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ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM

Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Why Ecological Urbanism? Why Now?(p12)

Preamble-The worlds population continues to grow, resulting in a strady migration from rural to urban areas. Increased numbers of people and icites go hand in hand with a greater exploitation of the worlds limited resources. Every year, more cities are feeling the devastating impacts of this situation. What are we to do? What means do we have as designers to address this challenging reality?(p12)

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

but there remains the problem that the moral imperative of sustainability and, by implication. of sustainable design, tends to supplant disciplinary contribution. Thus sustainable design is not always seen as representing design excellence or design innovation. This situation will continue to provoke skepticism and cause tension between those who promote disciplinary knowledge and those who push for sustainability, unless we are able to develop novel aways of design thinking that can contribute to both domains.(p13)

The second issue concerns scale...... because the challenges of rapid urbanization and limited global resources have become much more pressing, there is a need to nd alternative design approaches that will enable us to consider the large scale di erently that we have done in the past.(p13)

this book is to provide that framework-a framework that through the conjoining of ecology and urbanism can provide the knowledge, method, and clues of what the urban can be in the years to come.(p13)

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

As important as the question of energy is today, the emphasis quantityon energy reductionobscures its relationship with the qualitative value of things.(p17)

imagining an urbanism that is other than the status quo requires a new sensibilityone that has the capacity to incorporate and accommodate the inherent con ictual conditions between ecology and urbanism. This is the territory of ecological urbanism.(p17)

There Naratives: 1.connection between the invasion of iraq and the oil boom in Alberta. 2.a high-rise residence in Mumbai for one of Indias richest tycoon. 3.Grow your own, which chronicles the progress of a group of traumatized asylum-seekers as they work their inner-city allotment gardens in Liverpool.

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Guattaris The Three Ecologies, a profound yet concise manifestation of a relational and holistic approach to our understanding of ecological issues.(p22)

...ecological urbanism can be seen as a means of providing a set of sensibilities and practices that can help enhance our approaches to urban development. ....it utilizes a multiplicity of old and new methods, tools, and techniques in a cross-disciplinary and collaborative approach toward urbanism developed through the lens of ecology. These practices must address the retro tting of existing urban conditions as well as our plans for the cities of the future.(p26)

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

High Line Park the park produces a di erent experience of the city

Parc de la Villette by OMA & Tschumi

these examples are suggestive of the potential of an ethico-aesthetic design practice that brings together architecture, landscape architecture and urbanism.

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

each individual discipline is of limited value in responding to the range and diversity of contemporary urban issues.(p29)

the trans-disciplinary approach of ecological urbanism gives designers a potentially more fertile means of addressing the challenges facing the urban environment. (p29)

another key characteristic of ecological urbanism is its recognition of the scale and scope of the impact of ecology, which extend beyond the urban territory......we must be aware of the dynamic relationships, both visible and invisible, that exist among the various domains of l larger terrain of urban as well as rural ecologies.(p29)

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

e.g. Andrea Branzi proposed an adaptive urbanism based on their symbiotic relationship....its capacity to be reversible, evolving, and provisory.(p30) waste production in NY we must nd new ways not only of dealing with the problems of waste management and recycling but also of addressing garbage more forensically, for traces, clues of what we are doing to ourselves.(p36)

Havana urban allotments and other forms of productive urban landscapes are being cultivated in a more large-scale and commercial manner than ever before.(p36)

Detroit has been the site of various experiments in urban farming on the ever-expanding terrain between the remnants of its residential fabric.(p36)

New Orleans is ripe for such a projectfor an urbanism that can address the vast areas of sparsely populated territory with productive and other forms of biologically diverse urban landscapes just as e ectively as it can those areas still populates by a resilient community.(p39)

many African cities points to the importance and value of participatory and activists planning by citizens. This type of bottom-up, extraterritorial urbanism, developed outside conventional legal and regulatory frameworks, often produces novel and ingenious solutions to urban life. (p40)

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Ecological urbanism must provide the necessary and emancipatory infrastructures for an alternative form of urbanism, one that brings together the bene ts of both bottom-up and top-down approaches to urban planning.(p40)

ecological urbanism not take the form of xed rules but promote a series of exible principles that can be adapted to the circumstances and conditions of a particular location. (p40)

Today we face a situation where there is an erasure of di erentiation and a surprising degree of apparent sameness of conditions and circumstances connected to urban development in various parts of the world. (p44)

Gregory Bateson, maintaining exibility of ideas, systems, and actions was like being a tightrope-walker: to remain on the wire, you have to continually shift from one condition of instability to another, adjusting certain variables along the way.(p44)

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

chantal Mou e : the political, I refer to the dimension of antagonism which I take to be constitutive of human societies; while by politics, I refer to the set of practices and institution through which an order is created, organizing human coexistence in the context of con iction provide by the political.(p48)

we have to pay greater attention to the role of the urban as the urban as the provider of spaces of di erence and disagreement.p48

chantal Mou e : instrad of trying to design institutions which, through supposedly impartial procedures, would reconcile all interests and values, the aim of all who are interested in defending and radicalizing democracy should be to contribute to the creation of vibrant, agonistic public spaces where di erent hegemonic political projects could be confronted.(p48)

Guattaris conception of an ethics of the ecological is an inherently political project with a commitment to countering the global dominance of capitalism. (p50)

In this context, it is now up to us to develop the aesthetic meansthe porjects-that propose alternative, inspiring, and ductile sensibilities for our ethico-political interacions with the environmrnt.(p50)

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM

Harvard University Graduate School of Design

ANTICIPATE

COLLABOTATE

SENSE

CURATE

PRODUCE

PRODUCE

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
COLLABOTATE

INTERACT

MOBILIZE

MEASURE

COLLABOTATE

ADAPT

INCUBATE

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Anticipate
advancement versus Apocalypse Zeekracht Mumbai on My mind:Some Thoughts on Sustainability Urban Earth: Mumbai Notes on the Third Ecology social Inequality and Climate Change For a Post-Environmentalism: Seven Suggestions for a New Athens Charter and The Weak Metropolis Weak Work: Andrea Branzis Weak Metropolis and the Projective Potential of an Ecological Urbanism From sustain to Ability Forty Years Later-Back to a Sub-lunar Earth

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Collaborate
Art Fieldwork Ecological Urbanism and/as Urban Metaphor Black and White in Green Cities The Return of Nature Urban Ecological Practices: Felix Guattaris Three Ecologies Retro tting the City Productive Urban Envionments

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Sense
The City from the perspective of the Nose
our sanitized cities are depriving us of the chance to use our noses for navigation and information. What are we missing out on here? THe 5 percent of our genes that are related to smell are not called into play. What would happen if the nose started to play a role equal to those of the eyes and ears in the process of perception, navigation, and communication?p146)

Urban Earth: Mexico City CitySense: An urban-scale Sensor Network Eat Love Self-Engineering Ecologies Theres More to Green than Meets the Eye: Green Urbanism in Bahrain Play Me, Im Yours Mapping Main Street

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Curate
Curating Resources The sea and Monsoon Within: A Mumbai Manifesto Transcendent Eco-cities or Urban Ecological Security? New Waterscapes for Singapore To Raise the water level in a Fishpond Envisioning Ecological Cities Return to Nature Harmonia 57 Grounding a Sustainable Urban Strategy Center Street Plaza

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Produce
energy production and self-sustained system eco-city Energy Sub-structure, Supra-structure, INfra-stracture Wave Farm CR Land Guanganmen Green Technology Showroom Aux Fermes, Citoyens! Local River: Home Storage Unit for Fish and Greens Soft Cities The Zenfactory Logrono Eco-city The Big-foot Revolution La Tour Vivante, Eco-tower

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Collaborate
Management Challenges in Urban Transformation: Organizing to Learn
complex organizations are those with many interconnected parts that must coordinate to achieve intended outcomes. Cities surely qualify, introducing the added complexity of multiple interconnected organizations-homes, workplaces, stores, schools, government agencies-that must transform in compatible ways to produce the sustainable urban systems of the future. No one knows how to get this done, but it is clear that it cannot be achieved without both innovation and collaboration. it is also clear that the transformation cannot be centrally planned and controlled.

Collaboration. Iteration. knowledge sharing.


Ecological Urbanism will take shape through distributed collaborative learning. Cities must transform project-by-project(collaboration by collaboration), creating and implementing new technologies and new social contracts through which the promise of ecological urbanism may be realized. Designers must emerge as leaders engaging others hearts and minds in the uncertain journey ahead.

Air Puri cation in Cities Social Justice and Ecological Urbanism Governing the Ecological City Underground Future Temperate and Bounded Bioinspired Adaptive Architecture and sustainability

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Interact
urban Ecology and the Arrangement of Nature in Urban Regions The Agency of Ecology
the eld was shifting away from an understanding of systems that attempt to achieve a predictable equilibrium or steady-state condition to systems typically in states of change, adapting to subtle or dramatic changes in inputs, resources, and and climate. Adaptation, appropriation, and exibility became the hallmarks of successful systems as it is through ecosystems ability to respond to changing environmental conditions that they persist.(p325)

New York City Infrastructure Rede ning Infrastructure User-Generated Urbanism Situating Urban Ecological Experiments in Public Space A Holistic View of the Urban Phenomenon Gwanggyo New City Park System A Methodology for Urban Innovation Greenmetropolis

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Mobilize
Mobility, Infrastructure, and Society
In societies aspiring toward modern forms of democracy, increasing mobilityin both geographic and socioeconomic termshas become as critical to human emancipation as the more traditional liberal touchstones of civil liberty and equal representation.(p380) there appears to be a remarkable degree of consensus among professionals, activists, and politicians that creating more compact and integrated urban agglomerations, with more e cient and public forms of transport to serve them, is the best bulwark against the coming environmental Armageddon. The experts agree that such reforms would both reduce environmental impacts and increase the potential for human collaboration and sociability.(p380)

Sustainable Urban Mobility through Light Electric Vehicles Sustainable Mobility in Action Sustaining the City in the Face of Advanced Marginality A General Theory of sustainable Urbanism The Political Ecology of Ecological Urbansim The SynCity urban Energy System Model Oil City: Petro-landscapes and sustainable Futures Niger Delta Oil Fields The Upway GSD Research Nairobi Studio

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Measure
Five Ecological Challenges for the Contemporary City 1.Sustainability and Democracy 2.Agriculture and Ground Consumption 3.Nature and Control 4.Compact and Discard 5.Deserti cation and Subsidiarity

Revolutionizing Architecture The Canary Project Performalism: Environmental Metrics and Urban Design Nature Culture Investigating the Importance of Customized Energy Model Inputs: A Case Study of Gund Hall Perception of Urban Density Londons Estuary Region Urban Earth: London Sustainability Initiatives in London Moving beyond LEED: Evaluating Green at the Urban Scale Landscapes of Specialization GSD Research Half a Million Trees: Prototyping Sites and Systems for Sustainable Cities SlaveCity EcoBox/Self-Managed Eco-urban Network Temporary Urban Scene: Beach on the Moon

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Collaborate
Comfort and Carbon Footprint Ecological Urbanism and Health Equity: An Ecosocial Perspective Nature, Infrastructures, and the Urban Condition Sustainability and LIfestyle Ecological Urbanism and the Landscape Old Dark Religious Studies and Ecological Urbanism Ecological Urbanism and East Asian Literatures

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Adapt
Insurgent Ecologies: (Re)claiming Ground in Landscape and Urbanism Performative Wood: Intergral Computational Design for a Climate-Responsive Timber Surface Structure Shrinking Gothams Footprint Adaptivity in Architecture GSD Research Climate Change, Water, Land Development, and Adaptation: Planning with Uncertainty

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Incubate
Balances and Challenges of Integrated Practice The Luxury of Reduction: On the Role of Architecture in Ecological Urbanism bank of American GSD Research A place in Heaven, A place in Hell: Tactical Operations in Sao Paulo In Situ: Site Speci city in Sustainable Architecture Progetto Bioclimatico Wangzhuang Eco-city of Agriculture Ecosystemic Master Planning, DISEZ Region, Senegal Vegetal City: Dreaming the Green Utopia Verticalism(The Future of the Skyscraper) Urban Prototypes Taiwan Strait Climate Change Incubator

ECOLOGICAL URBANSIM
Edit by Moshen Mostafavi with Gareth Doherty Harvard University Graduate School of Design

Sustainable urbanism should not mean green cities for wealthy white poeple

-Lizabeth Cohen

Good citiesare like French cheeses. The worse they smell, the better they are.

-Homi Bhabha

How is Ecological Urbanism di erent from Landscape Urbanism?

What is Urbanism anyway?

The Possibility of An Absolute Architecture


Pier Vittorio Aureli

The essence of urbanization is therefore the destruction of any limit, boundary, or form that is not the in nite, compulsive repetition of its own reproduction and the consequent totalizing mechanism of control that guarantees this process of in nity. (16)

the in nite continuity of movemnt propelled by production, which systematically metabolizes anything within a process that always changes, and is thus able to preserve its stability.(16)

The Possibility of An Absolute Architecture


Pier Vittorio Aureli

No-stop City theorizes a city without di erence between outside and inside, old and new, public space and private space, production space and consumption space.(p19)

No-stop City theorizes a city without di erence between outside and inside, old and new, public space and private space, production space and consumption space.(p19)

No-stop City is neither a utopia nor a proposal for an alternative model of urbanization; rather, the hallucinatory and exaggerated descriptions of the existing conditions in which the economy reproduces its labor force are nally exposed as the ultimate core of urban culture.(p20)

No-stop City has come to pre gure how bad in nity has ensnared humanity within the logic of inde nite growth as a means of development, constantly aspiring to the new and di erent, and thereby forcing humanity to identically repeat its own condition.(p21)

The Possibility of An Absolute Architecture


Pier Vittorio Aureli

Arendt writes, Politics is based on the fact of human plurality. (p27)

Politics arises in what lies between men and it is established as relationship (p27)

The formal can be de ned as the xiperience of limit, as the relationship between the inside and outside .(p30)

The formal essentially involves an act of spatial determination, of limitation.(p30)

For this reason, the formal is against totality and generic conceptions of multiplicity.(p30)

the political and the concept of the formal indicate the possiblitily of the composition of di erece by assuming the limits of parts as their constituency.(p32)

The Possibility of An Absolute Architecture


Pier Vittorio Aureli

the way the plinth reprganizes the connection between a building and its site a ects not only ones experince of what is placed on the plinth, but also-and especially-ones experince of the city that is outside plinth.(p37)

Miess plinth reinvent urban space as an archipelago of limited urban artifacts. Its is this emphasis on niteness and separateness that makes artfacts like these the most intense manifestation of the political in the city.(p37)

The plinth introduces a stoppage into the smoothness of urban space.....as something that can be framed, limited and thus potentially situated as a thing among other things.(p41)

the symbolic possibility of confrontation.(47)

The Possibility of An Absolute Architecture


Pier Vittorio Aureli

...architectural form is not just the consequence but also one of the most poweful and in uential political examples.(p42)

...a city conceived as a group of islands within a sea of urbanization.(p42)

An archipelago is group of islands set in a sea that simultaneously unites and divides them.....the form of the archipelago presupposes that its parts, even in their absolute separation, are moved by an absent center, toward which each island, in comunion with the other , is oriented without claming possession of the center. (p42)

Confrontation is both what attracts the islands toward each other and what separates them preventing their coalescence into a single mass.(p44)

the sea is the extensive space of urbanization, its all-embracing connectiveness, the space of management of anything that constitutes our civilization. There is no other way to exceed this sea if not from within, by absorbing and forcing its attributes into nite, clearly separated parts.(p44)

The Possibility of An Absolute Architecture


Pier Vittorio Aureli

city of exacerbated di erences(p23)

The more change and exception are allowed , the more the urban principle is reinforced...which equalizes di erences within an isotropic network; the lobotomy , which largely eliminates the relationship between the inside(architecture) and the outside(urbanization); and the schism, which reduces every plot to a self-su cient enclave that, by retaining it function, can host any ideology without a ecting the general principle of urbanization.(p24)

the grid is a sea and the plots are islands.(p24)

architecture as an urban composition in miniature that wuld contain the complexity of the city as a whole(p24)

...can be interpreted as a prediction of contemporary urbanization in which pluralism and versity are celebrated within the strict spatial logic of the enclave.(p26)

.Bound to the regime of the economy, this logic of inclusion/exclusion dissolves the potential dialectical con ict among the parts of the city, and transformconfrontation and coexistence into the indi erence of conhabitation, which indeed is the way of living in urbanization.(p26)

The Possibility of An Absolute Architecture


Pier Vittorio Aureli

the iconic building cannot be considerd an exemplary aprt of the city beacuse its economic principle is to be unique and unrepeatable.(p44)

huge variety of these buildings subscribes to one main criterion: to obey the despotic of di erence and novelty-precisely the attributes that duel the bad in nity of labor for the sake of prodection and pro t.(p45)

di erence is...in nite variation or commercial competition not a confrontation of parts.(p45)

Instead of being an icon of diversity per se, an absolute architecture must refuse any impetus to novelty and accept the possibility of being an instrument of separation, and thus of political action. (p46)

Instead of being an icon of diversity per se, an absolute architecture must refuse any impetus to novelty and accept the possibility of being an instrument of separation, and thus of political action. (p46)

The Possibility of An Absolute Architecture


Pier Vittorio Aureli

If the ubiquitous nature of mobility and integration is the essence of urbanization, the sigularity of places is the essence of a city.(p46)

...rede ne the meaning of the city as a site of confrotation and thus of coexistence.(p46)

...architecture is...forming the space of coexistence within the city.(p46)

architecture...is able to represent and instituionalize the business of living as value that is at once universal and singular.(p46)

No-Stop City
Andrea Branzi Archizoom

the metropolis ceases to be a place, to become a contition .(p177)

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

Nature & Civilisation:


Francis Bacon, 1620: the first proposed the study of Nature History included things artificial and the works of mankind as a manipulation of nature. 1) ordinary nature( usual nature) 2) deviant nature 3) nature manipulated by man. The concept of nature as a system that unfold over time according to rules, and that mankind exists within that system, is the extension of Bacons natural history. Human activities is that the construction of tool, artefacts and dwellings is a natural behaviour, and that such natural behaviour was developed and involved over time. (12)

Form : Natural Form : Living form: Organism Natural Form: Non-living Form River/Rock

Nature

Civilisation

Civilisational Form: Cities 1.3 Eroded Canyon: Localized turbulence and eddy patterns in
the flow of water produce complex geometries in the eroded canyon

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

Natural and Civilisational Forms:


Natural Form: The forms of nature - living forms such as plants or animals, and non-living forms such as river deltas, hurricanes or desert sand dues, have an intricate relationship. Civilisational Form: The origin of the word civilisation suggests that it is associated with living in cities. (18) Cities are dynamic forms, constructed spatial and material arrays that are reworked and rebuilt over time , decaying, collapsing and expanding in irregular episodes of growth and incorporation. Civilisation is the common heritage of all humanity, the sun total of all the material, ecology and social products of human activities over time.

Form : Natural Form : Living form: Organism Natural Form: Non-living Form River/Rock

Nature

All forms of nature and all forms of civilization have architecture, an arrangement of material in space and over time that determines their shape, size, behaviour and duration, and how they come into being.

Civilisation

Civilisational Form: Cities

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

Evolution:
The Origin of Species was first published in1859 in it Charles Darwin argued that just as humans breed living organism by unnatural selection, organizing systematic changes in them, so wild organisms themselves are changed by the struggle for life... He described the process of natural selection as the war of nature. (19) Living organism can regarded as system, and these system acquire their complex forms and patterns of behaviour through the interactions, in space and over time, of their components.

Form : Natural Form : Living form: Organism Natural Form: Non-living Form River/Rock

Evolution: Biological Evolution

Nature

The evolutionary development over time of all the species of life was driven by mutation and natural selection (by Darwin )

Civilisation

Civilisational Form: Cities

Human cultural Evolution: Language Culture Complexity

The development of a large brain and enhanced cognition is strongly coupled to the evolution is strongly coupled to the evolutionary development of material technology that extends and enhances individual and collective human metabolism.

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

1.8 Information A 5,000 year old clay tablet marked with cuneiform script, made with the cut end of reeds. .. The increase in the flow of energy and materials through cities Mesopotanmia accelerated the evolutionary development of systems of notation and mathematics calculation.

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

Form and Behavior:


Form and behaviour have an intricate relationship, The form of an organism or city affects its behaviour in different environments, and a particular behaviour will produced different results in different environments, or if performed by different forms in the same environment. (p.26)

Form : Natural Form : Living form: Organism Natural Form: Non-living Form River/Rock

Evolution: ( by mutation ) Biological Evolution

Form and Behavior: Plant and Animal Forms

Nature

The evolutionary development over time of all the species of life was driven by mutation and natural selection (by Darwin )

Civilisation

Civilisational Form: Cities

Human cultural Evolution: Language Culture Complexity

Form of Settlements and Cities

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

Mathematical Descriptions of behavior: Mathematical Structure of process of systems


p27 : + Mathematical descriptions of behaviour: Whiteheads anticipation and response by Norber Wiener ...[t]he first systematic description of responsive behaviur in machines and animals

Form: Living Form : Organism Nature Non-living Form: River/ Rock

Evolution: Biological Evolution

Form and Behavior:

Plant and Animal Forms

By Ilya Prigogine: All biological organisms and many non-living systems are maintained by the flow of energy through the system
Human cultural Evolution: Form of Settlements and Cities

Civilisation

Civilisational Form: Cities

p29. The flow is modified by feedbacks, but occasionally there is such an amplification or inhibition that the system much change, must re-organise or collapse. An increase in complexity is always coupled to an increase in the flow of energy through the system, and systems that collapse and revert to a simpler organization are coupled to a reduced flow of energy. .. All systems tend to increase in complexity over time

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

Dynamics of Organization:

Dynamics of Organization:
...[a]ll the systems of nature and civilization is the analysis of organization.

Form: Living Form : Organism Nature Non-living Form: River/ Rock

Evolution: Biological Evolution

Form and Behavior:

Evolution, J Huxley argued is a continuous process from star-dust to human society. ... [t]he mathematical structure of the process of systems within which hierarchical organization arises. It focuses on the effects produced by the collective behaviour of many simple units that interact with each other, such as atom, molecules ad cells.

Plant and Animal Forms

Mathematical Structure of process of systems

Civilisation

Civilisational Form: Cities

Human cultural Evolution

Form of Settlements / Cities

.... Cities Human Each level interacts with other levels, and hierarchical orders are to be found with in all complex systems, from the anatomical form and metabolism of an individual organism, to the distribution of species and ecological systems, to the pattern of settlements and cities distributed across a region. ...... Parts Cells Molecules Atoms

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

Self-Organization:
Self-organized forms are also produced by the collective behavior of individual organisms. Self-organization occurs at the level of a whole ecological system, in the patterns of distribution of the many different species that live wit h in an ecological system, and in the forms of the individual organisms that exist within it. Each individual acting in response to stimuli from their immediate neighbors and from their close environments. (p31)

Dynamics of Organization: .... Cities Self- organization Interactions at many levels of hierarchy Human ...... Parts Cells Molecules Atoms

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

A Flock of birds without any leader / central directing without any central planning / construction

A School of Fishes

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

Emergence:

Dynamics of Organization:

Self- organization

Emergence:

Emerge

e-merge [intransitive] 1. to appear or come out from somewhere 2 if facts emerge, they become known after being hidden or secret 3 to come out of a difficult experience

Emergence

e-mer-gence [uncountable] 1. when something begins to be known or noticed emergence of the emergence of Japan as a world leader 2. when someone or something comes out of a difficult experience emergence from

... [a] synonym for appearance in the sciences the word refers to the production of forms and their behavior, by systems that have an irreducible complexity. Considering the processes of nature and of civilization as systems accentuates the interaction and connectivity of the different parts of the systems, and interaction between different systems. (p31)

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

Emergence:

Form: Living Form : Organism Nature Non-living Form: River/ Rock

Evolution: Biological Evolution

Form and Behavior:

Plant and Animal Forms

Mathematical Structure of process of systems

Dynamics of Organization:

Emergence

Civilisation

Civilisational Form: Cities

Human cultural Evolution

Form of Settlements / Cities

What is it that emerges, what does it emerge from, and how is emergence produced? The processes of complex system produce, elaborate and maintain all the forms of natural and cultural systems, and those processes include exchanges of energy and material with their environment. (p32) ...... The unfolding of the process of evolution , the emergence of diverse species of living forms over extended time, has been constrained and inflected by the relations of each living form to other living forms, and to climatic regimes and the topography of the surface of the earth.

...... Cities Human life Protein= arrangement of molecules Molecules = Bonding of atoms Atoms

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

Energy and information produce effects that act upon the architecture of material in space and over time and the interaction between them is neither exclusively bottom up nor top down. Information passing down through the generation modifies the interaction of living forms with their environment and the materials and energy that extract from it. ... all non-living natural forms emerge from the interaction of energy and material within complex systems that proceed through time, and that both the living forms of nature and the forms of civilization emerge from complex processes that are coupled to the transmission of information.

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

...[t]o delineate the process of emergence, the principles and dynamics of organization and interaction that are consistent across the intersecting domains and to identify the feedback and critical thresholds that drive the emergence of forms in natural and culturally constructed systems.

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

Climate and the Forms of the Atmosphere:


Energy falls on the earth from the sun, and some of that energy is transformed and transported around the world. Energy and material between the ocean, the land, the biosphere and the atmosphere are exchanged; and the forms of the global climate emerge from the interaction of those exchanges. Climate is the metasystem, a system of systems,the intricate choreography of its forms and behaviour modulates the exchanges of energy and material between all the other systems, and is in turn affected by them. ...[a] small change at one scale may initiate a great and rapid change at another.

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

Surface and the Forms of the Land


The topography of the surface of the earth emerges from the interaction of tectonic forces that act on the land from below, and the weathering and erosional forces that act on it from above. Exchanges of energy and material animate the morphological processes within differing climatic regimes, acting on small particles or grains at a very small but producing large forms and complex behaviour over much larger dimensional scale.

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

Living Form
The form of all living beings emerge from two interlinked processes with very different time spans; embryological development from a single cell to an adult form, and the evolution of diverse species of form over extended time. Each cell of every living form carries with it the information for the development of the whole being, and this information is transmitted generation by generation down through time by the genome. In turn, living forms have modified and continue to modify the processes of the atmosphere and oceans, and the geomorphic system of the surface of the earth.

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

The Forms of Metabolism


Energy, information and material flows through individual forms are vectored through their populations, habitats and the ecological systems that they construct and live within. Where living forms organise themselves into collectively extended metabolisms, intelligence, social and spatial organization, and material artefacts emerge. Collectively extended metabolism are conserved and developed by positive feedbacks that modify the regime of natural selection.

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

City Forms
Cities simultaneously emerged from the collapse and reorganization of the founding system of civilisation. The evolutionary development of city forms and their extended metabolic systems was strongly coupled to multiple changes of the climate and ecological system within witch they were situated, and to the rise in the flow of energy from intense cultivation, increased social complexity and to the evolution of information system.

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

The Architecture of Emergence Michael Weinstock Michael Weinstock

The Generic City Michael Weinstock Rem Koolhaas

Is the contemporary city like the contemporary airport "all the same"? Is it possible to theorize this convergence? What are the disadvantages of identity, and conversely, what are the advantages of blankness? What if we are witnessing a global liberation movement: "down with character!" That is left after identity is stripped? The Generic? The fact that human growth is exponential implies that the past will at some point become too small to be inhabited and shared by those alive. We ourselves exhaust it. The stronger identity, the more it imprisons, the more it resists expansion, interpretation, renewal, contradiction. THe Generic City is fractal , and endless repetition of the same simple structural module; it is possible to reconstruct it from its smallest entity, adesktop computer, maybe even a diskette.