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For Immediate Release: 15 th November 2011

Contact:

Iona Sale, IONA PR, 01451 832 268, 07721 030 825 or iona@ionapr.com

NOTABLE SUCCESSES IN CHORLEY’S NOVEMBER SALE

Thursday 10 th and Friday 11 th November 2011

Chorley’s two day sale on Thursday 10 th and Friday 11 th November 2011 proved an enormous success with a sold rate of over 85% and a premium inclusive total in excess of £500,000. With 80 lots reaching hammer prices in excess of £1,000 Chorley’s continue to confirm their dominance of the Cotswold auction scene.

Notable successes included Lot 65, a characteristic work by Joan Gilchrest depicting retired fishermen at St Ives harbour. This oil was much admired during the viewing and realised a mid-estimate £6,500. Lot 74, a more traditional work by Richard Wilson and studio depicting figures in an Italianate landscape secured £9,000.

This sale saw a particularly strong silver section. Chorley’s have had a number of good silver sales of late and the strong prices achieved have persuaded new vendors to consign items for sale. An early piece of Dresden silver of unusual design (Lot 119), the exterior modelled to resemble the bark of a pine tree, had been kept in a family safe for many years. Its lovely pale gilt colour, rarity and quality all helped it race past a £1,000-1,500 estimate eventually knocking down for £11,000. The importance of rarity was illustrated perfectly elsewhere in the sale with a pair of early 18 th century miniature candlesticks by George Manjoy (Lot 192) fetching £2,200. At just under 6cm in height, this contrasts with the £5,000 achieved for a set of four mid-18 th Century candlesticks of about 23cm high (Lot 298). This handsome set may have fetched double the price of the miniature sticks but weigh in at well over double the size.

For many the highlight of the sale was the collection of shagreen cased items, primarily nécessaires and étuis. This fantastic private collection is exactly the type that would once have been sold in London but which firms like Chorley’s now excel at handling. Clients feel they get more personal attention from the auctioneers and, thanks to the power of the internet, London prices can be achieved at a fraction of the cost. This collection totalled just over £80,000 hammer with a number of highlights including £6,600 for Lot 328, a George III chest étui, which was complete with over thirty items including inkwells, scent bottles, and brushes. Lot 330, a nécessaire, was a little

bottles, and brushes. Lot 330, a nécessaire , was a little Lot 933 A large Ge
bottles, and brushes. Lot 330, a nécessaire , was a little Lot 933 A large Ge

Lot 933

A large Ge type celadon moon flask sold for £55,000

933 A large Ge type celadon moon flask sold for £55,000 Lot 119 A late 17

Lot 119

A late 17 th Century silver gilt beaker and cover sold for £11,000

more exuberant in style with gold and gilt metal decoration including leaf mouldings to the corners of the case. The push button mechanism was set with a diamond and the interior fitted with gold topped inkwells and a variety of small implements, again the completeness and quality saw frenzied bidding take it to £7,500.

Other objets de vertu were hotly contested including Lot 342, a seal modelled in onyx as the head of a Nubian and embellished with enamel and gems, saw £5,200. A rather more sinister item, Lot 380, a gold and enamelled pomander box modelled as a skull obviously appealed to several bidders with unusual tastes and sold for £6,500.

With Christmas approaching it was no surprise to see jewellery fetch some sparkling prices. Cartier is a name that always draws attention and a small brooch by that firm and modelled as a duck, Lot 407, fetched £2,500. The sale will certainly be remembered for the pearl jewellery. A pair of pearl drop earrings, Lot 437, exceeded expectations by some margin, these were untested but obviously bidders felt the pearls were

natural and the price, £6,000, reflected this. Lot 442, a three- strand natural pearl necklace with diamond clasp, brought bidders from London and across Europe to Prinknash. These were offered with a certificate confirming that the vast majority

of the pearls were natural and this gave buyers the confidence

needed to pursue the necklace to a staggering £11,000.

A lot of column inches have been devoted to the boom in the

Chinese art market over the last few years. A huge number of Chinese objects have been offered for sale both in London and the provinces over the last month with some remarkable stand out prices but a large number of lots going unsold. It seems that Chinese buyers are becoming more discerning and Chorley’s were pleased to have several good pieces of porcelain and jade to offer. Lot 933, a large celadon crackle glazed moon flask of the Qianlong/Jiaqing period, led the sale at £55,000. A jade koro and cover of the 18 th /19 th century, Lot 984, and decorated with bat mask handles and Taoist emblems found a new home at £21,000 and the final lot in the sale, Lot 985, a spinach green jade vase with Qianlong mark, saw £25,000.

For further information please contact Catrin Hampton on 01452 344499 or ech@simonchorley.com

For press information or jpeg images please contact Iona Sale, IONA PR, on 01451 832 268, 07721 030 825 or iona@ionapr.com

Chorley’s next sale is Thursday 13 th December 2011.

Lot 330 An 18 th Century French chest étui sold for £7,500
Lot 330
An 18 th Century French chest étui
sold for £7,500

Lot 380 A gold, bone and enamel pomander box sold for £6,500

380 A gold, bone and enamel pomander box sold for £6,500 Lot 442 A triple strand

Lot 442 A triple strand pearl necklace sold for £11,000

Lot 328 A George III silver mounted shagreen chest étui sold for £6,600
Lot 328
A George III silver mounted
shagreen chest étui
sold for £6,600