams Deferred Presentations 3 weeks
7 The Great Gatsby Delusions Essay Test Response 3 weeks
(How to)
8 MME/ACT Prep. & Perseverance Persuasive & Cross- 3 weeks
Text Writing
9 The Great Gatsby Chasing Dreams Essay Test Response 3 weeks
(How to)
10 Short stories or novel The Grand Presentations 4 weeks
Illusion/Existentialism
in the modern world
School’s Attendance Policy: Once a student has accumulated ten (10)
absences per semester for any reason he/she must: 1. Earn a passing
grade and 2. Pass the final exam and/or project at the end of the
semester. If either (1) or (2) is not accomplished, the student will receive
a failing grade for the semester.

Grading Procedure and Scale: *40-40-20


40% tests & major writing assignments; 40% presentations, projects, &
drafts; 20% homework, quizzes, & participation *A student’s grade should
be primarily based upon him/her demonstrating competency of standards
per the Michigan Merit Curriculum guidelines. All students must
demonstrate competency on a research paper assessed with district rubrics
in the designated marking period. An incomplete will be given until the
research paper is completed.

2
100-93% A 92-90% A- 89-87% B+ 86-83% B
82-80% B- 79-77% C+
76-73% C 72-70% C- 69-67% D+ 66-63% D 62-
60% D- 59-0 E

3
Classroom Rules and Procedures: See instructor’s attached information

4
5
English 11
EN 312 and EN 322
2 Semesters

6
Syllabus for Teachers, Administrators, and Parents

Instructor: (Insert your name & information here.)


Email: Phone #:
Conference Period: Room #:

Course Description
What does the future hold for you? Who controls your destiny? What are you
doing today to secure your dream? Your destiny will be determined by the practical,
realistic expectations and goals you set.
Through American literature, we will examine decisions we are making now that
will affect the rest of our lives. We will explore themes of non-conformity, self-
reliance, and opportunity. The English language arts are the vehicles of communication
by which we live, work, share and build ideas and understandings of the present,
reflect on the past, and imagine the future. Through the English language arts, we
learn to appreciate, integrate and apply what is learned for real purposes in our
homes, schools, communities, and workplaces. The ultimate goal for all English language
arts learners is personal, social, occupational and civic literacy. Literacy combines the
skills of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and viewing. It goes beyond the ability to
read and write at basic levels. Literate individuals understand the different functions
of language arts for personal, social, political and cultural purposes.

Objectives
• All students will examine decisions and the resulting consequences through examination of
themes and concepts.
• All students will examine pivotal moments in life and literature, anticipating outcomes and
processing what to do differently when a similar experience presents itself again.
• All students will explore the idea of the American Dream and the realities of modern America.
• All students will study the cultural values expressed in past literature and their connections to
present and future opportunities.
• All students will practice the writing process as it relates to the above objectives.

All students will communicate this understanding through media, reading, writing, self
reflection, discussion and presentation in school, the home, community and workplace.
Students will explore ways in which to connect knowledge from all curriculum areas to
enhance their understanding of their place in the world.

*The English 11 course is in alignment with the course content expectations as defined by
the Michigan Department of Education. See www.michigan.gov/mde for details.

Materials/Resources
Textbook: Elements of Literature 5th Course, includes The Crucible
*The Crucible, Their Eyes Were Watching God, and The Great Gatsby are required pieces of literature
in 11th grade English.
Novels for Eleventh Grade
Scarlet Letter
The Joy Luck Club
Their Eyes Were Watching God
The Bone Setter’s Daughter
I know Why the Caged Bird Sings
The Awakening
7
The Great Gatsby
Death of a Salesman Rocket
Boys Night
Mississippi Trial, 1955
Fallen Angels

--Two novels are required.


--Teachers must get approval from English Dept. Chair to use a
different novel.
--Teachers may not use novels from another grade.

English 11 will include non-fiction. The instructor will identify


vocabulary words for each unit.
Grammar instruction will be integrated. High School English
Language Arts Companion Document: Power of Language Module Part 1:
ACT English (Grammar and Rhetoric) www.michigan.gov/mde
Free On-line Resources for Teaching & Practicing Grammar:
http://www.grammarbook.com
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/interact/esladjadvEX1.html
http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar

Unit Literature Topic Writing Pacing


1 Early American lit. A Dream is Born Persuasive & 4 weeks
Personal Narrative
2 The Crucible Questioning Persuasive &/or 3 weeks
Authority Compare/Contrast
3 Early American Finding My Voice Persuasive Writing 2 weeks
speeches and essays & Speaking
4 American Imagining Dreams & Persuasive 6 weeks
Romanticism & Possibilities Compare/Contrast
Transcendentalism Poetic Analysis
5 Short stories & Finding Courage Cross-Text Writing 3 weeks
poetry
6 Short stories or novel Loss & Redemption Poetry 2-3 weeks
7 The Great Gatsby Chasing Dreams Essay Test Response 3 weeks
(How to)
8 MME/ACT Prep. & Perseverance Persuasive & Cross- 3 weeks
Their Eyes Were Text Writing
Watching God
9 Short stories The Dream & The Research Paper & 5 weeks
Reality Presentations
10 Poetry Poetry Speaks Poetry & 4 weeks
Presentations
School’s Attendance Policy: Once a student has accumulated ten (10)
absences per semester for any reason he/she must: 1. Earn a passing
grade and 2. Pass the final exam and/or project at the end of the
semester. If either (1) or (2) is not accomplished, the student will receive
a failing grade for the semester.

Grading Procedure and Scale: *40-40-20


40% tests & major writing assignments; 40% presentations, projects, &
drafts; 20% homework, quizzes, & participation *A student’s grade should
be primarily based upon him/her demonstrating competency of standards
per the Michigan Merit Curriculum guidelines. All students must
demonstrate competency on a research paper assessed with district rubrics

8
in the designated marking period. An incomplete will be given until the
research paper is completed.
100-93% A 92-90% A- 89-87% B+ 86-83% B
82-80% B- 79-77% C+
76-73% C 72-70% C- 69-67% D+ 66-63% D 62-
60% D- 59-0 E

Classroom Rules and Procedures: See instructor’s


attached information

Unit 1 - Natives & Newcomers


The Dream is Born
1st 9 weeks (4 weeks)
Essential Questions
• Have I identified my origins?
• Does who I am determine who I will be?
• How will I know when to risk failure for possible success?
• How do I build a context for change in my life?

Literature
Creation myths, trickster tales, Native American literature

Examples from which to choose:


Sky Tree, The Sun Still Rises in the Same Sky, Deer
Woman, in Voices of Literature,
The Legend of Sleeping Bear and The Legend of Mackinac
(Amazon.com & local bookstores)

Required:
Of Plymouth Plantation
The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equinao
The History of the Dividing Line
Upon the Burning of Our House
Sinners in the Hands of An Angry God

Literary Elements & Devices/Academic


Vocabulary
• Archetypes • Audience
• Figures of speech • Persuasion
• Allusions • Metaphor and
• Connotations similes
• Inferences

Literacy Strategies—See Literacy Tool Kit


Set a purpose for reading Determine genre Graphic
organizers
Note taking strategies Ex: Double Entry and Cornell
Vocabulary strategies Ex: IT FITS and Frayer Model

9
• The Writing Process: Prewriting, Drafting, Revising
Content, Editing Details, Final Drafting, & Publishing
• 6 + 1 Traits of Writing: Ideas, Organization, Word
Choice, Sentence Fluency, Voice, & Conventions
(Presentation is the 7th trait in 6 + 1 Writing
Traits.)

Writing Process: Prewriting & Drafting Traits: Ideas

& Organization

Grammar Review: Review the 8 parts of speech,


subject, predicate, complement
Examples: Diagram sentences (in moderation); use student work
to practice editing a common grammatical error

Unit 1 Learning Outcomes / Standards & Expectations


*Identify learning targets within each content expectation in this unit. Example: 1.3.4

1.1 Understand and practice writing as a recursive process.


1.2 Use writing, speaking, and visual expression for personal understanding and
growth.

1.3 Communicate in speech, writing, and multimedia using content, form, voice,
and style appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g., to reflect,
persuade, inform, analyze, entertain, inspire).
*1.3.4 Develop an argument by analyzing different perspectives and employing a
structure that effectively conveys the ideas in writing (e.g., resolve
inconsistencies in logic; use a range of strategies to persuade, clarify, and
defend a position with precise and relevant evidence; anticipate and
address concerns and counterclaims; provide a clear and effective
conclusion.

2.1 Develop critical reading, listening, and viewing strategies.


2.2 Use a variety of reading, listening, and viewing strategies to construct meaning
beyond the literal level (e.g. drawing inferences; confirming and correcting;
making comparisons, connections, and generalizations; and drawing conclusions).
2.3 Develop as a reader, listener, and viewer for personal, social, and political
purposes, through independent and collaborative reading.
3.2 Read and respond to classic and contemporary fiction, literary nonfiction and
expository text from a variety of literary genres representing many time
periods and authors.
3.3 Use knowledge of literary history, traditions, and theory to respond to and
analyze the meaning of text.

10
Required Common Assessments and/or
Products
 Personal Narrative: Important person, place, or
event in our lives
 1st Writing Prompt: Instructional prompt used to
model, teach, and practice persuasive writing in a
timed setting
 Establish a writing portfolio for grade 11 (Traits of
Publishing & Presentation)

Additional assessments may include but are not


limited to the following:
• Address an essential question with textual support
from this unit
• Creative Writing--Write a creation story Example:
Why we have lightening
• Debate--Example: Native Americans vs. Puritans
(using biblical context to support actions—just or
unjust?)
• Brochures--Example: John Smith used propaganda
in his piece/Create a brochure about Grand Rapids or
design a brochure convincing people to leave England
and come to New England.

Connections through Literature and Multimedia


A& E biography, Cinque to connect with Equiano Clip
from Amazing Grace
Clip from Amistad (choose appropriately)
Multicultural myths & legends

Unit 2 – Questioning Authority


1st 9 weeks (3 weeks)
Essential Questions
• Where will I find wisdom?
• When is loyalty to myself more important than loyalty to a friend?
• How do I demonstrate that I am open-minded enough to learn from my
experiences?
• How can people use their power to make a difference in their lives and the
lives of others?

Literature
The Crucible (Required)

Literary Elements & Devices/Academic


Vocabulary
11
• Elements of • Paradox
drama: dialogue, • Allegory
stage directions, • Irony (dramatic,
rising action, situational, verbal)
climax, falling • Conceit (extended
action,
metaphor)
resolution/denouem
• Propaganda
ent, & theme
• Characterization
• Allusion

Literacy Strategies-See Literacy Tool Kit


Foldable graphic organizers
Venn diagram to compare & contrast 1690’s and 1950’s
RAFT
Two-column notes: to organize new information, connect
with it, & remember it
Make text to text, text to self, and text to world
connections

Writing Process: Drafting & Revising Content Traits:


Voice & Word Choice

Grammar Review: Continue review of 8 parts of speech


and punctuation
Include: commas, semi colons, colons, and using transitional
expressions

*Refer to MDE High School English Language Arts Grammar and


Rhetoric Companion Document for resources to use in the classroom
and to identify examples commonly found on the ACT.
www.michigan.gov/mde Curriculum and Instruction/HSCE/ ELA

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Unit 2 Learning Outcomes / Standards & Expectations
*Identify learning targets within each content expectation in this unit. Ex: 3.1.2

1.1 Understand and practice writing as a recursive process.


2.1 Develop critical reading, listening, and viewing strategies.
2.2 Use a variety of reading, listening, and viewing strategies to construct
meaning beyond the literal level (e.g. drawing inferences; confirming and
correcting; making comparisons, connections, and generalizations; and
drawing conclusions).
2.3 Develop as a reader, listener, and viewer for personal, social, and political
purposes, through independent and collaborative reading.
3.1 Develop the skills of close and contextual literary reading.
*3.1.2 Demonstrate an understanding of literary characterization, character
development, the function of major and minor characters, motives and
causes for action, and moral dilemmas that characters encounter by describing
their function in specific works.
3.2 Read and respond to classic and contemporary fiction, literary nonfiction,
and expository text, from a variety of literary genres representing many
time periods and authors (e.g., myth, epic, folklore, drama, poetry,
autobiography, novels, short stories, philosophical pieces, science fiction,
fantasy, young adult literature, creative non-fiction, hypertext fiction.)
4.1 Understand and use the English language effectively in a variety of
contexts and settings.
4.2 Understand how language variety reflects and shapes experience.

Required Common Assessments and/or


Products
 Address an essential question with textual support
from this unit and/or use the persuasive prompt
below.

Additional assessments may include but are not


limited to the following:
• Unit Test on The Crucible
• Persuasive Prompt Example: Support or oppose John
Proctor’s refusal to give a false confession.
• Compare/Contrast Essay
• Write Act V of The Crucible

Connections through Literature and Multimedia


Movie The Crucible Poem Half-Hanged Mary
Witch Hunt by Marc The Dying Girl that No
Aronson One Helped essay by
Movie Guilty by Suspicion Louden Wainright
Movie Pay It Forward
Media Power of One
www.caringstrangers.com/powerofone.htm
The Mother Tongue essay by Amy Tan
A& E Biography on Arthur Miller

13
Goodnight and Good Luck movie clip

Unit 3 – Finding My Voice


1st 9 weeks (2 weeks) American Revolution

Essential Questions
What does it mean to be American?
Do I trust America?
How have the values of democracy changed over time, and what do they mean to
me?
How do the heroes of literature reflect the time?
How do I defend my beliefs and values?

Audio versions of The Crucible are available at


www.amazon.com

Required Literature
Patrick Henry’s Speech to the Virginia Convention
Letter from Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther King (Connect
in this unit or unit 4)
Thomas Paine The Crisis
Thomas Jefferson The Declaration of Independence
Iroquois Constitution

Sample of Options in Addition to Required


Selections:
Phyllis Wheatley, The Mayflower Compact, Ben
Franklin/aphorisms

Literary Elements & Devices/Academic


Vocabulary
• Similes and • Anecdote
metaphors • Analogy
• Allusions • Symbolism
• Rhetorical • Parallelism
questions • Word roots
• Persuasive • What is a written
strategies: argument?
emotional and
logical appeals

Literacy Strategies-See Literacy Tool Kit


Save the Last Word Persuasive speech graphic
Gist organizer
Frayer Model Somebody wanted-but-so
Compare/contrast graphic
organizer
Think-Alouds

14
• Timed reading to determine time commitment for
each text
• Maintain writing portfolio (Traits of Publishing &
Presentation)
• Reflect on a piece of writing in portfolio that
represents effort and growth
• Monitor growth using literacy indicators: language
fluency, reading complexity, modes of discourse

Writing Process: Revising Content & Editing Traits:


Word Choice & Sentence Fluency

Grammar Review: Continue punctuation including


apostrophe, dash, and parentheses, gerunds and gerund
phrases, infinitives, verbal and verbal phrases, coordinating
conjunctions

15
Unit 3 Learning Outcomes / Standards & Expectations
*Identify learning targets within each content expectation in this unit. Examples are provided.

1.1 Understand and practice writing as a recursive process.

*1.1.3 Select and use language that is appropriate for the purpose, audience, and
context.
*1.1.4 Compose drafts that convey an impression, express an opinion, raise a question,
argue a position, explore a topic, tell a story, or serve another purpose.
*1.1.6 Reorganize sentence elements as needed and choose grammatical and stylistic
options that provide sentence variety, fluency, and flow.
*1.1.7 Edit for style, tone, and word choice (specificity, variety, accuracy,
appropriateness, conciseness) and for conventions of grammar, usage and
mechanics that are appropriate for audience.
*1.1.8 Proofread to check spelling, layout, and font; and prepare selected pieces for a
public audience.
1.3 Communicate in speech, writing, and multimedia using content, form, voice, and
style appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g., to reflect, persuade,
inform, analyze, entertain, inspire).
*1.3.1 Compose written, spoken, and/or multimedia compositions in a range of genres
(e.g., personal narrative, biography, poem, fiction, drama, creative nonfiction,
summary, literary analysis essay, research report, or work-related text):
pieces that serve a variety of purposes (e.g., expressive, informative,
creative, and persuasive) and that use a variety of organizational patterns
(e.g., autobiography, free verse, dialogue, comparison/contrast, definition, or
cause and effect).

*1.3.2 Compose written and spoken essays or work-related text that demonstrate
logical thinking and the development of ideas for academic, creative, and
personal purposes: essays that convey the author’s message by using an
engaging introduction (with a clear thesis as appropriate), well-constructed
paragraphs, transition sentences, and a powerful conclusion.

*1.3.4 Develop and extend a thesis, argument, or exploration of a topic by analyzing


differing perspectives and employing a structure that effectively conveys the
ideas in writing (e.g. resolve inconsistencies in logic; use a range of strategies
to persuade, clarify, and defend a position with precise and relevant evidence;
anticipate and address concerns and counterclaims; provide a clear and
effective conclusion).

*1.3.8 Evaluate own and others’ effectiveness in group discussions and formal
presentations (e.g., considering accuracy, relevance, clarity, and delivery;
types of arguments used; and relationships among purpose, audience, and
content).

16
Unit 3 Learning Outcomes / Standards & Expectations Continued
1.4 Develop and use the tools and practices of inquiry and research—generating,
exploring, and refining important questions; creating a hypothesis or thesis;
gathering and studying evidence; drawing conclusions; and composing a report.
*1.4.3 Develop and refine a position, claim, thesis, or hypothesis that will be explored
and supported by analyzing different perspectives, resolving inconsistencies,
and writing about those differences in a structure appropriate for the audience
(e.g., argumentative essay that avoids inconsistencies in logic and develops a
single thesis; exploratory essay that explains differences and similarities and
raises additional questions).
*1.4.4 Interpret, synthesize, and evaluate information/findings in various print sources
and media (e.g., fact and opinion, comprehensiveness of the evidence, bias,
varied perspectives, motives and credibility of the author, date of publication)
to draw conclusions and implications.

2.1 Develop critical reading, listening, and viewing strategies.

*2.1.10Listen to and view speeches, presentations, and multimedia works to identify


and respond thoughtfully to key ideas, significant details, logical organization,
fact and opinion, and propaganda.

2.2 Use a variety of reading, listening, and viewing strategies to construct meaning
beyond the literal level (e.g., drawing inferences; confirming and correcting;
making comparisons, connections, and generalizations; and drawing conclusions).

*2.2.1 Recognize literary and persuasive strategies as ways by which authors convey
ideas and readers make meaning (e.g., imagery, irony, satire, parody,
propaganda, overstatement/understatement, omission, and multiple points of
view).

Assessments may include but are not limited to


the following:
• Persuasive speech using persuasive devices such as a
rhetorical question, emotional, and logical appeals A
speech is required during at least one unit.
• Political pamphlet/presentation based on candidates
running for office

Connections through Literature and Multimedia


Barack Obama’s speech at the Democratic Convention (2004)
available on youtube,
or his book, The Audacity of Hope
Sojourner Truth, “Ain’t I a Woman”
Clip from Amazing Grace (if not used previously)
Political advertisements
Abolitionist newspapers and pamphlets
Core democratic values
www.libraryofcongress.gov
www.pbs.org
17
Unit 4 – Imagining Dreams & Possibilities
2nd 9 weeks (6 weeks)
American Romantics, Transcendentalists, & Poets

Essential Questions
What are Romanticism and Transcendentalism?
Do I use my imagination to create ideas, solve problems, and express myself?
What is my connection to the world?
Am I self-reliant?
Is my personal journey consistent with or different from the American Dream?
When is taking social action appropriate?

Literature
*Expose students to pieces by the following authors:
Longfellow and Bryant Hawthorne
Poe Whitman
Irving Dickinson
Emerson and Thoreau
Letter from Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther King (Connect
here if not used in unit 3)

Literary Elements & Devices/Academic


Vocabulary
• Allusion
• Similes and metaphors
• Symbolism
• Poetic Elements: meter, foot, iamb, tone, image,
alliteration, onomatopoeia, rhyme scheme,
personification, irony, etc.

Literacy Strategies—See Literacy Tool Kit


Identify purpose for reading Identify genre
Fluency for reading aloud prose vs. poetry
Text to Self, Text to World, and Text to Text Connections
Use anchor papers and rubrics to evaluate own and others’
writing
• Maintain writing portfolio (Traits of Publishing &
Presentation)

Writing Process: Revising Content & Editing


Traits: Word Choice, Voice, & Sentence Fluency

Grammar Review: Different types of paragraphs,


sentence structure, pronouns, prepositions, common usage,
problems, appositives and appositive phrases, parallel
18
structures, independent and subordinate clauses, varying
sentence beginnings, consistency and tense

Unit 4 Learning Outcomes / Standards & Expectations


*Identify learning targets within each content expectation in this unit. Examples are provided.

1.1 Understand and practice writing as a recursive process.

2.2 Use a variety of reading, listening, and viewing strategies to construct meaning
beyond the literal level (e.g., drawing inferences; confirming and correcting;
making comparisons, connections, and generalizations; and drawing conclusions).

*2.2.3 Interpret the meaning of written, spoken, and visual texts by drawing on
different cultural, theoretical, and critical perspectives.

3.1 Develop the skills of close and contextual literary reading.


*3.1.1 Interpret literary language (e.g.,imagery, allusions, symbolism, metaphor) while
reading literary and expository works.
*3.1.2 Demonstrate an understanding of literary characterization, character
development, the function of major and minor characters, motives and causes
for action, and moral dilemmas that characters encounter by describing their
function in specific works.
*3.1.3 Recognize a variety of plot structures and elements (e.g., story within a
story, rising action, foreshadowing, flash backs, cause-and-effect
relationships, conflicts, resolutions) and describe their impact on the reader in
specific literary works.
*3.1.4 Analyze characteristics of specific works and authors (e.g., voice, mood, time
sequence, author vs. narrator, stated vs. implied author, intended audience and
purpose, irony, parody, satire, propaganda, use of archetypes and symbols) and
identify basic beliefs, perspectives, and philosophical assumptions underlying an
author’s work.
*3.1.5 Comparatively analyze two or more literary or expository texts, comparing how
and why similar themes are treated differently, by different authors, in
different types of text, in different historical periods, and/or from different
cultural perspectives.
*3.1.6 Examine differing and diverse interpretations of literary and expository works
and explain how literary and expository works and explain how and why
interpretation may vary from reader to reader.

19
Unit 4 Learning Outcomes / Standards & Expectations Continued

*3.1.7 Analyze and evaluate the portrayal of various groups, societies, and cultures in
literature and other texts.
*3.1.8 Demonstrate an understanding of historical, political, cultural, and philosophical
themes and questions raised by literary and expository works.
*3.1.9 Analyze how the tensions among characters, communities, themes, and issues in
literature and other texts reflect human experience.
*3.1.10 Demonstrate an understanding of the connections between literary and
expository works, themes, and historical and contemporary contexts.

3.3 Use knowledge of literary history, traditions, and theory to respond to and
analyze meaning of texts.

*3.3.1 Explore the relationships among individual works, authors, and literary
movements in American literature (e.g., Puritanism, Romanticism, Harlem
Renaissance) and consider the historical, cultural, and societal contexts in which
works were produced.

*3.3.6 Critically examine standards of literary judgment (e.g., aesthetic value, quality
of writing, literary merit, social significance) and questions regarding the
inclusion and/or exclusion of literary works in the curriculum (e.g., canon
formation, “classic” vs. “popular” texts, traditional vs. non-traditional
literature, the place of literature by women and/or minority writers).

3.4 Examine mass media, film, series fiction, and other texts from popular culture.

*1.5.4 (if webquest is done) Use technology tools (e.g, word processing, presentation
and multimedia software) to produce polished written and multimedia work (e.g.,
literary and expository works, proposals, business presentations,
advertisements).

Required Common Assessments and/or


Products
 Compare/Contrast 2 pieces of literature from the
unit analyzing form or content or message (Teacher
to demonstrate model for students.)

Additional assessments may include but are not


limited to the following:
• Writing summaries Ex: A summary of Self-Reliance
• Persuasive Ex: Support or refute “The government
is best which governs not at all.”
• Narrative Ex: Write a piece explaining why Mr.
Hooper, or an invented character, wore a black veil.
Use foreshadowing and symbolism.
• Expository Ex: Write a piece comparing the
connections between Young Goodman Brown by
20
Hawthorne and The Man in the Black Suit by
Stephen King
• Creative Ex: RAFT: Role= The house from The
House of Usher; Write a real estate plan to sell The
House of Usher
• Poetic Analysis/Explication

Connections through Literature and Multimedia


Webquest on Poe: Write a piece sensationalizing Poe!
Ray Bradbury’s chapter from The Martian Chronicles,
“Usher II”
The Simpson’s version of The Raven
Rose Red movie

Unit 5 Finding Courage


2nd 9 Weeks (3 weeks)
Civil War, Realism, & Naturalism
Essential Questions
What is courage?
How do events in the world change our ideals?
How do you cope with a loss of innocence?
When and why should we challenge the norms of society?

Literature
*Expose students to pieces by the following authors:
Frederick Douglas Ambrose Bierce
Stephen Crane Jack London
Kate Chopin Twain

Options:
The Story of an Hour by Chopin; Desiree’s Baby by Chopin
War Prayer by Twain
Novel study from authors above

Literary Elements & Devices/Academic


Vocabulary
• Mood • Point of view
• Theme • Situational irony
• Paradox • Dramatic irony
• Comic devices • Foreshadowing
• Text structures: • Dialect
cause and effect • Characterization
• Hyperbole

Literacy Strategies
Cause and Effect graphic organizer Think- Alouds

21
Text Patterns Vocabulary
Word Map
• Timed reading to determine time commitment for
each text
• Maintain writing portfolio (Traits of Publishing &
Presentation)
• Reflect on a piece of writing in portfolio that
represents effort and growth
• Monitor growth using literacy indicators: language
fluency, reading complexity, modes of discourse

Writing Process: Drafting & Revising Content Trait:


Sentence Fluency

Grammar Review: adjective clauses, misplaced and


dangling modifiers, adverb clauses, subordinate clauses,
noun clauses

22
Unit 5 Learning Outcomes / Standards & Expectations
*Identify learning targets within each content expectation in this unit. Example: 3.2.5

1.1 Understand and practice writing as a recursive process.

1.3 Communicate in speech, writing, and multimedia using content, form, voice,
and style appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g., to reflect,
persuade, inform, analyze, entertain, inspire).

1.5 Produce a variety of written, spoken, multigenre, and multimedia works, making
conscious choices about language, form, style, and/or visual representation for
each work (e.g., poetry, fiction and creative nonfiction stories, academic and
literary essays, proposals, memos, manifestos, business letters,
advertisements, prepared speeches, group and dramatic performances, poetry
slams, and digital stories).
2.2 Use a variety of reading, listening, and viewing strategies to construct
meaning beyond the literal level (e.g., drawing inferences; confirming and
correcting; making comparisons, connections, and generalizations; and drawing
conclusions).

2.3 Develop as a reader, listener, and viewer for personal, social, and political
purposes, through independent and collaborative reading.

3.2 Read and respond to classic and contemporary fiction, literary nonfiction, and
expository text, from a variety of literary genres representing many time
periods and authors (e.g., myth, epic, folklore, drama, poetry, autobiography,
novels, short stories, philosophical pieces, science fiction, fantasy, young adult
literature, creative non-fiction, hypertext fiction).
*3.2.5 Respond to literature in a variety of ways (e.g., dramatic interpretation,
reader’s theatre, literature circles, illustration, writing in a character’s voice,
engaging in social action, writing an analytic essay) providing examples of how
texts affect their lives, connect them with the contemporary world, and
communicate across time.

4.1 Understand and use the English language effectively in a variety of


contexts and settings.

4.2 Understand how language variety reflects and shapes experience.

Assessments may include but are not limited to


the following:
• Cross Text: Response to one essential question
using 2 pieces of literature for support
• Study of influential women: Write an interview and
respond as the person you researched.

23
• Unit test
• Write a short story that exhibits the literary
elements and devices studied
• Comic strip

Connections through Literature and Multimedia


Bierce’s The Devil’s Dictionary Other additional
works by authors
Uncle Tom’s Cabin movie Glory movie
Movie version of short stories The Oldest
Living Confederate Widow movie
Webquest Ex: Douglas Webquest Hotel Rwanda
movie

Unit 6 – Loss & Redemption


3rd 9 weeks (2 to 3 weeks)
Modern Writers
Essential Questions
How do I overcome loss and/or adversity?
Does loss have to be a part of the human experience?
What price am I willing to pay for redemption?

Literature
*Expose students to pieces by the following authors:
Frost Cather
Jeffers Ransom
Hemingway

Literary Elements and Devices/Academic


Vocabulary
• Short story elements
• Poetic elements: blank verse, free verse, meter,
foot, iambic pentameter, tone, image, alliteration,
onomatopoeia, rhyme scheme, personification, irony,
etc.
• Tone
• Simile
• Elegy

Literacy Strategies
Set a purpose for reading
Graphic organizers
Paraphrasing
• Maintain writing portfolio (Traits of Publishing &
Presentation)

24
Writing Process: Drafting & Revising Content

Traits: Voice, Word Choice, & Sentence Fluency

Grammar Review: subject-verb agreement, active and


passive voice, common usage problems, clear pronoun
reference, revising to reduce wordiness, subordinating
conjunctions

Unit 6 Learning Outcomes/Standards & Expectations


*Identify learning targets within each content expectation in this unit. Example: 3.2.2

1.1 Understand and practice writing as a recursive process.


1.2 Use writing, speaking, and visual expression for personal understanding and
growth.
2.2 Use a variety of reading, listening, and viewing strategies to construct
meaning beyond the literal level (e.g., drawing inferences; confirming and
correcting; making comparisons, connections, and generalizations; and drawing
conclusions).
3.2 Read and respond to classic and contemporary fiction, literary nonfiction, and
expository text, from a variety of literary genres representing many time
periods and authors (e.g., myth, epic, folklore, drama, poetry,
autobiography, novels, short stories, philosophical pieces, science fiction,
fantasy, young adult literature, creative non-fiction, hypertext fiction).

*3.2.2 Identify different types of poetry (e.g., epic, lyric, sonnet, free verse) and
explain how specific features (e.g., figurative language, imagery, rhythm,
alliteration, etc.) influence meaning.

4.1 Understand and use the English language effectively in a variety of contexts
and settings.

Required Common Assessments and/or


Products
 Second Writing Prompt (Will be in 3rd 9
weeks)

Assessments may include but are not limited to


the following:
• Create a collection of original poems for writing
portfolio (This unit or unit 9)
• Respond to one essential question with textual
support
• Selection tests
25
Connections through Literature and Multimedia
A & E Biographies on authors
www.kdl.org (Place a hold on items you desire and have them
sent to nearest library.)

Unit 7 - Chasing Dreams


3rd 9 weeks (3 weeks)
Essential Questions
Why do people try to impress others? What do people do to impress
others?
How important is social class and status? To what lengths will people go
to create a better life?
What is the American dream and is it alive today?
What makes a man “great”?
What is more valuable—the journey or the destination?

Literature
The Great Gatsby (Required)

Literary Elements & Devices/Academic


Vocabulary
• Paradox • Theme
Symbolism Figures of
• Character speech
Conflict • Flashback Tone
• Motivation • Imagery
Narrator
• Episodic structure Foreshadowing

Literacy Strategies
Literature Circles
Character Organizer/Analyzer
RAFT
• Maintain writing portfolio (Traits of Publishing &
Presentation)

Writing Process: Prewriting & Drafting, Revising Content


& Editing
Traits: Ideas & Organization, Word Choice, Sentence
Fluency, & Voice

26
Grammar Review: Pronouns and antecedents, varying
sentence length, run-on sentences, fragments, and common

Unit 7 Learning Outcomes/ Standards & Expectations


Identify learning targets within each content expectation in this unit.

1.1 Understand and practice writing as a recursive process.


1.3 Communicate in speech, writing, and multimedia using content, form,
voice, and style appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g., to
reflect, persuade, inform, analyze, entertain, inspire).
1.4 Develop and use the tools and practices of inquiry and research—
generating, exploring, and refining important questions; creating a
hypothesis or thesis; gathering and studying evidence; drawing
conclusions; and composing a report.
1.5 Produce a variety of written, spoken, multigenre, and multimedia
works, making conscious choices about language, form, style, and/or
visual representation for each work (e.g., poetry, fiction and creative
nonfiction stories, academic and literary essays, proposals, memos,
manifestos, business letters, advertisements, prepared speeches,
group and dramatic performances, poetry slams, and digital stories).
2.1 Develop critical reading, listening, and viewing strategies.
2.2 Use a variety of reading, listening, and viewing strategies to construct
meaning beyond the literal level (e.g., drawing inferences; confirming
and correcting; making comparisons, connections, and generalizations;
and drawing conclusions).
3.1 Develop the skills of close and contextual literary reading.
3.3 Use knowledge of literary history, traditions, and theory to respond
to and analyze meaning of texts.

uses of punctuation marks

Required Common Assessments and/or


Products
 Respond to at least one of the following essay
questions:
• Discuss the differences and similarities between
Myrtle Wilson and Daisy Buchanan. Compare each
woman’s role in the novel: what does she add to the
story, and what part does she play in Gatsby’s fate?
• Writing of Fitzgerald, critic Lionel Trilling remarks,
“The tragic hero can conceive and realize a love that
is beyond…his powers…so that he is destroyed by the
very thing that gives him spiritual status and
stature.” Discuss the “greatness” of Gatsby’s love
and how Fitzgerald feels about it.
• Consider the theme of the American Dream in this
novel. What is it? Does Gatsby prove it to be
true, false, or something in between? Explain.

27
• Examine Gatsby’s parties and how Fitzgerald
presents them. Consider how they represent the
spirit of the times and how they fit into the plot.

Additional assessments may include but are not


limited to the following:
• Unit Test
• Cross-Text Writing between theme in The Great
Gatsby and Winter Dreams
• Group or individual presentations on researched
topics in the 1920’s: Music, politics, architecture,
dance, Al Capone, clothing, speak easies, cars,
gangsters, education, occupations, etc.

Connections through Literature and Multimedia


Winter Dreams Gatsby’s Girl
Bernice Bobs Her Hair Chicago movie clips
Biography of F. Scott Fitzgerald
Audio version with study guide available at www.kdl.org
The Great Gatsby movie

Unit 8 - Perseverance
3rd
9 weeks (3 weeks) including MME/ACT Preparation & Test

Essential Questions for MME/ACT Prep


How do I know if I am developing the academic skills that I will need in my
future? How can I demonstrate what I have learned?
What leadership skills have I developed?

Essential Questions for Novel Study


How can I create a world that I want to live in now and in the future?
How can I live a life that will inspire others?

MME/ACT Preparation/Topics
Review ACT content & format, released items & practice
tests, timing techniques, test taking strategies, purposes
for state assessments, incentives, & accountability of
teaching & learning

Literature
Their Eyes Were Watching God (Required)
Independent and in-class reading with in-class discussions

Literary Elements & Devices/Academic


Vocabulary
• Dialect • Frame Story

28
• Allusions • Diction
• Colloquial • Changes in point of
Expressions view
• Syntax • Metaphor
• Language
manipulation

Literacy Strategies
Double Entry journals Literature circles
Setting map
• Maintain writing portfolio (Traits of Publishing &
Presentation)

Writing Process: Prewriting & Drafting, Revising Content


& Editing
Traits: Ideas and Organization, Word Choice, Sentence
Fluency, and Voice

Grammar Review: Editing details in a writing (Practice


with MME/ACT released items)

Unit 8 Learning Outcomes/Standards & Expectations


*Identify learning targets within each content expectation in this unit. Example: 3.1.4

1.1 Understand and practice writing as a recursive process.


1.2 Use writing, speaking, and visual expression for personal understanding and
growth.
1.3 Communicate in speech, writing, and multimedia using content, form, voice,
and style appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g., to reflect, persuade,
inform, analyze, entertain, inspire).
1.5 Produce a variety of written, spoken, multigenre, and multimedia works, making
conscious choices about language, form, style, and/or visual representation for
each work (e.g., poetry, fiction and creative nonfiction stories, academic and
literary essays, proposals, memos, manifestos, business letters, advertisements,
prepared speeches, group and dramatic performances, poetry slams, and digital
stories).
2.1 Develop critical reading, listening, and viewing strategies.
2.2 Use a variety of reading, listening, and viewing strategies to construct meaning
beyond the literal level (e.g., drawing inferences; confirming and correcting;
making comparisons, connections, and generalizations; and drawing conclusions).
2.3 Develop as a reader, listener, and viewer for personal, social, and political
purposes, through independent and collaborative reading.
3.1 Develop the skills of close and contextual literary reading.
*3.1.4 Analyze characteristics of specific works and authors (e.g., voice, mood, time
sequence, author vs. narrator, stated vs. implied author, intended audience and
purpose, irony, parody, satire, propaganda, use of archetypes and symbols) and
identify basic beliefs, perspectives, and philosophical assumptions underlying an
author’s work.

29
Unit 8 Learning Outcomes/Standards & Expectations
Continued

3.2 Read and respond to classic and contemporary fiction, literary


nonfiction, and expository text, from a variety of literary
genres representing many time periods and authors (e.g., myth,
epic, folklore, drama, poetry, autobiography, novels, short
stories, philosophical pieces, science fiction, fantasy, young
adult literature, creative non-fiction, hypertext fiction).
3.3 Use knowledge of literary history, traditions, and theory to
respond to and analyze meaning of texts.
4.1 Understand and use the English language effectively in a
variety of contexts and settings.
4.2 Understand how language variety reflects and shapes
experience.
Assessments may include but are not limited to
the following:
• Unit Test
• Memoir: The power of a story in your life
• Interview a family member
• Essay on perseverance or leadership
• Cross-Text Theme Writing between Their Eyes
Were Watching God and I Know Why the Caged Bird
Sings or The Color Purple

30
Connections through Literature and Multimedia
Redemption movie about Stanley Tookie Williams
Their Eyes Were Watching God movie
Bob Edward’s Interview with Alice Walker (look on p.20)
NPR
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
The Color Purple (A chapter to compare author’s style or
another technique to Their Eyes Were Watching God)
Oprah’s biography:
http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/win0bio-1

Unit 9 – The Dream and The Reality


4 th
9 weeks including the Research Paper (5 weeks)

Essential Questions
Why do people desire an escape from reality?
Is it possible to escape your past?
Do you have the power to determine your future?

Instructional Topics & Resources for Research


Papers
How to outline
Plagiarism
Works Cited versus Bibliography
MLA Handbook/format /how to cite a source
Set up your Work Cited page using MLA format via Calvin
College’s site: http://www.calvin.edu/library/knightcite/
Researching techniques
Evaluating resources: time, content, source, authority,
credibility
.edu & .org versus .com
Paraphrasing
Direct/indirect referencing
To create rubrics to use with assignments:
www.rubistar4teachers.org and www.rubricbuilder.com
http://owlenglish.purdue.edu

*Short stories in unit 9 and poetry in unit 10 may be interchanged in


order to accommodate selected research topics.

Literature
The Secret Life of Walter Mitty A Worn Path

31
Jilting of Granny Weatherall A Rose for
Emily
The Life You Save May be Your Own

Literary Elements and Devices/Academic


Vocabulary
• Stream of
Consciousness • Irony
• Idioms
• Parody • Characterization
• Foreshadowing
• Symbolism
• Theme • Suspense
• Point of View
• Extended metaphor

Literacy Strategies
Timeline of events
Short story map

Grammar Review: End punctuation marks, using


commas, punctuating dialogue, using MLA format

Academic Vocabulary for Research and


Presentations
• Thesis Statement • Attention Getter,
Transitions, Closing
• Citation Statement
• Works Cited • Nonverbal Devices:
• Modern Language Eye contact,
Association pausing for
• Primary and emphasis, rate of
Secondary Sources speech, posture,
• Search Site Ex: gestures, visuals
www.google.com

32
Unit 9 Learning Outcomes/ Standards and Expectations
*Identify learning targets within each content expectation in this unit. Examples are provided.

1.1 Understand and practice writing as a recursive process.


1.3 Communicate in speech, writing, and multimedia using content, form, voice,
and style appropriate to the audience and purpose.
*1.3.8 Evaluate own and others’ effectiveness in group discussions and formal
presentations (e.g., considering accuracy, relevance, clarity, and delivery;
types of arguments used; and relationships among purpose, audience, and
content.)
1.4 Develop and use the tools and practices of inquiry and research –
generating, exploring and refining important questions; creating a hypothesis or
thesis; gathering and studying evidence; drawing conclusions; and
composing a report.
*1.4.1 Identify, explore, and refine topics and questions appropriate for research.
*1.4.2 Develop a system for gathering, organizing, paraphrasing, and summarizing
information; select, evaluate, synthesize, and use multiple primary and
secondary (print and electronic) resources.
*1.4.5 Develop organizational structures appropriate to the purpose and message,
and use transitions that produce a sequential or logical flow of ideas.
*1.4.6 Use appropriate conventions of textual citation in different contexts.
*1.4.7 Recognize the role of research, including student research, as a contribution
to collective knowledge, selecting an appropriate method or genre through
which research findings will be shared and evaluated, keeping in mind the
needs of the prospective audience.
1.5 Produce a variety of written, spoken, multigenre, and multimedia works,
making conscious choices about language, form, style, and/or visual
representation for each work (e.g., prepared speeches).
*1.5.1 Use writing, speaking, and visual expression to develop powerful, creative,
and critical messages.
*1.5.2 Prepare spoken and multimedia presentations that effectively address
audiences by careful use of voice, pacing, gestures, eye contact, visual
aids, audio and video technology.
*1.5.3 Select format and tone based on the desired effect and audience, using
effective written and spoken language, sound, and/or visual
representations (e.g., focus, transitions, facts, detail and evidence to
support judgments, skillful use of rhetorical devices, and a coherent conclusion.
*1.5.4 Use technology tools (e.g., word processing, presentation and multimedia
software) to produce polished written and multi media work.
*1.5.5 Respond to and use feedback to strengthen written and multimedia
presentations (e.g., clarify ideas, expand on a topic, set goals for future
presentations).
4.1 Understand and use the English language effectively in a variety of
contexts and settings.
*4.1.5 Control Standard English structures in a variety of contexts (e.g., formal
speaking, academic prose, business, and public writing) using language
carefully and precisely.

33
Required Common Assessments and/or
Products
 Research paper with reference page
 Presentation of information researched
• Speech (A presentation is required in at least
one unit. Choose among Unit 3, Unit, 9, or
Unit 10…or do all three!)
• PowerPoint (Data projectors are available in
each school.)
 Third Writing Prompt (Will be in 4th 9 weeks)

Additional assessments may include but are not


limited to the following:
• Selection test on pieces of literature and literary
elements and devices
• Cause/Effect essay
• Collage of Granny’s life
• Creative Writing: Word Association (list is passed
around room--story starter) for stream of
consciousness device

Unit 10- Poetry Speaks


4th 9 weeks (4 weeks)
Essential Questions
Create the questions with students to involve them in the process.

Literature
Harlem Renaissance: James Weldon Johnson, Langston
Hughes, Countee Cullen, Claude McKay

Contemporary Poets (Select 5 to 10 poets): Sylvia Plath,


Anne Sexton, William Carlos Williams, Adrienne Rich, Carl
Sandburg, Ezra Pound, e.e. cummings, T.S. Elliot, Maya
Angelou, Nikki Giovanni, Gwendolyn Brooks, Louise Gluck,
and others

Literacy Strategies—See Literacy Tool Kit


Gist
Comprehension strategy: Visualization and making inferences

Literary Devices/Academic Vocabulary


• Personification, onomatopoeia, imagery
• Alliteration, assonance, consonance
• Free Verse and blank verse
34
• Rhyme, rhyme scheme, rhythm

Writing Process: Drafting & Revising Content


Trait: Word Choice

Grammar Review: Weak words and clichés, irregular


verbs, action verbs, common usage problems

Unit 10 Learning Outcomes/Standards & Expectations


*Identify learning targets within each content expectation in this unit. Example: 1.1.3

1.1 Understand and practice writing as a recursive process.


*1.1.3 Select and use language that is appropriate (e.g., formal, literary,
technical) for the purpose, audience, and context of the text, speech, or
visual representation (e.g., letter to the editor, proposal, poem, or digital
story).
1.2 Use writing, speaking, and visual expression for personal understanding and
growth.
2.1 Develop critical reading, listening, and viewing strategies.
2.2 Use a variety of reading, listening, and viewing strategies to construct
meaning beyond the literal level (e.g., drawing inferences; confirming and
correcting; making comparisons, connections, and generalizations; and
drawing conclusions).
2.3 Develop as a reader, listener, and viewer for personal, social, and
political purposes, through independent and collaborative reading.
3.2 Read and respond to classic and contemporary fiction, literary nonfiction, and
expository text, from a variety of literary genres representing many time
periods and authors (e.g., myth, epic, folklore, drama, poetry,
autobiography, novels, short stories, philosophical pieces, science fiction,
fantasy, young adult literature, creative non-fiction, hypertext fiction).

Assessments may include but are not limited to


the following:
• Write 5 to 10 original poems applying devices used
by the poets studied
• Maintain writing portfolio (Traits of Publish and
Presentation)
• Present an original poem or a poem by a favorite
author in this unit
(A presentation is required in at least one unit.)
• Quiz on poetic devices

35
• Poetic analysis/explication
• Cross-Text writing between two poems studied in
this unit
• Select a piece in the portfolio from 11th grade and
write a piece self-assessing the strengths and areas
in need of improvement.

Connections through Literature and Multimedia


Walter Dean Meyer’s poem Harlem
Poetry Speaks available at www.kdl.org
Poetry for Young Adults:
www.fresnolibrary.org/teen/bn/booklists/poetry.pdf
Select carefully; use only school appropriate poetry.

Adoff, Arnold. I Am the Darker Brother: An Anthology of Modern Poems


by African Americans. (811.08 Ad711) A collection of poems featuring
themes of race or racial problems by well-known African-American poets,
including Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Maya Angelou.

Carlson, Lori. Cool Salsa: Bilingual Poems on Growing Up Latino in the


United States. (811.08 C776)
This collection celebrates the tones, rhythms, sounds, and experiences of
growing up Latino in America. Includes works by poets such as Sandra
Cisneros, Martin Espada, Gary Soto, Ed Vega, and others.

Fletcher, Ralph. Room Enough for Love. (811.54 F636ro)


Fletcher writes a medley of romantic poems for teens, talking about the
heartbreak, joy, and intense thrill of love. Poems take place in a variety of
locales, such as the beach, the classroom, and the prom.

Franco, Betsy. You Hear Me? Poems and Writing by Teenage Boys.
(810.8092)
All the poems in this volume are written by teenage boys, and they speak
to every kind of issue: drugs, sex and sexuality, rejection, conformity,
bullying, love, anger and more. As a collection, they weave together to
demonstrate the challenge of becoming an adult.

Gilbert, Derrick. Catch the Fire: A Cross-Generational Anthology.


(811.08 C281)
Contains interviews with six established African-American poets, each of
whom introduces a chapter of poems by emerging African-American
writers about street violence, hip-hop culture, families, love, revolutions,
cultural expression, inspiration, and other topics.

Glenn, Mel. Split Image. (811.54 G487s)


This series of poems reflects the thoughts and feelings of various people --
students, the librarian, parents, the principal, and others--about the
seemingly perfect Laura Li and her life inside and outside of Tower High
School.

Okutoro, Lydia. Quiet Storm: Voices of Young Black Poets. (811.008


Q48)

36
Works by well-known poets like Langston Hughes and Maya Angelou
introduce the poetry of 13 - 21 year olds from all over the world,
including the US, Jamaica, Barbados, and several African countries. The
poems are grouped together by themes such as freedom, music, home, and
spirit.

Rosenberg, Liz. Earth-Shattering Poems, Light Gathering Poems.


(8511.54 R723ea)
Intense and serious, this collection of poetry features more than 40 poets,
including John Keats, Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Path and Pablo Neruda.

Shakur, Tupac. The Rose That Grew. (811 SHA)


Passionate, original poems from the late rapper Tupac Shakur, written
before he became famous, featuring reprints of poems in his own
handwriting. * Select carefully.

Turner, Ann. A Lion's Hunger. (811.54 T851L)


A series of short poems that follow the life span of a couple's relationship,
detailing the intense feelings of experiencing, and then losing, a first love.

Watson, Esther. The Pain Tree. (811.5408 W32)


A collection of original poems that is written by teens about real
experiences and feelings, such as love, despair, honesty and trust. Poets
range in age from 13-18; poems are accompanied by colorful illustrations.

Wong, Janet S. Behind the Wheel: Poems About Driving. (811.54


W8466)
The joy of driving is detailed through poems devoted entirely to the
subject, from the shine of a new car to the exhaustion of a long road trip,
often connecting the world of driving to the world of teenage life.
English 11 MDE Content Expectations Summary
HSCE Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6 Unit 7 Unit 8 Unit 9 Unit 10

1.1 Understand and practice writing


as a recursive process. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
1.2 Use writing, speaking, and visual
expression for personal ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
understanding and growth.
1.3 Communicate in speech, writing,
and multimedia using content, form,
voice, and style appropriate to the ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
audience and purpose.
1.4 Develop and use the tools and
practices of inquiry and research--
generating, exploring, and refining
important questions; creating a
hypothesis or thesis; gathering and ♦ ♦ ♦
studying evidence; drawing
conclusions; and composing a
report.
1.5 Produce a variety of written,
spoken, multigenre, and multimedia
works, making conscious choices ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
about language, form, style, and/or
visual representation for each work.
2.1 Develop critical reading,
listening, and viewing strategies. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
2.2 Use a variety of reading,
listening, and viewing strategies to
construct meaning beyond the literal ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
level.

37
2.3 Develop as a reader, listener, and
viewer for personal, social, and
political purposes, through ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
independent and collaborative
reading.
3.1 Develop the skills of close and
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
contextual literary reading.
3.2 Read and respond to classic and
contemporary fiction, literary
nonfiction, and expository text, from
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
a variety of literary genre ♦
representing many time periods and
authors.
3.3 Use knowledge of literary
history, traditions, and theory to
respond to and analyze the meaning ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
of texts.
3.4 Examine mass media, film, series
fiction, and other texts from popular ♦ ♦
culture.
4.1 Understand and use the English
language effectively in a variety of ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
contexts and settings.
4.2 Understand how language
variety reflects and shapes ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
experience.
Pacing Sept. Oct. Oct.- Nov.- Dec.- Jan. Jan.- Feb.- April May-
Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. March June

38