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POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS
FIRST OF A TWO- PART SERIES ON THE TOLL
THE DISORDER IS TAKING ON SOME VETERANS OF IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN
NIKO KALLIANIOTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Former Marine Sgt. Stanley Laskowski thought his involvement in the war in Iraq was over when he returned home froma tour of duty in 2003. But the horror he
witnessed never went away, leading himto develop post-traumatic stress disorder.
The Iraqi soldier burst into the home, kidnapping
and then killing Marine Corps Sgt. Stanley Laskow-
ski’s four young children, and raping and murdering
his wife, Marisol.
The veteranMarine fought valiantly to save his fam-
ily, only to be overpowered after his rifle malfunc-
tioned, leaving himto watch as they were brutalized.
Ahorrific scene, but one that never
happened, at least not in the physical
world. The carnage was the product
of a mind ravaged by the horrors of
war that Laskowski, 33, witnessed
duringhis tour of duty inIraqin2003.
Night after night, the Iraqi soldier –
the personification of men Laskowski
killed in combat – exacted his re-
venge, taking control of Laskowski’s
mind in a reoccurring nightmare.
It was a terrifying scene – not just
for Laskowski, but for his wife and
children, whofoundthemselves faced
with a highly charged and delusional
Marine, never knowing what he
might do to “protect” them.
“By then he had a house full of
weapons. There were guns and rifles
loaded and ready to go everywhere,”
said Marisol Laskowski, 36. “I was
terrified … I don’t think he realized
where he was or what people were do-
ing.”
It was not thehomecomingtheCar-
bondale couple expected after Stan-
ley Laskowski concluded his 5½-
month tour of duty in July 2003.
Military memorabilia and medals decorate a table
at the Laskowski family’s Carbondale home.
THE ENEMY WITHIN
First Penn State. NowSyracuse.
Concerned that allegations of
child sex abuse in two big college
sports programs could trigger
more cases around the country,
universities are urging employees
to reread their school’s reporting
policies, while more closely scruti-
nizing the people who work in
their athletic departments.
Those reminders were circulat-
ing even as news of the scandals
kept unfolding.
On Friday, the NCAA notified
PennStateit wouldinvestigatethe
school for lackof institutional con-
Penn State
a wake-up
for schools
Academic leaders urge those
on campus to step up and
report bad behavior.
By EDDIE PELLS
AP National Writer
See REPORT, Page 2A
INSIDE
A NEWS
Local News 3A
Nation/World 4A
Obituaries 2A, 13A
B PEOPLE
Community News
2-3B, 3B, 5-8B, 11B
Birthdays 10B
C SPORTS
Outdoors 12C
D BUSINESS
Stocks 7D
E VIEWS
Editorials 2E
Forum 3E
F ETC.
Puzzles 2F
Books 5F
Travel 6F
G CLASSIFIED
Dallas falls
Mounts beaten
in district final.
Story, 1C
To the U.S. Marines, former
Sgt. Stanley Laskowski was a
highly regarded solider, an effec-
tive leader who had “limitless
potential.”
A veteran of the war in Iraq in
2003, Laskowski earned several
medals and proved himself to be
an invaluable asset during sever-
al major battles in the initial
invasion of Baghdad, his superi-
ors said.
But just six months after he
was honorably discharged from
the Marines in 2007, the deco-
rated veteran found himself in a
jail cell, charged with breaking
into a pharmacy to steal drugs.
How had he fallen so far in
such a short time?
Was it an act of a good soldier
gone bad, who knowingly broke
the law to feed his addiction to
Suit targets
care at VA
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER tmorgan@timesleader.com
See STRESS, Page 6A See SUIT, Page 7A
WILKES-BARRE – Credited
with reviving the downtown,
the University Corners project
has struggled to hold on to
commercial tenants and fill
empty storefronts finished with
a $1 million state grant.
Nearly $600,000 of the grant
awarded to the city in 2008 paid
for pouring a concrete floor, in-
stalling an elevator and other
work in a two-level, 7,418-
square-foot section where an
Irish pub was planned.
The space remains an empty
shell, however, and is on the
market with a $1.2 million price
tag.
Most of the other street-level
spaces are empty as well. The
latest tenant to exit the $31 mil-
lion project developed by the
Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber
of Business and Industry was
Blue Chip Gourmet in mid-Oc-
tober.
Four tenants remain, includ-
U N I V E R S I T Y C O R N E R S
Space
remains
empty
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
See CORNERS, Page 9A
$$$$$$
K

PAGE 2A SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Broskoske, Ronald
Dancheck, Esther
Dante, James
Ford, Gary
Girvan, Frank
Gless, Dale
Just, Louise
Mitchneck, David
Stencavage,
George Sr.
Sulzinski, Leonard
Thomas, Dorothy
Zelnock, Rita
OBITUARIES
Page 2A, 13A
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Daily Number, Midday
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Sunday: 3-1-5-1-2
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Sunday: 18-23-26-31-37
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Wednesday: 14-32-37-39-43
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Friday: 03-13-17-29-34
Saturday: 13-34-35-37-38
Match 6 Lotto
Monday: 01-10-14-20-40-47
Thursday: 10-15-32-39-43-46
Powerball
Wednesday: 13-22-25-39-51
powerball: 28
powerplay: 02
Saturday: 09-16-17-28-30
powerball: 11
powerplay: 03
Mega Millions
Tuesday: 03-06-24-30-33
Megaball: 21
Megaplier: 04
Friday: 04-13-33-39-55
Megaball: 03
Megaplier: 04
WEEKLY LOTTERY
SUMMARY
More Obituaries, Page 13A
J
ames A. Dante of Scranton died
WednesdayNovember16, 2011at
the Regional Hospital of Scranton.
Born in Scranton, he was the son
of the late Alfredo and Margaret
Longo Dante; educated in Scranton
schools, he proudly served in the
United States Army.
Prior to his retirement, he was
employed by the United States Gov-
ernment at the Defense Logistics
Agency.
He was precededindeathbya sis-
ter, Carmella Trotta; two brothers,
Alex and Alfred.
Surviving are a sister, Mary Mil-
lington and her husband, Milt, For-
ty Fort; a brother, Samand his wife,
Jean, Old Forge; a sister-in-law Sue
Dante, Dunmore; several nieces and
nephews.
Private funeral services will
be conducted fromthe Patrick
F. Guido Funeral Home, 120 South
Main Ave., Scranton, at the conve-
nience of the family.
Interment will be at Cathedral
Cemetery.
Memorial contributions may be
made to St. Joseph’s Center, 2010
Adams Ave., Scranton, PA18509.
Please visit www.patrickguido-
funeralhome.com for information,
directions or to send an online con-
dolence.
James A. Dante
November 16, 2011
KINGSTON TWP. – Christ-
mas was inthe air duringanafter-
noon tea at the “Cottage” at the
Lands at Hillside Farms Satur-
day.
Nearly 100 people filtered
through the dozens of holiday-
decorated rooms as they toured
thehistoric Victorianhomeof the
Conyngham family. A fire crack-
led in the living room’s massive
stone hearth, while guests en-
joyed tea, eggnog and wassail
along with a huge assortment of
homemade sweets.
Built in 1881 as a summer
home for WilliamL. Conyngham,
a prominent Wilkes-Barre coal
broker, and his wife, Olivia Hill-
ard Conyngham, the cottage,
which overlooks the 412-acre
farm, boasts 34 rooms and 14 ½
bathrooms. The Conyngham
family owned and operated the
farm for over 100 years.
Renovations to the cottage,
which included painting, updat-
ing wiring and installing a water
main, began in 2009, when the
Lands, a nonprofit organization,
bought the farm.
Each room, preserved with
original period furnishings, is a
reminder of the opulent lifestyle
the family led. “Inthe heart of the
Depression, (William L. Conyng-
ham) brokered all of the anthra-
cite coal in the Valley that fueled
the Industrial Revolution,” said
Chip Morgan, cottage chairman.
Volunteer tour guides pointed
out interesting details, from the
French porcelain basin in the
cook’s bathroom, to the servant
buzzers in the children’s bed-
rooms. The shelves inthe butler’s
pantry bulged with china that
once served250people. Aneleva-
tor, which was the only one in the
region for years, travels from the
winecellar inthebasement tothe
third floor.
Tacked to the door of a second
floor linen closet is an inventory
of the cottage’s sheets, towels,
pillowcases and bathrobes. The
paper, brownandbrittlewithage,
is dated October 9, 1942. “They
kept track of everything – linen,
silver and china – because it was
all extremelyvaluable,” saidMor-
gan.
Fran DeFazio, 55, of Houston
said she loved learning the histo-
ry of one of Wyoming Valley’s
“great” families. “Ever since I was
a little girl I used to go by this ev-
ery day and always wonder what
it was like,” she said. “It is such a
grand structure, and to see this
preserved is such a joy.”
A taste of old-time elegance
An afternoon tea gives
visitors a chance to see how
the Conynghams lived.
By CAMILLE FIOTI
Times Leader Correspondent
HARRISBURG — A North-
eastern Pennsylvania lawmaker
says he wants to change the
commonwealth’s three-year-old
open records law to get rid of
an exemption that allows Penn
State and three other state-re-
lated universities to keep their
operations out of the public
eye while receiving taxpayer
money.
Democratic state Sen. John
Blake of Lackawanna County
said that he hopes to introduce
a bill early next year to end the
disclosure exemption for Penn
State, Temple and Lincoln uni-
versities as well as the Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh.
The exemption has come un-
der scrutiny since Penn State
assistant football coach Jerry
Sandusky was accused of sex-
ual abuse involving eight boys
over 15 years. School adminis-
trators Tim Curley and Gary
Schultz are charged with not
properly alerting authorities to
suspected abuse and with per-
jury. In the wake of the scan-
dal, Joe Paterno, Division I’s
winningest coach with 409 vic-
tories, was fired by university
trustees. University president
Graham Spanier also left his
job under pressure
Terry Mutchler, executive di-
rector of the state Office of
Open Records, says the four
universities are required to dis-
close “nothing, zippo” under
current law, even though they
receive hundreds of millions of
dollars each year in state
funds. That stands in contrast
for the disclosure requirements
for the most obscure state
agencies or the smallest mu-
nicipal government, not to
mention the 14 state-owned
schools in the Pennsylvania
State System of Higher Educa-
tion, which are fully subject to
the law,
Mutchler
said.
Republican
Gov. Tom
Corbett and
Senate Major-
ity Leader Do-
minic Pileggi,
R-Delaware, both said they
support reviewing the open re-
cords law, which was consid-
ered one of the weakest laws in
the nation until it was
changed. The Right-to-Know
law now assumes that most re-
cords are public, with specific
exemptions, reversing a long-
standing rule requiring resi-
dents to prove why records
were public when they request-
ed them.
Pileggi said Friday that he
wants to “review our entire sys-
tem of open records as it per-
tains to our state-related uni-
versities.” Corbett’s spokes-
man, Kevin Harley, said the
governor believes “it is time to
examine whether (Penn State)
should be subject to broad ex-
emptions of the Right-to-Know
Law.”
Blake said he has been con-
sidering changes to the statute
since his days as a senior Ren-
dell administration official in
the state Department of Com-
munity and Economic Devel-
opment, which includes the Of-
fice of Open Records, but the
scandal at Penn State has put
new emphasis on those efforts.
“Certainly, a higher level of
scrutiny could have revealed
something and allowed for ear-
lier detection” in the case, he
said.
Officials at the schools have
argued in favor of the exemp-
tion because they are quasi-
public institutions, receiving a
mix of private and public mon-
ey. Spanier and other officials
have said that including the
universities in the law would
discourage donors who wish to
remain anonymous and could
raise intellectual property is-
sues, among other concerns.
Sen. Blake wants bill
to change exemption
Lawmaker hopes to change
open records law for
state-related universities.
The Associated Press
Blake
REALTORS HONOR RHEA SIMMS
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
R
hea Simms of Lewith & Freeman Real Estate receives a bouquet of flowers from toast-
master Joseph Moore upon Simms being awarded the 2011 REALTOR of the Year on
Saturday at Greater Wilkes-Barre Association of REALTORS held at the Westmoreland
Club in Wilkes-Barre.
trol resulting from the child sex
abuse allegations against Joe Pa-
terno’s former assistant coach, Jer-
ry Sandusky. The evening before,
Syracuse placed basketball coach
Jim Boeheim’s top assistant, Ber-
nie Fine, on leave after old allega-
tions resurfaced that he molested
two former ballboys. Sandusky
and Fine each have denied the ac-
cusations against them.
In his letter to Penn State,
NCAApresident MarkEmmert re-
statedamessagethat schoolshave
beenreceivingsimplybywatching
the news.
“It is critical that each campus
and the NCAA as an Association
re-examine how we constrain or
encourage behaviors that lift up
young people rather than making
themvictims,” Emmert wrote.
Earlier this week at Michigan,
President Mary Sue Coleman
wrote an open letter to the univer-
sity community reminding people
tocall 911orthepolicedepartment
if they see a crime in progress.
“Thisisachancetoremindonean-
other that a community’s values
are lived out in the actions of each
of us as individuals,” she wrote.
At St. John’s, athletic director
Chris Monasch said the incidents
offered a good opportunity to em-
phasize to staffers “that if there is
an issue that’s inappropriate you
have to deal with it immediately.”
“A cover-up only makes it more
severe,” Monaschsaid. “Certainly,
we do background checks on the
people we hire for summer camps
and those types of things. We’re
trying to take precautions, but I
don’t know how you can prepare
for some of those things.”
At NorthCarolinaState, athletic
director Debbie Yowasks athletes
to anonymously complete a thor-
ough survey that includes a ques-
tionaskingif anathleticstaff mem-
ber ever engaged in inappropriate
contact.
“I think inthis case it was some-
thing that was so new, a new type
of allegation,” Yow said. “You’re
used to someone saying players
are gambling or there’s alcohol
abuse or there was a fight in the
parking deck or any number of
things like that —an NCAAviola-
tion, extra benefits. Thelist is very
long that we know about and we
try to protect against. This was a
new type of issue I don’t believe
that was on the radar of athletics
administrators.”
John Burness, the former long-
timevicepresident of publicaffairs
at Duke, said there could be a
“safety in numbers,” element for
victims who keep details of their
abuse quiet, but suddenly see a
chance to seek justice.
“I’m not surprised, nor would I
be surprised, if we saw people
coming forward nowto make alle-
gations,” Burness said. “Becauseit
could be more comfortable to do
so. That shouldn’t be discouraged.
It should be encouraged. At the
same time, we have to realize that
every allegation is not necessarily
true.”
At a couple of smaller schools
where sports aren’t as big a focus,
leaders nevertheless used the lat-
est episodes to put a sharper point
on their reporting policies.
“We all need an immediate real-
ity check,” Southern Baptist The-
ological Seminary president R. Al-
bert Mohler Jr., wrote in a letter
first reported by The Chronicle of
Higher Education.
REPORT
Continued fromPage 1A
PHILADELPHIA — The new
president of a charity founded
by a former Penn State assistant
football coach accused of mo-
lesting young boys said Friday
the organization is looking at
three options for its future and
may not close.
David Woodle, who was
named president of The Second
Mile this week after longtime
leader Jack Raykovitz resigned,
told The Patriot-News newspa-
per of Harrisburg that the orga-
nization was exploring how it
could stay open and keep serv-
ing children.
“No decision has been made,”
he told the newspaper in a re-
port posted on its website Fri-
day after The New York Times
reported that the charity was set
to be closed down, its programs
folded into other nonprofit orga-
nizations.
Woodle did not reply to mess-
ages from The Associated Press,
and phone calls to several board
members rang unanswered Fri-
day night.
The charity was founded in
1977 by Jerry Sandusky, who re-
tired from Penn State in 1999.
Sandusky, 67, was charged
this month with molesting eight
boys over a 15-year period in a
scandal that rocked the Penn
State campus in State College.
Authorities say some assaults
happened on the campus and
were reported to administrators
but not to police.
Sandusky has said he is in-
nocent. He has acknowledged
he showered with boys but said
he never molested them.
Woodle was quoted by the
Times earlier Friday as saying
that the charity was “working
hard to figure out how the pro-
grams can survive this event.”
“We aren’t protective of this
organization that it survives at
all costs,” he said.
He told The Patriot-News that
The Second Mile’s options in-
clude having the programs con-
tinue, transferring them to an-
other charity and closing.
“We hope (option No. 3)
doesn’t happen,” Woodle told
The Patriot-News. “We’re only
into this four days. We’re figur-
ing out what’s viable.”
But Lynne Abraham, a former
Philadelphia district attorney
hired by The Second Mile, said
the damage to the charity might
be irreparable.
Sandusky’s Second Mile may not close
New president of the charity
is looking at options for it to
remain open.
The Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
➛ timesleader.com
HARRISBURG
District collects $20 million
U.S. Attorney Peter J. Smith has
announced the Middle District of Penn-
sylvania collected over $20 million in
civil and criminal actions for the fiscal
year of 2011.
The office also recovered $2.2 mil-
lion in Medicare payments from health
care providers, in-
cluding $1.3 million as
part of a settlement
with Geisinger Med-
ical Center.
The district also
collected $7.9 million
in criminal and civil
forfeitures.
Forfeited assets are
used to restore funds to crime victims
and for a variety of law enforcement
purposes, including sharing with local
police departments.
WILKES-BARRE
Athletic Club, Y join up
The Athletic Club, 1140 Highway
315, and the Greater Wilkes-Barre
Family YMCA, 40 West Northampton
St., are teaming up to provide their
members new fitness opportunities.
The health clubs have entered into a
reciprocal agreement allowing a mem-
ber of either facility access to both
facilities at no additional charge.
The agreement follows the YMCA’s
announcement that it will eliminate
racquetball courts as part of a major
renovation project expanding the space
used as apartments. It will allow YM-
CA members to play racquetball at The
Athletic Club’s four courts, while Ath-
letic Club members will be able to
access the YMCA’s swimming pool, a
feature The Athletic Club doesn’t have.
For additional agreement details and
membership information, contact The
Athletic Club at 823-2124 or the YMCA
at 823-2191.
HARRISBURG
Driver centers will close
All Pennsylvania Department of
Transportation driver license and pho-
to centers will be closed Thursday and
Friday for the Thanksgiving holiday.
Customers may still obtain a variety
of driver and vehicle products and
services online through PennDOT’s
Driver and Vehicle Services website,
www.dmv.state.pa.us.
WILKES-BARRE
Practitioner program set
Wilkes University’s School of Nurs-
ing has launched a new online nurse
practitioner program for nurses wish-
ing to provide primary patient care for
the adult population. Classes start in
fall 2012.
Nurse practitioners are registered
nurses with advanced education and
clinical training that qualifies them to
manage patient care. They diagnose
and manage acute episodic and chronic
illnesses and utilize health promotion
and disease prevention interventions.
The scientific process and national
standards of care guide clinical practice
of nurse practitioners.
Wilkes’ 40-credit program is held
online with two on-campus residencies.
Students complete clinical hours in a
facility of their choosing, pending facul-
ty approval. Successful completion of
the program leads to a master’s degree
with a major in nursing with adult
nurse practitioner concentration. Stu-
dents will be eligible to sit for national
certification exams.
A16-credit adult nurse practitioner
post graduate certificate program is
also available for advanced-practice
nurses already holding a master’s de-
gree in nursing.
BERWICK
MetroCast to aid toy drive
MetroCast, a video, Internet and
phone provider, has partnered with the
U.S. Marine Corps Reserve’s “Toys for
Tots” program.
Through Dec. 15, MetroCast will
waive its standard installation fee for
new video or Video-Internet-Phone
package customers who donate a new,
unwrapped toy valued at $15 or more.
MetroCast technicians will collect
toys at the time of installation. Met-
roCast offices in Berwick and White
Haven also are official drop-off loca-
tions for the toys, which will be distrib-
uted to less fortunate children in the
region by the U.S. Marine Corps Re-
I N B R I E F
Smith
PLAINSTWP. –Fans of thecabletele-
vision show “The Cake Boss” had their
cake and ate some too Saturday at the
fifth anniversary celebration of the Mo-
hegan Sun at Pocono Downs casino.
Carlo’s Bakery of Hoboken, N.J., the
setting for the show, and its owner Bud-
dy Valastro, made the sweet treat re-
sembling the valet entrance with its
flame topped tower. A trio of harness
racing horses, gambling chips and play-
ing cards accented the cake.
“I think it’s pretty,” said 10-year-old
Grace Jeffrey of Wyoming.
A big fan of the show, her parents ac-
companied her to the casino where she
posed with her mother Nancy for a pho-
tograph in front of the
cake, which was sit-
ting on a cart just in-
side the entrance to
Breakers lounge.
A line of nearly 100
people stretched
along the carpeted
walkway circling the
casino floor for photos
and to get a piece of
the sheet cakes made
by the bakery.
Megan Millo, her sister Melissa and
mother Pat, all of Dallas, cut short their
Christmas shopping to see the cake.
“We knew it was going to be here,”
Casino’s birthday cake is winner
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs banquet supervisor Barbara Hughes wheels
out the casino’s fifth anniversary birthday cake Saturday evening.
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs
celebrates its fifth anniversary,
with help from a popular TV show.
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
See CAKE, Page 15A
A trio of har-
ness racing
horses, gam-
bling chips
and playing
cards accent-
ed the cake.
WILKES-BARRE – In the polarized
debate surrounding development of the
Marcellus Shale, where supporting ei-
ther the gas companies or their environ-
mentalist opponents risks attack from
the other side, Seamus McGraw seems
a rare figure: a man who wants to stand
in the middle.
McGraw, a Monroe County native,
has written a book titled “The End of
Country,” about natural gas drilling and
its consequences in and around Di-
mock, Susquehanna County.
The Institute for Energy and Environ-
mental Research invited McGraw to
speak at Wilkes University Saturday
and offer his perspective on the emer-
gent gas industry’s presence in Pennsyl-
vania and the debate it has stirred.
McGraw said he doesn’t view the gas
companies, as their opponents have de-
picted them, as moustache-twirling in-
dustrial barons quibbling about straws
and milkshakes. Nor does he see the in-
dustry in its self-styled guise of the flag-
brandishing
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Local author Seamus McGraw speaks at Wilkes University Saturday morning
about the impacts of natural gas drilling on rural Pennsylvania, which he wrote
about in his book, ‘The End of Country.’
Taking a view from the middle
in the debate over natural gas
Seamus McGraw says he’s not
against drilling per se. He wants
energy independence.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
See GAS, Page 10A
The Luzerne County Public De-
fenders office has made “dramatic im-
provements” in representing juve-
niles since the release of a state report
that heavily criticized the office, one
of the attorneys who
evaluated shortcom-
ings within the sys-
tem said.
Robert Listenbee, a
member of the Inter-
branch Commission
on Juvenile Justice,
said the creation of a
special juvenile de-
fenders unit within the Public De-
fender’s office has resulted in signif-
icant changes that have put it on path
to become a model for the state.
“There have been dramatic im-
provements in the unit since the In-
terbranch Commission report was is-
sued,” Listenbee said. “They are a ve-
ry engaging and very committed as a
group. I think they are off to a really,
really good start.”
The juvenile unit was recently
awarded a two-year, $158,000 grant
by the Pennsylvania Commission on
Crime and Delinquency that has al-
lowed it to further expand services,
said Chief Public Defender Al Flora,
who runs the unit along with attorney
Cheryl Sobeski-Reedy.
Luzerne County beat out two other
counties was among four counties
who competed for the grant, said
Mike Pennington, director of the Of-
fice of Juvenile Justice and Delin-
quency Prevention for PCCD.
Defenders
unit’s help
for youth is
commended
Reforms made in the wake of
scandal are noted in a report by the
Interbranch Commission.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
See REFORMS, Page 15A
Listenbee
WILKES-BARRE– Santa swept into
town on Saturday atop a shiny red
sleigh, signaling the start of the yule-
tide season at the annual holiday pa-
rade and tree light-
ing.
Santa rode down
South Main Street to
the delight of the
hundreds of specta-
tors whocame out tocatcha glimpse of
the North Pole’s number-one resident.
The all-day event began with a special
screening of the holiday classic, "A
Christmas Story," followed by a per-
formance by King’s College Cantores
Christi Regis Singers at the Ramada, a
fun-filled carol sing-along on Public
Square and culminating with a tree-
lighting ceremony at dusk
A N N U A L W I L K E S - B A R R E PA R A D E
A season for Santa
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Carmel Bianconi, 97, of Wilkes-Barre has a chat with Santa Claus at Saturday’s annual Christmas parade in down-
town Wilkes-Barre. She never misses the Christmas parade.
Symbol of holiday cheer arrives in W-B
King’s College students decked out in reindeer costumes march in the an-
nual Christmas parade along South Main Street.
By STEVEN FONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
See SANTA, Page 15A
INSIDE: Click
photos, 11A
• More photos,
16A
K
PAGE 4A SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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NEW HAVEN, CONN.
1 dies during tailgating
A
driver of a U-Haul truck
carrying beer kegs through
a tailgating area before the Yale-
Harvard game Saturday sudden-
ly accelerated, fatally striking a
30-year-old Massachusetts wom-
an and injuring two other wom-
en, police said.
It’s not clear why the driver
sped up, New Haven Police
spokesman David Hartman said.
The truck then crashed into
other U-Haul vans in the lot, an
open playing field used for pre-
game tailgating parties before
Yale home games in New
Haven.
Hartman said the driver was
in police custody.
He said the woman who was
killed was pronounced dead at
about 10:15 a.m. at Yale-New
Haven Hospital. Police did not
immediately release her identi-
ty.
FAIRBANKS, ALASKA
Record brr-eaking cold
Alaska’s second-largest city is
used to cold weather, but few
residents expected record-break-
ing cold this early in the season.
Shawn Ross has lived in Fair-
banks his entire life and says
few people were prepared for
this severe of a cold snap in
mid-November.
The Fairbanks Daily News-
Miner reported Fairbanks set a
new low temperature record on
Thursday. A temperature of 41
degrees below zero was record-
ed at Fairbanks International
Airport at 6:29 a.m.
The National Weather Service
in Fairbanks says that broke the
old record of 39 below set in
1969.
OUIDAH, BENIN
Pope unveils treatise
In a basilica built in the birth-
place of Africa’s Voodoo religion
in Benin, Pope Benedict XVI on
Saturday unveiled a treatise
outlining the role of the Cathol-
ic Church on the continent and
explained how Catholicism can
help address Africa’s chronic
wars and interact with indige-
nous practices.
Among the messages the
pope is bringing to Africa is that
Catholicism has evolved from
the religion practiced by the
missionaries who first brought
the church to this coastal town,
considered the cradle of Voo-
doo, a state religion in Benin
alongside Christianity and Is-
lam.
WASHINGTON
Impersonator fools AP
An Associated Press reporter
mistook an impersonator of
actor Christopher Walken on a
sports-talk radio program Friday
for Walken himself, leading the
news cooperative to include
comments mistakenly attributed
to the actor in its coverage of
the Natalie Wood death investi-
gation.
The AP corrected the story
about an hour later and told its
members not to use the in-
correct information.
The radio station, Washing-
ton, D.C.-based ESPN 980, in-
formed the AP that the Walken
impersonator appears weekly to
discuss sports-related topics for
a humorous segment. Walken
has a distinctive, staccato style
of speaking.
Walken was sharing a yacht
with Wood and her husband,
actor Robert Wagner, when the
actress drowned on Nov. 29,
1981.
During Friday’s appearance,
co-host Kevin Sheehan asked
impersonator Marc Sterne
about the Wood case. Sterne,
impersonating Walken, re-
marked: “We had a lot to drink
that night. There was Sambuca.
There was shouting. And then
there was tragedy. And that’s all
I can remember.”
The Walken impersonator
added that he went to bed after
reading “one of the Hardy Boys
novels” and awoke to learn that
Wood was dead.
I N B R I E F
ZINTAN, Libya — Moammar
Gadhafi’s former heir apparent
Seif al-Islamwas capturedbyrev-
olutionary fighters in the south-
ern desert Saturday just over a
monthafter his father was killed,
setting off joyous celebrations
across Libya and closing the
door on the possibility that the
fugitive son could stoke further
insurrection.
Seif al-Islam—whohas under-
gone a transformation from a
voice of reform in an eccentric
and reviled regime to one of In-
terpol’s most-wanted — now
faces the prospect of trial before
an international or Libyan court
to answer for the alleged crimes
of his late father’s four-decade
rule over the oil-rich North Afri-
can nation.
Thunderous celebratory gun-
fire shook the Libyan capital of
Tripoli and other cities after Li-
byan officials said Seif al-Islam,
who has been charged by the In-
ternational Criminal Court for
crimes against humanity, had
beendetainedabout 30miles (50
kilometers) west of the town of
Obari inanarea that borders Nig-
er, Mali and Algeria.
A photograph was widely cir-
culated showing the 39-year-old
son in custody, sitting by a bed
and holding up three bandaged
fingers as a guard looks on, al-
though Osama Juwaid, a spokes-
man for the fighters from Zintan
who made the arrest, said it was
an old injury caused by a NATO
airstrike and the detainee was
otherwise in good health.
“I am hopeful that the capture
of Gadhafi’s son is the beginning
of a chapter of transparency and
democracy and freedom,” Li-
bya’s interimPrime Minister Ab-
durrahim el-Keib at a news con-
ference in the mountain town of
Zintan, where Seif al-Islam was
taken after his capture.
ICC prosecutor Luis Moreno
Ocampo told The Associated
Press that he will travel to Libya
next week for talks with the
country’s transitional govern-
ment on where the trial will take
place. Ocampo said that while
national governments have the
first right to try their own citi-
zens for war crimes, his primary
goal was to ensure Seif al-Islam
has a fair trial.
Rebels capture Gadhafi’s fugitive son
Seif al-Islam now faces trial
before an international or
Libyan court.
AP PHOTO
This image from Libyan television and made available by the
Libyan Outreach group via Facebook, Saturday, purportedly
shows Seif al-Islam Gadhafi in custody in undisclosed location.
By RAMI AL-SHAHEIBI
and HADEEL AL-SHALCHI
Associated Press
CAIRO — Egyptian riot po-
lice firing tear gas and rubber
bullets stormed into Cairo’s
Tahrir Square Saturday to dis-
mantle a protest tent camp, set-
ting off clashes that killed two
protesters, injured hundreds
and raised tensions days before
the first elections since Hosni
Mubarak’s ouster.
The scenes of protesters
fighting with black-clad police
forces were reminiscent of the
18-day uprising that forced an
end to Mubarak’s rule in Febru-
ary. Hundreds of protesters
fought back, hurling stones and
setting an armored police vehi-
cle ablaze.
The violence raised fears of
new unrest surrounding the
parliamentaryelections that are
due to begin on Nov. 28. Public
anger has risen over the slow
pace of reforms andapparent at-
tempts by Egypt’s ruling gener-
als to retain power over a future
civilian government.
Witnesses said the clashes
began when riot police disman-
tled a small tent camp set up to
commemorate the hundreds of
protesters killed in the uprising
and attacked around 200 peace-
ful demonstrators who had
camped in the square overnight
in an attempt to restart a long-
term sit-in there.
“Violence breeds violence,”
said Sahar Abdel-Mohsen, an
engineer who joined in the pro-
test after a call went out on
Twitter urging people to come
to Tahrir to defend against the
police attacks. “We are tired of
this and we are not leaving the
square.”
Police fired rubber bullets,
tear gas and beat protesters
withbatons, clearingthe square
at one point and pushing the
fighting into surrounding side
streets of downtown Cairo.
A 23-year-old protester died
from a gunshot, said Health
Ministry official Mohammed el-
Sherbeni. At least 676 people
were injured, he said. At least
one other protester was killed
in Alexandria, where demon-
strations and clashes also took
place, said a security official,
speaking on condition of ano-
nymity because he was not au-
thorized to talk to journalists.
Clashes erupt in Egypt
AP PHOTO
A protester throws a tear gas grenade back at Egyptian riot police in Tahrir Square in Cairo,
Egypt, Saturday.
2 dead, hundreds hurt in renewed protests
By AYA BATRAWY
Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO — The
chancellor of the University of
California, Davis said Saturday
that the school was launching
an investigation after “chilling”
video images surfaced online
showing an officer using pepper
spray on several protesters as
they sit passively with their
arms interlocked.
“The use of the pepper spray
as shown on the video is chill-
ing to us all and raises many
questions about how best to
handle situations like this,”
Chancellor Linda Katehi said in
a message posted on the
school’s web site.
Katehi said she is forming a
task force comprised of faculty,
students and staff to review the
events surrounding the Friday
protest and the police response.
“While the university is trying
to ensure the safety and health
of all members of our communi-
ty, we must ensure our strate-
gies to gain compliance are fair
and reasonable and do not lead
to mistreatment,” her message
went on to say.
In the video, posted on You-
Tube and widely circulated on-
line, the officer displays a bottle
before spraying its contents on
the seated protesters in a sweep-
ing motion while walking back
and forth. Most of the protesters
have their heads down, but at
least one is hit in the face.
Some members of a crowd
gathered at the scene scream
and cry out. The crowd then
chants, “Shame on You,” as the
protesters on the ground are led
away. The officers retreat min-
utes later with helmets on and
batons drawn.
It’s not clear from the video
what agency the officer who
used the pepper spray repre-
sents. Officers from UC Davis
and other UC campuses as well
as the city of Davis responded
to the protest, according to An-
nette Spicuzza, UC Davis police
chief. Davis is about 80 miles
north of San Francisco.
AP PHOTO
A police officer uses pepper spray as he walks down a line of Oc-
cupy demonstrators sitting on the ground at UC Davis on Friday.
UC Davis begins probe
of protest pepper spray
By SUDHIN THANAWALA
Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan —Presi-
dent Hamid Karzai received a re-
sounding endorsement Saturday
from a traditional national as-
sembly to negotiate a security
agreement that could keep a U.S.
military presence in Afghanistan
past 2014, when most interna-
tional forces are to have left. The
size of the force is subject to ne-
gotiations but a future deal could
keep thousands of American
troops here for years.
The nonbinding resolution is-
sued at the end of a Loya Jirga as-
sembly alsosuggestedsome con-
ditions for the talks between Af-
ghan and American officials, in-
cluding an end to unpopular
night raids by military forces
searching for insurgents.
The more than 2,000 people
who attended the four-day meet-
ing asked Karzai to ensure the
United States hands over all de-
tainees to Afghan custody and
limits any agreement to10 years.
They also said the future pact
must be approvedby parliament.
“We will act on the basis of
your consultation,” Karzai told
the assembled delegates.
“I amvery happy that youhave
accepted it and have put lots of
conditions on it. I accept this res-
olution. It is the instruction to
the Afghan government fromthe
Afghan people.”
As part of a future deal, both
sides envision a force of several
thousand U.S. troops, who
would train Afghan forces and
helpwithcounterterrorismoper-
ations. The pact would outline
the legal status of that force inAf-
ghanistan, rules under which it
would operate and where it
would be based.
Afghanistan assembly favors talks to keep U.S. troops there past 2014
By AMIR SHAH and RAHIMFAIEZ
Associated Press
C M Y K
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PAGE 6A SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
The couple, married nine
months at the time, felt fortunate
he had made it home in one
piece. They knew nothing about
the invisible wounds that had
been inflicted upon his shattered
psyche.
The full extent of the damage
would not be known until years
later, when an increasingly irra-
tional, hostile and depressed Las-
kowski was diagnosed with post-
traumatic stress disorder, a debil-
itating psychological condition
brought on by witnessing or ex-
periencing a traumatic event.
Common affliction
The Department of Veterans
Affairs estimates that up 20 per-
cent of the 2.1millionsoldiers de-
ployed to Iraq and Afghanistan
since 2001 will be afflicted by
PTSD or some other mental
health condition related to their
service.
The degree and symptoms of
PTSDvarybut aregenerallychar-
acterized by depression, fear of
crowds, hyper-alertness, agita-
tion, nightmares and flashbacks.
For the Laskowskis, Stanley’s
diagnosis was a blessing and a
curse.
They were relieved to finally
have an explanation for his bi-
zarre behavior.
Why, they had wondered,
would he jump up and fly into a
rage when one of their children
dropped a toy on the hardwood
floors, creating a “bang?”
Why would he suddenly envi-
sion himself driving a Humvee in
Iraq when in reality he was inside
his Ford Taurus on the Cross Val-
ley Expressway?
And why would that dead Iraqi
soldier not allow let him to sleep
in peace?
Those are classic symptoms of
PTSD, the couple learned. Once
he was diagnosed, they set out to
do whatever was needed to get
him “fixed.”
But their efforts toobtaineffec-
tive treatment would turn into a
nightmare of its own.
Deployed in 2003
Sgt. Stanley Laskowski arrived
in Kuwait with the 3rd Battalion,
5th Marines, 1st Marine Division
in February 2003.
The unit was among the first
wave of Marines to invade Iraq.
At first, Laskowski’s unit,
tasked with invading Baghdad,
saw little combat. That changed
the afternoon of March 26, 2003,
when his platoon was ambushed
in a brief but intense attack on a
highway.
It was the 25-year-old’s first
taste of combat, and it would
havebeenhis last, if not for fellow
Marine Jared McNerney.
Standing a few arm lengths
apart, Laskowski and McNerney
were advancing toward the ene-
my. As they worked through the
hail of bullets, Laskowski looked
to his side to locate his comrades’
positions.
He didn’t see the Iraqi soldier
on the ground behind a sand pile.
“He was about to roll over and
put one in my head when McNer-
ney shot him,” Laskowski said.
Two weeks later, the platoon
had advanced within 20 miles of
Baghdad when they encountered
another fierce battle.
“We heard shots from all
around. It was hardtodistinguish
where the bullets were coming
from,” he said.
Minutes into the firefight, an
Iraqi soldier popped up from be-
hind a bush and fatally shot Las-
kowski’s friend, 22-year-old Cpl.
Eric Sylva, as he stood just 15 to
20 feet away.
The battles weighedheavily on
Laskowski, but tothis day he can-
not say if they caused his PTSD.
“Certain things bothered me
more than others, but I can’t say
this one incident did it,” he said.
“It’s more about the whole way
your mind starts to think while
you are over there.”
Throughout his tour, he per-
formed with valor and courage,
as reflected in reports issued by
several of his commanding offi-
cers who described him as a
“highly effective combat leader”
whowas “amongthe most valued
and respected in the company.”
For his efforts, he was awarded
the Navy and Marine Corps
Achievement Medal, Marine
Corps Good Conduct Medal, the
Combat Action Ribbon and sev-
eral others.
He returned to the United
States with plans to continue to
build his life with his wife and
children. They had no idea that
once he finished fighting the ene-
my in Iraq, he would face another
war at home.
This time, the enemy would be
him.
Uneasy feeling
It was supposed to be one of
the happiest days of Stanley and
Marisol Laskowski’s lives as they
gathered with family and friends
at a party to celebrate his return.
There was food, handshakes
and backslapping as dozens of
guests greetedandcongratulated
him for his service.
On the outside, Laskowski was
all smiles. No one sensed the fear
inside.
“It starts so subtle that you al-
most don’t notice it,” Laskowski
said. “I just didn’t feel comfort-
able about so many people in one
place.”
He shrugged off the feelings as
post-deployment jitters.
“A few months ago I was in a
place where if you saw a huge
crowd, something had already
happened or was about to hap-
pen. I thought it’s just residual
stuff. It will work its way out in
time.”
Shortly after the party, the Las-
kowskis returned to South Car-
olinawhereStanley, whowas still
in the Marines, was a rifle in-
structor at the Parris Islandtrain-
ing base. He remainedat the base
for four more years, working his
way up to chief rifle instructor.
Symptoms of PTSDfirst began
tomanifest while he was at Parris
Island, but they were relatively
mild, he said. He was uneasy be-
ing around people and occasion-
ally had a nightmare, but the
symptoms were manageable.
“I’m thinking, again, it’s leftover
stuff and will process its way out.
Maybe I was always this way and
I just never noticedit. Youkindof
rationalize things like there’s
nothing really wrong with me.”
In 2007 he took a new path in
life. He was discharged from the
Marines and moved back to the
Scranton area, where his extend-
edfamilylived. He landeda jobas
a salesman of financial products.
Life was looking up, but his
mental state was about to spiral
out of control.
Trigger for PTSD
Researchers say significant
changes in life, particularly those
that cause increased stress, are
often a trigger for PTSD.
After the family relocated, Las-
kowski grew increasingly para-
noid and agitated. Even the most
ordinary acts drew his suspicion.
“That guy on the street corner
– I gotta watch him. He’s got a
loose shirt so he could be carry-
ing a weapon,” Laskowski said.
“That vehicle that just drove by –
why was that guy looking at us?”
The nightmares continued to
escalate in intensity and frequen-
cy, sometimes occurring three or
four times a week.
“I’d wake up and feel like I’m
back there again,” Laskowski
said. “My brain is thinking, we
have to find the enemy. I’d grab a
baseball bat or golf club next to
the bed and walk through the
house to make sure nobody is
there.”
Sometimes he would not sleep
for three days. He developed
mood swings and became in-
creasingly irrational.
“I’d be in the house and one of
the kids would drop a toy in the
kitchen. I’d hear a loud bang and
immediately I’d want to dive off
my chair and hit the floor, think-
ing of how I can flank the enemy
that’s in my kitchen,” he said.
“In a matter of 3 seconds, of
course, I realize where I am and
what’s going on. Then I’m angry.
Why am I doing this? Why am I
acting like a lunatic?”
And then there were the flash-
backs.
“They were becoming down-
right scary,” Laskowski said. “I’d
be driving somewhere. All of a
sudden something will set me off
and for a fewseconds I’mdriving
a Humvee in the middle of Iraq. I
come back, and I’m in my Ford
Taurus on the Kingston express-
way.”
Perhaps most disturbing was
the cache of weapons he had
stashed throughout the home
and the targets he had placed on
every door – set to the height of
anaverage manso that he’dknow
howhighto aimto shoot through
the door if an intruder tried to
break in.
Thedepressionandanxietyled
him to begin abusing alcohol,
and, later, the painkiller Vicodin,
which he obtained illegally on
the street.
By then Marisol had reached
her breaking point. How, she
wondered, could the loving and
caring father and husband she
once knew have turned into this
“crazy guy?”
She had always been proud of
her husband’s service in Iraq, but
now she was seeing it in a new
light.
“When he decided to re-enlist,
that’s what I signed up for, so I
was OK. I didn’t know this was
coming,” she said, choking back
tears. “I didn’t know I was going
toget backa different guy, a scary
guy that wasn’t him anymore.”
Finally, in April 2007 Marisol
convinced him to seek help.
“We were arguing and the kids
were seeing him like that –
punching walls, punching the tel-
evision,” she said. “You don’t live
ina house full of weapons andtar-
gets on the doors. That’s not a
normal life. I was afraid of what
could happen.”
He made an appointment with
the Department of Veterans Af-
fairs Medical Center in Plains
Township. The medical staff im-
mediately suspected PTSD.
It’s what the VA did next, or,
Laskowski says, what it didn’t do,
that led to the next crisis.
Medications prescribed
The medical staff at the VAim-
mediately prescribed medica-
tions, including anti-anxiety
drugs and anti-depressants. He
was reluctant to take the drugs,
but agreed.“I said, is this really
necessary? I just want to talk to
someone. Isn’t there anyone I can
talk to?” Laskowski said. “They
said that will come later. You’re
going to take these for now.
They’regoingtohelpyoufeel bet-
ter.”
But things only worsened. He
began drinking even more heavi-
ly and abusing Vicodin.
The couple said they both re-
peatedly called the VA to advise
them that Stanley was getting
progressively worse. The re-
sponse was to alter his medica-
tion, but no counseling was pro-
vided.
Marisol watched helplessly as
he continued to unravel. At one
point she decided she and the
children had to get out.
“I’d look at him, and I would be
afraid. I would think what hap-
penedtohim? What’s wrongwith
him? And then I’m thinking to
myself, what’s wrong with me?
What the hell am I doing here
with him?”
She called the VA once again,
pleading withthe medical staff to
take some action to help him.
“I wanted someone to know I
was leaving him. I was afraid if I
left himand no one knewI wasn’t
there, he was going to go off and
do something and hurt some-
body,” she said.
He was a ticking time bomb,
and he was about to explode.
“I’m begging these people, do
something for me. Help me out,”
Stanley Laskowski said. “I’mask-
ing them the only way I know
how to help me, but that never
came. Then I find myself in a
pharmacy one night.”
Pharmacy break-in
The early morning of Aug. 13,
2007, Laskowski left behind his
life as a decoratedIraqi war veter-
an and became a criminal.
Shortly after 3 a.m. he drove to
a pharmacy in Olyphant,
smashed the windowwith a rock
and grabbed handfuls of opiate
painkillers andanti-anxiety med-
ications.
Four years following his arrest,
he still struggles to understand
and explain what happened that
night.
He hadrunout of Vicodinearli-
er that day and went out that eve-
ning in search of more. But he
had no intent to burglarize a
pharmacy, he said.
He recalls driving to the area,
making his way through back
yards, setting up “reconnais-
sance” of the building, then
breaking the window and enter-
ing.
What he can’t explain is why.
He was caught after a police of-
ficer saw his vehicle in the area
and became suspicious. Marisol
got the call around 7 the next
morning.
The arrest was a crushing blow
toher. She nowwas not onlydeal-
ing with a mentally ill husband,
but a mentally ill husband who
was in jail.
Stanley lost his job, and it
seemed that all hope was lost as
well.
His arrest, however, turnedout
to be the catalyst that finally
helped him get the treatment he
needed.
Counseling obtained
It was clear to Laskowski and
his family that he needed inten-
sive inpatient therapy. The VA
hospital in Plains Township re-
fused to accept him, however, be-
cause of the criminal charges,
Laskowski said.
His attorney, Patrick Casey of
Scranton, reached out to the VA
hospital in Coatesville 150 miles
away, which agreed to take custo-
dy of him.
He entered a 10-week counsel-
ing programthat dealt specifical-
ly with PTSD. Finally, he got
what he’dbeenasking for – some-
one to talk to. He began to learn
how to deal with the trauma he
experienced in Iraq. That led to
an immediate lessening of his
PTSD symptoms.
“All the things that happened
over there, you try not to think
about them. You push them
down. Yougototherapy, andnow
you’re talking about that stuff,”
he said.
“It’s kind of like an emotional
numbing. The more you talk
about it, the more you can talk
about it and the more it becomes
OK to talk about it. Before that,
you’re thinking ‘I can’t talk about
this, ever.’ ”
The VA has acknowledged the
depth of Laskowski’s condition.
He was declared to be 100 per-
cent disabled as a result of his
PTSD and receives a monthly
disability pension of roughly
$3,100.
The criminal case against Las-
kowski concluded in May 2008.
Aware of his diagnosis of PTSD,
Lackawanna County prosecutors
allowed him to plead guilty to a
reduced charge of drug posses-
sion. He was sentenced to two
years probation through a first-
time offenders program that al-
lowed him to get his record ex-
punged.
Following his discharge from
Coatesville, he continued indi-
vidual counseling with a private
counselor.
Today he only has one or two
nightmares every few months.
He still gets unusually startled if
his children drop a toy, but he no
longer dives for cover.
And the arsenal of weapons he
stashed in his house is gone.
But that sense of anxiety
aroundpeople still remains. With
Marisol’s urging and support, he
can occasionally go to a restau-
rant – in off-peak hours when not
so many people are there.
And then there’s that ritual the
family goes through each time
they return from a trip.
“He has to come in the house
first and make sure it’s OKfor ev-
eryone else before we can get out
of the car,” Marisol said.
They have learned to take
those issues in stride, and even
attempt to find humor in some
situations – like the time she
woke him from a dream in which
he was firing mortars at the
neighbor’s house.
“Most wives, if they go to wake
up their husband and he says ‘I’m
firing mortars at the house down
the road,’ they’d be like, what are
you talking about?” Laskowski
said. “She’s like, ‘OK, stop with
the mortars and get up.’ ”
It’s been a long, arduous road
back to mental health – a journey
Laskowski said would not have
been possible had his wife not
stood by him.
There were a several times Ma-
risol agonized over leaving him,
she said. But her love and devo-
tion wouldn’t let her give up on
him or that sliver of hope that
some day she would get back the
man she married.
“I still have that hope, but I’ve
come tothe realizationthat that’s
probably not going to happen,”
she said. “I love him. I’ve just
come to accept it.”
Bitterness lingers
While the couple is grateful for
the help he received at the Coa-
tesville VA, they remain bitter
that help did not come sooner.
In 2010 they filed a multimil-
lion-dollar federal lawsuit
against the Department of Veter-
ans Affairs, alleging Stanley had
received substandard care at the
Plains Township VA that led to
the progression of his PTSD.
Vince Riccardo, spokesman for
the medical center, said he could
not comment on the suit, citing
the VA’s policy to not comment
on pending litigation.
The case is in the final pre-trial
stages and is expected to go to
trial soon. The Laskowskis hope
to recover significant damages
for emotional trauma, as well as
lost wages.
Equally important, they say, is
their hope that his case will lead
to changes in how the VA treats
vets suffering from PTSD.
“There are a lot of us walking
around, guys like me who think
it’s just something in my head
and will work its way out,” Las-
kowski said. “I feel like someone
dropped the ball with me … If
somebody else goes up there and
says, ‘Is there someone I can talk
to?’ I want to make sure that guy
gets to talk to someone.”
STRESS
Continued from Page 1A
NIKO KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Former Marine Sgt. Stanley Laskowski and his wife, Marisol, discuss the struggles they endured in seeking help for Stanley’s post-traumatic stress disorder.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 7A
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the painkiller, Vicodin?
Or was it a plea for help
from a veteran tormented by
memories of war, who acted
in desperation after his at-
tempts to obtain mental
health counseling were ig-
nored?
That’s the question a federal
judge must answer as he con-
siders a $10 million medical
malpractice lawsuit Laskowski
and his wife, Marisol, filed
against the Department of
Veterans Affairs relating to his
treatment at its medical cen-
ter in Plains Township.
The lawsuit, filed last year,
alleges medical professionals
botched the mental health
treatment provided to Laskow-
ski after he was diagnosed in
April 2007 with post-traumatic
stress disorder, a psycholog-
ical condition that results
from experiencing a severe
traumatic event. The most
common symptoms include
fear of crowds, nightmares,
flashbacks and mood swings.
Similar lawsuits
The suit is the latest in a
growing number of actions
nationwide that have been
filed against the Department
of Veterans Affairs for alleged-
ly providing substandard care
to veterans suffering PTSD.
In 2009 the VA agreed to
pay $350,000 to settle a law-
suit filed by the family of
Jeffrey Lucey of Massachu-
setts, who committed suicide
after he became increasingly
despondent over failed efforts
to treat him for his mental
health problems.
Attorney Cristobal Bonifaz
of Conway, Mass., who repre-
sented Lucey’s family, said his
case paved the way for other
suits because it defined the
legal basis upon which a fam-
ily or soldier could seek to
recover damages.
Under federal law, the U.S.
government is immune from
lawsuits relating to injuries a
soldier suffered during com-
bat, Bonifaz said.
“The focus of the case was
not what happened in Iraq,
but what happened here,”
Bonifaz said. “I was not claim-
ing damages for the PTSD
itself. That was caused by the
war. I was saying he had
PTSD and the VA had a duty
to treat him and they didn’t.”
That’s the key issue in Las-
kowski’s case.
Laskowski, 33, of Carbon-
dale, has been declared 100
percent disabled as a result of
his PTSD, which resulted
from his experiences during a
5½-month tour of duty in Iraq
in 2003.
Laskowski was seen at the
VA’s medical center in Plains
Township from April to Au-
gust 2007, when he was ar-
rested. In that entire time he
was given only medications
and never provided any coun-
seling, according to the law-
suit filed by attorney Dan
Brier of Myers, Brier and
Kelly in Scranton.
Lawsuit allegations
The lawsuit contends the
lack of proper care caused
Laskowski’s PTSD to progress
unabated. That led him to self
medicate with alcohol and
drugs. His break-in at an Oly-
phant pharmacy was a desper-
ate attempt to obtain drugs he
believed would relieve his
symptoms.
The key legal issue in the
case, which will be heard in a
non-jury trial, is whether the
VA’s alleged negligence was a
direct and proximate cause of
the injuries Laskowski claims
to have suffered, which in-
clude mental anguish, past
and future lost earnings and
medical expenses.
A psychological expert for
the VA has acknowledged the
care provided to Laskowski
fell below expected medical
standards, according to court
documents filed in the case.
Vince Riccardo, spokesman
for the VA, declined comment
on the suit, citing the hospi-
tal’s policy not to discuss
pending litigation.
In court records, the VA has
denied liability, arguing there
was no way medical staff there
could foresee that Laskowski
would commit a crime.
The VA also contends Las-
kowski initially downplayed
the severity of his symptoms
to medical staff. In a pre-trial
memorandum, Assistant U.S.
Attorney Michael Thiel said
Laskowski admitted he first
experienced PTSD symptoms
shortly after he returned from
Iraq, but didn’t seek treatment
until 2007 out of fear the
stigma could impact his mil-
itary career.
There’s also a legal dispute
over whether Laskowski is
barred from seeking damages
because his alleged injuries
were caused by his own action
in burglarizing the pharmacy.
Brier said the VA has placed
too much emphasis on the
burglary. The issue, he said, is
not so much the crime Las-
kowski committed, but what
caused him to commit the
crime.
“The incident at the phar-
macy was a dramatic manifes-
tation of his mistreated
PTSD,” Brier said. “If he had
received the care he was entit-
led to from the VA, he would
not be 100 percent disabled
today and he would not have
resorted to painkillers to avoid
the emotional horrors of his
combat-related PTSD.”
SUIT
Continued from Page 1A
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BALTIMORE SUN/JOHN MAKELY
Marines in Sgt. Stanley Laskowski’s unit look over a hill during a battle near Al Muhaydi As
Salih, Iraq in April 2003. One of Laskowski’s friends was killed in the battle.
“If he had received the care he was entitled to
from the VA, he would not be 100 percent dis-
abled today... ”
Dan Brier
Laskowski’s lawyer
“It’s residual stuff fromthe war. It
will pass.”
Former Marine Sgt. Stanley
Laskowski can’t count the number
of times he said those words to
himself as he tried to make sense of
the anxiety, flashbacks and depres-
sion that plagued himupon his
return froma tour of duty in Iraq in
2003.
Laskowski, 33, had heard the
termpost-traumatic stress disorder
many times. But surely, that
couldn’t be what he had. That only
afflicts weak-minded people, those
looking to “get out of doing stuff,”
he thought.
It’s a common perception among
the general public and those serving
in the military, leading many of
those who are afflicted with the
mental condition to avoid seeking
treatment, say experts who treat the
disorder.
The Department of Veterans
Affairs estimates that up to 30 per-
cent of Vietnamveterans and 20
percent of veterans who served in
Iraq and Afghanistan currently
suffer or will develop PTSD. Yet
studies reveal that as many as two-
thirds of those veterans are not
receiving treatment, according to a
report by Military Pathways, a
nonprofit organization that provides
mental health assessment services
to military personnel.
“There is an element of pull
yourself up by your bootstraps,” said
Dr. Joseph Boscarino, a social psy-
chologist at the Center for Health
Research at Geisinger Clinic in
Danville, who is an expert in PTSD.
“You have to soldier on and suck it
up. It’s part of the job and your
identity, and you take pride in it.”
For most people, symptoms of
PTSDdevelop within a fewmonths
of the traumatic event, but the
condition is also known to lie dor-
mant for years, Boscarino said.
“A study of World Trade Center
responders showed some people
didn’t develop PTSDuntil a year or
two after,” he said. “The memories
go back into the unconscious and
stay there. When there is a big
change in your environment or you
get more stress, it doesn’t have to
be traumatic stress, it manifests
itself.”
Laskowski, of Carbondale, no-
ticed something was wrong shortly
after he finished his tour of duty in
July 2003. He was extremely edgy
around people and began experi-
encing nightmares.
As time went on, his symptoms
got progressively worse, coming to
a head in 2007 after he was dis-
charged fromthe military and
moved his family fromSouth Car-
olina to the Scranton area.
The circumstances surrounding
service in Iraq and Afghanistan,
including multiple deployments, the
inability to identify the enemy, lack
of real safe zones and the inad-
vertent killing of innocent civilians,
make veterans of those conflicts
particularly prone to develop PTSD,
researchers say.
Yet despite significant research,
the mental health community still
doesn’t fully understand why some
people who have experienced trau-
ma develop the disorder, and others
don’t.
Research has shown those with
pre-existing mental conditions, such
as depression and substance abuse,
and those who experienced trauma
earlier in life or have a family histo-
ry of mental illness are more prone
to develop PTSD.
“We are finding that people who
get post traumatic stress disorder
tend to have a lot of risk factors
before deployment. Their deploy-
ment triggers the onset of symp-
toms,” Boscarino said.
In most cases, symptoms typical-
ly last for several months. But oth-
ers will be afflicted for years, and
possibly the rest of their lives.
Laskowski has had to come to
terms with that reality.
He is continuing to receive coun-
seling for his symptoms and has
made significant progress. But he’s
been told it’s unlikely he will ever
fully recover.
“I had thought that, if I’mon my
medications and do whatever the
VA told me to do, eventually this is
going to go away,” he said. “They
set me straight that I’mprobably
going to have this, at least some
formof it, for the rest of my life. It
was a sobering moment.”
Here’s what to watch
out for with PTSD
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
C M Y K
PAGE 8A SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 9A
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ing the anchor R/C Wilkes-
Barre Movies 14 complex, but
that’s for sale too, at an asking
price of $8.5 million.
William Geary, the private de-
veloper who took over most of
the retail and theater space from
the chamber, filed for bankrupt-
cy in California and has been
barred from working as a broker
or salesperson for violating the
state’s real estate code.
A similar property he man-
aged in Florida has been fore-
closed on by lenders, and a
pending civil suit in California
accused him of misappropriat-
ing funds and concealing deals
he made on properties he man-
aged for investors.
Geary did not return a call
seeking comment.
Support for Geary
Still, city and economic devel-
opment officials have stood be-
hind him and blamed the high
vacancy rate on the poor econo-
my, even though others business
owners have ventured into the
same risky environment.
Within walking distance of
the project that starts on South
Main Street and wraps around
to East Northampton Street,
bars and restaurants such as Ca-
fé Toscana, Thai Thai and Mulli-
gan’s Irish Pub opened in spaces
outfitted without the benefit of
state funding.
Mulligan’s owner Ron Ka-
mionka said he was not ap-
proached by anyone from Uni-
versity Corners.
“This was absolutely a wise
investment of public funds to
stimulate positive development
in the city,” said Drew
McLaughlin the city’s adminis-
trative coordinator in an email
response to inquiries about the
project.
“The University Corners pro-
ject was the catalyst for all of the
downtown development which
followed the opening of the mo-
vie theater in 2006.”
State funding found
In October 2008, the city ap-
plied for $1 million in Local
Share funds the state distributes
annually from taxes on gam-
bling revenues. Municipalities
request the money to bankroll
projects dealing with economic
development, health and safety
and the mitigation of impacts
from gambling from Mohegan
Sun at Pocono Downs and other
casinos throughout the state.
The state Department of
Community and Economic De-
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
The first floor of the University Corners.
CORNERS
Continued from Page 1A
See CORNERS, Page 12A
“This was absolutely a
wise investment of pub-
lic funds to stimulate
positive development in
the city. The University
Corners project was the
catalyst for all of the
downtown development
which followed the open-
ing of the movie theater
in 2006.”
Drew McLaughlin
Administrative coordinator
C M Y K
PAGE 10A SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
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Name:_________________________________
Address:________________________________
_______________________________________
Phone:_________________________________
Email:__________________________________
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He sees the gas companies as
corporations; machines with the
singular function of making
profit, much the same as any
other company, and said it is in
everyone’s best interest to view
and treat them that way.
McGraw said gas companies
are developing new technolo-
gies every day that can greatly
reduce the risk of environmen-
tal damage and the industry’s
carbon footprint. The problem
is that they aren’t applying
them, by and large, because
they have no monetary incen-
tive to do so.
“They are not motivated by
the better angels of their nature;
they are not,” McGraw said.
“But we need to use the in-
stincts that they’ve got… You
appeal to greed.”
Doing so could begin with a
severance tax on gas extraction
with a rate that could be re-
duced for companies that em-
ploy green practices like con-
verting their diesel
fleet trucks to run on
cleaner-burning gas
and fashioning stur-
dier gas-well casings.
Though “fright-
ened and hesitant,”
McGraw said he ulti-
mately supports do-
mestic gas drilling,
mainly because he
doesn’t want more
American soldiers to
fight wars “defend-
ing someone else’s
oil.”
It’s also important
to remember, he
said, that the world’s non-renew-
able resources are running out
and that global warming is a
real concern, a point he drove
home at the start of his speech
by tossing to the floor a 19.6-
pound bag of coal representing
the energy the average Amer-
ican consumes daily.
“There are real perils to de-
veloping the Marcellus,” he
said. “But when we talk about
risks, we need to view those
risks in context.”
Some of his opinions clearly
didn’t sit well with
many of roughly the
30 who attended the
lecture, among
them both oppo-
nents and backers of
local drilling.
McGraw held an
hour-long discussion
after reading a chap-
ter from his book,
and some chal-
lenged his asser-
tions and his fig-
ures.
But at the very
least, McGraw gave
the crowd some-
thing to think about, and that’s
exactly what the Institute
hoped for in inviting him to
speak, Associate Director Ken
Klemow said.
“Our goal is to bring in peo-
ple with different philosophies
on energy and the Marcellus
Shale in the interest of better
educating the public,” Klemow
said.
GAS
Continued from Page 3A
McGraw said he
doesn’t view the
gas companies, as
their opponents
have depicted
them, as mous-
tache-twirling in-
dustrial barons
quibbling about
straws and milk-
shakes.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 11A
➛ C L I C K
2
6
6
6
9
3
News. Events. Captured Moments.
Reader submitted photos that’s as easy as drag and drop or a simple click and upload.
Now you can create your own online photo gallery.
Start sharing your collection today at photos.timesleader.com. m.
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DOWNTOWN WILKES-BARRE
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OUTSTANDING LEADERS
FORUM: THOMAS FRIEDMAN
SPAGHETTI BENEFIT FOR
FIREFIGHTER MIKE AVERY
PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Cousins Hailey Gyle, 8, left, and Breanna Gyle, 7, of Edwardsville
dance to Christmas tunes during Christmas parade Saturday.
Helen Donovan of Plains Township and granddaughter Emily Wo-
lak, 8 months old, of Pittston
Kiera Thompson, 3, of Wilkes-Barre, left, Michelle Harenza of
Hanover Township, Ava Malacarne, 4, of Wilkes-Barre, and Mary
Lou Thompson of Wilkes-Barre
Jennifer Franze of Wilkes-Barre with her daughter Victoria, 17
months old
Kristen Stevenson of Kingston with her son Kayden, 4
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Karen Alessi, left, Dina Udomsak and Kathleen Houlihan
Mary Simmons, left, and Sara Hagenbach
Mike Wood, left, Lissa Bryan-Smith and Richard Smith
Albert G. Albert and Barbara
Albert Alison Drake and Jared Sabol
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Mikey, 3, Brandi, Michael and Mackenzie Avery, 8
Jessie, 16, Ella Rose, 6, Shannon and Jacob Seabridge, 15
Front, Sue Kuc and Ruth Kinney; back, Christina and Jameer Kuc
Elis, left, Haley, 5, and Jerry Yale
C M Y K
PAGE 12A SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
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The Quandel Group Inc. of
Harrisburg was paid $550,321for
contracted work. Borton Lawson
Architecture of Plains Township
was paid $40,721.
Panzitta Enterprises Inc. of
Wilkes-Barre and G.C. Wall Inc.
velopment in2009awarded$13.8
million to 22 projects, including
University Corners, known at
that time as the Northampton
and Main Street mixed-use facil-
ity.
Among the other recipients of
state funds were: Dallas,
$750,000 for Misericordia Uni-
versity’s College of Health Sci-
ences; Freeland, $412,315 for
streetscape improvements; and
Wyoming, $799,195 for public
safety projects.
In its application to DCED, the
city said the project “is specifical-
ly designed to ‘reknit’ the frayed
urban fabric of downtown
Wilkes-Barre.”
At full occupancy, the Universi-
ty Corners was expected to cre-
ate between 60 and 115 full-time
jobs, the application said.
The downtown Wilkes-Barre
project has a combination of re-
tail and residential components
that have since been sold to sep-
arate owners.
Above the storefronts sit 21
condominiums that make up the
Elevation Lofts on Main devel-
oped and managed by Susque-
hanna Real Estate of York. Eigh-
teen of the lofts have been sold.
Part of the state grant was usedto
soundproof ceilings of the retail
space so that loft residents would
not hear noise of business being
conducted below.
The work on the retail space
began in 2009, and the first of 10
payments made to the city for re-
imbursement to contractors was
made in December of that year.
The last payment was made on
July 29.
The payments totaled
$982,370, and 60 percent of that
went toward completion of the
planned Irish pub.
According to records provided
by the DCED, infrastructure
work on the Irish pub cost
$591,042.
of Wyoming were the other two
contractors onthe project that re-
ceived payments for work done
on other retail space.
In the email comments from
the city, McLaughlin said the
“possibility” of an Irish pub was
discussed by Geary, but the im-
provements to the space make it
suitable for other tenants.
The city is awaiting the time
when that and the other spaces
are filled, McLaughlin added.
“The city has a realistic expec-
tation,” he said, “that once the
economy completes its recovery,
there will be any number of po-
tential business ventures that
will enhance South Main and
Northampton Streets and build
upon the existing foundation of a
thriving downtown business dis-
trict whether it be restaurant, re-
tail, or other merchant opportu-
nity in University Corners.”
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
The mezzanine features a window wall.
CORNERS
Continued from Page 9A
The first floor of the University Corners property.
DALLAS – Cymbals valued
between $1,800 and $2,000
were reported stolen during a
burglary Saturday morning
from Wayne’s World music
store at 419 Memorial High-
way.
Matthew Pall, an employee,
said store surveillance
showed a car pull up around
3 a.m. and a rock was
thrown, breaking the front
window. A male dressed in
black reached inside and
grabbed 10 Zildjian cymbals
from a display rack.
WILKES-BARRE TWP. –
Police are investigating a fire
Friday afternoon that spread
from a camper to other vehi-
cles in John’s Auto yard on
Augusta Street.
Township fire chief John
Yuknavich said juveniles were
seen running from the area.
A state police fire marshal
was scheduled to investigate.
Ashley and Laurel Run fire
departments assisted at the
fire scene, said Yuknavich.
WILKES-BARRE - City
police reported the following:
• Robyn Hoban of Terrace
Drive, Mountain Top reported
Saturday night her purse was
stolen from her vehicle while
it was parked on South Penn-
sylvania Avenue.
• Michael Whitest was
arrested Saturday afternoon
on entering the fenced-in yard
of Sherry Guy on High Street
without her permission.
Whitest will be charged with
criminal trespass.
• A gunman robbed the
Rite Aid Pharmacy on Amber
Lane Thursday night. The
man came to the register and
demanded money. He had a
handgun and left the store
with cash. The gunman is a
black male in his mid 20s
and approximately 150
pounds. He was wearing a
gold or tan hooded sweatshirt
and blue jeans.
POLICE BLOTTER
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 13A
➛ O B I T U A R I E S
The Times Leader publish-
es free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid
obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. A funeral
home representative can call
the obituary desk at (570)
829-7224, send a fax to (570)
829-5537 or e-mail to tlo-
bits@timesleader.com. If you
fax or e-mail, please call to
confirm. Obituaries must be
submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 7:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Obituaries must be sent by a
funeral home or crematory,
or must name who is hand-
ling arrangements, with
address and phone number.
We discourage handwritten
notices; they incur a $15
typing fee.
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H otelBerea vem entRa tes
825.6477
Happy 50th Birthday In Heaven
THOMAS
NORVELL JR.
11/20/61 - 6/22/11
Your beloved Cathy Huk, Children,
Grandchildren, Godchildren, Sisters
& Brothers and family & friends
Missed, loved & always in our hearts
RIP
In Loving Memory Of
Harry J. Butchko
6/30/24-11/20/10
It’s been a year now that
you have been gone and not a
day goes by that you are not
thought about and missed.
We love you Dad.
Sadly missed by Wife, Sons,
Daughters, Grandchildren
and Family
BROSKOSKE – Ronald, funeral
services noon Monday in the
Stanley S. Stegura Funeral Home
Inc., 614 S. Hanover St., Nanti-
coke. Divine Liturgy at 12:30 p.m.
at Transfiguration of Our Lord
Ukrainian Catholic Church, Ha-
nover Section of Nanticoke.
Friends may call today from 4 to
7 p.m. at the funeral home. A
Parastas Service will be held at 6
p.m. by the Rev. Roman Petrysh-
ak.
GIRVAN – Frank, funeral 9 a.m.
Monday in the Hugh P. Boyle &
Son Funeral Home Inc., 416
Wyoming Ave., Kingston. Mass of
Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St.
Ann’s Chapel, Kingston. Friends
may call today 5 to 8 p.m.
JONES – Patricia, funeral 11 a.m.
Tuesday in the Nulton Funeral
Home Inc., 5749 SR 309, Beau-
mont. Friend may call Tuesday 10
a.m. until time of service.
KOBYLARSKI – Anthony, funeral
services 11:30 a.m. Monday in the
Jendrzejewski Funeral Home, 21
North Meade Street, Wilkes-
Barre. Mass of Christian Burial at
noon in Our Lady of Hope Parish,
Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call
today 6 to 9 p.m.
LIBENSON – Arnold, shiva 2 to 4
and 7 to 9 p.m. Monday in the
family residence, 126 Pollock Dr.,
Brooks Estates, Jenkins Town-
ship.
MIKUSH – Elizabeth, Mass of Chris-
tian Burial 9 a.m. Monday in Our
Lady of Hope Parish, 40 Park
Ave., Wilkes-Barre
MITCHNECK – David, funeral 1 p.m.
today in the Rosenberg Funeral
Chapel Inc., 348 S. River St.,
Wilkes-Barre.
STEVENS – Frank Jr., funeral ser-
vice 4 p.m. today in the E. Blake
Collins Funeral Home, 159 George
Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may
call 2 p.m. until the time of ser-
vice.
STROH – Joseph, funeral services 9
a.m. Monday in the Kopicki Funer-
al Home, 263 Zerbey Ave., King-
ston. Mass of Christian Burial at
9:30 a.m. in St. Ignatius Church,
Kingston. Friends may call 2 to 4
p.m. today at the funeral home.
SWEENEY – Mary, funeral services
9 a.m. Monday in the Nat &
Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park
Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St.
Andrew’s Parish, Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call 2 to 4 p.m. today
in the funeral home.
FUNERALS
LOUISE M. JUST, 76, of Du-
pont, passed away peacefully on
Friday, November 18, 2011 in Hos-
pice Community Care, Dunmore,
following a prolonged illness. The
complete obituary will appear in
Monday’s edition.
Funeral arrangements are
pendingfromthe Peter J. Adonizio
Funeral Home.
F
rank T. Girvan, 65, of NorthLan-
don Avenue, Kingston, passed
away Thursday, November 17, 2011,
at home following an illness.
Born November 25, 1945, in Dal-
las, hewas thesonof thelateFrancis
and Mary Homan Girvan. He at-
tendedGate of Heavengrade school
and was a graduate of the former
West Side Central Catholic High
School, Kingston.
Upon moving to Kingston, he re-
sided on Wyoming Avenue.
He was associated with the fam-
ily business, Francis Girvan’s Cus-
tom Kitchens located on Wyoming
Avenue, Kingston.
Mr. Girvan was a U.S. Navy veter-
an aboard the USS Princeton. He
was later employed by Matthews
Wood Products, Luzerne.
Prior to his retirement, he was
employed by Carpenter’s Union Lo-
cal 645 out of Scranton. Mr. Girvan
was amember of St. Ignatius Parish,
Kingston, and was a third degree
member of the Knights of Colum-
bus, Assumpta Council 3987, Lu-
zerne. Frank loved woodworking.
Preceding him in death was a
brother Robert.
Surviving are his wife, the former
Jane Rogan; sons, Seanandhis wife,
Lori, Forty Fort; Scott and his wife,
Kristin, Newtown Square, Pa.;
daughter, Megan, Kingston; grand-
sons, Aaron and Jack Girvan; broth-
ers, Theodore, Georgetown, Texas,
and Edward, Round Rock, Texas; a sis-
ter, Kathryn Beurlen and her husband,
Clark, Tarpin Springs, Fla.; a foster sis-
ter, Martha Spare, Wilkes-Barre; sever-
al nieces and nephews; grand-nieces
and grand-nephews.
Funeral for Frank will be held
Monday at 9 a.m. fromthe Hugh
P. Boyle &Son Funeral Home Inc., 416
Wyoming Ave., Kingston, followed by
a Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m.
in St. Ann’s Chapel, located at the cor-
ner of East Hoyt Street and North
Loveland Avenue, Kingston. Inter-
ment will be in Fern Knoll Burial Park,
Dallas.
Friends may call today from 5 to 8
p.m.
Frank T. Girvan
November 17, 2011
G
ary Ford, 43, of Wilkes-Barre,
passed away quietly on Wednes-
day, November16, 2011, surrounded
by family and friends.
He was a 1986 graduate of G.A.R.
Memorial High School and he at-
tended Luzerne County Communi-
ty College and King’s College. He
was anavidfanof news andpolitical
shows and he spent hours chatting
and blogging politics and playing
with his cat, Pickles. Gary was self-
employed as a computer technician
and website designer.
He is survived by his loving fa-
ther, Frederick L. Ford Jr. and his
stepmother, Jean Ford of Halifax,
Pa., and by a brother, Frederick L.
Ford III of Swoyersville; half-broth-
er, Sean Ford of Wanamie; nieces
and nephews. He also leaves behind
lifelong friends, Daniel and Collette
Carey of Wilkes-Barre and Michael
Caselli of Olyphant.
Private funeral services were
held at the convenience of the fam-
ily. Interment was in Mount Green-
wood Cemetery, Shavertown.
Memorial donations may be made
tothe S.P.C.A. of Luzerne County, 524
East Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702 or to the Leukemia & Lympho-
ma Society, 961 Marcon Blvd., Suite
452, Allentown, PA18109.
Funeral arrangements were by the
Nat &Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park
Avenue, Wilkes-Barre.
Online condolences may be made
at www.natandgawlasfuneralhome-
.com.
Gary Ford
November 16, 2011
D
ale Lee Gless passed away
peacefullyThursday, November
17, 2011.
He was born February 7,1930, as
the secondsontolovingparents Ge-
orge and Nellie Gless of Kent, Ohio,
and was husband to Mary Ellen
Opalenik, wed November 12, 1955,
in St. Patrick’s, Kent, Ohio.
He was the father of Heather
Kimberly and Honor Koren (wed to
James DeLancey, parents of Kyle
James and Connor Morgan DeLan-
cey); brother of Raymond Gless and
brother-in-law to Helen (deceased),
Rootstown, Ohio; uncle to Ray-
mondJr., Rosie andRobert; brother-
in-law to George and Betty Opale-
nik, Wadsworth, Ohio, and uncle to
Matthew, Debbie, Martin and Su-
san.
Dale was a graduate of Kent State
High School and the1st Mechanical
Engineering graduating class of
Northrop Institute of Technology,
Inglewood, Calif.
Upon graduation, Dale was hired
as plant engineer for American Cya-
namid in Pensacola, Fla. To be clos-
er to his family in Ohio, he accepted
a position with Owens-Illinois in
Perrysburg, Ohio. He spent two
years at that facility then accepted a
transfer to the Vineland, N.J., loca-
tion. Two years later, he moved his
family again when he accepted the
position as plant engineer at the
Owens- Illinois (Kimble Division)
plant in Pittston. After the division
closed in the early ’80s, Dale went
on to enjoy careers at Johnson-John-
son, Aerotek, and other local com-
panies. He was also a part-time in-
structor at Luzerne County Com-
munity College.
Dale spent many hours flying his
Cessna “79-B” (the nickname he
lovingly bestowed on his airplane).
He spent many hours flying across
the Untied States, particularly in
Ohio, New Jersey, California and
Florida.
In addition to being a successful
engineer, pilot and father, he was an
accomplishedcarpenter, draftsman,
builder, and mechanic and musi-
cian. Dale designed and built two of
his residences, repaired, restored
and maintained many vehicles and
was an accomplished mason and
carpenter. The family still resides in
the last home Dale enjoyed building
for them.
May he rest in Peace. Son, broth-
er, husband, father, grandfather and
friend. He will be greatly missed.
Memorial service will be held
Saturday, November 26, at 3:30p.m.
from The Richard H. Disque Funer-
al Home Inc., 672 Memorial High-
way, Dallas with Deacon Thomas
Cesarini, Gate of Heaven Church,
Dallas, officiating. Friends may call
Saturday from2 to 3:30 p.m. Anoth-
er memorial service will be held in
Ohio at a later date.
Dale Lee Gless
November 17, 2011
D
orothyP. Thomas, age 81, of Ply-
mouth, passed to her eternal re-
ward at the Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital on November 18, 2011, sur-
rounded by her loving family.
Born August 12, 1930, in Wilkes-
Barre, she was the daughter of the
late Michael and Helen Wisko Gdo-
vin.
She was a 1947 graduate of
G.A.R. Memorial High School. Do-
rothy retired from her vocation as a
nurse’s aide at Valley Crest in 1991
andshehadalsoworkedat theLittle
Flower Manor, Wilkes Barre.
Previously, she was employed at
Heavenly Shoe Company, Hanover
Township. For several years, follow-
ing her retirement, she served as a
volunteer at Hospice Care of the
V.N.A. Inpatient Unit.
Earlier in life, she was a Den
Mother for Pack 455 in Plymouth
and she worked at many bazaars at
St. Vincent de Paul Church. She was
a member of All Saints Parish, Ply-
mouth.
Dorothy’s life was dedicated to
her faith in the Lord and her deep
love for her family. She was looking
forward to marking her 60th wed-
ding anniversary on December 26.
She was preceded in death by her
brother, Willard Gdovin of Wilkes-
Barre.
Surviving are her husband, Wil-
liam A. Thomas of Plymouth; sons,
William M. and his wife, Carol, of
Sparta, N.J., Kevin A. and his wife,
Mary, of Larksville, and Brian C.
and his wife, Megan, of Forty Fort;
her grandchildren, William N., Mi-
chael, Christopher, Susan and Amy;
great-grandchildren, Owen, Benja-
min, Abigail, CarlieandJillian; her sis-
ter, Bernadette Gdovin of Edwards-
ville, and her sister-in-law, Marietta
Gdovin of Wilkes-Barre Township.
Thefuneral will be heldTuesday at
10 a.m. from the S.J. Grontkowski Fu-
neral Home, 530 West Main Street,
Plymouth, followed by Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at 10:30 a.m. in All Saints
Parish, Plymouth. Interment will im-
mediately follow in St. Mary’s Ceme-
tery, Hanover Township.
Family and friends may call Mon-
day from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests donations are made to the
Chronic Disease Fund, which assists
deserving people with chronic medi-
cal conditions meet their financial
burdens. Donations may be sent to
C.D. Fund, 6900 North Dallas Park-
way, Suite 200, Plano, TEXAS 75024
or online atwww.gooddaysfromcd-
f.org.
Please visit www.sjgrontkowski-
funeralhome.com for directions or to
submit online condolences tothe fam-
ily.
Dorothy P. Thomas
November 18, 2011
MR. LEONARD J. SULZINSKI,
a resident of North End section of
the Wilkes-Barre, passed into Eter-
nal Life early Saturday morning,
November 19, 2011, in the Green
Ridge Care Center, Scranton, fol-
lowing an illness.
Funeral services and arrange-
ments have been entrusted to and
are pending from the John V. Mor-
ris Funeral Home, 625 North Main
Street, North Wilkes-Barre, and
will appear in Monday’s edition of
the newspaper.
RITAZELNOCK, 81, Larksville,
passed away Saturday, November
19, 2011. She was preceded in
death by mother, Nellie Supina
Barcheski; brothers, William and
Walter Barcheski. Surviving are
husband, Robert Sr.; sons, Robert
Jr. and wife, Janice, Michael and
wife, Ellen; grandchildren, Robert
III, Douglas, Christine, Samantha
and Erica; sister, Dolores Chopick;
brother, Albert Barcheski.
Funeral will be Tuesday at 8:30
a.m. fromthe S.J. Grontkowski Fu-
neral Home, Plymouth, with Mass
of Christian Burial at 9 a.m. in All
Saints Parish, Plymouth. Inter-
ment will be in St. Mary’s Ceme-
tery, Hanover Township. Friends
may call Monday from 6 to 8 p.m.
Visitwww.sjgrontkowskifuneral-
home.comfor directions or to sub-
mit condolences.
D
avid Aaron Mitchneck, 85, for-
merly of Wilkes-Barre, and
Boynton Beach, Fla., died on No-
vember 18, 2011 while a resident at
The Garden of Pine Run in Doyles-
town, Pa., where he made a lasting
impression on the staff and the
manyfriends heacquiredinthenine
months he resided there.
David was born on October 25,
1926, inWilkes-Barre, sonof the late
Sam & Nettie Mitchneck. He was
one of four siblings, Harriet Kase,
deceased; Marvin Mitchneck and
his wife, Bunny, of New Rochelle,
N.Y., and Jerry Marsh of Miami, Fla.
He is survived by his wife of 62
years, Honey Mitchneck. He is also
survived by his sisters and brothers-
in-law, Frances and Bernie Orbach
and Florence and Larry Kramer.
David was an avid athlete and a
Mason for over 50 years. He joined
the Navy andwas a veteranof World
War II and Korean War. He was the
co-owner of the Wilkes-Barre Win-
dow Cleaning Co until his retire-
ment, at which time he and his wife
moved to Boynton Beach, Florida.
He spent 20 happy years playing
tennis, golfing, taking long walks,
and spending time with his family.
He was a wonderful andcaringfa-
ther to Linda Weisberger, Jill and
Stan Pannella, and Lisa and Dr. Lo-
ren Grossman. He will be fondly re-
membered by his grandchildren
Noah Weisberger, Sarajane Weis-
berger, Hannah Mosca, Brooke
Obrien, Ryan Stevens, Jarod Gross-
man, Kelsey Grossman and Gabby
Grossman. He will also be missed
by his four great-grandchildren, Jor-
dyn Obrien, Dylan Obrien, Makayla
Weisberger and Xavier Gray.
David lived his life as a good-na-
tured person who was loyal to his
family, friends and acquaintances.
He was a big believer in second
chances, saw everyone as his equal
and treated them with considera-
tion and respect. He will truly be
missed.
Funeral services will be held
today, Sunday, November 20,
2011, at 1 p.m. at the Rosenberg Fu-
neral Chapel, 348 S. River St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Interment will be in
Ohav Zedek Cemetery, Hanover
Township.
Shiva will be observed 7 to 9 p.m.
Sunday, and 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m.,
MondayandTuesdayat the home of
his daughter, Lisa Grossman, 725
Hampton Road, Shavertown.
Memorial contributions, if desir-
ed, may be made to the Alzheimer’s
Association, P.O. Box 96011, Wash-
ington DC 20090 alz.org
Condolences may be sent by vis-
iting David’s obituary at www.ro-
senbergfuneralchapel.com.
David Mitchneck
November 18, 2011
R
onald L. Broskoske, a lifelong
resident of Alden, passed away
Friday, November 18, 2011, in the
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital after
a brief illness.
Ronald was born in Alden, on Ju-
ly 25, 1937, son of the late Leo and
Eva Urchak Broskoske. He was a
graduate of Newport High School,
class of 1956 and attended Penn
State University for three years. He
was a member of the109th Field Ar-
tillery Battery B, Nanticoke.
Ronnie retired in 1994 from the
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
White Haven State School and Hos-
pital, where he served as a security
guard and police officer. He had
many hobbies, including videotap-
ing family events, collecting whisky
glasses from both his travels and
those of his globetrotting friends
andcollectingHess trucks. Hewas a
member of the American Eagle and
World Wide Web CDX radio clubs.
Ronnie and his wife traveled exten-
sively after retirement, takingsever-
al Caribbean cruises. He especially
enjoyed attending the Country Mu-
sic Legends Shows wherehecollect-
ed many autographs. He regularly
visited friends at Boscov’s and Weg-
mans for breakfast. He was a mem-
ber of the former St. Nicholas Ukrai-
nian Catholic Church and was cur-
rently a member of Transfiguration
of Our Lord Ukrainian Catholic
Church.
He is survived by his wife of 52
years, Theresa (Katyl) Broskoske;
son Dr. Stephen and his wife, Kim-
berly, Wanamie; daughter Gail and
her husband, Paul Kennedy, Pott-
stown; aunts, Martha Danko, West
Pittston; Julia Yurchak, Alden; sev-
eral cousins.
A viewing will be held today
from 4 to 7 p.m. at Stanley S.
Stegura Funeral Home Inc., 614 S.
Hanover St., Nanticoke. A Parastas
Service will be held at 6 p.m. by the
Rev. Roman Petryshak. Funeral ser-
vices will be on Monday at noon
from the funeral Home with Divine
Liturgy at 12:30 p.m. at Transfigura-
tion of Our Lord Ukrainian Catholic
Church, 240 Center St., Hanover
Section of Nanticoke. Entombment
will be at St. Mary’s Mausoleum.
Inlieuof flowers, memorial dona-
tions in Ronald’s name may be sent
to Development Office, Misericor-
dia University, 301 Lake St., Dallas,
PA18612.
Ronald L. Broskoske
November 18, 2011
More Obituaries, Page 2A
G
eorge E. Stencavage Sr. of
Wilkes-Barre died Saturday, No-
vember 19, 2011, at his home sur-
rounded by his loving family.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, he was the
son of the late Joseph and Mary
Dagnis Stencavage. George was a
graduate of G.A.R. Memorial High
School, Wilkes-Barre.
He attended King’s College and
graduatedfromWyomingSeminary
Dean School of Business.
He was a U.S. Navy veteran of the
Korean Conflict.
He was on the staff of the New
York International Ladies Garment
Workers Union, UNITE, as an audit
supervisor for the state of Pennsyl-
vania for 36 years before retiring.
He was on the Resident’s Panel
for the G.A.R. Urban Renewal Pro-
ject.
He was a member of Our Lady of
Hope Parish, Wilkes-Barre, and pre-
viously a long-time member of Holy
Trinity Church, Wilkes-Barre.
Surviving are his beloved wife of
55 years, the former Dorothy M. Ku-
ren; his son, George and his wife,
Clare, Mountain Top; his daughter,
Mary D. Aschendorf, and her hus-
band, Stephen, Mountain Top, and
the light of his life, his grandchil-
dren, Alyssa, Eric andRyanStencav-
age.
He was an accomplished fly fish-
erman and avid reader.
Funeral services will be held
with a Mass of Christian Buri-
al on Tuesday, November 22, at
nooninOur Ladyof Hope Parish, 40
ParkAvenue, Wilkes-Barre, withthe
Rev. John S. Terry officiating.
Interment will be at Holy Trinity
Cemetery, Bear Creek.
Relatives and friends may call
one hour prior to the service at
11a.m.
Memorial contributions may be
made to Our Lady of Hope Parish,
40 Park Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702.
Arrangements were entrusted to
the Jendrzejewski Funeral Home,
Wilkes-Barre.
George E. Stencavage Sr.
November 19, 2011
E
sther Dancheck, of Mountain
Top, passed away on Friday, No-
vember 18, 2011, in Hospice Com-
munity Care at Geisinger South
Wilkes-Barre, following an illness.
Her husband of 51 years is Bernard
J. Dancheck.
Esther was born in Bear Creek to
the late Stephen and Mary Sapp.
Esther was educated in the Wilkes-
Barre Area School District.
She was employed by RCA,
Mountain Top and for various cloth-
ing manufacturers.
She was a faithful and longtime
member of Holy Resurrection Or-
thodox Cathedral, Wilkes-Barre.
Esther was preceded in death by
her infant sonMatthew; andabroth-
er, Stephen Sapp.
Surviving, in addition to her hus-
band, Bernard, are her daughters,
Susan Barney and Andy of King-
ston, and Maria Heylek of Plains
Township and her fiancé, Michael
Sitar; her three grandsons, A.J. Bar-
ney and Jacob and Lucas Heylek;
her sisters, Evelyn Suhoski and Jus-
tine Gulczyski; her brothers George
and John Sapp, and several nieces
and nephews.
Private requiem services will
be held at the convenience of the
family with Archpriest Joseph Mar-
tin officiating.
Interment will take place at St.
Tikhon of Zadonsk Orthodox Cem-
etery, South Canaan.
Arrangements are entrusted to
the Simon S. Russin Funeral Home,
Plains Township.
Esther Dancheck
November 18, 2011
C M Y K
PAGE 14A SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 15A
➛ N E W S
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LV MALL WALMART TARGET ARENA HUB MALL
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12:45
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3:45
10:25
11:10
11:55
12:55
1:40
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LCTA FREE SATURDAY
SHOPPER SHUTTLE SERVICE
FREE SATURDAY SHOPPER SHUTTLE!!
Ride the Loop FREE between 9:30AM and 3:30PM from
the WYOMINGVALLEY MALL, WALMART,
TARGET, and the ARENA HUB
Once again this year the Luzerne County Transportation
Authority will be offering free shuttle service on the four
Saturdays preceeding Christmas. The free shuttle will service
the Wyoming Valley Mall, Walmart, Target and the Arena
Hub. The dates for the shuttle are Nov. 26, December 3, 10,
17 and 24 and will run between 10:15AM and 4:15PM
The FREE “SATURDAY SHOPPERS SHUTTLE
SERVICE” will loop between the Wyoming Valley
Mall, Walmart, Target, and the Arena Hub.
The Shuttle departs the Wyoming Valley Mall at
10:15AM and the last departure time is 4:15PM.
The LCTA is encouraging holiday shoppers to park their
vehicle in one spot and enjoy a hassle free and convenient
shopping experience in the Mall area. Schedules will be
posted in each bus and on the website at LCTABUS.COM
The FREE “SATURDAY SHOPPERS SHUTTLE
SERVICE” schedules will be posted on LCTA’s website,
lctabus.com, and also will be available on all LCTA’s buses.
For more information,
please call BUSTIME (287-8463).
Ride FREE between 10:15 and 4:15 to and from:
THE MALL, WALMART, TARGET,
& THE ARENA HUB!
Saturdays-Nov. 26, Dec. 3,
Dec. 10, Dec. 17, Dec. 24
(Please note that all times are approximate
depending on holiday traffic!)
LUZERNE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY
CLEAN AIR ELECTRIC HYBRID
**At 4:20 the Shuttle bus will leave the Mall and go EXPRESS to the
Intermodal. The regular 4:20 Mall bus will make stops along the way**
The grant allowed the unit,
which consisted of three attor-
neys, an investigator, a social
worker and secretary, to add a
second social worker and to in-
crease the hours of the investi-
gator from part-time to full-
time, making it one the most
comprehensive units in the
state that’s dedicated solely to
juveniles, Flora said.
As a member of the Inter-
branch Commission, Listen-
bee had been one of the most
vocal critics of prosecutors
and public defenders who
failed to halt abuses of juve-
niles’ rights committed by for-
mer judge Mark Ciavarella.
The Commission’s report, is-
sued in 2010, laid much blame
on a lack of training of juvenile
defenders.
That’s no longer an issue as
the three attorneys in the
county’s juvenile unit have un-
dergone extensive training,
Flora said. They continue to
attend training conferences all
over the country, with the tab
being picked up entirely by
various other grants the unit
has received, he said.
Flora said Luzerne County
has also set itself apart in that
it’s the only public defender’s
office in the state that has two
social workers with master’s
degrees.
The social workers are cru-
cial to the process as they eval-
uate the children and their
families to determine the root
cause of the juvenile’s behav-
ior. They also visit the facili-
ties the county utilizes to help
determine if it is the best facil-
ity to meet a particular child’s
needs.
Most recently the unit de-
veloped a mentoring program
that pairs at-risk juveniles
with students fromKing’s Col-
lege.
The program focuses on ju-
veniles who have behavioral is-
sues, but who have not yet
committed any criminal of-
fense, from entering the juve-
nile justice system, Sobeski-
Reedy said.
“Going to court is very trau-
matic for kids. It should be a
last resort,” Sobeski-Reedy
said. “This program gives par-
ents and teachers another
choice than sending a kid into
the juvenile justice system.”
Listenbee said he’s im-
pressed by the changes and
continuing efforts the county
is making to improve.
“Things are going extremely
well. It’s too early to conclude
that they’ve become a model
for the state, but they are cer-
tainly making progress in that
direction,” he said.
REFORMS
Continued from Page 3A
Flora Sobeski-Reedy
said Pat Millo.
But Doug and Lisa Lyons of
Mackeyville didn’t knowabout it.
The couple was at the casino
celebrating the second anniver-
sary of their wedding on Nov. 21.
“We’re big Cake Boss fans,”
said Lisa Lyons after posing next
to the cake with her husband.
“We were surprised when they
said this was gonna be here,” he
added.
The casino has been drawing
people fromnear and far, like the
Lyonses, who live near Lock
Haven in Central Pennsylvania.
It’s evolved since it first opened
with slot machines and horse rac-
ing to include table games, res-
taurants, bars and shops, said
Bobby Soper, president and chief
executive officer of the casino.
“It’s become a destination,”
said Soper.
The complex could undergo
further change with the addition
of a hotel and conference center
planned for the site, he said.
CAKE
Continued from Page 3A
"I come out every year and ev-
ery year it gets bigger," said Ted
Stanislau of Hanover Township,
who came with his two balloon-
toting toddlers.
"This is an event my kids really
love. It puts you in the holiday
mood."
Thedowntownareawas ablaze
with holiday spirit as shop win-
dows adorned with Christmas
motifs enticed the crowds to be-
gin their Christmas shopping in
earnest. Peddlers pushed carts
overflowing with colorful chil-
dren’s trinkets and holiday mer-
chandise along the parade route
and a number of downtown busi-
ness owners joined the celebra-
tion by offering their fare at side-
walk stands along South Main
Street.
This year’s parade featured
marching bands from Meyers,
Coughlin and GAR high schools
as well as a number of dance
troupes and local emergency re-
sponders. Children along the
route scrambled for the candy
and treats strewn from the pass-
ing holiday-themed floats.
"The economy’s really de-
pressed right now," said one
young father, kneeling next to his
daughter’s stroller. "It’s nice that
we can come together to forget
our troubles for a little while and
just enjoy the meaning of Christ-
mas. I mean, who doesn’t love
Santa Claus?"
Santa Claus mingles with children during Saturday’s Christmas parade festivities on Public Square
in Wilkes-Barre.
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Santa arrives in downtown
Wilkes-Barre on Saturday.
SANTA
Continued from Page 3A
C M Y K
PAGE 16A SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
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A J O L LY O L D W E L C O M E I N W I L K E S - B A R R E
Bailee Yancheck, 9, of Wilkes-
Barre, cuddles with her niece
McKaila Yancheck, 4 months
old, of Wilkes-Barre.
Kids and parents stand along the parade route waiting to catch a
glimpse of Santa Claus as his float goes by.
PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Spectators at Saturday’s Christmas parade in downtown Wilkes-Barre try to get Santa’s attention as his float rolls by. Young and old
turned out to welcome the spirit of holiday good cheer.
Josh Blockus of Kingston and his son Eli, 2, keep an eye out for
Santa Claus’ float to come by.
Geisinger employees were going with the late 1960s theme of
Christmas as they marched.
A member of the Northeast Gymnastic Academy Athletic Associ-
ation does a flip during the parade.
Mrs. Claus waves to the crowd during the annual Christmas pa-
rade on Saturday in downtown Wilkes-Barre.
C M Y K
PEOPLE S E C T I O N B
timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011
G
enealogists all know that news-
papers contain much of the
information they need on their
quests — obituaries, wedding notices,
news stories. That’s why they spend so
much time straining their eyes over
microfilm.
But there’s an often-overlooked area
of those old papers where much of our
ancestors’ lives was chronicled. That
was the social notes.
Joe Gregory of Mountain Top found
a little social note that paid a big divi-
dend in his search for information. He
knew that out in Missouri many dec-
ades ago he had a great-uncle named
Pickett “who according to family leg-
end was associated with Missouri’s
most famous son, Jesse James.”
Gregory’s problem, though, was that
there were too many Picketts out there
and “without a given name he could
never be isolated from the other Pick-
etts in Missouri.”
But people then as now traveled
about to visit friends and relatives, and
it was in a microfilmed copy of the old
Wilkes-Barre Sunday Independent that
Gregory found his breakthrough.
“These snippets can be useful,” he
writes. “From one I learned that my
great-uncle Thomas Pickett from Mis-
souri was visiting his parents in Ge-
orgetown.” With that information,
Gregory was able to go decades back
and identify his ancestor in the 1880
U.S. Census for Missouri.
Here’s the bottom line: though it’s
largely a hit-or-miss proposition, a
genealogist can often find valuable
family information from these social
notes. Locally, The Times Leader,
which until the 1990s published only
Monday through Saturday, and the
Sunday Independent carried a lot of
this material.
Today, of course, no one advertises
his departure on vacation in a newspa-
per, and an account of a relative vis-
iting from out of state would not be
considered publishable news. But
many years ago information like this,
and much more, was run in newspa-
pers. Often it was collected and run
under town headings somewhere in-
side the paper. Occasionally it would
be used as filler.
Where did it come from? Newspa-
pers employed part-time correspond-
ents whose job was collecting items
that might be as simple as a wife
throwing a birthday party for her hus-
band or a club electing new officers.
These brief items would generally be
run inside the paper under titles like
“Nanticoke News.”
The Sunday Independent microfilms
are at the Osterhout Free Library in
Wilkes-Barre. The library has good
20th-century files of The Times Leader
the Wilkes-Barre Record as well. Just a
few doors away is the Luzerne County
Historical Society, with complete
Times Leader and Record microfilms
going back more than a century, as well
as lots of other area papers.
Searching: In recent weeks I’ve re-
ceived inquiries about local Civil War-
related groups and mid-20th-century
bakeries in Wilkes-Barre’s Heights
section. While it would seem that no
two topics could be further apart, they
have one thing in common: they can
both be researched through old copies
of the Wilkes-Barre City Directory.
If you look up the GAR Hall in the
second block of South Main Street a
century ago you will find several relat-
ed groups of veterans, wives and de-
scendants that met there. One, Sons of
Union Veterans of the Civil War, is still
active. Check out East Market Street
circa 1950 and you will find several
bakeries. Others will be listed under
“bakeries” in the business listings,
though you might need a map to find
out if they were in the Heights.
Where are these directories? They’re
in the same two fantastic places as the
newspaper microfilms mentioned
above – the library and the historical
society.
TOM MOONEY
O U T O N A L I M B
Social notes
may lead to
historical finds
Tom Mooney is a Times Leader genealogy
columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.
help put people into a home that they
were involved with since day one. “It
really is. I enjoy it. I enjoy when they come
back after they’ve been in it for a year or
two and stop in to see me. I’ll go to trade
shows, and people will come up and say, ‘I
built a house with your company in 1974,
and I’m still living it, and the house is
great.’ I wasn’t even here then, but it’s nice
to hear that.”
What do you do to relax? “I’m a runner. I
wrestled and ran track in high school, and
I’ve been running ever since. I used to run
a seven-minute mile. Now I run a 10-minute
mile. But I run whenever I can. And I enjoy
watching college football.”
Hobbies? “My brother-in-law got me started
with Lionel trains, and I was involved for
about 10 years. We used to go to all of the
train meets all over the state. I’ve got quite
a collection at home, but I haven’t done it
in quite a number of years.”
Music? “Moody Blues. And I like the Motown
sound, Roy Orbison, The Bee Gees and
America. And Anita Baker.”
Favorite city? “That’s a tough one. I lived in
Marina del Ray, California, right on the
beach, and I loved it out there. I lived in
Philadelphia and loved Philadelphia. My
daughters live in New York and we’re there
all the time. Love New York. And I lived
most of my life in Allentown. But I’m a
certified diver, and my buddy and I used to
go down to the Florida Keys two or three
times a year, and Key West, Florida, is my
favorite city. I love it.”
Favorite vacation spot? “Hilton Head Island,
South Carolina.”
DON CAREY/
THE TIMES
LEADER
J
oe Peterson is the owner and president of the Hanover Homes North Corporation in Plains Town-
ship. Peterson, 61, is a native of Allentown and is a graduate of Temple University, where he re-
ceived a degree in mechanical engineering. Hanover Homes was formed in 1959 by his wife’s family
and he has been involved in the business since 1982. He and his wife, Eve, have two children: Pamela,
27, and Nicole, 24. They live in Allentown.
You’ve been in the home-building
business for nearly 30 years.
What do you enjoy about it
the most? “Every day is a new
challenge. You come into the
office, and there’s always
something going on. And I
enjoy the architecture.
When I was little, I always
wanted to be an architect,
and though I didn’t quite
make it to architecture, I
became an engineer, and
I’m close enough on the
building end of things
that I work with a lot of
architects. I enjoy design
work.”
It must be rewarding to
MEET JOE PETERSON
See MEET, Page 2B
B
efore she ever met him, Mollie
Marti knew the judge for whom
she was going to work as a law
clerk had to be an incredible man. She
could tell it fromthe way her lawprofes-
sor spoke of him with deep respect and
fondness decades after he himself had
served as the man’s clerk and from what
shereadinthethoughtful, fairandjustde-
cisions the man had written as a judge in
Federal Appeals Court. But none of that
could truly prepare her for how her life
changed when she traveled to Wilkes-
Barre andmet Judge MaxRosenn.
“I came from Iowa to Wilkes-Barre to
meet him, and within a week, I told my
husband that if I never practice lawa day
inmylife, thisiswhyIgotmydegree—to
work beside this man,” Marti said. She
was originally scheduled to clerk for a
year, but received the unprecedented of-
fer tocontinue toworkwithRosennafter
that andendedupworkingwithhimato-
tal of three years. They remained friends
for10yearsafterthat, untilRosenn’sdeath
in2006at the age of 96.
Now, more than 20 years after she first
heard about Rosenn, Marti has written a
book that she hopes will give others a
glimpseintothelifeandlegacyofmanshe
calls simply, “Judge.” The book, Walking
with Justice: Uncommon Lessons from
One of Life’s Greatest Mentors, will be
available early next year.
“IknewwhatJudgemeanttome,”Mar-
ti said, “but whenI sat downtostart writ-
ingthisbookIwassurprisedbyall of what
hehaddoneinhis career. Hewas theSec-
retary of Welfare for Pennsylvania andhe
started Head Start here, and it was then
rolled out as a national program. He was
theonewhorecognizedthedifferencebe-
tween mental illness and mental retarda-
tion, and he wrote decisions on that that
are used to this day. There was his mili-
tary service, andthe way he continuedto
grow in his service to his community all
hislife. Thechallengeinwritingthisbook
was that he was such a great man. How
couldItakeamanthatIcouldwrite10vol-
umes about and write one book that
wouldtell whohe was?”
Marti saidshestruggledwiththis until
shethoughtoftheeulogiesRosenn’ssons,
Daniel and Keith, had delivered at his fu-
neral.
“They talkedabout the choices that he
madethat shapedhimandwhohewas as
afatherandasaperson,”shesaid. “That’s
where I foundmy structure.”
UsingexcerptsfromDaniel andKeith’s
moving tributes to their father as a start-
ing point, Marti wove in anecdotes and
stories that flash back to moments in the
judge’s life that illustrate the eulogies’
messages or shed light on incidents that
formed Rosenn. For example, a chapter
entitled A Patriot’s Heart opens with a
son’s words about his dad’s military ser-
vice as a JAGlieutenant, then goes on to
tell howRosenn, thoughexempt fromthe
draft because he was married with two
children and despite the fact that he was
in the middle of growing a law practice,
was determined to serve his country in
WorldWar II.
Whenthe Navy wouldn’t enlist him—
it turned out to be because they weren’t
acceptingJewishofficers—Rosennturn-
edtotheArmyandwassent tothePhilip-
pineIslands. About this, Marti quotesRo-
sennassaying, “I felt elatedwhenI got in-
tothe Army because I was able tomake a
contribution to a cause that affected so
many.”
One incident related in the book that
Marti finds especially telling happened
when Rosenn was only about 5. Marti re-
calledRosenntellingher about thehobos
that wouldoftencomelookingfor money
orfoodandhowhismothertreatedthem.
Rosenn explained howhis mother called
TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO
U.S. Circuit of Appeals Senior Judge Max Rosenn during a court hearing on the day of his 90th birthday in 2000. Rosenn was 96 when he died.
“I knew what Judge meant to me, but when I sat down to start writing this book I was surprised by all
of what he had done in his career. He was the Secretary of Welfare for Pennsylvania and he started
Head Start here. ... He was the one who recognized the difference between mental illness and mental
retardation, and he wrote decisions on that that are used to this day. ... The challenge in writing this
book was that he was such a great man. How could I take a man that I could write 10 volumes
about and write one book that would tell who he was?”
Mollie Marti
Lawyer, author of “Walking with Justice: Uncommon Lessons from One of Life’s Greatest Mentors”
The life and legacy of ‘Judge’
By JANINE UNGVARSKY
For The Times Leader
Mollie Marti is a lawyer, psychologist, professor of psychology at
the University of Iowa and speaker. Her book “Walking with Jus-
tice: Uncommon Lessons from One of Life’s Greatest Mentors,” is
available for preorder at amazon.com and barnesandnoble.com.
Bulk pricing available at 800ceoread.com.
Contact the author directly at info@drmollie.com.
ABOUT MARTI
Marti
See ROSENN, Page 2B
C M Y K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Favorite food? “Pasta.”
Always in the fridge? “Choco-
late-chip ice cream.”
First car? “A1955 Oldsmobile.
Two-door, hard-top. White.
Pristine condition. Powder-
blue interior. I bought it for
$25 dollars. I was 15 years old
and didn’t have my driver’s
license yet. My dad let me
keep it the garage until I was
able to get my driver’s li-
cense. And I remember, it
didn’t have reverse. There
was a problem with the
transmission, so I had to be
real careful when I drove,
because I could only drive it
forward. But it was a great
car.”
Favorite movies? “‘Midnight
Cowboy,’ the original version
of ‘The Day The Earth Stood
Still,’ ‘The Bridge on the
River Kwai’ and ‘Islands In
The Stream.’”
Favorite author? “I like the
Hemingway classics. And
right now, I’m reading ‘Un-
broken’ by Laura Hillen-
brand.”
Favorite TV shows? “‘Blue
Bloods,’ ‘Hawaii Five-0’ and
‘Burn Notice.’ And, when the
series was running, ‘24.’”
What about you might sur-
prise people? “I was a rugby
player. I played on a rugby
football team from1970-1975.
Loved it.”
Favorite quote? “If you’re
going through hell, keep
going.” — Winston Churchill.
Words to live by? “You have
two choices in life: You can
be part of your own plan or
part of someone else’s.”
Proudest professional mo-
ment? “I received the 2009
‘Builder of the Year’ award
from the Pennsylvania Build-
ers Association. It’s the
highest honor and recognizes
achievement in the building
industry and commitment to
it. I went to the banquet, and
I had no idea I was getting it.
It was kind of a shock, and it
was kind of like a defining
moment, because it’s judged
by a group of your peers.
They’re all past recipients of
the award, and they’re all
builders, and it’s recognition
of the fact you did well.”
MEET
Continued from Page 1B
them mendicants — an old word
originallyappliedtofriarswhosur-
vivedonalmsorbybegging—and
she always gave each one a dollar,
no questions asked. On this partic-
ular day, an aunt was visiting, and
the aunt and Rosenn’s mother no-
ticeda manout inthe yardpicking
up the clothespins that were scat-
teredunder theline. Themanthen
cametothedoor andofferedtosell
the clothespins to Rosenn’s moth-
er, while the aunt and young Max
Rosenn watched from inside. The
mothergavethemanthemoneyhe
asked for in exchange for her own
clothespins, promptingthe aunt to
questionheraboutwhyshepaidfor
somethingshe alreadyowned.
“Judge told me his mother said,
‘If I have the opportunity to show
him respect, if I can maintain his
dignity, howcouldI not givethat to
him?’” Marti said, “Andas a 5-year-
old, Judgewas watchingthis close-
lyandheclearlylearnedthatlesson
that dayandnever forgot it.”
Marti said that dozens of law
clerks who were able to work with
Rosennsharesomanyfondmemo-
ries of the man who shaped their
livesthat theyformedasocietyand
sponsor a lecture series in his hon-
or. Manyof them–includingMarti
— keep pictures of the judge in
their home or office, or even both,
andsaytheycanstill turntotheles-
sons hetaught themandtheexam-
ple he set to guide them in their
lives years after he has passedon.
That feeling of his guidance still
being with her helped Marti en-
dure a recent difficult time in her
life, onethatshesaidledtothewrit-
ing of this book. When a virus at-
tacked her neurological system
and Marti was unable to work, she
foundthatRosennhadaleftbehind
a lessonfor eventhat situation.
“He was a master of rejuvena-
tion, andamasterof intentional liv-
ing,”Martisaid.“HereIwas,mylife
haddeconstructedandIhadclosed
downmyconsultingpractice. I had
theopportunitytointentionallyre-
construct my life one block at a
time.”
Thinking about the many les-
sons shehadlearnedfromRosenn,
Marti said she took time to think
about what her greatest regret
would be if her life had ended and
very intentionally began to chart
her newpath.
“My greatest regret would have
beennot writingthisbook, not tell-
ingJudge’sstory,”shesaid. “I need-
ed to tell about his leadership, his
resilience, how we can keep hope
alive, howtoserve, andthehealing
wecanbringtohumanity—all the
things he taught me.”
While the book has not yet been
published, Marti said she is encour-
agedbytheresponsefromthosewho
havereadadvancecopies, especially
thosewhoknewRosenn—starting
with his family, and then his second
family, the lawyers and law clerks
who worked with him. A standing
ovation at a public reading and re-
peatedly hearing from law clerks
thatshewrotethebooktheywanted
towrite tells her she toldthe judge’s
story right. She thinks she knows
why the story came together soeas-
ily and resonates so well with those
whoknewRosenn.
“I feel like this was co-written
with Judge,” she said. “At so many
points, I asked him what should I
sayor what doyouwant said. I feel
like he guided this whole process.
When I would get stuck, I would
just say, ‘Judge…’ and it would al-
most feel like his hand was on my
shoulder.”
Thebookhasbeencalledahand-
book for living and the story of a
mentor to mentors, and Marti
agrees it’s all that and one thing
more.
“This is a love story,” she said.
“No one will walk away from this
booknot realizingthis is alovesto-
ry between me and my life’s great-
est mentor.”
She wrote the book, Marti said,
to share that love with others who
never had the opportunity to meet
Rosenn and to let them benefit
fromthelifelessonsof amentorbe-
lovedbymany.
“Judge had a simple prayer that
he said every day: God help me
make a contribution to a just
world,” Marti said. “I think that’s
the invitation here to people: what
is your life’s prayer to your God, to
your creator. Identifythat prayer in
yourlifeandprayit, andwalkitona
daily basis. Use, develop and share
all thegifts youhavefor thebenefit
of humanity. That’s what Judge
taught all of us.”
ROSENN
Continued from Page 1B
Michael Schwab, a sophomore at
Pittston Area
High School,
recently at-
tended the
National AM-
VETS Confer-
ence in Valley
Forge and
Philadelphia.
Schwab re-
ceived an invitation for his
award-winning essay entitled
‘Why it is Important to Vote,’ that
captured first place nationally.
Over 100 students from many
states across the country partici-
pated in the conference which
featured several workshops and
speakers, a mock trial at the
Criminal Justice Center and a
tour of colonial Philadelphia.
Devon Bailey, Kia Randolph and
Teyonnie Johnson received the
Ella M. Wynn Heritage Award
given by the Rediscovering
Ancestry thru Culture and Edu-
cation team. The awards are
presented to great-grandchil-
dren who
have gradu-
ated high
school and
are pursuing
a college
education.
Constance
Wynn, direc-
tor of the
organiza-
tion, recent-
ly helped to
redesign the
award which
was former-
ly known as
the Ella M.
Wynn Schol-
arship
Award.
Bailey is the
daughter of
Audrey and
Bruce Bailey,
Wilkes-
Barre. Ran-
dolph is the
daughter of Kelly and Theo-
dore Randolph, Wilkes-Barre,
and Johnson is the daughter
of Melinda and Robert John-
son Jr., Boston, Mass.
NAMES AND FACES
Schwab
Bailey
Randolph
Johnson
Monday
PLYMOUTH: The Plymouth
Cambrian Club, 6:30 p.m. at
the First Welsh Baptist Church.
The board meeting will begin
at 6:30 p.m. and the club
meeting at 7 p.m. President
Megan Landmesser will pre-
side. Plans for the Christmas
banquet will be discussed and
reservations will be accepted.
Hostesses for the evening are
Vivienne Evans and Mary
Holzman.
MEETINGS
The fifth annual North Street Elementary School reunion was recently held at Grotto Pizza at the
Wyoming Valley Mall. North Street School, Wilkes-Barre, was attended by children who resided between
North Main Street and Pennsylvania Avenue and Union and Butler streets. It was later replaced by the
Dan Flood Elementary School. The North Street reunion grew from a group of seven who convened five
years ago to the recent 45 attendees. Female classmates (above), from left, first row, are Lola Compton
Johnson, Judy Mullin, Annette Barbini, Rose Mary Smulowitz Kovaleski, Eileen Brown Hatala, Carol Wil-
liams Marsden, Drena Riehl Casey and Patricia Langdon Leandri. Second row: Frances Kram Gibbon,
Peggy Compton Laubaugh, Patricia Bartosh Bekelja, Jeanne Wetterau Schineller, Carol Riemensnyder
Jones, Patricia Conahan Shumoski, Bridget Gabriele Serafin, Florence Herzfeld Koapat, Barbara Kalinow-
ski Tinner and Elaine Barbini Morehead. Male classmates (below), from left, first row, are Donald Comp-
ton, James Marsden, Rocco Grant, Arthur Brown, Robert Langdon, Joseph Wildes and Patrick Umbra.
Second row: Charles Thennes, Donald Riemensnyder, Allan Randall, Allan Davis, Donald Langdon, William
DeRemer, Richard Kemmerer, William Dempsey and Charles Stallone. Third row: Jack Knelly, David Hoff-
man, Jack Smulowitz, Angelo Gabriele, Michael Reilly and Paul Gritman.
Fifth annual North Street Elementary School reunion held at Grotto Pizza
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 3B
➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
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Five students recently completed the requirements at King’s Col-
lege for a master’s degree in physician assistant studies. A physician
assistant is a dependent mid-level health professional licensed by the
state to practice medicine under the supervision of a physician. They
perform physical exams, diagnose illnesses, develop and carry out
treatment plans, order and interpret lab tests and assist in surgeries.
Graduates, from left, are Amanda Mullins, Jennifer Pajakinas, James
Kramarz, Corinna Evans and Jennifer Otway.
Students finish master’s studies as physician assistants
C M Y K
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 5B
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Wyoming Valley Health Care System/University of Scranton School of Nurse Anesthesia recently honored its newest graduates during
the school’s graduation ceremony at the Thomas P. Saxton Medical Pavilion, Edwardsville. The School of Nurse Anesthesia educates pro-
fessional advanced practice nurses and provides anesthesia theory along with clinical practice and prepares nurses to develop advanced
clinical skills and strategies in support of the area of anesthesia. Graduates of the 25-month program are immediately eligible for national
certification as a CRNA through the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. At the graduation ceremony, from left, first row: Daniel
Squier, Little Meadows; Dr. Caroline Raskiewicz, program administrator; Binal Shah, Nanticoke; Michele Schwartz, Minersville; Eric Culp,
Jenkins Township.; Dr. Ann Culp, assistant program administrator; Susan Elczyna, clinical director; Dr. Dong-Joon Oh; and Dr. Ragupathy
Veluswamy, vice president, medical affairs. Second row: Daniel Kelly, Pottsville; Sherie Morganti, Hanover Township; Maryellen Wrubleski,
Cooperstown, N.Y.; and Christopher Overman, Pittston. Third row: Jonathan Kopka, Kingston; Annette DuFour, Danville; Michelle Rease,
Monroeton; and Charlene Johnson, Saylorsburg. Fourth row: Aliya Alla Lazinsky, Kingston; Lisa Moser, Danville; Rebecca Allen, Towanda;
and Sajini Mary Thekkel, Vestal, N.Y. Fifth row: Stephen Pawlowski, Bershire, N.Y.; Keith Milligan, Plains Township; Amanda Kissinger,
Bloomsburg; and Jeana Santostefano, Bath.
Nurse Anesthesia graduates recognized at ceremony
Roger Legg, son of Sherry and Boomer Legg, White Haven, was
recently selected as the Outstanding Student for the First Quarter at
Crestwood High School. Legg enjoys computer applications and
psychology classes and is a member of the varsity football team and
the varsity wrestling team. He also enjoys extracurricular activities
such as football, softball and volleyball. Legg plans to attend college
and become a high school guidance counselor. He has a brother,
Michael, and two sisters, Samantha and Grace. At the award present-
ation, from left: Christy Laubach, computer applications teacher;
Roger Legg; and Sherry Legg.
Legg named outstanding student at Crestwood
The Savio Club at St. Nicholas-St. Mary School, Wilkes-Barre, is
participating in the annual U.S. Marine Corps ‘Toys for Tots’ program.
Collection boxes have been distributed throughout the school and
toys will be accepted until Dec. 2. The Savio Club is under the direc-
tion of its 6B officers and Sister Marion Tarone is the moderator.
Officers of the club with the collection boxes, from left, are Nial Ven-
der, Nicole Kerestes, Emily Bush and Bridget Thole.
St. Nicholas-St. Mary School participates in ‘Toys for Tots’
C M Y K
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ O C C A S I O N S
M
r. and Mrs. Michael Ciechoski,
Wilkes-Barre, are pleased to
announce the engagement and ap-
proaching marriage of their daughter,
Maria Ann, to Steven Matthew Rami-
za, son of Anthony Pace and the late
Theresa Ramiza Pace, Pittston Town-
ship, and the late Frank Ramiza.
The bride-to-be is the granddaught-
er of the late George and Mary
Brown, Wilkes-Barre, and the late
Adam and Elsie Ciechoski, Lee Park.
She is a 2001 graduate of Bishop
Hoban High School and a 2005 grad-
uate of Wilkes University, with a
Bachelor of Arts degree in psycholo-
gy. Maria earned a Master of Science
degree in rehabilitation counseling
from the University of Scranton in
2009 and is employed as a vocational
rehabilitation counselor with the
Pennsylvania Office of Vocational
Rehabilitation, Wilkes-Barre.
The prospective groom is the
grandson of Steven and Loretta Ha-
luschak, Duryea; Ruth Tavella, King-
ston; and the late Frank Ramiza.
He is a 2000 graduate of Seton
Catholic High School and a 2004
graduate of Penn State University,
with a Bachelor of Science degree in
business administration. Steven is
employed by Canadian Pacific Rail-
road.
The couple will be united in mar-
riage on May 19, 2012, at St. Aloysius
Church, Wilkes-Barre.
Ramiza, Ciechoski
K
evin and Michelle Coombs,
Dallas, and David and Patri-
cia Harrison, both of Shaver-
town, announce the engagement
of their children, Savannah Ma-
rie Coombs to David Ryan Harri-
son.
Savannah is the granddaughter
of the late Richard and Elizabeth
Maher, Harveys Lake; the late
Elbert and Margaret Coombs,
Lehman; and the late Helen Rice
Coombs, Dallas.
David is the grandson of
Theresa Harvey, Shavertown; the
late Gilbert Harvey, Noxen; and
Wayne and Jean Harrison, Dal-
las.
Savannah and David are 2005
graduates of Lake-Lehman High
School, Lehman.
The bride-to-be is a 2009 grad-
uate of Lebanon Valley College,
Annville, where she attained a
bachelor’s degree in elementary
and special education. Savannah
is pursuing a master’s degree in
developmental strategies from
Wilkes University. She is employ-
ed as an eighth-grade special
education teacher in the Tunk-
hannock Area School District.
The prospective groom is em-
ployed by his family’s business,
All Seasons Pools and Spa, Dal-
las. David is an avid hunter and
fisherman and participates in
both bass and ice fishing tourna-
ments.
An engagement brunch, hosted
by the parents of the couple,
was held for family members at
the Irem Country Club.
The couple will exchange vows
in the presence of family and
friends in August, 2012, at Our
Lady of Victory Church, Harveys
Lake.
Coombs, Harrison
F
aith N. Kringer and Stephen
L. Kelchaw, together with
their families, announce their
engagement and approaching
marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter
of Joseph and Carla Kringer,
Drums. Faith is the granddaught-
er of Kathleen Gigliotti and the
late Joseph Gigliotti and Peter
and Sophia Kringer, McAdoo.
She is a 2006 graduate of Ha-
zleton Area High School. Faith
earned an associate’s degree in
court reporting from Luzerne
County Community College in
2008. She is employed as a free-
lance court reporter.
The prospective groom is the
son of John and Teresa Kelchaw,
Hazle Township. Stephen is the
grandson of the late Congetta and
John Kelchaw and Dolores Dolin-
sky, Harwood.
He is a 2005 graduate of Hazle-
ton Area High School. Stephen
earned a master’s degree in archi-
tectural engineering from Penn-
sylvania State University in 2010.
He is employed as a project engi-
neer.
The couple will exchange vows
on July 14, 2012, at Most Pre-
cious Blood Church, Hazleton.
Kelchaw, Kringer
L
isa M. Rittenhouse and James J.
Oliveri, together with their fam-
ilies, announce their engagement and
approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Robert and Gayle Rittenhouse, Ed-
wardsville. She is the granddaughter
of Robert and Lenore Dickson, Ed-
wardsville, and the late Thomas and
Thelma Rittenhouse.
The prospective groom is the son
of James and Susan Oliveri, Pittston
Township. He is the grandson of
Salvatrice (Katie) Oliveri and the late
Vincent Oliveri, Pittston, and Susan
Sebastianelli and the late Constanti-
no (Bello) Sebastianelli, Pittston
Township.
The bride-to-be is a 2001 graduate
of Wyoming Valley West High School.
Lisa is an associate manager of Big
Lots, Luzerne.
The prospective groom is a 1995
graduate of Pittston Area High
School. James is a claims adjuster for
the GWC Warranty.
An April 21, 2012, wedding is
planned.
Rittenhouse, Oliveri
L
inda and Carl Fedak Jr., Mountain
Top, are pleased to announce the
engagement of their son, Thomas
Andrew, to Darcie Lyn Peale, daugh-
ter of Laird and Joni Peale, Grand
Junction, Colo.
Tom is a 2006 Crestwood High
School graduate and proudly served
four years as an Airborne Ranger in
the United States Army. He is em-
ployed by US Bank and is attending
Colorado State University, majoring
in business accounting.
Darcie is a 2008 graduate of Col-
orado State University and is com-
pleting a master’s degree in forensic
science. She teaches science at Rocky
Mountain High School, Fort Collins,
Colo., where the couple resides.
A July 2012 wedding is planned.
Peale, Fedak
A
manda Russ and Joseph Speicher
Jr., together with their families,
announce their engagement and
upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Thomas Russ and the late Phyllis
Russ, Dallas.
The prospective groom is the son
of Carolyn and Joseph Speicher Sr.,
Wilkes-Barre.
Amanda is a 2001 graduate of Dal-
las High School. She is employed by
The Dallas School District and the
Checkerboard Inn in Trucksville.
Joseph is a 1999 graduate of James
M. Coughlin High School. He studied
mobile electronics at Luzerne County
Community College. He is employed
as a service manager at A&A Auto,
Exeter.
The couple will exchange vows
July 2012, on the beach of Ocean
City, Md.
Speicher, Russ
A
lison Casey and David Durko
were united in marriage April 30,
2011, at St. Leo’s Church, by the Rev.
Thomas J. O’Malley.
The bride is the daughter of Sand-
ra Casey and the late Joseph Casey,
Ashley. She is the granddaughter of
the late Lawrence and Evelyn Cole-
man, Mountain Top, and Thomas and
Catherine Casey, Ashley.
The groom is the son of Margaret
Durko and the late Paul Durko, Du-
ryea. He is the grandson of the late
Charles and Margaret Brandenburg,
Pittston, and Joseph and Helen Dur-
ko, Simpson.
The bride was given in marriage by
her brother, Brian Casey. She chose
her sister, Kimberly Berrettini, as
matron of honor. Bridesmaids were
long-time friends, Tricia Bernoski
and Michelle Mullin.
The groom chose his brother-in-
law, Lawrence Casey, as best man.
Groomsmen were Brian Casey, broth-
er of the bride, and James Casey,
cousin of the bride. Ring bearers
were David and Christopher Durko,
children of the couple.
Scriptural readings were given by
Michele Casey. Offertory gifts were
presented by Cecelia Brandenburg,
godmother of the groom; William
Brandenburg, godfather of the
groom; and Maura Casey and Megan
Casey, cousins of the bride. Erin
Clarke-Klein and Joseph Dubinski
provided vocal selections. Instru-
mental arrangements were provided
by Suplee String Trio.
The bride was honored with a
bridal shower given by the brides-
maids at the home of Tricia Bernoski.
The bride hosted a Victorian after-
noon tea at Sugar’s Tea Room, Forty
Fort, honoring the mothers of the
bride and groom, bridesmaids and
aunt, Michele Casey. A rehearsal
dinner was hosted by Michele Casey
at Kelsey’s Restaurant, Ashley. An
evening cocktail hour and reception
were held at the Ramada Inn, Wilkes-
Barre. Music was provided by 3rd
Degree.
The bride is a graduate of Bishop
Hoban High School and earned a
Bachelor of Science degree in biology
and a Doctorate in Pharmacy, both
from Wilkes University. She is em-
ployed as a staff pharmacist by CVS/
Caremark, Hanover Township.
The groom is a graduate of Pittston
Area High School and Wilkes-Barre
Area Vocational-Technical School and
is employed as a forklift operator by
Ward Trucking, Wilkes-Barre.
The couple, along with their chil-
dren, enjoyed a seaside vacation.
They reside in Ashley.
Durko, Casey
D
awn Marie Washington and
Zachary Ragukas were united
in marriage on Aug. 26, 2011, at
St. Leo’s Parish, Ashley, Pa., by
the Rev. Thomas O’Malley.
The bride is the daughter of
Thomas and Beverly Washington,
Pringle. She is the granddaughter
of Charlotte Neupauer and the
late Daniel Neupauer, Ashley.
The groom is the son of Don
and Judy Ragukas, Sweet Valley.
He is the grandson of Regina
Angle and the late Donald Angle,
Nanticoke, and Pauline Ragukas
and the late Bernard Ragukas,
Plymouth.
The bride was escorted down
the aisle by her father and chose
Crystal Moore, her best friend for
years, as her maid of honor. Bri-
desmaids were Traci Ragukas,
sister of the groom; Nicole Hoi-
sington, cousin of the bride; and
Rachael Sromovski, Jen Fitzsim-
mons and Diane Clark, all long-
time friends of the bride.
The groom chose Edward Beck-
er, longtime best friend, as his
best man. Groomsmen were Chris
Teetsel, Chris Albee, Josh Ku-
waye, Rich Patton and Chase
Krasniak, all long-time friends of
the groom. Junior groomsman
was Jeffery Moravinski, son and
stepson of the couple. The ring
bearer was Tanner Ragukas, son
of the couple.
Scripture readings were given
by Lauren and Melissa Stefaniak,
cousins of the groom. Ushers
were Ed Washington, brother of
the bride; Lenny Stefaniak, cousin
of the groom; and Donny Angle,
cousin of the groom. Offertory
gifts were presented by Tommy
and Danny Washington, brothers
of the bride.
A bridal shower was hosted by
the mothers of the bride and
groom, the bridesmaids and the
maid of honor at the Genetti Ho-
tel and Conference Center,
Wilkes-Barre. A bachelorette party
was given for the bride in Atlantic
City, N.J., by the bridesmaids and
maid of honor. The groomsmen
hosted a bachelor party for the
groom in Philadelphia.
The happy couple honey-
mooned in Jamaica, following
Hurricane Irene. They reside in
their home in Forty Fort with
their two children, Jeffery and
Tanner.
Ragukas, Washington
G
ina Marie Bellanca and Edwin
John Weidow were united in the
sacrament of marriage on Sept. 10,
2011, at Holy Family Parish, Luzerne,
by the Rev. Michael Zipay.
The bride is the daughter of Robert
and Mary Ann Bellanca, Kingston.
She is the granddaughter of Anna
Laktasic and the late Stanley Lak-
tasic, both of Kingston, and the late
Samuel and Helen Bellanca, Wilkes-
Barre.
The groom is the son of Edwin and
Donna Weidow, Hanover Township.
He is the grandson of the late Wil-
liam and Margaret Weidow, Hanover
Township, and the late Maurice and
Mary Lou Lowery, Wilkes-Barre.
The bride was given in marriage by
her father. She chose her best friend,
Vanessa McElroy, as her matron of
honor. Bridesmaids were all friends
of the bride and included Lauren
Baldassarre, Nicole Condrasky, Katie
Delp, Nancy Jacobs and Randi Setta.
The groom chose best friends,
Wayne Woznikaitis and Dave Mislive-
ts, as his co-best men. Groomsmen
were all friends of the groom, Alan
Dudeck, Joe Michalochick, Pat Sim-
mers and Rich Wakefield. Corey
Zelinka, nephew of the groom, served
as junior groomsman. Sammy A.
Bellanca, nephew of the bride, served
as ring bearer.
Scriptural readings were given by
Samuel J. Bellanca, brother of the
bride, and Marybeth Zelinka, sister of
the groom. Offertory gifts were pre-
sented by Leonard and Rose Stacho-
wiak, aunt and uncle of the bride;
Lisa Chernetsky, godmother of the
bride; Martin Sherlinski, brother of
the groom; and Michael Sherlinski,
nephew of the groom.
Musical direction and vocals were
performed by Linda Houck, organist,
accompanied by Steve Saive, trumpet
player. All engagement and wedding
photography was completed by Gary
and Pat Day, Altar Imaging.
A bridal shower was hosted by the
mothers of the bride and groom and
the bridesmaids at The Gallery at
Pierce Plaza, Kingston. The rehearsal
dinner was hosted by parents of the
bride at TGIFridays, Wilkes-Barre.
The couple hosted a cocktail hour
and dinner reception at the St. Maria
Goretti Banquet Hall, Laflin.
The bride is a 1998 graduate of
Wyoming Valley West High School.
She earned her bachelor’s degree in
2002 from Bloomsburg University
and her Master Degree in Social
Work in 2005 from Marywood Uni-
versity.
The groom is a 1996 graduate of
Hanover Area High School and a
2010 graduate from the Lackawanna
Police Academy.
The couple honeymooned in Ha-
waii. They reside in Kingston.
Bellanca, Weidow
M
r. and Mrs. James Ravert Sr.,
West Pittston, recently cele-
brated their 50th wedding anniver-
sary. They were married Oct. 21,
1961, at the former First United
Church, Plymouth, by the Rev. Ge-
orge I. Dickinson.
Mrs. Ravert’s cousin, Jane Ann
Phillips Filippini, was maid of honor
and the best man was the late James
Ward. Mr. Ravert’s brother, Charles,
served as usher.
Mrs. Ravert is the former Patricia
Ann Phillips daughter of the late Ben
and Loretta Phillips.
She is employed by Intermountain
Medical Group in the offices of Dr.
Lauren Argenio and Dr. Joseph Radz-
wilka, West Pittston.
Mr. Ravert is the son of the late
Ralph and Lillian Ravert. He retired
from Techneglas, Pittston, after 34
years.
The couple has two sons, James
Ravert Jr. and his wife, Carol, West
Pittston, and Scott Ravert and his
wife, Colleen, Swoyersville.
They have three granddaughters,
Amanda, Jillian and Olivia.
The couple enjoyed a trip to Ocean
City, Md., and a dinner was held by
their family to celebrate the occasion
at Ruth’s Chris restaurant at Mohe-
gan Sun at Pocono Downs.
The Raverts
M
r. and Mrs. John E. Marut
will celebrate their 60th
wedding anniversary on Nov. 22,
2011. The couple was married in
the Exaltation of the Holy Cross
Church, Buttonwood, by the Rev.
C. Wydra.
Their attendants were Mr. and
Mrs. Louis Fela.
They are the parents of three
children, Susan Mazzarella, Exe-
ter; Diane Marut, Wilkes-Barre;
and the late John, Jr.
They have six grandchildren,
Scott and Eric Stobodzian; Jessi-
ca Marut Moniot; Jillian Marut;
and Christopher and Matthew
DeMarco. They are also blessed
with two great-grandchildren,
twins Jack and Rhett.
A family dinner was held in
their honor to mark the occa-
sion.
The Maruts
J
im and Linda Suponcic will
observe their 21st wedding
anniversary on Nov. 23. They
were married Nov. 23, 1990, at
Sacred Heart of Jesus Church
(now Holy Family Parish) by the
late Rev. Arnold P. Smith.
Their attendants were Anthony
Pero and LuAnn Lanzone-Han-
cock.
Linda is the daughter of Agnes
Lanzone, West Pittston, and the
late Louis Lanzone.
Jim is the son of the late Ed-
mund and Helen Suponcic, Lu-
zerne.
A family dinner will be held to
celebrate their special day.
Jim and Linda reside in Lu-
zerne with their kitty, Dora
Anne.
The Suponcics
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 7B
➛ O C C A S I O N S
The Times Leader allows you to
decide how your wedding notice
reads, with a few caveats.
Wedding announcements run in
Sunday’s People section, with
color photos, free of charge.
Articles must be limited to 220
words, and we reserve the right to
edit announcements that exceed
that word count. Announcements
must be typed or submitted via
www.timesleader.com. (Click on
the "people" tab, then “weddings”
and follow the instructions from
there.) Submissions must include
a daytime contact phone number
and must be received within 10
months of the wedding date. We
do not run first-year anniversary
announcements or announce-
ments of weddings that took place
more than a year ago. (Wedding
photographers often can supply
you with a black-and-white proof
in advance of other album pho-
tographs.)
All other social announcements
must be typed and include a day-
time contact phone number.
Announcements of births at local
hospitals are submitted by hospi-
tals and published on Sundays.
Out-of-town announcements
with local connections also are
accepted. Photos are only accept-
ed with baptism, dedication or
other religious-ceremony an-
nouncements but not birth an-
nouncements.
Engagement announcements
must be submitted at least one
month before the wedding date to
guarantee publication and must
include the wedding date. We
cannot publish engagement an-
nouncements once the wedding
has taken place.
Anniversary photographs are
published free of charge at the
10th wedding anniversary and
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Other anniversaries will be pub-
lished, as space allows, without
photographs.
Drop off articles at the Times
Leader or mail to:
The Times Leader
People Section
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711
Questions can be directed to
Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or
e-mailed to people@timeslead-
er.com.
SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES
M
r. and Mrs. Theodore B. Dennis
Jr. will celebrate their 30th wed-
ding anniversary on Nov. 21, 2011.
They were married on Nov. 21, 1981,
in St. Nicholas Parish, Wilkes-Barre.
Attendants at the wedding were
Grace Boris, matron of honor; Donna
Patts; Liz Kwashnik; Joel Jones, best
man; John Forlenza; and David Coop-
er.
Mrs. Dennis is the former Ellen M.
Proeller, daughter of Joseph R. Proell-
er and the late Mary V. Proeller. She
has a master’s degree in education
from Wilkes University and a mas-
ter’s degree in nursing from the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania. She is a clin-
ical associate at Wilkes University’s
School of Nursing.
Mr. Dennis is the son of Theodore
B. Dennis Sr. and the late Bessie L.
Dennis. He has a master’s degree in
music from Marywood University
and recently retired after a 35-year
teaching career in the Wilkes-Barre
Area School District.
The couple has three children,
Julie, Silver Spring, Md., and T.J. and
Becca, at home.
The family will celebrate with a
special dinner held in their honor.
The Dennises
B
ob and Carol Eyet, Dallas, will
celebrate their 50th wedding
anniversary on Nov. 25. They were
married on Nov. 25, 1961, in the Sha-
vertown United Methodist Church by
the late Rev. Robert D. Yost.
They were attended by Nancy
Harris Cook, maid of honor; Alvie
Cook, best man; and Richard Eyet,
usher.
Mrs. Eyet is the former Carol Dy-
mond, daughter of the late Lauren
and Aileen Dymond.
Mr. Eyet is the son of the late
Glenn and Evelyn Eyet.
The couple has three children,
Robert and his wife, Ella, Califon,
N.J.; Leigh and his wife, Tina, Tunk-
hannock; and Sharon Zomerfeld and
husband, David, Dallas. They also
have four grandchildren, Justin, Ka-
tie, Jacob and Nicole.
The occasion was marked with a
month-long train trip across the Unit-
ed States. A family dinner hosted by
their children will be held on their
anniversary.
The Eyets
M
r. and Mrs. Jerry Hudak, Nanti-
coke, celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary Nov. 18, 2011.
They were married Nov. 18, 1961, in
the former St. Joseph’s Slovak
Church.
Jerry is the son of the late Meth-
od and Mary Hudak, Nanticoke.
Dorothy Bush Hudak is the
daughter of the late Ruth Meyers
Bush, Plymouth.
They are the parents of five chil-
dren, Jerry James, and his wife,
Lori, Hunlock Creek; the late Jay
Joseph; the late Jeff John; Jason
Jude and his wife, Nancy, York; and
Justin Joel and his wife, Donna,
Mountain Top.
They have 16 grandchildren and
three great-grandchildren.
Mr. and Mrs. Hudak celebrated
with a Mass at St. Faustina’s Parish,
Nanticoke, and a reception at the
Alden Manor with family and
friends.
The Hudaks
M
r. and Mrs. William Littleton,
Laflin, will celebrate their 40th
anniversary on Nov. 25, 2011. They
were married on Thanksgiving Day
in 1971 at St. Ignatius Church, King-
ston, by the Rev. Austin Flanagan.
Genetti’s Castlefondo, Wilkes-Barre,
was the scene of a Thanksgiving
celebration with a roaring fire, 27
inches of snow and family and
friends.
Mrs. Littleton is the daughter of
the late Edward and Rita McHugh
Allman.
Mr. Littleton is the son of Shirley
Norcross Littleton, Forty Fort, and
the late William Littleton Sr.
Colleen Kelly Benson was maid of
honor. Best man was John Mould.
The couple is blessed with two
daughters, Maureen Blake and Kath-
leen Maffei, and son-in-law, Gene
Maffei. They have three grandsons,
Kris, Julian, and Ryan.
Prior to retirement, Pat was a
teacher in the Wilkes-Barre Area
School District and Bill was an elec-
trician for Geisinger Medical Center.
A family celebration has been
planned by their daughters and son-
in-law.
The Littletons
J
ack Joseph Dodg-
son, son of Scott
and Bethie Dodgson,
Dupont, was bap-
tized on Nov. 13 at
Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church, Dupont.
His godparents are his uncle and
aunt, Richard and Lynn Belles, West
Wyoming.
Jack was born on Sept. 1, 2011.
He is the grandson of Joseph and
Patricia Dodgson, Dickson City, and
Richard and Betty Belles, Pittston
Township.
Jack J. Dodgson
baptized
A
yla Grace Spinelli
and Anthony
Spinelli Jr., children
of Anthony and Amy
Spinelli, Wilkes-
Barre, were baptized
on Aug. 28, 2011, at
St. Benedict’s Parish,
Parsons.
They were born on
June 11, 2011, at
Geisinger Hospital,
Danville.
Ayla Grace’s god-
parents are her aunt,
Jill Savage, and her
uncle, James Spinelli.
Anthony’s godparents are his aunt,
Stephanie Savage, and his uncle,
Nicholas Spinelli.
They are the grandchildren of
Karen and Scott Skiba, Plains Town-
ship; Robert and Rita Savage, Hanov-
er Township; and Roseann Smigiel-
Spinelli, Wilkes-Barre.
They are the great-grandchildren of
John and Mary Grace Simonson,
Shirley Savage and the late Walter
Savage Sr., all of Plains Township,
and the late Anthony Spinelli and the
late Joan Spinelli, Bronx, N.Y.
A celebration was held in the chil-
dren’s honor at the church hall after
the ceremony.
Ayla Grace Spinelli
and Anthony Spinelli
Jr. baptized
Ayla
Anthony
T
heresa Tomko,
Hanover Town-
ship, celebrated her
75th birthday on
Nov. 9, 2011.
Mrs. Tomko is
the wife of the late
George Tomko.
She has four children, Cathe-
rine Strenfel Metric and husband,
Gabe, Hanover Township; JoAnne
Sufrinko and husband, David,
Winterville, N.C.; Julie Rodgers
and husband, Gary, Plymouth;
and George Tomko and wife, Pau-
line, Centreville, Va.
She has eight grandchildren,
Eric Strenfel and wife, Moriah,
Shickshinny; Timothy Strenfel
and wife, Shawna, Middletown,
N.Y.; Gary Rodgers Jr., Kingston;
Brian Sufrinko, Winterville, N.C.;
Krista Rodgers, Kingston; Zachary
Tomko, Centreville, Va.; Brianne
Tomko, Centreville, Va.; and El-
izabeth Sufrinko, Winterville,
N.C.
Theresa also has two great-
grandchildren, Jesse James Stren-
fel, son of Eric and Moriah, and
Addison Lily Strenfel, daughter of
Timothy and Shawna.
She celebrated her birthday
with family and friends at a sur-
prise party given in her honor.
Theresa Tomko
celebrates 75th
birthday
C
eil Modrick,
formerly of
Kingston and Ply-
mouth and now a
resident of North
Penn Manor of
Wilkes-Barre, is
celebrating her 97th birthday
today, Nov. 20.
Ceil is proud of her fulfilling
career, first as a ballet dancer in
her early years, then having
danced at prestigious supper
clubs that include the Latin
Quarter in New York and the
Coconut Grove in Miami, Fla.
Ceil was one of the original
Radio City Music Hall Rockettes
in the early 1930’s.
Following her dancing career,
Ceil went into restaurant man-
agement in several restaurants
throughout the area.
One of Ceil’s favorite pastimes
is a day of fun at Mohegan Sun
Casino.
Born in 1914, she is the sur-
viving sibling of eight children.
Five of her brothers served in
the military during World War
II.
She has several nieces and
nephews and great-nieces and
great-nephews.
Ceil will celebrate her birthday
today with family and friends at
the North Penn Manor in
Wilkes-Barre.
Ceil Modrick
celebrates 97th
birthday
M
ichela Bryn
Welby was bap-
tized on Nov. 6, 2011,
at Holy Trinity Par-
ish, Swoyersville.
Michela is the
daughter of Jamie
and Angela Welby, Swoyersville.
Godparents are Jeffrie Welby, un-
cle, and Cheryl Fazio, close friend of
the family.
Michela is the granddaughter of
Alberta and Michael Hetro, Wyom-
ing, Kingston Township; John En-
drusick, Wyoming; and Jim and Gin-
ny Welby, Lehman. She is the great-
granddaughter of Agnes Endrusick,
Wyoming, and Irene Hetro, Exeter.
Michela B. Welby
baptized
Nesbitt Women’s & Children’s
Center at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital
McElwee, Marie and Richard Avery Jr.,
Edwardsville, a daughter, Nov. 1.
Nissly, Jennifer and Jason Deitz,
Hunlock Creek, a son, Nov. 1.
Woss, Jennifer and John, Mountain
Top, a son, Nov. 1.
Smith, Shelby and Craig, Forty Fort, a
son, Nov. 1.
Campbell, Fallon and Jeffrey Supon-
cic, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Nov. 1.
Bomber, Brittany and Lee, Duryea, a
daughter, Nov. 3.
Smith, Sarah Jarusinski and Steven
Ray Smith, Forty Fort, a son, Nov. 3.
Santee, Rachael and Robert Besermin,
Swoyersville, a daughter, Nov. 4.
Weitoish, Stacey Ann and Christopher
Thomas Harmon, White Haven, a
son, Nov. 4.
Fitch, Nicole and Leon, Mountain Top,
a son, Nov. 4.
Rychleski, Cherie and Bryant Astles,
Pittston, a daughter, Nov. 5.
Miller, Carmelita and AdamScott,
Exeter, a daughter, Nov. 7.
Pawloski, Sarah, Plains Township, and
Stuart Fenner, Nanticoke, a daugh-
ter, Nov. 7.
Smith, Karis and Cleve, Wilkes-Barre, a
son, Nov. 7.
Dunleavy, Danielle and James, Wilkes-
Barre, a daughter, Nov. 8.
Connors, Denise and David, Wyoming,
a daughter, Nov. 8.
Shotwell, Tamra and Anthony Taylor,
Hanover Township, a son, Nov. 8.
Ulichney, Ruth Ann and Michael,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, Nov. 9.
Derby, Melanie and Aaron, Kingston, a
son, Nov. 10.
Kostick, Kristen and Matthew, Shaver-
town, a son, Nov. 10.
Hummer, Nicole and Richard, Hanover
Township, a son, Nov. 10.
Ricko, Heather and Steven, Mountain
Top, a daughter, Nov. 10.
McCue, Brenda and Tim, Mountain Top,
a daughter, Nov. 1 1.
Marsh, Stacy A. and Joseph B. Rockel,
Hunlock Creek, a son, Nov. 1 1.
Parks, Emily and Rodney Samson,
Trucksville, a daughter, Nov. 12.
Powers-Gilpin, Amy and Marvin Gilpin
Jr., West Pittston, a daughter, Nov. 13.
Dalton, Brittany and Kyle Lamoreaux,
Kingston, a daughter, Nov. 14.
Gardjulis, Tiffany and Joseph Gard-
julis III, Plains Township, a daughter,
Nov. 14.
BIRTHS
Geisinger Medical Center, Danville
Zimmerman, Dorothy and Thomas Jr.,
Dallas, a son, Nov. 5. Grandparents
are Margaret Yankovich, Dallas, and
Florence and Thomas Zimmerman
Sr., Larksville.
OUT-OF-TOWN BIRTHS
Hanover Memorial High School Class of 1956 celebrated its 55th anniversary reunion with a three-day event. An ice break-
er pizza party took place Sept. 29 at Norm’s Pizza and Eatery, Wilkes-Barre. An evening celebration was held Sept. 30 at the
Quality Inn, T.G.I. Fridays, Wilkes-Barre. The celebration ended with a breakfast buffet at Old Country Buffet, East End Centre,
Wilkes-Barre. Attendees, from left, first row, are Mary Lou Skwirut Mikulski, Shirley Bowery Smith, Alice Snyder, Rose Jacobs
Stachowiak, Shirley Sonnenberg Pascoe, Carolyn Tarutis Langan, Catherine Scanlon Jones, Judy Woodburn Metcalf, Betty
Shersknas Ambrose, Mary Malinchak Sinay, Betty Jane Weida Forney, Dorothy Wasilewski Weiss and Theresa Ford Kinsley.
Second row: Eileen Aufiero Gillis, Dorothy Swinski Ciavarella, Paul Garber, Theresa Tryba McAvoy, Barbara Smigelski Czajkow-
ski, Shirley Schneider Bumeder, Barbara Yedlock Nash, James Forney, David Lane, Andrew Torbik, Walter Swank, Bert Reese,
Edward Sudo, Thomas Sedlak, Joseph Pegerella, Michael Kopacz, William Zeveney and Robert Walent.
Hanover Memorial High School Class of ’56 gathers for 55th reunion
C M Y K
PAGE 8B SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Swoyersville High School Class of 1951 held its 60th anniversary reunion on Sept. 24. A Mass was read
for deceased classmates at St. Mary’s/Holy Name Church before cocktails and dinner at the American
Legion Post 644 in Swoyersville. Mary Ann Olejnik Morrison has attended all 14 reunions. Classmates in
attendance, from left, first row, are Dolores Dombrauskas Ebert, William Polk, Marie Lipo Dugan, Pau-
line Matello Kyttle, Theresa Matley Sherman and Mary Ann Olejnik Morrison. Second row: Joan Urban
John, Mary Ann Tirpak Obremski, Dorothy Runchka Tengowski, Shirley Savage Gavlick, Dorothy Raieski
Yescavage, Dorothy Beny Parulski, Florence Haddick Wazeter, Jack McBride, Bernadette Pollick Dint-
inger, Rose Baldovsky Birosak, Margaret Jaslewicz Ziegler and Alice Wysocki Chronowski. Third row:
David Bronsberg, Jerome Kender, Carl Zoolkoski, Daniel Levitsky, Gerald O’Donnell, Michael Sabol and
Edward Chiampi.
Swoyersville Class of ’51 holds reunion
The Jonathan Grula Memorial Foundation has donated $20,000 to the Four Diamonds Fund, Hershey,
for a total of $221,000 since 2000. Jonathan of Wilkes-Barre was 12 years old when he died in September
1999 of complications from a bone marrow transplant to treat leukemia. The Four Diamonds Fund bene-
fits children with cancer, their families and research at Hershey Medical Center. Board members for the
Grula Foundation from left, are Dr. Andrew Frieberg, pediatric hematology oncologist; Karen Grula, presi-
dent; and Mary Gorski, board member. Second row: Charles Millard, co-founder, Four Diamonds Fund;
Joanne Joseph and Robert Gorski, board members; Dr. Sinisa Dovat; and Robert Grula, board member.
Jonathan Grula Memorial Foundation donates $20,000 to Hershey’s Four Diamonds Fund
WYOMING: The Ven. Lama
RinchenPhuntsok Rinpoche will
be giving a series of talks on Tibe-
tanBuddhismDec. 1-4inthe Com-
munityRoomattheWyomingFree
Library, 358WyomingAve. These-
riesof teachingsonphilosophyand
meditation practices are for those
new to Tibetan Buddhism and ex-
periencedpractitioners.
LamaRinchenisanaccomplished
meditationpractitionerandteacher;
former secretary to H.H. Dudjom
Rinpoche, theHeadof theNyingma
Orderof TibetanBuddhism; andhas
servedas theheadof boththeZang-
dogPalri Monastery, India, and Ur-
gyenDongag Choling Monastery,
Katmandu, Nepal.
The presentations will be offered:
6:30-8:30p.m.Dec.1,Introductionto
Tibetan Buddhism; 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Dec. 2, KarmaandRefugeinTibetan
Buddhism; 11a.m.-1p.m. Dec. 3, Pu-
rificationPractices inTibetanBudd-
hism; 2:30-4:30p.m. Dec. 3GuruYo-
ga in Tibetan Buddhism; 11 a.m.-1
p.m. Dec. 4TibetanViews onDeath
and Dying, Part 1; 2:30-4:30 p.m.
Dec. 4 Tibetan Views on Death and
Dying, Part 2.
Thereis nochargefor theclasses,
but donationswill beaccepted.
To register for one or more ses-
sions, or for more information,
email: info@hermeticinstitute.org.
For more informationonLama Rin-
chen, visit http://dongakchol-
ing.org/LamaRinchen.html
Lama Rinchen to speak on Tibetan Buddhism
C M Y K
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The Sound of Christmas
Maria Elisabeth von Trapp and Empire Brass join the
Philharmonic, to present an evening of holiday favorites,
highlighted by a wonderful medley from The Sound of
Music.
The evening will also feature audience favorite Bal-
let Theater of Scranton, performing The Parade of the
Wooden Soldiers.
Tickets $28-$60 Adult / $15 Student
Thursday, December 15, 2011
Scranton Cultural Center @ 7:00PM
Friday, December 16, 2011
F.M. Kirby Center @ 7:00PM
Tickets: 570-341-1568 / www.nepaphil.org
C M Y K
PAGE 10B SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Photographs and information must
be received two full weeks before your
child’s birthday.
To ensure accurate publication, your
information must be typed or comput-
er-generated. Include your child’s
name, age and birthday, parents’,
grandparents’ and great-grandparents’
names and their towns of residence,
any siblings and their ages.
Don’t forget to include a daytime
contact phone number.
We cannot return photos submitted
for publication in community news,
including birthday photos, occasions
photos and all publicity photos.
Please do not submit precious or
original professional photographs that
require return because such photos can
become damaged, or occasionally lost,
in the production process.
Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15
North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-
0250.
GUIDELINES
Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
If your child’s photo and birthday
announcement is on this page, it will
automatically be entered into the
“Happy Birthday Shopping Spree”
drawing for a $50 certificate. One
winner will be announced on the first
of the month on this page.
WIN A $50 GIFT
CERTIFICATE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Anna Elisabeth Grove, daughter
of Brian and Renee Grove, Tunk-
hannock, celebrated her eighth
birthday Nov. 18. Anna is a
granddaughter of Raymond and
Rosemary Chimock, Swoyers-
ville; Leona Lynn, Kingston; and
the late Joseph Lynn. She has a
brother, Jack, 4.
Anna E. Grove
Bryce Robert Lubinski, son of
Melissa and Pete Lubinski,
Wilkes-Barre, is celebrating his
first today, Nov. 20. Bryce is a
grandson of Jean and Joseph
Zaborney, Wilkes-Barre; Karen
Rome, Dallas; and Walter Lubin-
ski, Sweet Valley. He has two
brothers, Peter Joseph, 8, and
Nicholas James, 7.
Bryce R. Lubinski
Ruth Elizabeth Mullisky, daughter
of Heather Johnson-Mullisky and
John Mullisky, Mountain Top, is
celebrating her eighth birthday
today, Nov. 20. Ruthie is a grand-
daughter of Michael and Sharon
Johnson, Nuangola, and Paul and
Judy Mullisky, Clarks Summit. She
has a sister, Caitrin Jin, 8, and a
brother, Michael John, 5.
Ruth E. Mullisky
DALLAS: Misericordia Uni-
versity is hosting two open
house programs for adult lear-
ners interested in the Express-
way Accelerated Degree Pro-
gram.
The first open house will take
place 4-7 p.m. Nov. 29 in Room
406, Building 4, Luzerne County
Community College, 1333 S.
Prospect St., Nanticoke.
The second session will be
from 4-7 p.m. Nov. 30 in the
boardroom of Lackawanna Col-
lege, 501 Vine St., Scranton.
Misericordia University’s
Expressway Program offers
adult students the opportunity
to earn a bachelor’s degree in
just two and a half years in a
part-time and flexible format
online and at seven convenient
locations throughout northeast-
ern Pennsylvania.
For more information, contact
the Misericordia University
Office of Admissions at 570-674-
6331 or online at www.miser-
icordia.edulexpressway.
HANOVER TWP.: The annual
children’s Christmas party spon-
sored by the Breslau Hose Com-
pany #5 will be held 1-3 p.m.
Dec. 18 at the firehouse on First
Street, Lyndwood. All children
from infant to 10 years of age
who live in Breslau, Iona Place
and Lyndwood are eligible to
attend. Gifts from Santa will be
given.
Registrations for the party
will take place noon-3 p.m.
today at the firehouse and 9
a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through
Friday by calling 825-1267. Par-
ents are urged to register for the
party so that all children receive
a gift. Deadline for registration
is Dec. 10.
WILKES-BARRE: Luzerne
County Head Start Inc. is ac-
cepting applications for its 2012
Alumni Scholarships.
Former Head Start students
who will graduate from high
school in June 2012 and contin-
ue their education at a college
or vocational school are eligible
to apply for a scholarship. The
competitive awards are based on
academic performance, lead-
ership, motivation and extracur-
ricular and community activ-
ities.
The scholarships are spon-
sored entirely through dona-
tions from area businesses,
organizations and individuals.
Information and application
packets are available from se-
nior guidance counselors in all
area high schools and at Head
Start centers in the two-county
area. Applications are also avail-
able on Head Start’s web site at
www.lchs.hsweb.org. Applica-
tions are due Jan. 31, 2012. The
scholarships will be presented at
Head Start’s 47th anniversary
celebration in May.
Applications are being accept-
ed for Luzerne County Head
Start programs for pregnant
women, infants and children up
to four years of age. Interested
families may call Head Start at
1-800-551-5829 or 570-829-6231
for enrollment information.
WILKES-BARRE: The Big
Band Society of Northeastern
Pa will hold its next dinner
dance Dec. 9 at the Genetti
Hotel and Conference Center,
Wilkes-Barre. This event is for
members only. The doors will
open at 5:45 p.m. with dinner at
6:30 p.m. Music will be provid-
ed by After Hours. For reserva-
tions call Glen at 570-586-5359
or Herman at 570-654-6454.
IN BRIEF
Law enforcement and health-related technology students from West Side Career and Technology Center recently participated in the Epi-
lepsy Foundation’s seizure recognition and first aid program. Mary Loughlin from the Epilepsy Foundation presented information on the first
aid response for law enforcement first responders and health care professionals. Students received certificates at the end of the training
session. At the program, from left, first row, are Amanda Cavanaugh, Melissa Troy, Emily Mansilla, Ceara Letteer, Kim Veitz, Sam Edmonds,
Bethany Bielut, Jacky Joseph and Hannah Smith. Second row: Robert Arnold, Sajion Edmonds, Jia Torres, Nikki Davenport, Shawn Davis,
Audre Edwards, Sam Savakinas, Audrey Sutton, Cora Brady, Baily Wright, Amanda Fink, Emily Krasson, Stephany Matoski, Vicky Apostalav
and Erica Yager. Third row: Mark Davis, Chris Osbourne and Dylan Williams. Fourth row: Dan Pierce, Dave Eland, Elias Kocher, Kasim Freeman,
Kersti Hughes, Hayli Lucas, Rebecca Kemp, Amber Scheil, Brandy Castner, Hailee Rhoades, Barb Farley, Heather Kennedy, Emily Farver, Alli-
sah Fuches, Rebecca Green and Courtney Neishell.
Tech students learn about responding to patients with epilepsy
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 11B
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In observance of Memorial Day, fifth-grade students from State
Street Elementary Center, Wyoming Valley West, participated in an
essay contest entitled, ‘Who I thank for my freedom,’ sponsored by
the American Legion in Larksville. Award-winning students, from left,
first row, are Daevon Cherry, Ashlin Broody-Walega, Alison Kraynak,
Brandon Donnely and Lauren Piercy. Second row: teachers Lisa Rad-
ginski, Ed Kopec, Sherri Yeninas and Ann Marie McGlynn.
State Street students write essays about freedom
Plains Memorial and Sacred Heart High School Classes of 1961 celebrated a 50th anniversary reunion
Oct. 15 at the Quality Inn and Convention Center, Wilkes-Barre. Members of the reunion committee are
Judy Johnson Vanderburg, Joyce Colontuno Gelli, Margaret (Peggy) Silkiewicz Casagrande, Dorothy
Condo Gardjulis, Ann Phillips Giovanini, Joe Salus, Barbara Baganski Salus,Vince Albertelli, Betty Marek
Minucci, Rosalie Shivell Eckert, Barbara Jagodinski Oliveri, Mike Salerno, Dorothy Kovaleski Ristagno,
Marie Corcoran Spagnuolo, Carol Sabatini Komensky, Kay Doran Giovagnoli. Classmates also enjoyed a
farewell breakfast at the Country Buffett the Sunday after the reunion. There will be a Dutch-treat lun-
cheon for all classmates at 12:30 p.m. Jan. 3, 2012, at Norm’s Pizza and Eatery, Wilkes-Barre. Members of
the Plains Memorial High Class of 1961 (left), from left, first row, are Betty Ann Marek Minucci, Barbara
Baganski Salus, Dorothy Kowalewski Ristagno, Barbara Jagodinski Oliveri, Rosalie Shevell Eckert, Peggy
Silkiewicz Casagrande, Joyce Colantuno Gelli and Veronica Witt. Second row: Ann Marie Benczkowski
Gocek, Vivian Barbacci Greenberg, Ann Bankos Krill, Judy Johnson Vanderburg, Ann Phillips Giovanini,
Lee Shubert, Joan Welgos Evans, Dorothy Condo Gardjulis, Henry Butler, Elaine Rock Shivell and Bill
Mainwaring. Third row: Maxie Baldrica, Joe Salus, Mike Salerno, Mike Loncoski, Pete Kozloski, Chester
Williams, Carl Majeski, David Ercolini, Jim Collura, Vince Albertelli, Kenny Jones, Tom Shivell and Tom
Griffith. Members of the Sacred Heart Class of 1961 (right), from left, are Patricia Tontini Krulack, Kay
Doran Giovagnoli, Carol Sabatini Komensky, Marie Corcoran Spagnuolo, Cecelia Roman Prizzi and Patri-
cia Dorrance Calabrese.
Plains Memorial and Sacred Heart High School Classes of 1961 celebrate 50th reunion
The Luzerne County Community
College Schulman Gallery recently
hosted a ‘Pink Ribbon’ exhibit in
recognition of breast cancer
awareness. All artwork sold had a
percentage from the sale donated
to Candy’s Place. At the exhibit
opening, from left: Leigh Pawling,
Kingston; Allison Maslow, Shaver-
town; Nina Davidowitz, Kingston;
Bill Karlotski, chair, commercial art;
Thomas P. Leary, president, LCCC;
Nicole Farber, center coordinator,
Candy’s Place; and Kelly Olszyk,
curator, Schulman Gallery.
LCCC sponsors ‘Pink
Ribbon’ exhibit
The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce recently hosted its annual
Walk/Run for Business and Healthy Workplace Awards presentation event at
the River Common MillenniumCircle Portal. The annual event brings together
Wilkes-Barre employers to celebrate the importance of a health-conscience
workplace. More than 200 employees fromlocal businesses participated in the
one-mile lunchtime walk/run. Healthy Workplace Awards were created by Blue
Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania in partnership with regional chambers and
ChamberChoice to recognize local businesses that promote employee wellness.
Sallie Mae won the Large Employer Healthy Workplace Award and Hilton Gar-
den Inn was named the Small Employer Healthy Workplace Award winner.
Members of the Hilton Garden Inn teamreceiving their award, fromleft: Donna
Sedor, executive vice president, Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce;
Nicole Shardnick, housekeeping operations manager; Nelsa Novak, guest ser-
vice representative; Hildy Ide, director of sales and marketing; Amanda Salvo,
sales manager; and Dan Jorris.
W-B Chamber of Commerce presents Walk/Run Awards
The Northwest Area High School Class of 1971 celebrated its 40th anniversary reunion Sept. 4 at the American Legion, Shick-
shinny. Classmates in attendance, from left, first row, are Norma Barchik Mazaika, Alice Grosspietsch Newell, Pamela McHenry
Thomas, Karin Lazarowicz, Patricia Decowski Davison, Romaine Yudiski Stout and Kathy Cragle Litwiler. Second row: Howard Ro-
sencrance, Donna Wolfe Bishop, Joel Whitmire, Melanie Fink Sirak, Bonnie Boone Wido, Carol Wagner May, MaryAnn Schuckers
Bardo, Harold Rosencrance and Deborah Stevens Stone. Third row: John Baltzer, John Hasay, Joan Hasay Ferrance and Lori Krothe
Sorber. Fourth row: Jerry Gehling, Larry Wandel, Michael Thorne, Shelley Kleintob Russin. Fifth row: Robin Diltz, Ted Sadowski,
David Kephart and Randy Schuckers. Also attending were Pamela Hazlak Dymond and Leroy Crane.
Northwest Area High School Class of 1971 celebrates 40th anniversary reunion
C M Y K
PAGE 12B SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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SPORTS S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011
timesleader.com
LIKE SO
MANY other
Penn State
alumni, Jerry
Needel was
dazed with
confusion.
The proud
university he believed he knew
was suddenly shocked by
shame, its reputation sullied by
a sex scandal swirling around
the Penn State football coaching
staff and through the universi-
ty’s administration.
And Needel, a 1998 Penn
State grad whose passion for
sports starts and stops with the
Nittany Lions football team, was
beyond dismayed.
“I felt very helpless and frus-
trated,” Needel, a Morristown,
N.J. resident, said. “I have a
Penn State sweatshirt that I
wear when I walk the dog at
night.
“I’m like, ‘Can I even wear
this?’”
He wore that embarrassment
for a few days after former Penn
State defensive coordinator
Jerry Sandusky was charged
with preying on young boys and
legendary head coach Joe Pa-
terno lost his job over a suspect-
ed university cover-up.
But Needel wasn’t going to
hide from the core values he
learned at Penn State, or turn
his back on what he knew in his
heart. So he turned to a few
thousand friends.
This is how a grassroots effort
by Penn State alums to raise
money for RAINN (the Rape,
Abuse and Incest National Net-
work) came about.
In the days after Sandusky
was charged and even before
Paterno was gone, Penn State
alums were already turning this
focus from the football field to
the alleged victims.
It was time for Penn Staters
to stop hurting and start help-
ing.
“They’re very proud people,”
Needel said. “No one in the
world is better at supporting
causes. We’ve seen this emotion
out there. Let’s funnel all this
passion and emotion the Penn
State and Pennsylvania commu-
nity had into something posi-
tive.”
Led by Needel, a small group
of Penn State grads – who had
no affiliation with the university
other than they went there –
pitched their idea to RAINN.
When it was approved, they
started an online charity, proud-
tobeapennstater.com, hoping to
generate funds in the quest to
help sexually abused children.
“If we do the right thing,”
Needel reasoned, “it will help
Penn Staters heal and get their
pride back. We threw up that
website 9 or 10 in the morning.”
By 4 p.m. that day, responses
were flooding in, overwhelming
disgrace with kind-hearted
determination.
WE ARE …PENN STATE
The people at RAINN thought
it would be great if this fundrais-
er could generate about
$25,000. In just three days, it
collected $250,000 by gametime
last Saturday. And that total
rose to $357,000 by the end of
last weekend.
“It’s blown me away,” Needel
said.
It’s still going.
Business owners with Penn
State connections from around
the state began reworking their
budgets to free up donations to
RAINN.
Norma Mann, who helps run
Gary Mann Jewelers – a family
business in the Manayunk sec-
tion of Philadelphia – is one of
them. With one child who is
attending Penn State and anoth-
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
Shedding
light on a
dark subject
See SOKOLOSKI, Page 8C
COLUMBUS, Ohio—Before kickoff, it was
pronounced that the game was essentially
meaningless. Wisconsin had already won. So
Penn State’s fate would be decided next week
in Madison, not on Saturday at the Horse-
shoe.
That hardly seemed to matter to the Nitta-
ny Lions as they ran off the field at Ohio State
after a 20-14 win over the Buckeyes.
After two weeks of turmoil and exclusively
bad news, this one had plenty of meaning for
Penn State players and coaches.
“Don’t get no better than this,” linebacker
Gerald Hodges bellowed as he took off for the
locker room.
Anything to feel good again. Or, at the
least, anything to feel normal.
On top of the horrific allegations of sexual
abuse and cover-up at the university, those
outside of Joe Paterno’s family learnedFriday
that the deposed coach was suffering from
lung cancer.
“This win, this isn’t about me,” interim
coach Tom Bradley said after his first victory
in Paterno’s stead. “It’s about these players.
The team. I don’t think any teamin the histo-
PENN STATE FOOTBALL
BUCKEYES
14
NITTANY LIONS
20
Inspired Lions take care of OSU
Division will be decided vs. Wisconsin
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
AP PHOTO
Penn State
running
back
Stephfon
Green (21)
falls over
Ohio State
defensive
back C.J.
Barnett
(4) for a
four-yard
touchdown
in the first
half of
Saturday’s
game.
See PSU, Page 3C
WHITEHALL – It was a game of
a lifetime for the entire Wyoming
Seminary roster.
For Kristian Stefanides, it was
probably even more than that.
In her final high school game,
Stefanides scored three times to
lift the Blue Knights to the PIAA
Class 2A state field hockey cham-
pionship, as Wyoming Seminary
defeated Villa Maria 3-2 on Sat-
urday.
“I’m speechless. This was just
the most incredible game,” Stefa-
nides said. “This was our last
game. For the seniors, this meant a
lot. We won state championships
in three of our four seasons. Wow.”
The victory brought home the
fifth state title for Seminary since
2001, and the school’s first repeat
championship. The win was also
an unprecedented 16th consecutive
state tournament victory -- a streak
which began with the Knights’
2006 march to a title.
PIAA CLASS 2A FIELD HOCKEY CHAMPIONSHIP
Knighted again
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Members of the Wyoming Seminary field hockey teamcelebrate Saturday after defeating Villa Maria 3-2 for
the PIAA Class 2A championship at the Zephyr Sports Complex in Whitehall.
Seminary wins 3rd title in 4 years
By JOHN MEDEIROS
jmedeiros@timesleader.com
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Teammates congratulate Kristian Stefanides (3) of Wyoming Seminary
after she scored the first goal in the first half of a Saturday’s PIAA
Class 2A championship game with Villa Maria. See KNIGHTS, Page 6C
DALLAS – One thing that concerned Dallas
greatly happened twice in the closing minutes
Saturday afternoon.
It was just enough to end the Mountaineers’
season and quest for their first district football
title since 1999.
Valley View connected on
twotouchdownpasses, thefinal
with 1:11 remaining, to rally
past Dallas for an 18-12 victory
and the District 2 Class 3Atitle.
Dallas ended its season at
10-2. Valley View (11-1) won its
first district title after falling
short three previous times. The
Cougars will play D11 cham-
pion Allentown Central Cathol-
ic (7-5) at 7 p.m. Friday at Be-
thlehem Liberty High School.
Brian Lalli, Valley View’s all-
time leading receiver, hauled in
a 74-yard touchdown pass at
2:56 and then after recovering a
Dallas fumble caught a 16-yard
game-winning toss with 1:11 to
play.
“Everybody knows we’re a run-first team,” Lal-
li said, “soweliketoestablishtherun. Fortunate-
ly in the end it opened up a little bit for me and I
was able to make some plays.”
That was a worry Dallas coach Ted Jackson
mentioned a week ago after a semifinal win
against Scranton Prep. The Cougars like to
pound their pair of 1,000-yard backs and then
shock opponents with a big hitter in the passing
game.
D I S T R I C T 2 C L A S S 3 A F O O T B A L L
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Dallas Back Paul Brace jumps over defenders
into Valley View linebacker Matt Wolfel.
Valley View
ends Dallas’
solid season
Cougars score two touchdowns in last 2:56
to overcome 12-point, first-quarter deficit.
By JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
18
VALLEY VIEW
12
DALLAS
See DALLAS , Page 7C
K
PAGE 2C SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S C O R E B O A R D
CAMPS/CLINICS
Electric City Baseballl and Softball
Academy will host a Winter Skills
Camp at Riverfront Sports on
Saturdays, Nov. 26, Dec. 3, 10 and
17 with baseball from 4 p.m. to 6
p.m. and softball from 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. Cost for each is $145. For
more information, please call
570-878-8483 or visit www.e-
lectriccitybaseball.com.
The Tenth Annual Paul McGloin
Holiday Pitching Camp will be
held at Riverfront Sports on Dec.
26 – 28 from 9:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
Cost is $145 or $130 if signed up by
Nov. 23. For more information,
please call 570-878-8483 or visit
www.electriccitybaseball.com.
MEETINGS
Crestwood Boys Basketball Booster
Club will be holding their next
meeting on Monday, Nov. 28th at 7
p.m. at Cavanaugh’s. We will be
discussing Meet the Players Night,
Comet clothing orders and the
Munley Tournament. Parents of
basketball players are invited to
attend.
Hanover Area Cheerleading Booster
Club will hold their next meeting
on Monday, Nov. 21 at 7 p.m. at the
high school cafeteria.
Luzerne County Girls Softball will
hold their next meeting on Mon-
day, Nov. 21 at 7 p.m. at Alexis
Tavern. It is very important to have
division presidents attend as the
agenda will cover the many NEW
Rule Changes including tourna-
ment play. Some decisions will
need to be made and voted on;
Babe Ruth HQ wants commitments
by the end of this month. Please
come and give your opinion so the
executive board can make an
educated decision.
PA Boys Basketball Booster Club
will hold a quick meeting on Tues-
day, Nov. 22 at 7 p.m. at the high
school to plan for upcoming
events. Any questions, call Carl or
Maria Stravinski at 570-883-7220.
UPCOMING EVENTS
The Dallas Alumni Game will be held
on Saturday, Nov. 26 at Cleary
Field. All Dallas Alumni and current
Dallas soccer players are invited to
attend. There will be hot chocolate,
drinks, and donuts, so bring your
cleats and be ready to play and
have fun. Kill Thursday
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
7
1
2
3
4
5
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Sporting Goods
THE STORE FOR ALL
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W B 8824 33050
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Mon-Fri 8:30-6:00 Sat 8-4 Sun 10-2
BIG BUCK CONTEST
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WREN’S
TAXIDERMY & DEER PROCESSING
DEER MUST BE
PROCESSED AT
WREN’S TAXIDERMY
CALL FOR DETAILS
(570) 814-9509
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
Today's Events
AHL
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Worcester, 4 p.m.
MONDAY, NOV. 21
COLLEGE WRESTLING
Wilkes at East Stroudsburg, 7 p.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Luzerne CCC at Stevens Tech, 8 p.m.
TUESDAY, NOV. 22
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Bible Baptist at Wilkes, 7 p.m.
King’s at Albright, 7 p.m.
Misericordia at Scranton, 7 p.m.
PSU Wilkes-Barre at Centenary, 8 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Lycoming at Misericordia, 6 p.m.
PSU Wilkes-Barre at Centenary, 6 p.m.
Scranton at King’s, 7 p.m.
Wilkes at Marywood, 7 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 23
AHL
Syracuse at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, 7:05 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Luzerne CCC at PSU Wilkes-Barre, 7 p.m.
FRIDAY, NOV. 25
AHL
Hershey at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, 7:05 p.m.
SATURDAY, NOV. 26
AHL
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Binghamton, 7:05 p.m.
W H A T ’ S O N T V
(All times Eastern)
AUTO RACING
3 p.m.
ESPN—NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Ford 400, at Home-
stead, Fla.
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour, Johor Open, final
round, at Johor, Malaysia (same-day tape)
10:30 a.m.
TGC —European PGA Tour, Alfred Dunhill Cham-
pionship, final round, at Malelane, South Africa
(same-day tape)
Noon
NBC — PGA Tour, Presidents Cup, final round, at
Melbourne, Australia (same-day tape)
1:30 p.m.
TGC—LPGA, Titleholders, final round, at Orlando,
Fla.
MEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
2 p.m.
BTN — Rhode Island at Nebraska
4 p.m.
BTN — Creighton at Iowa
5:30 p.m.
ESPN2 —Puerto Rico Tip-Off, third-place game, at
San Juan, Puerto Rico
6 p.m.
FSN — Paradise Jam, semifinal, Norfolk St. vs.
TCU, at St. Thomas, Virgin Islands
BTN — Arkansas Little Rock at Michigan State
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — Puerto Rico Tip-Off, championship
game, at San Juan, Puerto Rico
8:30 p.m.
FSN—ParadiseJam, semifinal, Mississippi winner
vs. Marquette, at St. Thomas, Virgin Islands
NFL
1 p.m.
CBS — Cincinnati at Baltimore
FOX — Dallas at Washington
4 p.m.
CBS — San Diego at Chicago
8 p.m.
NBC — Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants
SOCCER
2 p.m.
FOX — Premier League, Liverpool at Chelsea
(same-day tape)
Broadcast at 4:30 p.m. in early NFL markets
9 p.m.
ESPN — MLS Cup, Houston at Los Angeles
COLLEGE WRESTLING
Noon
BTN — Minnesota at Penn State
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
VOLLEYBALL
10 p.m.
BTN — Indiana at Ohio State
T R A N S A C T I O N S
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
DETROIT REDWINGS—Activated F Todd Bertuz-
zi frominjured reserve. Placed D Ian White on sev-
en-day injured reserve.
FLORIDA PANTHERS—Recalled G Jacob Mark-
strom from San Antonio (AHL).
NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Recalled G Anders
Nilsson from Bridgeport (AHL).
TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS—Recalled F Joe Col-
borne from Toronto (AHL).
WINNIPEG JETS—Activated F Eric Fehr from in-
jured reserve.
American Hockey League
SANANTONIORAMPAGE—Signed GRob Nolan.
ECHL
ECHL—Suspended Colorado’s Tommy Maxwell
one game and fined him an undisclosed amount as
a result of his actions in a Nov. 18 game against Ba-
kersfield.
ELMIRA JACKALS—Announced F Maxime
Gratchev and GBrian Stewart were assigned to the
team by Binghamton (AHL).
COLLEGE
ALABAMA—Suspended DE Nick Gentry and WR
DeAndrew White one game each for violating team
rules.
F O O T B A L L
H.S. Playoff Glance
DISTRICT 2/4-11 CLASS 4A
Friday, Nov. 11
Nazareth 43, Delaware Valley 28
Parkland 38, Stroudsburg 10
Easton 35, Bethlehem Freedom 28
Scranton 36, Wyoming Valley West 7
Friday's Results
Easton 29, Scranton 20
Nazareth 63, Parkland 27
Friday, Nov. 25
Championship, Easton (10-2) at Nazareth (11-1), 7
p.m.
Dec. 2 or Dec. 3
(Site TBA)
D2/4-11 champion vs. District 12 champion
DISTRICT 2 CLASS 3A
Friday, Nov. 11
Valley View 49, Crestwood 7
Saturday, Nov. 12
Dallas 39, Scranton Prep 6
Saturday's Result
Valley View18, Dallas 12
Friday, Nov. 25
Valley View (11-1) vs. District 11 champion
Allentown Central Catholic (7-5), 7 p.m., Be-
thlehem Liberty H.S.
DISTRICT 2 CLASS 2A
Friday, Nov. 11
Lakeland at GAR, suspended power outage
Wyoming Area 35, Mid Valley 28
Saturday, Nov. 12
GAR 42, Lakeland 21
Friday's Result
GAR 53, Wyoming Area 44
Friday, Nov. 25
GAR (11-1) vs. District 11 champion Pen Argyl
(11-0), 7 p.m. Spartan Stadium, Kingston
DISTRICT 2 CLASS A
Friday, Nov. 11
Riverside 14, Dunmore 13
Old Forge 10, Lackawanna Trail 7
Friday's Result
Old Forge 47, Riverside 6
Friday, Nov. 25
Old Forge (10-2) vs. District 4 champion Southern
Columbia (11-1), 7 p.m., Shamokin H.S.
EASTERN CONFERENCE CLASS 3A
Friday, Nov. 11
Berwick 29, Coughlin 28
Southern Lehigh 27, Blue Mountain 24
Friday's Result
Berwick 57, Southern Lehigh 46
EASTERN CONFERENCE CLASS A
Friday, Nov. 11
Pottsville Nativity 17, Bucktail 0
Mahanoy Area 41, Northwest 0
Friday's Result
Mahanoy Area 47, Pottsville Nativity 0
NCAA
The AP Top 25 Fared
No. 1 LSU (11-0) beat Mississippi 52-3. Next: vs.
No. 6 Arkansas, Friday, Nov. 25.
No. 2 Oklahoma State (10-1) lost to Iowa State
37-31, 2OT, Friday. Next: vs. No. 5 Oklahoma,
Saturday, Dec. 3.
No. 3 Alabama (10-1) beat Georgia Southern
45-21. Next: at Auburn, Saturday.
No. 4 Oregon (9-1) vs. No. 18 Southern Cal. Next:
vs. Oregon State, Saturday.
No. 5 Oklahoma (8-1) at No. 25 Baylor. Next: vs.
Iowa State, Saturday.
No. 6 Arkansas (10-1) beat Mississippi State
44-17. Next: at No. 1 LSU, Friday, Nov. 25.
No. 7 Clemson (9-2) lost to NC State 37-13. Next:
at No. 14 South Carolina, Saturday.
No. 8 Stanford (9-1) vs. California. Next: vs. No.
24 Notre Dame, Saturday.
No. 9 Virginia Tech (10-1) beat North Carolina
24-21, Thursday. Next: at Virginia, Saturday, Nov.
26.
No. 10 Boise State (8-1) at San Diego State. Next:
vs. Wyoming, Saturday.
No. 11 Houston (11-0) beat SMU 37-7. Next: at
Tulsa, Saturday.
No. 12 Michigan State (9-2) beat Indiana 55-3.
Next: at Northwestern, Saturday.
No. 13 Georgia (9-2) beat Kentucky 19-10. Next: at
Georgia Tech, Saturday.
No. 14 South Carolina (9-2) beat The Citadel
41-20. Next: vs. No. 7 Clemson, Saturday.
No. 15 Wisconsin (9-2) beat Illinois 28-17. Next:
vs. No. 21 Penn State, Saturday.
No. 16 Kansas State (8-2) at Texas. Next: TBD.
No. 17 Nebraska (8-3) lost to No. 20 Michigan
45-17. Next: vs. Iowa, Friday.
No. 18 Southern Cal (8-2) at No. 4 Oregon. Next:
vs. UCLA, Saturday.
No. 19 TCU (9-2) beat Colorado State 34-10. Next:
vs. UNLV, Saturday, Dec. 3.
No. 20 Michigan (9-2) beat No. 17 Nebraska
45-17. Next: vs. Ohio State, Saturday.
No. 21 Penn State (9-2) beat Ohio State 20-14.
Next: at No. 15 Wisconsin, Saturday.
No. 22 Southern Miss (9-2) lost to UAB 34-31,
Thursday. Next: vs. Memphis, Saturday.
No. 23 Florida State (7-3) vs. Virginia. Next: at
Florida, Saturday.
No. 24 Notre Dame (8-3) beat Boston College
16-14. Next: at No. 8 Stanford, Saturday.
No. 25 Baylor (6-3) vs. No. 5 Oklahoma. Next: vs.
Texas Tech, Saturday.
College Football Scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 31, Sacred Heart 21
Buffalo 51, Akron 10
CCSU 42, Bryant 21
California (Pa.) 44, Elizabeth City St. 0
Colgate 21, Bucknell 6
Columbia 35, Brown 28, 2OT
Cornell 48, Penn 38
Cortland St. 14, Albright 0
Dartmouth 24, Princeton 17
Delaware 26, Villanova 16
Delaware Valley 62, Norwich 10
Duquesne 45, Robert Morris 10
Harvard 45, Yale 7
Holy Cross 41, Fordham 21
James Madison 34, UMass 17
Kutztown 17, Concord 14
Lehigh 37, Lafayette 13
Louisville 34, UConn 20
New Hampshire 30, Maine 27
Rutgers 20, Cincinnati 3
Salisbury 62, W. New England 24
St. John Fisher 23, Johns Hopkins 12
Stony Brook 41, Liberty 31
Temple 42, Army 14
Towson 28, Rhode Island 17
Wagner 44, Monmouth (NJ) 29
Wesley 35, Hobart 28
Widener 48, Waynesburg 27
MIDWEST
Iowa 31, Purdue 21
Kent St. 28, E. Michigan 22
Marian (Ind.) 31, Grand View 0
Michigan 45, Nebraska 17
Michigan St. 55, Indiana 3
Mid-Am Nazarene 40, S. Nazarene 28
Minn. Duluth 30, Saginaw Valley St. 27
Missouri 31, Texas Tech 27
Missouri St. 38, Youngstown St. 34
Monmouth (Ill.) 33, Illinois Wesleyan 27
Mount Union 47, Benedictine (Ill.) 7
Murray St. 35, SE Missouri 34
N. Dakota St. 37, W. Illinois 21
N. Iowa 23, Illinois St. 20, 2OT
NW Missouri St. 35, Missouri Western 29
North Central 59, Dubuque 13
North Dakota 38, South Dakota 37
Northwestern 28, Minnesota 13
Notre Dame 16, Boston College 14
Penn St. 20, Ohio St. 14
S. Illinois 35, Indiana St. 28
St. Francis (Ill.) 21, Morningside 17
St. Francis (Ind.) 28, Missouri Valley 14
St. Thomas (Minn.) 48, St. Scholastica 2
St. Xavier 51, Bethel (Tenn.) 13
Wabash 38, Illinois College 20
Washburn 52, Abilene Christian 49
Wayne (Mich.) 48, St. Cloud St. 38
Wis.-Whitewater 59, Albion 0
Wisconsin 28, Illinois 17
SOUTH
Alabama 45, Georgia Southern 21
Appalachian St. 28, Elon 24
Arkansas St. 45, Middle Tennessee 19
Auburn 35, Samford 16
Bethune-Cookman 26, Florida A&M16
Cal Poly 41, South Alabama 10
Coastal Carolina 45, W. Carolina 21
Davidson 30, Valparaiso 22
Delaware St. 39, Howard 36
E. Kentucky 23, UT-Martin 16
FIU 28, Louisiana-Monroe 17
Florida 54, Furman 32
Georgia 19, Kentucky 10
Georgia St. 42, Campbell 35
Georgia Tech 38, Duke 31
Hampton 42, Morgan St. 18
Jackson St. 51, Alcorn St. 7
Jacksonville St. 38, Tennessee St. 16
Miami 6, South Florida 3
Morehead St. 55, Butler 35
NC A&T 31, NC Central 21
NC State 37, Clemson 13
Presbyterian 45, Charleston Southern 14
SC State 20, Savannah St. 10
South Carolina 41, The Citadel 20
Stephen F. Austin 33, Northwestern St. 0
Tennessee Tech 49, Austin Peay 7
Troy 34, FAU 7
VMI 31, Gardner-Webb 24
Wake Forest 31, Maryland 10
William & Mary 25, Richmond 23
Wofford 28, Chattanooga 27
SOUTHWEST
Alabama A&M17, Prairie View15
Ark.-Pine Bluff 42, Texas Southern 6
Arkansas 44, Mississippi St. 17
Houston 37, SMU 7
Rice 19, Tulane 7
Sam Houston St. 36, Texas St. 14
TCU 34, Colorado St. 10
Texas A&M 61, Kansas 7
Tulsa 57, UTEP 28
UTSA 49, Minot St. 7
FAR WEST
Air Force 45, UNLV17
E. Washington 45, Idaho St. 14
Louisiana Tech 24, Nevada 20
Montana 36, Montana St. 10
Oregon St. 38, Washington 21
S. Utah 27, N. Arizona 24
San Diego 23, Jacksonville 14
San Jose St. 27, Navy 24
UC Davis 23, Sacramento St. 19
Utah 30, Washington St. 27, OT
Utah St. 49, Idaho 42, 2OT
Weber St. 48, Portland St. 33
Wyoming 31, New Mexico 10
NFL
Favorite Points Underdog
FALCONS 6 Titans
DOLPHINS 2 Bills
RAVENS 7 Bengals
BROWNS 1 Jaguars
VIKINGS 1 Raiders
LIONS 7 Panthers
PACKERS 14 Bucs
Cowboys 7 REDSKINS
49ERS 10 Cards
RAMS 3 Seahawks
BEARS 3.5 Chargers
GIANTS 5.5 Eagles
Monday
PATRIOTS 15 Chiefs
Bye week: Texans, Colts, Saints, Steelers.
College Basketball
Favorite Points Underdog
OHIO U 8.5 Arkansas St
NEBRASKA 11.5 Rhode Island
FLORIDA ST 24.5 S Alabama
d-IOWA PK Creighton
MICHIGAN ST 21.5 Ark-L Rock
SAINT LOUIS 1.5 Washington
PORTLAND 2 Washington St
Colorado PK W Michigan
Iona 3 Maryland
Temple PK Wichita St
Alabama 1 Purdue
Virginia Comm 13.5 W Kentucky
Georgia Tech 2.5 Lsu
Tulsa 3 St. Joseph’s
Northwestern 1.5 Seton Hall
CS-Fullerton NL Hou-Baptist
UL-LAFAYETTE NL Nicholls St
E Kentucky NL Lehigh
LIBERTY NL William & Mary
Duquesne 3.5 VALPARAISO
Tcu 7.5 Norfolk St
Marquette 6.5 Mississippi
IOWA ST 8.5 W Carolina
S CAROLINA 10.5 Tennessee St
OREGON 14.5 SE Missouri St
E Illinois 2.5 NO ILLINOIS
FURMAN PK Loyola-Chicago
NO IOWA 20.5 No Colorado
Montana 1 SAN DIEGO
UAB 7.5 Murray St
d- Des Moines, IA.
NHL
Favorite Odds Underdog
HURRICANES -$160/
+$140
Maple Leafs
Sharks -$140/
+$120
AVALANCHE
Red Wings -$125/
+$105
DUCKS
CANUCKS -$185/
+$165
Senators
CFL
Favorite Points Underdog
WINNIPEG 3.5 Hamilton
BR COLUMBIA 6.5 Edmonton
Home Teams in Capital Letters
AME RI C A’ S L I NE
By ROXY ROXBOROUGH
INJURY REPORT: On the NFL board, Houston QB Matt Schaub is out, Matt Leinart
will get the start; Philadelphia QB Michael Vick is out, Vince Young will get the start;
Kansas City QB Matt Cassel is out, Tyler Palko will get the start.
BOXING REPORT: In the WBA junior middleweight title fight on December 3 at
Madison Square Garden, Miguel Cotto is -$180 vs. Antonio Margarito at +$160.
H O C K E Y
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Philadelphia .................... 19 11 5 3 25 71 58
Pittsburgh........................ 20 11 6 3 25 60 50
N.Y. Rangers .................. 17 10 4 3 23 47 38
New Jersey ..................... 18 10 7 1 21 49 50
N.Y. Islanders ................. 17 5 9 3 13 35 56
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Buffalo.............................. 20 12 8 0 24 58 51
Toronto ............................ 20 11 7 2 24 61 66
Boston.............................. 18 11 7 0 22 64 39
Montreal........................... 20 9 8 3 21 53 49
Ottawa.............................. 20 10 9 1 21 61 68
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida............................ 19 10 6 3 23 56 48
Washington................... 18 10 7 1 21 58 56
Tampa Bay .................... 19 9 8 2 20 54 60
Winnipeg ....................... 20 8 9 3 19 58 65
Carolina ......................... 20 6 11 3 15 46 68
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago ......................... 20 12 5 3 27 69 58
Nashville........................ 18 10 5 3 23 50 44
Detroit ............................ 18 10 7 1 21 49 41
St. Louis......................... 18 10 7 1 21 46 40
Columbus...................... 18 3 13 2 8 39 66
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Minnesota...................... 19 11 5 3 25 44 38
Edmonton...................... 18 9 7 2 20 41 43
Vancouver ..................... 19 9 9 1 19 56 56
Colorado........................ 20 9 10 1 19 55 61
Calgary .......................... 18 8 9 1 17 41 47
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Phoenix............................ 18 10 5 3 23 51 45
Los Angeles .................... 20 10 7 3 23 49 48
Dallas............................... 18 11 7 0 22 48 50
San Jose.......................... 16 10 5 1 21 49 41
Anaheim.......................... 19 6 9 4 16 39 57
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
Buffalo 1, Carolina 0
Colorado 3, Dallas 0
Calgary 5, Chicago 2
Saturday's Games
Winnipeg 6, Philadelphia 4
Detroit 4, Los Angeles 1
Phoenix 4, Buffalo 2
Toronto 7, Washington 1
Montreal 4, N.Y. Rangers 0
Boston 6, N.Y. Islanders 0
New Jersey 4, Tampa Bay 2
Florida 3, Pittsburgh 2
Columbus at Nashville, late
St. Louis at Minnesota, late
San Jose at Dallas, late
Chicago at Edmonton, late
Today's Games
Toronto at Carolina, 5 p.m.
San Jose at Colorado, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Ottawa at Vancouver, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
Carolina at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Washington, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Boston at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
AHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
St. John’s ................ 18 12 3 3 0 27 67 52
Manchester ............. 19 9 9 0 1 19 50 50
Portland................... 16 8 7 0 1 17 45 49
Providence.............. 19 8 10 1 0 17 42 60
Worcester ............... 13 5 4 2 2 14 36 35
East Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Penguins................ 17 10 3 1 3 24 56 41
Norfolk..................... 18 10 7 0 1 21 66 52
Hershey................... 16 7 4 3 2 19 54 49
Syracuse................. 15 7 5 2 1 17 49 49
Binghamton ............ 18 6 10 1 1 14 41 56
Northeast Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Springfield................. 17 10 7 0 0 20 55 47
Albany........................ 17 9 6 1 1 20 43 51
Connecticut............... 15 8 4 1 2 19 47 46
Bridgeport ................. 17 8 7 2 0 18 50 58
Adirondack................ 14 8 5 0 1 17 43 38
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Charlotte.................... 17 9 6 1 1 20 45 43
Peoria......................... 17 9 6 1 1 20 59 52
Milwaukee.................. 14 9 4 0 1 19 40 36
Chicago...................... 14 7 5 0 2 16 38 34
Rockford .................... 15 6 8 1 0 13 45 56
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Toronto....................... 17 9 5 2 1 21 50 46
Rochester .................. 18 8 7 2 1 19 48 53
Hamilton..................... 16 6 8 1 1 14 36 52
Lake Erie.................... 17 6 9 1 1 14 37 49
Grand Rapids............ 16 6 9 1 0 13 42 46
West Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Oklahoma City.......... 17 12 4 0 1 25 55 38
Abbotsford ................ 17 11 5 1 0 23 47 38
Houston..................... 16 9 3 1 3 22 53 45
Texas......................... 15 7 7 0 1 15 50 50
San Antonio .............. 15 6 9 0 0 12 34 52
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Saturday's Games
Toronto 3, Rochester 2
St. John’s 3, Norfolk 1
Manchester 4, Penguins 3, SO
Albany 6, Hershey 5, SO
Springfield 4, Bridgeport 1
Milwaukee 3, Grand Rapids 1
Portland 3, Providence 2
Peoria at Lake Erie, late
Adirondack at Syracuse, late
San Antonio at Chicago, late
Houston at Texas, late
Abbotsford at Oklahoma City, late
Today's Games
Adirondack at Bridgeport, 3 p.m.
Rockford at Charlotte, 3 p.m.
Penguins at Worcester, 4 p.m.
Connecticut at Providence, 4:05 p.m.
Peoria at Toronto, 5 p.m.
San Antonio at Milwaukee, 5 p.m.
Abbotsford at Houston, 6:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
No games scheduled
B O X I N G
Fight Schedule
Nov. 26
At U.S. Bank Arena, Cincinnati (HBO), Adrien Bron-
er vs. Vicente Rodriguez, 12, for the vacant WBO
junior lightweight title.
At the Bancomer Center, Mexico City (HBO), Cane-
lo Alvarez vs. Kermit Cintron, 12, for Alvarez’s WBC
super welterweight title; Gilberto Ramirez sanchez
vs. Samuel Miller, 10, middleweights.
Nov. 30
At Challenge Stadium, Perth, Australia, Krzysztof
Wlodarczyk vs. Danny Green, 12, for Wlodarczyk’s
WBC cruiserweight title.
A U T O R A C I N G
NASCAR Sprint Cup
Ford 400 Lineup
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 175.467.
2. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 174.808.
3. (4) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 174.582.
4. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 174.52.
5. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 174.492.
6. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 174.475.
7. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 174.436.
8. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 174.109.
9. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 174.098.
10. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 173.969.
11. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 173.907.
12. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 173.734.
13. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 173.678.
14. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 173.371.
15. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 173.332.
16. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 173.321.
17. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 173.277.
18. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 173.271.
19. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 173.249.
20. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 173.16.
21. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 173.155.
22. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 173.094.
23. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 173.082.
24. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 172.966.
25. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 172.889.
26. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 172.701.
27. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 172.656.
28. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 172.425.
29. (84) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 172.392.
30. (55) J.J. Yeley, Ford, 171.991.
31. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 171.821.
32. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 171.685.
33. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 171.059.
34. (35) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 171.027.
35. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 170.881.
36. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 170.881.
37. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 170.578.
38. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 170.143.
39. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota, 169.929.
40. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, Owner Points.
41. (32) T.J. Bell, Ford, Owner Points.
42. (36) Geoffrey Bodine, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
43. (71) Mike Bliss, Ford, 169.94.
Failed to Qualify
44. (46) Scott Speed, Ford, 169.529.
45. (7) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 169.359.
46. (37) Mike Skinner, Ford, 168.587.
47. (92) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 167.775.
48. (93) Grant Enfinger, Chevrolet, 165.807.
2011 Driver Standings
1. Carl Edwards, 2,359.
2. Tony Stewart, 2,356.
3. Kevin Harvick, 2,308.
4. Brad Keselowski, 2,294.
5. Jimmie Johnson, 2,291.
6. Matt Kenseth, 2,289.
7. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,257.
8. Kurt Busch, 2,252.
(tie) Ryan Newman, 2,252.
10. Denny Hamlin, 2,249.
11. Jeff Gordon, 2,247.
12. Kyle Busch, 2,224.
13. Clint Bowyer, 1,009.
14. Kasey Kahne, 1,004.
15. Greg Biffle, 987.
16. AJ Allmendinger, 984.
17. Marcos Ambrose, 931.
18. Paul Menard, 919.
19. Juan Pablo Montoya, 918.
20. Mark Martin, 910.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 3C
➛ P S U F O O T B A L L L
No. 21 PENN ST. 20
OHIO ST. 14
Penn St. .............................. 10 10 0 0 — 20
Ohio St. ............................... 0 14 0 0 — 14
PSU OSU
First downs............................. 16 15
Rushes-yards ........................ 39-239 43-206
Passing................................... 88 83
Comp-Att-Int .......................... 10-18-1 7-17-0
Return Yards.......................... 10 15
Punts-Avg............................... 4-36.0 4-38.3
Fumbles-Lost ......................... 0-0 2-2
Penalties-Yards..................... 5-40 6-32
Time of Possession .............. 30:08 29:52
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Penn St., Green 16-93, Redd 8-63,
Drake 3-50, Beachum 4-16,
Belton 4-15, Suhey 1-1, Zordich 2-1, McGloin 1-0.
Ohio St.,
B.Miller 18-105, Herron 18-76, Hyde 4-24, J.Hall
2-8, Team1-(minus 7).
PASSING—Penn St., McGloin 10-18-1-88. Ohio
St.,
B.Miller 7-17-0-83.
RECEIVING—Penn St., Moye 3-40, Green 2-8,
Beachum1-13,
Szczerba 1-12, Brown 1-11, Suhey 1-3, Zordich 1-1.
Ohio St., Posey 4-66, C.Brown 1-10, Stoneburner
1-7, Herron 1-0.
FIRST QUARTER
PSU-- Stephfon Green 40-yard run
(Anthony Fera kick), 12:27. Drive: 5
plays, 80 yards, 2:33. Comment:
Penn State coaches (understan-
dably) denied as late as Thursday
that the Nittany Lions were working
on a wildcat package for this game.
Naturally they bust it out on the
opening drive against the Buckeyes,
and its first appearance leads to a
touchdown. Wideout Curtis Drake, a
quarterback fromhis high school
days at West Catholic in Philadel-
phia, took a snap out of the shotgun
and handed it off to senior Stephfon
Green. The middle of the field opens
up entirely and Green doesn’t even
need to make a cut, sprinting untou-
ched for the score. It’s the fourth
score of the season for the senior, all
coming in the last four games. It’s
also the second-longest run of the
season for the Lions (Silas Redd 42
yards vs. Northwestern). PENN
STATE 7, OHIO STATE 0.
PSU-- Fera 43-yard field goal, 1:59.
Drive: 15 plays, 54 yards, 5:29. Com-
ment: With Silas Redd not 100 per-
cent, the Lions use four different
ball-carriers on this drive and Matt
McGloin converts a couple of third-
and-long passes before the offense
stalls in Buckeyes territory. Fera
comes on and boots a career-long
field goal at the end of the lengthy
drive. His previous best had been 40
yards. PSU10, OSU0.
SECOND QUARTER
OSU-- Braxton Miller 24-yard run
(Drew Basil kick), 12:32. Drive: 10
plays, 77 yards, 4:22. Comment: The
Buckeyes and their true freshman
quarterback certainly missed top
receiver DeVier Posey. The senior
had been suspended for the first 10
games of the season following an
investigation into illegal benefits, but
he shows no rust fromit. Posey
makes a gorgeous one-handed catch
at the sideline, barely getting a foot
down in bounds near two Lions
defenders for a big first down. Look-
ing confident, Miller takes the ball
himself after that, making a great
cut and bouncing off right tackle to
race to paydirt at the near corner of
the end zone. PSU10, OSU7.
PSU-- Green 4-yard run (Fera kick),
10:05. Drive: 5 plays, 81 yards, 2:20.
Comment: Definitive answer on the
ensuing drive fromPenn State as
Redd once again looks like Redd.
The sophomore matches his career-
longest run by tearing out of a
tackle and trotting 42 yards down to
the Buckeyes’ 36. A McGloin-to-
Moye connection and another run
out of the wildcat -- this time from
true freshman Bill Belton -- drives
the Lions to the goal line, where
Green punches it in. That makes
back-to-back games with two touch-
downs for Green, who is closing his
career strong after missing much of
the start of the campaign for dis-
ciplinary reasons. PSU17, OSU7.
OSU-- Jake Stoneburner 7-yard
pass fromMiller (Basil kick), 5:22.
Drive: 5 plays, 37 yards, 2:51. Com-
ment: Two big interceptions by
McGloin turned last year’s matchup
completely around. This one doesn’t
go all the way back for a touchdown,
but the Buckeyes still manage to
convert a McGloin turnover into
points. Rolling to his right, McGloin
throws a pass across his body and
too high for tight end Andrew
Szczerba. The ball is tipped and
picked off by safety Orhian Johnson,
who returns it 15 yards to the Lions’
37. Fromthere, the Buckeyes get
their option game going and Miller
fools the defense with a fake pitch
for a 24-yard gain. On third down,
Miller hits his tight end in the back
of the end zone for the score. PSU
17, OSU14.
PSU-- Fera 46-yard field goal, 0:00.
Drive: 9 plays, 49 yards, 5:18. Com-
ment: Once again, the Lions’ newly
implemented wildcat scheme hurts
the Buckeyes. This time it’s Drake
taking the snap and weaving 38
yards through traffic to set up the
field goal try. Penn State winds the
clock all the way down to four sec-
onds before calling a timeout and
bringing on Fera again. The sopho-
more connects to set a new career-
high for the second time in the half.
Now at 20 points, the Lions have
their most points scored at Ohio
Stadiumsince 1964. PSU20, OSU
14.
PLAY OF THE GAME
In 2008, it was a safety who made a
big defensive play on Ohio State’s
quarterback to fuel Penn State’s first
win at the Horseshoe in 30 years. In
2010, it was another safety who
helped preserve another one. On
fourth-and-10 fromthe Penn State 41
with two minutes to play, the Buck-
eyes’ Braxton Miller took off as he
had done so many times on the day.
Astorino was able to take out the
rookie quarterback’s legs right in
front of the Lions sideline, dropping
himjust a yard short of a critical
conversion.
COLUMBUS, Ohio— Despite
the notion that Penn State will
look to distance itself from Joe
Paterno’s staff, acting athletic di-
rector Dave Joyner said the
search for a permanent football
coach will include candidates
with ties to the school.
Joyner said that a search com-
mittee to find a permanent re-
placement for Paterno will be
formed in the near future with
himself andnewuniversity presi-
dent Rod Erickson being the fi-
nal decision-makers.
“We’re going to decide on that
structure very soon,” Joyner said
Saturday before Penn State’s 20-
14 win over Ohio State.
Joyner, who was named acting
athletic director on Wednesday,
said that the decision on a foot-
ball coachwill not come fromthe
board of trustees, which voted to
fire Paterno on Nov. 9.
With the university still reel-
ing over the sexual abuse charg-
es against former defensive coor-
dinator Jerry Sandusky, there
was a question as to whether
anyone with even passing ties to
Penn State or Sandusky would
be a candidate for the full-time
job.
Joyner, a former Penn State
football and wrestling All-Amer-
ican himself, said that would not
influence his opinion.
“I would have no objection” to
hiring someone connected to
PennState, Joyner said. “It won’t
be my decision alone. There will
be a lot of counsel. But Penn
State, I would have no objection
to a Penn-State tied person.
Whoever is the best person is go-
ing to get the job.”
Presumably that includes in-
terim coach Tom Bradley, who
has been at the university as a
player and coach since 1975.
“I think coach Bradley has
doneaveryfinejob,” Joyner said.
“I’ve known him for a very long
time and he’s very direct. I think
he’s good with the media. And
the players really respect him.
Because he’s a very tough guy.
They don’t call him ‘Scrap’ for
nothing. I think he’s done a fine
job.
“People that know me know
I’m going to do the right thing,
no matter what it is. It doesn’t
matter if I’m a Penn Stater or
fromOhio State or wherever. It’s
more about what’s inside the per-
son than what’s going on out-
side.”
As for Joyner himself, his offi-
cial title is “acting athletic direc-
tor,” as Tim Curley is still em-
ployed by the university. Curley
has been on paid administrative
leave since being charged with
perjury and failure to report
child abuse in connection with
the Sandusky case.
Mark Sherburne was initially
appointed acting athletic direc-
tor on an emergency basis before
Joyner was eventually selected.
Sherburne has returned to his
previous role as associate athlet-
ic director.
Joyner, who had been on the
board of trustees since 2000 be-
fore taking leave to serve in this
newposition, said he will contin-
ue on in that capacity for as long
as needed.
“I will help the university for
as long as they want me to help
them,” Joyner said. “If it’s five
months, if it’s five years, I’m pre-
pared to do that.
“If somebody would offer me
the job (full-time), depending on
how things were, I would cer-
tainly be very interested.”
Joyner said he was eager to
help lead the athletic depart-
ment -- and the school as a whole
-- out of the darkest period in its
history.
Penn State got yet more bad
news on Friday as Paterno’s fam-
ily revealed that the former
coach had been diagnosed with
lung cancer.
This came just hours after the
NCAA announced it would be
launching an inquiry to deter-
mine if any of the organization’s
bylaws had been violated in light
of the Sandusky case.
“We’ve all been in a whirlwind.
It’s everything at once,” Joyner
said. “First and foremost is the
tragedy for the victims. I’ve said
to people that have been in a fu-
neral for the last … two weeks. I
think we’re in a period of mourn-
ing now, to be honest with you.
“We’ve got to get about our
business. We’ve got to get to
work and get things done, and
we’re beginning to do that. But
we have to keep walking that
straight path. We’ll be respectful
and we’ll never forget.”
New coach could be current staff member
PSU acting AD Dave Joyner
said ties to program would
not influence candidate.
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
ry maybe of college football has
been through so much in such a
(short) time period.
“And to be able to hang in
there andfight their waythrough
it, they’ve done everything we’ve
asked themto do. …I couldn’t be
prouder of them.”
Yes, as far as the Big Ten race
goes, the victory at Ohio State --
the Lions’ second in three trips
to Columbus after a 30-year
drought there -- didn’t change
anything.
The winner of next weekend’s
Penn State-Wisconsin show-
down will represent the Leaders
Divisioninthe inaugural BigTen
championship game against Mi-
chigan State. And that would not
have changed had the Lions lost
to the Buckeyes.
But that wasn’t on the players’
minds on Saturday. Not after
landinginOhioa day earlier only
to have their phones light up and
sound off in unison with reports
of Paterno’s health.
“He’s gonna beat it,” his son,
quarterbacks coach Jay Paterno
said. “If there’s anyone who can
beat it, it’s him.”
Jay Paterno broke the news to
his fellow coaches on the plane
to Columbus. Bradley then for-
mallydiscussedit withthe entire
squad that night.
It served as yet another emo-
tional backdrop to a game for the
Lions.
“We’ve dedicated this season
to Joe,” said senior tailback
Stephfon Green, who scored
both of the Lions’ touchdowns
for the second straight week.
“With everything he’s going
through, with the adversity he’s
going through, we (feel it), too.
“We’re just going to fight to-
gether. And he’s gonna come out
good on his side, and we’re gon-
na come out good on our side.”
“We’re playing for everybody,”
senior captain Drew Astorino
said. “We’re playing for Joe.
We’re playing for Penn State Uni-
versity. We’re playing for just ev-
erybody.”
Unlike last week, that feeling
translated over onto the field in
the early going as Penn State
(9-2, 6-1 Big Ten) scored on four
of its five first-half drives to lead
20-14 at the break.
Debuting a wildcat scheme
that caught the Buckeyes by sur-
prise, the Lions racked up 254
yards of total offense inthe open-
ing 30 minutes while having re-
ceivers Curtis Drake andBill Bel-
tontake periodic snaps out of the
shotgun.
The first time the Lions un-
veiled it, Drake handed off to
Green, who burst 40 yards up the
middle untouched for a score.
Green added a 4-yard touch-
down in the second quarter and
Anthony Fera hit field goals of 43
and 46 yards, both topping his
previous career-high of 40.
By halftime, the Lions had
scored more points in a game at
Ohio Stadiumsince a 27-0 win in
1964 -- the last time they played
in Columbus without Paterno as
head coach.
Both offenses shut down from
there. Penn State came up with
two fumble recoveries in the
third quarter sandwiched
around a four-play goal-line
stand by the Buckeyes defense.
“There was no doubt in my
mind we were going for it,” Bra-
dley said. “I told them we were
going the whole way. We were
going for the win the whole way.
Normally I would’ve probably
kicked it. But I felt that would’ve
been the wrong decision. Be-
cause I’maskingthose guys togo
to the wall, I’m going to the
wall.”
Ohio State (6-5, 3-4), which
hadpulledoff animprobablelast-
minute winover Wisconsinjust a
fewweeks ago, lookedtobe mak-
ing a similar rally.
The Buckeyes’ true freshman
quarterback, Braxton Miller, ran
andthrewfor a touchdowninthe
first half and was on the verge of
adding a third score for the win
in the final two minutes.
But on a fourth-and-10 scram-
ble fromthe Penn State 41, Asto-
rinobrought Miller downjust be-
fore he could pick up the first
downwithless thantwominutes
to play.
Ohio State got the ball back
with 36 seconds left but only
went backward on four plays be-
fore time expired.
Now the Lions head to Wis-
consin with a chance to win the
division. And a chance to finish
the season with memories of
more thanjust scandal andtrage-
dy.
“I challenged the guys before
the game,” Bradley said. “I said
thelast teams towinherewerein
’78 and ’08. How are you gonna
be remembered?”
PSU
Continued from Page 1C
AP PHOTOS
Penn State’s Nick Sukay, left, D’anton Lynn, center, and Ohio State’s Jake Stoneburner chase an Ohio State fumble during the fourth
quarter. Penn State recovered the ball and defeated Ohio State 20-14.
Penn State running back Silas Redd (25) is stopped short of the
goal line on a fourth and goal in the second half. Penn State won
20-14.
Penn State interim head coach Tom Bradley directs his team in
the first half of Saturday’s game against Ohio State.
C M Y K
PAGE 4C SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L
SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Jonas
Gray rushed for a touchdown,
David Ruffer kicked three field
goals and No. 24 Notre Dame re-
covered an onside kick with just
under 2 minutes to play to hold
off Boston College 16-14 on Sat-
urday.
Ruffer had field goals of 40, 41
and 27 yards for the Irish (8-3),
who matched their victory total
from last year with their fourth
straight win. But it was a costly
victory, too, with Gray leaving in
the third quarter with what
looked to be a knee injury. Gray,
whowas enjoyingabreakout year
after a lackluster first three sea-
sons, had extended his scoring
streak to eight games with a 26-
yard run on the opening drive of
the game.
The Eagles struggled to get
anything going offensively for
most of the second half, with
Chase Rettig throwing 10 incom-
pletions ina rowat one point. But
Rettig got on track just in time to
make things interesting, finding
Chris Pantale for a 21-yard gain
and throwing a 17-yarder to Ro-
landan Finch as the Eagles ad-
vanced to the Notre Dame 16
with about 3 minutes to play. A
pass interference call on Zeke
Motta moved Boston College to
the2and, after afalsestart andan
incompletion, Rettig connected
with Bobby Swigert for a 7-yard
score.
Boston College (3-8) went for
the onside kick, but Robby Toma
recovered it and Notre Dame ran
the clock down to just eight sec-
onds. The Eagles got the ball
back and lateraled several times
before Irish linebacker Troy Nik-
las made the final tackle around
the Boston College 15 to end the
game. Notre Dame has beaten
Boston College three years in a
row after losing six straight.
Eagles linebacker Luke Kuech-
ly was credited with 14 tackles,
leavinghimoneshyof theBoston
College career record. The junior
did set the ACC record with 523
career tackles.
Notre Dame looked as if it was
going to have an easy afternoon
when it marched 80 yards on its
opening drive, capped by Gray’s
rumble through the Boston Col-
lege defense. But the Irish of-
fense stalled twice just outside
the Boston College red zone, and
Tommy Rees was picked off
around midfield on another
drive. Rees finished 24-of-39 for
256 yards.
Cierre Wood had 98 yards for
Notre Dame, giving him1,001for
the season. Michael Floyd had10
catches for 92 yards in his final
game at Notre Dame Stadium.
N O T R E D A M E F O O T B A L L
Irish hold off BC, win 4th straight
Notre Dame matches win total
from 2010 with two-point
victory over Eagles.
By NANCY ARMOUR
AP National Writer
AP PHOTO
Boston College D-back Dominique Williams goes over Notre Dame
guard Chris Watt (66) and he goes for quarterback Tommy Rees.
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Trent
Richardson rushed for 175 yards
and scored three touchdowns to
power No. 3 Alabama to a 45-21
victory over Georgia Southern
on Saturday.
The Crimson Tide (10-1)
didn’t win many style points in
giving up a season-high 21
points, but the team’s biggest
national title boost came the
previous night when No. 2 Okla-
homa State fell 37-31 to Iowa
State in two overtimes.
Alabama needed Richardson
more than expected against the
FCS Eagles (9-2). The Heisman
Trophy candidate ran 32 times,
caught a 4-yard touchdown pass
and broke Shaun Alexander’s
school single-season mark of 19
rushing touchdowns.
He was still running well into
the fourth quarter in a game
that was expected to be a low-
stress tuneup for the Iron Bowl
at Auburn.
No. 1 LSU 52, Mississippi 3
OXFORD, Miss. — Ron
Brooks returned an interception
for a touchdown 28 seconds into
the game and top-ranked LSU
never looked back, piling up 353
yards rushing on the way to a
52-3 rout of Mississippi on Sat-
urday night.
The Tigers (11-0, 7-0 South-
eastern Conference), who
matched their best start since
1958, built a 35-3 halftime lead.
Quarterback Jordan Jefferson
started his second consecutive
game, completing 7 of 7 passes
for 88 yards and a touchdown.
Alfred Blue led the Tigers with
74 rushing yards while Spencer
Ware added 70 yards and a
touchdown.
No. 6 Arkansas 44,
Mississippi St. 17
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — Tyler
Wilson had a school-record 32
completions as No. 6 Arkansas
defeated Mississippi State 44-17.
Wilson finished 32 of 43 for
365 yards and three touch-
downs.
The win is the seventh
straight for the Razorbacks
(10-1, 6-1 Southeastern Confer-
ence), who travel to No. 1 LSU
next week for a game with con-
ference and national title impli-
cations.
It also clinched the first back-
to-back 10-win seasons since
1988-89 for Arkansas, which
completed its first undefeated
season at home since 1999.
N.C. State 37,
No. 7 Clemson 13
RALEIGH, N.C. — Mike
Glennon threw three touch-
down passes and North Carolina
State shut down No. 7 Clem-
son’s explosive offense to help
the Wolfpack beat the mistake-
prone Tigers 37-13 on Saturday.
Tobais Palmer had a dazzling
43-yard catch-and-run touch-
down to highlight a surprisingly
dominating performance by
N.C. State (6-5, 3-4 Atlantic
Coast Conference). The Wolf-
pack scored 27 points in the
second quarter, then increased
the lead and never let the Tigers
(9-2, 6-2) build any momentum
to rally.
No. 11 Houston 37, SMU 7
HOUSTON — Case Keenum
set the Football Bowl Subdivi-
sion career record for comple-
tions, threw a touchdown pass
and ran for another score as No.
11 Houston stayed unbeaten
with a 37-7 win over SMU on
Saturday.
Keenum completed 30 of 45
passes for 318 yards, a modest
day for the nation’s leader in
total offense and pass efficiency.
He set the completions mark on
his seventh throw, breaking the
previous mark (1,403) set by
Texas Tech’s Graham Harrell
(2005-08).
No. 13 Georgia 19, Kentucky 10
ATHENS, Ga. — Aaron Mur-
ray threw a touchdown pass to
Marlon Brown on the first play
of the fourth quarter, Blair
Walsh kicked four field goals
and No. 13 Georgia beat Ken-
tucky 19-10 on Saturday to
clinch a spot in the SEC cham-
pionship game.
Georgia struggled on offense
after losing top rusher Isaiah
Crowell to a left ankle injury
after only two carries. Crowell’s
top backup, Carlton Thomas,
was not at the game for personal
reasons.
Georgia was left with Ken
Malcome and Brandon Harton,
who rushed for 101 yards, at
tailback.
South Carolina 41, Citadel 20
COLUMBIA, S.C. — Connor
Shaw threw for 217 yards and
three touchdowns, including
Alshon Jeffery’s first scoring
catch in more than a month, and
No. 14 South Carolina defeated
The Citadel 34-20 on Saturday.
The Gamecocks (9-2) reached
nine victories in back-to-back
years for the first time in school
history and held out hope for
even more milestones.
A Kentucky win at Georgia
later Saturday would send
South Carolina back to the
Georgia Dome as Southeastern
Conference Eastern Division
champions.
No. 19 TCU 34,
Colorado State 10
FORT WORTH, Texas —
Antoine Hicks, Ed Wesley and
Matthew Tucker ran for touch-
downs and Tank Carder return-
ed an interception 69 yards for a
touchdown, helping No. 19 TCU
win at least a share of the Moun-
tain West title with a 34-10 vic-
tory over Colorado State on
Saturday.
Coming off an upset win at
Boise State, the Horned Frogs
(9-2, 6-0) seemed a bit flat in the
first half. They got rolling in the
third quarter on their way to
handing the Rams (3-7, 1-4) a
sixth straight loss.
Miami 6, South Florida 3
TAMPA, Fla. — Jake Wie-
claw’s second field goal of the
game, a 36-yarder as time ex-
pired, gave Miami a 6-3 victory
over South Florida and made
the Hurricanes bowl eligible on
Saturday.
Temple 42, Army 14
PHILADELPHIA — Temple
kept its bowl hopes alive with a
42-14 victory over Army before
25,516 at Lincoln Financial Field
on Saturday afternoon.
The victory gives the Owls a
7-4 overall record (4-3 MAC)
and a modest two-game winning
streak, with Kent State remain-
ing on their schedule. Army lost
its third consecutive game and
fifth of its last six.
San Jose St. 27, Navy 24
SAN JOSE, Calif. — Brandon
Rutley rushed for 132 yards and
two touchdowns and caught a
career-high eight passes for
another 101 yards, lifting San
Jose State to a 27-24 victory
over Navy on Saturday.
C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L R O U N D U P
Crimson Tide, Razorbacks earn easy victories
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Alabama tight end Brad Smelley (17) dives into the end zone on a 4-yard touchdown pass fromquarterback AJ McCarron in the sec-
ond half of a 45-21 win over Georgia Southern Saturday at Bryant-Denny Stadiumin Tuscaloosa, Ala.
ANN ARBOR, Mich. — De-
nard Robinson threw two
touchdown passes and ran for
two scores to help No. 20 Mi-
chigan rout No. 17 Nebraska
45-17 Saturday.
The Wolverines (9-2, 5-2 Big
Ten) moved into second place
in the conference’s Legends
Division and kept its chances of
playing in a BCS bowl for the
first time since the 2006 sea-
son.
The Cornhuskers (8-3, 4-3)
lost any hope of playing in the
Big Ten’s first title game.
Michigan State clinched its
spot in the Dec. 3 game in
Indianapolis with a win over
Indiana and Michigan’s victory
against Nebraska.
No. 12 Michigan St. 55,
Indiana 3
EAST LANSING, Mich. —
Kirk Cousins threw for 273
yards and three touchdowns in
just over a half and No. 12 Mi-
chigan State clinched a spot in
the inaugural Big Ten cham-
pionship game with a rout of
Indiana.
The Spartans entered the
game with a one-game lead in
the Legends Division over both
Nebraska and Michigan, who
were playing at the same time
in Ann Arbor. When the Wolve-
rines won, it locked up the
division for Michigan State
(9-2, 6-1 Big Ten) because of its
28-14 win over Michigan on
Oct. 15.
Cousins hit B.J. Cunningham
for a 7-yard touchdown on
Michigan State’s first posses-
sion of the second half, giving
the Spartans a 41-3 lead. He left
on the next possession.
Wisconsin 28, Illinois 17
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Montee
Ball rushed for 224 yards and
Wisconsin forced four turn-
overs in a comeback win
against Illinois.
The slumping Illini jumped
out to a 14-0 lead in the second
quarter and carried a 17-7 ad-
vantage into halftime. But Ball
had a 5-yard TD run after Wis-
consin recovered a fumble,
pulling the Badgers within
three early in the third quarter.
The Badgers kept up the
pressure, grabbing the lead for
good on quarterback Russell
Wilson’s 1-yard TD run that
made it 21-17. Wilson’s team
only had to go 44 yards for the
go-ahead score after a 74-yard
punt buried the Illini at their
own 3. Donovonn Young
rushed for two TDs for Illinois.
He finished with 43 yards on
eight carries.
Iowa 31, Purdue 21
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. —
James Vandenberg threw three
touchdown passes, including
two to Marvin McNutt, to help
Iowa defeat Purdue 31-21 on
Saturday for the Hawkeyes’
first road win of the season.
Vandenberg passed for 273
yards, and McNutt caught nine
passes for 151 yards.
Marcus Coker rushed for 139
yards on 30 carries for the
Hawkeyes (7-4, 4-3 Big Ten),
who had lost their three road
games by a combined 14 points.
The Hawkeyes outgained the
Boilermakers 408 yards to 286
but struggled to put away
scrappy Purdue.
Antavian Edison caught nine
passes for 97 yards and Ralph
Bolden ran for 71 yards for
Purdue on Senior Day. Quarter-
back Robert Marve threw two
interceptions and fumbled
once.
Northwestern 28,
Minnesota 13
EVANSTON, Ill. — Dan Per-
sa threw for 216 yards and two
touchdowns, and Northwestern
won its fourth straight, beating
Minnesota 28-13 on Saturday.
Venric Mark came through
with two big kickoff returns as
the Wildcats (6-5, 3-4 Big Ten)
scored touchdowns on their
first three possessions to build
a 21-7 lead. That set the tone as
Northwestern became eligible
for its fourth straight bowl
appearance.
B I G T E N R O U N D U P
Michigan wallops Nebraska; MSU secures spot in title game
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Michigan linebacker J.B. Fitzgerald (42) holds up the ball he reco-
vered froma Nebraska fumble, with safety Josh Furman (14).
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 5C
• 6.35 acre site
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• Graded, flat 7.98 acre site
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• Can be subdivided
• Two floors
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• Near I-81 and I-476
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• Large parking areas
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C M Y K
PAGE 6C SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
“That is incredible,” goalie
Hannah Dressler said of the state
tourney winstreak. “I’mjust soex-
cited. I never expected this to hap-
pen. We all just pulled together
andtheteamplayedagreat game.”
For the seniors, there was noth-
ing but smiles, and some relief. Af-
ter a few minutes to take it all in,
they were even able to laugh a lit-
tle.
“Yeah, three times. We’re used
to it,” Ann Romanowski joked be-
fore taking a serious look at the
class of 2012’s three titles.
“This one (was the toughest),”
Romanowski said. “We are the se-
niors now. A lot of it relies on us.”
“This never gets old,” AshLeigh
Sebia said.
With the game looking like a
matchup between top scorers Se-
bia of Seminary (34 goals) and
Caroline Troncelliti of Villa Maria
(28 goals), Stefanides played like
shewasthenation’stopscorer. Her
hat trick came after a postseason
of just onegoal insixpreviousplay-
off games.
“Kristian Stefanides’ three
goals, that was just wonderful,”
Seminary coach Karen Klassner
said. “She was where she was sup-
posed to be. The coaching staff
worked with Kristian on her of-
fense, her tips. I felt cominginthat
Kristian was going to have a big
game.”
Stefanides converted penalty
corners in the first seven minutes
of each half, tucking a pass from
Mallory Lefkowitz into a gaping
net to open the scoring and shov-
ing home a flip across the goal
from Molly Turner in the second
half to give Seminary a 3-1 lead.
The senior also scored in the
18thminute onanimpressive rush
upfield. Kristen Mericle started
the playwitha longdrive fromjust
inside the 25-yard line. Sebia
tipped the ball at the top of the cir-
cle to Stefanides, who poked it be-
hind keeper Maddie Joyce.
“She was unbelievable today,”
Sebia said of co-captain Stefa-
nides. “She was there when we
needed her.”
She could have had more. Ste-
fanides put the ball into the net in
the 49th minute, but a foul halted
play before the shot. A potential
fifth goal set up by Sebia with
3:56 remaining was called back
when the officials decided a cor-
ner had already been awarded.
TheHurricanes scoredless than
twominutes after Seminary tooka
1-0 lead on a corner. Olivia Bolles’
shot squeaked through Dressler
and Lauren Del Valle was behind
the keeper toslamthe ball intothe
goal. Down3-1, VillaMaria’s Bolles
flicked a shot on a corner past
Dressler on the stick side with 19
minutes remaining.
“I’dsaytheywerenervous,” Villa
Maria coach Maurene Polley said
of her team. “Sometimes they
werealittleindecisive. Theydidn’t
dotoday what got themhere. Alot
of these kids that are seniors now,
theydidn’t haveaminuteof varsity
time before this season.”
Molly Turner had a long rush
upfield with less than five minutes
remaining to relieve pressure, but
Villa Maria pressed for the tying
goal during the final minutes. A
wall of Knights defenders greeted
the Hurricanes.
Emily Granger, Mericle, Marra
Wagner and Lefkowitz all had
clears in the final two minutes be-
fore Ann Romanowski made two
big stops to put the game away.
“To have back-to-back cham-
pionships is themost amazingfeel-
ing in the world,” Stefanides said.
“For us to make it past districts,
past the playoffs ... this has been
an amazing run.
“We put what everyone else
said about us behind us. We
didn’t listen to what everyone
else said. We just went out and
kept playing as hard as we
could.”
Villa Maria.................................................. 1 1 — 2
Wyoming Seminary .................................. 2 1 — 3
First half: 1. SEM, Kristian Stefanides (Mallory
Lefkowitz), 24:36; 2. VIL, Lauren Del Valle (Olivia
Bolles), 22:41; 3. SEM, Stefanides (AshLeigh Se-
bia, Kristen Mericle), 12:21.
Second half: 4. SEM, Stefanides (Molly Turn-
er), 23:06; 5. VIL, Bolles (Caroline Troncelliti),
19:28.
Shots: VIL 8, SEM 10. Saves: VIL 5 (Maddie
Joyce), SEM 6 (Hannah Dressler). Corners: VIL
11, SEM 12.
KNIGHTS
Continued from Page 1C
WHITEHALL – After the
three senior co-captains re-
ceived their gold medals, the
next Wyoming Seminary play-
ers to receive their champion-
ship prizes were goalie Hannah
Dressler and defenders Emily
Granger, Devin Holmes and
Bridget McMullen.
That group stymied Villa
Maria, which was riding a
14-game winning streak into
the state final Saturday.
"After we had heard that
they beat Selinsgrove 6-0, we
were kind of shocked, especial-
ly since Selinsgrove had beaten
us before," Seminary senior
Kristian Stefanides said. "They
were skilled, very fast and
made some amazing plays, but
we were ready for them."
Villa Maria had scored 13
goals in its previous three
games. The Hurricanes blasted
Selinsgrove in the state semi-
finals Tuesday, just a month
after the Seals had topped
Seminary 2-1.
"Emily Granger played a
great game defensively and
Hannah really stepped up,"
Seminary coach Karen Klassn-
er said. "Emily really took No.
3 out of the game."
Caroline Troncelliti, No. 3
and a Northwestern recruit
with 105 career goals, managed
just one assist and two shots --
one saved by Dressler in the
first half and a penalty corner
drive deflected wide in the
second half.
CORNER WORK
While Villa Maria was 2-
for-11 on penalty corners, the
Hurricanes could be state
champs if not for the work by
Seminary’s Ann Romanowski.
"Ann is always making those
kinds of big plays," Dressler
said. "So many times she’s
been able to make defensive
plays when we needed her to."
The senior flyer blocked four
drives from the circle and flus-
tered Villa Maria into three
empty opportunities in which
they did not set the ball.
"We knew they used a lot of
blow flicks," Granger said. "We
knew we had to stop them,
stay low, and watch their pass-
ing."
Romanowski said it is impor-
tant to stay focused while
charging at the shooter on a
corner.
"I think you just have to
watch the ball hit your stick,"
Romanowski said.
PERFECTION
Goalie Dressler is now 7-0 in
playoff games in her career
after taking over the starting
job when Ellie McDougal be-
came ill.
The junior has a 1.14 goals
against average in the postsea-
son after her six-save victory
Saturday.
THE STREAK
Wyoming Seminary’s PIAA
win streak reached 16 games
with the victory. The Blue
Knights are 27-3 in the state
tournament since 2001, and are
14-2 against district champions
during that stretch.
They are now 7-0 against
District 1 foes in the state
brackets in the past decade,
with wins over Villa Maria in
2008 (4-0 in semifinals), 2010
(4-2 in quarterfinals) and 2011.
Defenders handle potent offense
By JOHN MEDEIROS
jmedeiros@timesleader.com
FIELD HOCKEY
N O T E B O O K
Back-to-back state titles
AshLeigh Sebia (38) of Wyoming Seminary and a Villa Maria de-
fender watch as a shot misses the mark.
Members of the Wyoming Seminary field hockey team celebrate Saturday after
defeating Villa Maria 3-2 for the Class 2A Championship.
Mallory Lefkowitz (left) of Wyoming Seminary is
airborne on her way to the ground.
DON CAREY PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Members of the Wyoming Seminary field hockey team celebrate by holding up the championship trophy Saturday after defeating Villa Maria 3-2 for the
PIAA Class 2A Championship at the Zephyr Sports Complex in Whitehall.
Molly Turner (12) of Wyoming Seminary battles
Villa Maria’s Sam Mueller (19).
Mallory Lefkowitz(left) of Wyoming Seminary
battles Villa Maria’s Lindsay Moore.
Wyoming Seminary team members get fired up during introduc-
tions before Saturday’s game.
Kristen Mericle (No. 7) of Wyoming Seminary moves with
the ball between two Villa Maria defenders.
Members of the winning team celebrate Saturday’s 3-2 win over Villa
Maria as coach Karen Klassner passes out the medals.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 7C
➛ S P O R T S
“It’s a shame somebody had to
lose,” Jackson said, “but they
made the plays at the end of the
game. I thought we made plays
all game. I thought our defense
was outstanding to that point.”
The Dallas defense was as it
forced three turnovers, including
an interception by Paul Brace
that he returned for a 26-yard
touchdown and a 12-0 lead after
one quarter.
Dallas had Valley View pinned
in a second-and-16 situation after
linebacker Kris Roccograndi
blindsided Valley View quarter-
back Liam Callejas for a 6-yard
sack. The ball popped loose, but
the Cougars recovered.
On the next play, Callejas
found Lalli on a post pattern for a
74-yard touchdown to tie the
score 12-12. The Cougars got two
cracks at the extra point because
of Dallas penalties, but the kicks
were pushed left both times.
The Mountaineers fumbled on
their first play after the kickoff,
andLalli pouncedontheball. Val-
ley View went to the run four
times before Callejas and Lalli
hooked up on another post pat-
tern for the 16-yard touchdown.
“When we went motion, they
were moving guys out of the mid-
dle,” said Valley View coach Ge-
orge Howanitz, who quarter-
backed the Cougars to the 1992
Class 2A state title. “So the two
touchdowns were the same play.”
Any chances of a Dallas rally
were dealt a severe setback prior
to the 74-yard TD pass. Quarter-
back Ryan Zapoticky was
knocked out of the game by a vi-
cious hit from Valley View line-
backer Nyeem Wartman, a Penn
State recruit. Zapoticky led the
entire Wyoming Valley Confer-
ence in touchdown passes, pass-
ing yards and completion per-
centage in the regular season.
Wartman didn’t play defense
the first half after being sick all
week with a stomach virus, strep
throat and a fever. He said he lost
10 pounds this week because he
was unable to eat.
“My coach kept saying, ‘This
could be your last game here,’”
Wartman said. “I told him I
wasn’t going to let it be my last
game, and I had to keep pushing
it.”
Zapoticky’s departure put the
task of rallying Dallas in the
hands of backup Bill Dixon, who
had thrown one pass all season.
“Nobody wants to come in in
that situation,” Jackson said. “It’s
a tough situation, it’s a tough sit-
uation.”
Trailing18-12, Dallas took over
at its 32-yard line with 1:04 re-
maining. Dixon’s first pass, a
screen to receiver Shane Dunn,
banged off a couple players be-
fore falling incomplete. After an-
other incompletion, Dixon was
engulfed by several Cougars for
consecutive sacks.
Dallas took advantage of two
Valley View turnovers to take a
12-0 lead in the first quarter. The
Cougars fumbled on their second
play of the game, leading to a 1-
yardtouchdownpass fromZapot-
icky to Dunn.
Valley View defensive back
Garrett Rupe had the fourth-
down play read well. He tipped
the pass, but Dunn caught it in
the rear left corner of the end
zone while falling.
Then at 2:24 of the first, Brace
sliced in front of a pass and
zippeddowntheleft sidelinefor a
26-yard score and a 12-0 lead.
Dallas moved to the Valley
View35 or better in its next three
possessions. But penalties, a
turnover and an errant shotgun
snap hampered the drives.
District 2 Class 3A Championship
Valley View 18, Dallas 12
Valley View........................... 0 6 0 12 — 18
Dallas .................................... 12 0 0 0 — 12
First Quarter
DAL – Dunn 1 pass from Zapoticky (kick
blocked), 8:31
DAL – Brace 26 interception return (pass
failed), 2:24
Second Quarter
VV – Jeffers 10 run (kick failed), 8:42
Fourth Quarter
VV – Lalli 74 pass from Callejas (kick failed),
2:56
VV – Lalli 16 pass from Callejas (run failed),
1:11
TeamStatistics Valley View Dallas
First downs........................ 12 9
Rushes-yards ................... 46-172 32-65
Passing.............................. 71 96
Total Yards........................ 243 161
Comp-Att-Int ..................... 4-10-2 8-15-2
Sacked-Yards Lost .......... 1-6 5-21
Punts-Avg.......................... 3-25 3-41.3
Fumbles-Lost.................... 3-2 3-1
Penalties-Yards................ 9-65 9-55
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING – Valley View, Phillips 13-56, Jeffers
16-75, Callejas 9-13, Kapunis 6-22, Lalli 1-7, team
1-(minus-1). Dallas, J.Roccograndi 11-43, Brace 4-
12, Zapoticky 8-16, Artsma 5-23, Wanek 1-4, Dixon
2-(minus-15), team 1-(minus-18).
PASSING – Valley View, Callejas 4-10-2-71.
Dallas, Zapoticky 8-13-2-96, Dixon 0-2-0-0.
RECEIVING – Valley View, Wartman 1-1, Phil-
lips 1-(minus-10), Lalli 2-80. Dallas, Dunn 6-84, Wa-
nek 1-9, Brace 1-3.
INTS – Valley View, McAndrew, Wartman. Dal-
las, Brace, Dunn.
MISSED FGS – none.
DALLAS
Continued from Page 1C
District 2 Class 3A title showdown
Dallas defender Kris Roccograndi sacks Valley View QB
Liam Callejas in the fourth quarter. Valley View players celebrate an 18-12 win over Dallas.
FRED ADAMS/PHOTOS FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Valley View players celebrate with their medals and championship plaque after the 18-12 win over Dallas.
Valley View tailback Tyler Phillips carries the ball as Dallas defenders close
in.
Dallas back Paul Brace is pursued by (3) Nyeem Wartman and (5) Garrett
Rupe as he tries to run for yardage.
Dallas wide receiver Shane Dunn
pulls in a scoring pass.
Dallas defender Bill Dixon knocks a TD
pass away fromBrian Lalli.
Valley View tailback Tyler Phillips looks for running room against the Dallas
defense.
C M Y K
PAGE 8C SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
er who graduated, she said the
Penn State community is anx-
ious to assist with raising
awareness about abuse.
“They want to make a differ-
ence,” Norma Mann said.
“They won’t let this (scandal)
define them.”
Instead, they want to do
something about it, something
to bring light to a situation fil-
led with darkness. You want to
know what the real reflection
of Penn State’s image is these
days? Start there.
SOKOLOSKI
Continued fromPage 1C
Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader
sports columnist. You may reach
him at 970-7109 or email him at
psokoloski@timesleader.com.
BETHANY, W. VA. – The foot-
ball season for King’s didn’t end
much better than it began.
The Monarchs were routed by
Bethany on Saturday, 48-0 to end
their season with a 1-9 record for
the second
straight year.
The host
piled up 487 to-
tal yards and
held King’s to
just 74 total
yards.
The game,
which was rescheduled from
Sept. 10 due to flooding in North-
east Pa., came at an inopportune
time for the injury-depletedMon-
archs as they made the six-hour
drive without several starters
who missed the game with inju-
ries. King’s, which typically trav-
els with 66 or 67 players, made
the trip with just 51 on Saturday.
Bethany held a 7-0 lead after
the first quarter then poured on
21 more in the second to open a
28-0 lead at halftime. At the
break, the Bison outgained the
Monarchs 240-12.
The loss was the second time
the Monarchs were shutout this
seasonandtheeighthstraight de-
feat after starting the season 1-1.
The Monarchs managed just
38 rushing yards on 30 attempts,
led by Delano Mullings’ 38 yards
on 12 carries. Freshman quarter-
back Bryant Klein was 7-of-16 for
26 yards with an interception.
Bethany 48, King's 0
King’s .................................... 0 0 0 0 — 0
Bethany................................. 7 21 13 7 — 48
First Quarter
BETH – Walker 5 run (Amic kick) 9:56
Second Quarter
BETH – Irizarry 3 run (Amic kick) 13:06
BETH – Holmes 47 pass from Grimard (Amic
kick) :42
BETH – Joyce 40 interception return (Amic
kick) :18
Third Quarter
BETH – Foster 18 pass from Grimard (Amic
kick) 10:19
BETH – Walker 35 run (kick failed) 7:19
Fourth Quarter
BETH – Grimard 25 run (Amic kick) 10:47
TeamStatistics King's Bethany
First downs ............................. 6 25
Rushes-yards......................... 30-38 49-263
Passing.................................... 36 224
Total Yards ............................. 74 487
Comp-Att-Int ........................... 8-20-1 16-24-0
Sacks by-Yards Lost............. 0-0 6-38
Punts-Avg. .............................. 7-33.7 3-32.7
Fumbles-Lost ......................... 0-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards ..................... 5-92 6-122
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING– KING’S: Mullings 12-38, Ofcharsky
7-17, Torres 1-6, Wilson 1-0, Leganza 1-(minus-5),
Klein 8-(minus-18). BETHANY: Walker 21-132, Gri-
mard 8-74, Irizarry 10-34, Acrie 3-13, Hill 2-5, Lipps
1-5, Landowski 2-3, TEAM1-(minus-1), Evans1-(mi-
nus-2).
PASSING – KING’S: Klein 7-16-1-26, Leganza
1-3-0-10, Ofcharsky 0-1-0-0. BETHANY: GRimard
15-21-0-216, Mitchell 1-3-0-8.
RECEIVING– KING’S: Torres 3-24, Kempa 2-9,
Mullings 2-0, Ofcharsky 1-3. BETHANY: Evans 6-
75, Holmes 5-82, Walker 2-34, Foster 1-18, Lotozo
1-9, Powell 1-6.
L O C A L C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L
King’s season ends
with another loss
Bethany was too much for
Monarchs, who were shutout
for second time this season.
The Times Leader staff
48
BETHANY
0
KING’S
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. —
The New York Giants had their
chancetoburythePhiladelphiaEa-
glesayearagoandfailedmiserably.
Who can forget the Meadow-
lands MeltdowninDecember, or if
you’re anEagles fan, the Miracle at
the Meadowlands?
With first place in the NFCEast
ontheline, Eli ManningandtheGi-
antsopeneda21-point fourth-quar-
ter lead, only to see Michael Vick
and DeSean Jackson steal their
crown with one of the most im-
probable comebacks in NFL histo-
ry.
Vickledtheteamtothreetouch-
downs to tie the game late and
Jackson won it returning a punt
that was supposedtobekickedout
of bounds65yardsonthefinal play
of regulation.
Remember either Giants coach
Tom Coughlin slamming his clip-
board to the turf as Jackson ran
past theGiants’ bench? Or Jackson
tiptoeing along the goal line to eat
the final seconds on the clock be-
fore scoring?
It was uplifting and thrilling for
the Eagles, and downright heart-
breaking for the Giants, who mis-
sed the playoffs for the second
straight year.
Less thanayear later, theGiants
(6-3) get another chancetoburyto
the Eagles (3-6), and this one
seems just as improbable.
FewexpectedNewYork to have
aone-gamelead
in the division
and even fewer
had any idea
that Philadel-
phia’s ‘Dream
Team’ would be
this close to
missing the
playoffs with
seven games re-
maining in the
regular season.
The comeback
they need now
might be even
bigger than last
season.
“Ourmindset
is just to find a
way to win the
game,” Eagles
running back
LeSean McCoy
said. “We are just trying to take it
one game at a time and have a
chance to get in the playoffs and
makesomegoodof our season. We
arejust takingeachgameat atime.
We can’t think about our record or
where we are at, we just need to
win a game.”
This one might be tough be-
cause Vick broke two ribs in last
week’s loss to Arizona and was
ruledout fortonight’sgameonSat-
urday. Vince Young will get the
start.
Jackson also is expected back in
the lineup after being benchedlast
week for missing a teammeeting.
Coming off tough 27-20 loss at
San Francisco that cut their NFC
EastleadoverDallastoagame, the
Giants are preparing for Vick.
“This has been a big rivalry as
long as I have been here, and I am
sure it goes on longer than that,”
defensive end Dave Tollefson said.
“There are two agendas on each
team, us trying to get back in the
win column and get some control
of the NFC East, and they are try-
ingtoget the ball rollingtomake a
push. It’s huge. It’s always some-
thing, isn’t it? Whenare the Eagles
andGiantsevergoingtoplayandit
ain’t something?”
N F L S U N D AY
AP FILE PHOTO
DeSean Jackson helped the Eagles defeat the Giants last year at the Meadowlands with a 65-yard
punt return touchdown as time expired. The teams are at that site tonight for the first time since.
Burying hopeful Birds
With a win tonight over the
Eagles, the Giants could dash
Philly’s playoff hopes.
By TOMCANAVAN
AP Sports Writer
PHILADEL-
PHIA at N.Y.
GIANTS
TV: 8:20 p.m.,
NBC, WBRE-28
OPENING
LINE: Giants by
3
1
⁄2
LAST MEET-
ING: Giants
beat Eagles
29-16, Sept. 25
U P N E X T
A F C L E A D E R S
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
Brady, NWE........ 360 238 3032 23 10
Schaub, HOU...... 292 178 2479 15 6
Roethlisberger,
PIT........................ 354 224 2877 16 9
Hasselbeck,
TEN...................... 312 193 2233 14 7
Fitzpatrick, BUF .. 291 190 2076 16 12
J. Campbell,
OAK...................... 165 100 1170 6 4
Dalton, CIN.......... 287 173 1866 14 9
Sanchez, NYJ..... 298 169 2081 14 9
Rivers, SND........ 352 216 2743 13 15
Mat. Moore, MIA. 167 105 1159 4 5
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
F. Jackson, BUF... 163 917 5.63 80t 6
Jones-Drew, JAC. 191 854 4.47 41 4
A. Foster, HOU..... 171 740 4.33 42t 6
Be. Tate, HOU ...... 122 686 5.62 27t 3
McGahee, DEN.... 127 640 5.04 60t 3
D. McFadden,
OAK........................ 113 614 5.43 70t 4
Benson, CIN ......... 152 593 3.90 39t 2
S. Greene, NYJ .... 145 563 3.88 24 2
R. Rice, BAL.......... 138 559 4.05 53 6
Ry. Mathews,
SND........................ 117 543 4.64 36 3
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Welker, NWE........ 72 1006 14.0 99t 6
M. Wallace, PIT.... 53 922 17.4 95t 6
B. Marshall, MIA... 53 742 14.0 46 2
R. Gronkowski,
NWE ...................... 52 709 13.6 30 8
R. Rice, BAL ......... 46 470 10.2 52 2
A. Brown, PIT ....... 44 626 14.2 32 1
St. Johnson, BUF. 44 531 12.1 52 4
Boldin, BAL ........... 43 649 15.1 56 2
Garcon, IND.......... 43 621 14.4 87t 4
Wayne, IND........... 42 530 12.6 36 1
Punters
No Yds LG Avg
Lechler, OAK................. 44 2274 77 51.7
Scifres, SND.................. 27 1344 71 49.8
Moorman, BUF.............. 38 1890 66 49.7
B. Colquitt, DEN............ 51 2499 66 49.0
Fields, MIA..................... 41 1993 70 48.6
McAfee, IND.................. 59 2796 64 47.4
D. Colquitt, KAN............ 50 2345 68 46.9
Koch, BAL...................... 41 1917 62 46.8
Sepulveda, PIT ............. 25 1153 66 46.1
Mesko, NWE................. 31 1405 58 45.3
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Arenas, KAN........... 16 225 14.1 37 0
Bess, MIA............... 17 202 11.9 22 0
Mariani, TEN .......... 22 255 11.6 79t 1
Jac. Jones, HOU ... 27 308 11.4 79t 1
A. Brown, PIT......... 24 265 11.0 41 0
Cosby, DEN............ 18 196 10.9 30 0
Br. Tate, CIN........... 33 347 10.5 56t 1
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
McKnight, NYJ..... 21 756 36.0 107t 1
Da. Reed, BAL..... 16 457 28.6 77 0
A. Brown, PIT....... 19 528 27.8 52 0
Cribbs, CLE.......... 18 498 27.7 63 0
D. Manning, HOU 13 356 27.4 46 0
Br. Tate, CIN ........ 23 559 24.3 45 0
R. Goodman,
SND....................... 17 409 24.1 42 0
Karim, JAC........... 21 501 23.9 37 0
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
Decker, DEN...... 8 0 7 1 48
A. Foster, HOU.. 8 6 2 0 48
R. Gronk, NE...... 8 0 8 0 48
R. Rice, BAL....... 8 6 2 0 48
Burress, NYJ...... 6 0 6 0 36
Chandler, BUF.... 6 0 6 0 36
A.. Green, CIN ... 6 0 6 0 36
F. Jackson, BUF 6 6 0 0 36
V. Jackson, SND 6 0 6 0 36
Mendenhall, PIT 6 6 0 0 36
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Rackers, HOU.......... 30-31 19-22 54 87
Cundiff, BAL.............. 22-22 21-27 51 85
Gostkowski, NWE.... 29-29 16-19 50 77
Nugent, CIN.............. 21-22 17-18 48 72
Suisham, PIT............ 24-24 16-21 48 72
Novak, SND.............. 19-19 17-19 52 70
D. Carpenter, MIA.... 14-14 18-22 51 68
Janikowski, OAK...... 22-22 14-15 63 64
Lindell, BUF .............. 25-25 13-15 49 64
N F C L E A D E R S
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
A. Rodgers, GBY 295 215 2869 28 3
Brees, NOR......... 422 299 3326 23 11
Romo, DAL.......... 309 200 2508 16 7
E. Manning, NYG 320 202 2688 17 8
Ale. Smith, SNF.. 236 151 1709 11 3
Stafford, DET...... 362 216 2508 20 8
Cutler, CHI .......... 283 164 2033 11 6
C. Newton, CAR. 327 197 2605 11 10
M. Ryan, ATL...... 328 197 2309 14 10
McNabb, MIN...... 156 94 1026 4 2
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
L. McCoy, PHL ..... 165 906 5.49 49t 10
Forte, CHI.............. 166 869 5.23 46 3
A. Peterson, MIN.. 180 846 4.70 54 10
M. Turner, ATL ..... 179 788 4.40 61 7
Gore, SNF............. 165 782 4.74 55 5
S. Jackson, STL... 140 707 5.05 47t 4
Murray, DAL.......... 100 674 6.74 91t 2
B. Wells, ARI......... 146 588 4.03 39 7
Vick, PHL............... 65 535 8.23 53 0
M. Lynch, SEA...... 129 507 3.93 47 5
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
J. Graham, NOR.... 62 873 14.1 59 6
Sproles, NOR......... 60 448 7.5 36 3
Ca. Johnson, DET. 54 885 16.4 73t 11
St. Smith, CAR....... 51 951 18.6 77t 4
G. Jennings, GBY.. 51 755 14.8 79t 7
Witten, DAL............ 49 585 11.9 64 4
R. White, ATL......... 47 563 12.0 33 3
Maclin, PHL............ 46 612 13.3 59 4
Pettigrew, DET....... 46 398 8.7 27 2
Fitzgerald, ARI ....... 45 792 17.6 73t 5
Punters
No Yds LG Avg
A. Lee, SNF................... 45 2271 68 50.5
McBriar, DAL................. 26 1263 68 48.6
J. Ryan, SEA................. 54 2620 77 48.5
Morstead, NOR............. 31 1493 64 48.2
Koenen, TAM................. 44 2006 65 45.6
Weatherford, NYG........ 46 2093 61 45.5
Masthay, GBY............... 28 1256 67 44.9
Rocca, WAS.................. 39 1752 63 44.9
Zastudil, ARI.................. 42 1877 63 44.7
Donn. Jones, STL......... 56 2499 65 44.6
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
D. Hester, CHI........ 15 302 20.1 82t 2
P. Peterson, ARI.... 25 441 17.6 99t 3
Ginn Jr., SNF ......... 27 338 12.5 55t 1
L. Washington,
SEA ......................... 21 252 12.0 36 0
Cobb, GBY............. 17 188 11.1 80t 1
Sherels, MIN .......... 19 194 10.2 53 0
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Cobb, GBY........... 20 600 30.0 108t 1
Ginn Jr., SNF....... 18 522 29.0 102t 1
Sproles, NOR....... 24 635 26.5 57 0
Logan, DET.......... 13 335 25.8 32 0
Booker, MIN......... 16 390 24.4 68 0
D. Hester, CHI ..... 18 432 24.0 98t 1
Stephens-
Howling, ARI ........ 22 522 23.7 35 0
Dev. Thomas,
NYG....................... 21 498 23.7 40 0
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
L. McCoy, PHL... 12 10 2 0 72
Ca. Johnson,
DET ..................... 11 0 11 0 66
A. Peterson,
MIN...................... 11 10 1 0 66
G. Jennings,
GBY..................... 7 0 7 0 42
J. Nelson, GBY.. 7 0 7 0 42
C. Newton, CAR 7 7 0 0 42
M. Turner, ATL... 7 7 0 0 42
B. Wells, ARI ...... 7 7 0 0 42
Bradshaw, NYG. 6 5 1 0 38
T. Gonzalez,
ATL...................... 6 0 6 0 36
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Kasay, NOR.............. 33-33 22-27 53 99
Akers, SNF ............... 22-22 23-25 55 91
D. Bailey, DAL .......... 22-22 23-24 51 91
Crosby, GBY............. 38-38 16-16 58 86
Gould, CHI ................ 25-25 20-22 51 85
Ja. Hanson, DET...... 27-27 19-20 51 84
Henery, PHL............. 25-25 15-18 47 70
M. Bryant, ATL.......... 23-23 15-16 50 68
Barth, TAM................. 13-13 17-19 55 64
Mare, CAR................ 18-19 14-18 45 60
PHILADELPHIA — Mi-
chael Vick has to watch his
teammates play from home.
Vick won’t play when the
Philadelphia Eagles visit the
New York Giants today be-
cause of two broken ribs. He
won’t even be on the sideline
because injured players typ-
ically don’t make the trip.
Vince Young will make his
first start for Philadelphia in
Vick’s place. He’s thrown one
pass this season — an in-
terception.
Vick didn’t practice this
week because he broke his
two lower ribs on the second
play in a 21-17 loss to Arizona
last Sunday.
Vick was listed as question-
able on Friday’s injury report,
but was ruled out after Sat-
urday’s walkthrough. Wide
receiver Jeremy Maclin also
won’t play because of shoul-
der and hamstring injuries.
Vick, Maclin
will not play
By ROB MAADDI
AP Pro Football Writer
BALTIMORE — The Cincin-
nati Bengals have surprised
quite a fewpeople with their im-
pressive start this season. The
Baltimore Ravens are not among
those on the list.
Cincinnati went 4-12 last year
and still beat the Ravens. Balti-
more is 5-4 in its last nine regu-
lar-season games against Pitts-
burgh and 3-6 against the Ben-
gals.
So don’t go telling the Ravens
(6-3) that today’s showdown for
first place in the AFCNorth is an
unexpected development.
“I knew they were always on
the brink of being a good team,”
Baltimore linebacker Terrell
Suggs said. “Now they’re win-
ning games.”
Suggs is the Ravens’ career
sacks leader, but he didn’t have
one last year against Cincinnati
(6-3). Today he will be chasing
quarterback Andy Dalton,
whose14touchdownpasses over
the first nine games is the most
by a rookie since the 1970 AFL-
NFL merger.
Four different Cincinnati re-
ceivers have at least 26 catches
and two touchdowns, most nota-
bly A.J. Green (41receptions, six
TDs). Green’s returnfromaright
knee injury sustained in last
week’s 24-17 loss to the Steelers
won’t be determined until game
time, but coach Marvin Lewis
still has plenty of options to send
at the renowned Baltimore de-
fense he ruled from1996-2001.
“They’ve got some goodweap-
ons over there,” Suggs said.
“This team is not only danger-
ous, but they’re special. Marvin
Lewis knows that. They’re play-
ing with a lot of confidence. We
definitely have some work to do,
especially after last week.”
Ah, last week. Coming off an
uplifting win in Pittsburgh, the
Ravens inexplicably lost at Seat-
tle to tumble out of first place.
“We lost a game. Nobody feels
good about it, but at the same
time, we can’t really ride that
wave and be on emotional highs
and lows,” quarterback Joe Flac-
co said. “We have to get ready to
play another game — a very im-
portant game.”
Another first-place fight in AFC North
By DAVID GINSBURG
AP Sports Writer
CINCINNATI at BALTIMORE
TV: 1 p.m., CBS, WYOU-22
OPENING LINE: Ravens by 7
LAST MEETING: Ravens beat
Bengals 13-7, Jan. 2, 2011
N E X T G A M E
WINNIPEG, Manitoba —
Bryan Little scored twice early in
the first period to help the Winni-
peg Jets beat the Philadelphia
Flyers 6-4 on Saturday.
Dustin Byfuglien had a goal
and two assists, and Andrew
Ladd, JimSlater and Nik Antro-
pov also scored for Winnipeg.
Little, Ladd and Byfuglien had
power-play goals, and Slater
scored short-handed.
Scott Hartnell and Matt Read
each scored twice for Philadel-
phia. The Flyers hadn’t lost in
regulation time in nine games,
and had won three straight.
Devils 4, Lightning 2
TAMPA, Fla. —Martin Bro-
deur held the Tampa Bay Light-
ning scoreless for 51minutes,
David Clarkson had a goal and an
assist, and the NewJersey Devils
hung on for a 4-2 victory Saturday
night.
Brodeur lost out on a bid to
extend his NHLrecord to117
shutouts when Martin St. Louis
scored fromin-close and cut the
Lightning’s deficit to 3-1at 8:24 of
the third. Brodeur made 21saves
en route to his NHL-best 629th
career win.
Canadiens 4, Rangers 0
MONTREAL—Carey Price
made17 saves for his second
straight shutout, and the Mon-
treal Canadiens ended NewYork’s
seven-game winning streak with a
4-0 win over the Rangers on Sat-
urday night.
Brian Gionta scored twice and
Erik Cole and Tomas Plekanec
each had a power-play goal and
assist for Montreal, which is on a
4-1-1run. Scott Gomez had two
assists.
Bruins 6, Islanders 0
UNIONDALE, N.Y. —Chris
Kelly scored two goals and Tim
Thomas turned away 22 shots to
lead the Boston Bruins to their
eighth straight win, 6-0 over the
NewYork Islanders on Saturday
night.
Patrice Bergeron, Nathan Hor-
ton, AndrewFerence and Zdeno
Chara also scored for Boston
(11-7), who has outscored oppo-
nents 42-14 during the streak.
NewYork (5-9-3) has lost three of
four and11of 13. The Bruins have
won14 of 18 games against the
Islanders.
Red Wings 4, Kings1
LOS ANGELES —Pavel Dat-
syuk had two goals, Niklas Kron-
wall got the go-ahead score dur-
ing a power play in the second
period, and the Detroit Red
Wings snapped a five-game road
losing streak with a 4-1victory
over the Los Angeles Kings on
Saturday.
Jimmy Howard, who gave up
four goals on 21shots Thursday
night at San Jose and was pulled
after two periods, was back in the
nets for Detroit and made 23
saves —one of themon a penalty
shot by Anze Kopitar in the sec-
ond period.
Coyotes 4, Sabres 2
BUFFALO, N.Y. —Radim
Vrbata and Paul Bissonnette
scored 66 seconds apart in the
second period to lift the Phoenix
Coyotes to a 4-2 win over the
Buffalo Sabres on Saturday night.
Vrbata, who also scored into an
empty net, tied it at 2 at the 8:35
mark on a wrist shot fromthe left
circle, and Bissonnette connected
on a rebound to put Phoenix in
front. It was Bissonnette’s first
goal since Feb. 1and came with
his mother watching her son play
live for the first time in his NHL
career.
Maple Leafs 7, Capitals1
TORONTO—Jonas Gus-
tavsson made a career-high 40
saves, and Joffrey Lupul had a
goal and three assists in the To-
ronto Maple Leafs’ 7-1victory
over the reeling Washington
Capitals on Saturday night.
Phil Kessel added a goal and an
assist. He leads the NHLwith14
goals and 27 points.
N H L R O U N D U P
Little comes up big
as Jets ground Flyers
The Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 9C
PENGUINS SUNDAY
➛ WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
Nov. 11
at Hershey
W, 5-4
Nov. 12
Norfolk
L, 5-3
Nov. 15
Binghamton
W, 3-0
Saturday
at M’chester
7 p.m.
Friday
at Portland
L, 3-2
L A S T F I V E G A M E S
Today
at Worcester
4 p.m.
Wednesday
Syracuse
7:05 p.m.
Nov. 25
Hershey
7:05 p.m.
Nov. 29
at Norfolk
7:15 p.m.
Nov. 26
at B’hamton
7:05 p.m.
N E X T F I V E G A M E S
STEVE MACINTYRE
Forward
Although Steve MacIntyre was re-
called to Pittsburgh last week, he left
quite an impression during his short
stay with Wilkes-Barre/Scranton. He
also left an impression on a few oppo-
nents’ faces who were willing to drop
the gloves with MacIntyre.
Known as one of the toughest play-
ers in hockey, MacIntyre’s experience
at the AHL and NHL levels has also
made him pretty knowledgeable on
what makes a good team.
When asked to play GM and as-
semble his own fantasy hockey team,
MacIntyre breezed through just about
every position with players he has
played with because, as he said, he
has seen how good they are.
He also broke the rules a bit, picking
the same player for two spots – but
when you’re one of the top fighters in
pro hockey you can get away with
that.
When it came time to pick who he
feels is the best enforcer, MacIntyre
put a lot of thought into it. It’s under-
standable, considering MacIntyre is a
top authority on the
subject.
Forward – Sidney
Crosby (Pittsburgh),
“That one’s a no-
brainer.”
Defenseman –
Nicklas Lidstrom
(Detroit)
Goaltender – Marc-
Andre Fleury (Pittsburgh), “He’s pretty
darn good.”
Power Play Specialist – Sidney
Crosby (Pittsburgh), “Can I pick him
again.” Yes.
Penalty Kill Specialist – Craig
Adams (Pittsburgh)
Shootout Specialist – Evgeni Mal-
kin (Pittsburgh), “He’s pretty dirty
with the moves he can make.”
Enforcer – Shawn Thornton (Bos-
ton), “He’s really good and he’s been
doing it a long time.”
Agitator/Pest – Brad Marchand
(Boston), MacIntyre threw out Daniel
Carcillo and Alexandre Burrows before
settling on Marchand. “He’s good at
what he does. He can score and get in
your face. He’s one of the reasons why
Boston won the Stanley Cup.”
Head Coach – Dan Bylsma (Pitts-
burgh), “The best coach I’ve ever
had.”
All-Time Great – Wayne Gretzky
(Edmonton, Los Angeles, St. Louis,
N.Y. Rangers), “I grew up an Oilers fan.
There’s a reason why they call him
The Great One.”
Fantasy GM
Crosby
customized coaching ap-
proach.
“Depending on the sched-
ule and travel, a lot of times
if a guy is playing a lot on the
road it’s tough to work on
things in practice because
you don’t want to burn them
out,” Bales said. “That’s
when you have to stay on top
of habits and game prep-
aration.”
But in the end there is only
one goal no matter who the
netminder is.
“My job is to keep these
guys progressing and get
them to the next level,” Bales
said.
How a goaltender plays in
a game may be a good in-
dication of how close they
are to reaching the next level
and, more immediately, what
Bales needs to address in
practice.
“I look for tendencies and
even strengths that we want
to emphasize,” he said. “It’s
not always working on weak-
nesses. You want to continue
to improve on strengths too.”
Mike Bales began laying
the groundwork for his career
as a goaltender coach in the
early 1990’s.
Bales was a fifth round
draft choice of the Boston
Bruins in 1990, and two years
later he stepped on the ice
with one of his childhood
idols – Andy Moog.
Moog was in the later
stages of his career with the
Bruins, and Bales studied the
veteran goal-
tender while
they were on
the ice to-
gether for
practice.
“He was a
technical
guy for back
then and he
was a really good skater for a
goaltender of that era,” Bales
said. “A lot of guys struggled
with that back then, but
Moog was really good at it.”
Bales went on to have an
18-year pro career, which
included 23 NHL games.
But it was that first impres-
sion left by Moog that trans-
formed Bales into a student
of the game.
Today, Bales is a teacher.
He is the goaltender devel-
opment coach for the Pitts-
burgh Penguins – a job that
requires him to spend most
of his time working with
netminders in Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton and in Wheeling,
along with scouting amateur
goaltenders.
The post is similar to a
pitching coach for a baseball
team, Bales said.
“Teams are starting to
realize you need to have
goaltending coaches in the
American Hockey League,”
he said. “They all have them
at the NHL level, and typical-
ly the NHL goaltending
coach would come and work
with the AHL team. But
there’s so much pressure and
emphasis on winning up
there that those coaches just
don’t have the time.”
Bales fills that void – one
that is admittedly important,
by working with Brad Thies-
sen and Scott Munroe at
Wilkes-Barre, and Patrick
Killeen in Wheeling.
Call it a specialized job for
a specialized position.
“What I do really depends
on the individual,” Bales
said. “At Wilkes-Barre, you
have two guys who are veter-
ans at this level, so it’s less
work on technical things and
more about the mental as-
pects and making sure they
stay sharp.”
But that doesn’t mean
Bales can coach Thiessen and
Munroe the same way. When
Thiessen started 10 straight
games this season, Bales had
to make sure Munroe stayed
sharp and ready to go when
he got the call. Being in a
backup position is difficult
for a goaltender, he said,
because they need to be in
games to stay sharp.
“In those situations, you
have to treat your practices
like games. Treat every puck
like it’s overtime in a game
and you have to stop every-
thing,” Bales said.
Even a goaltender that
starts every night requires a
Before Bales was hired by
the Penguins this summer,
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton never
had a goaltending coach.
Gilles Meloche, who serves
in the capacity for Pitts-
burgh, came down to work
with the AHL goaltenders
periodically throughout the
season, but that was about it.
Having a coach of their
own is something Munroe
and Thiessen feel is a benefit
from several perspectives.
For Munroe – who has had
goaltending coaches with just
about every team he’s played
on, said Bales is another set
of eyes and ears that under-
stands the mindset of those
who play between the pipes.
“He’s really good to bounce
things off of and use some
terminology that he under-
stands,” Munroe said. “But
having a goalie coach is as
much for the mental part of
the game as it is for the phys-
ical side. It’s nice to have a
guy you can talk to.”
Thiessen said that while
coaches work with forwards
and defensemen, goaltenders
can sometimes get lost in the
shuffle. With Bales on board,
he said, that’s not an issue.
“To have a specialized
coach is nice,” Thiessen said.
“He’s a guy that’s been
through it all and you can
address different situations
that happen during the sea-
son because he’s been there.”
The benefits even extend
to head coach John Hynes,
who said the uniqueness of
the position requires a coach
who has experience playing
in net.
Goaltenders have a differ-
ent set of pressures and cir-
cumstances than other play-
ers, Hynes said, and if a
coach never played the posi-
tion they don’t truly under-
stand the intricacies in-
volved.
“You can coach the goalten-
ders’ effort, how they battle
for pucks, rebound control
and even confidence,” Hynes
said. “But whether a guy’s
getting beat because of his
glove or blocker – and how to
fix those areas, that’s where
Mike comes in. He can have
that technical talk with the
goalies and he can help prob-
lem-fix.”
Munroe added that be-
cause the goaltending posi-
tion has become so impor-
tant and increasingly special-
ized, a coach dedicated to
netminders is a necessity
today.
Goaltending coaches are
part of the reason why NHL
teams have been able to
make deep runs in the play-
offs with a relatively un-
known goaltender.
Munroe points to goalten-
ders such as Antti Niemi,
who guided the Chicago
Blackhawks to Stanley Cup
championship as a rookie,
and Michael Leighton, who
led the Philadelphia Flyers to
the final despite having no
NHL postseason experience.
“These guys are coming up
from seemingly out of no-
where and taking their teams
on these long playoff runs,”
Munroe said. “The goaltend-
ing position is so important
and there’s so much focus on
it now, and that’s why you
need that extra coach to work
with those guys.”
Penguins goaltender development coach Mike Bales is helping young
netminders hopeful of NHL dreams.
From bottom to top
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
Penguins goaltending development coach Mike Bales played pro hockey for 18 years before
entering the coaching ranks.
Since being sent down by Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton on Nov. 8, Cody Chupp
has five points (three goals, two as-
sists) in four games with the Nailers.
Chupp has a goal in three straight
games heading into this weekend.
Chris Barton also remains hot, with
seven points in his last three games,
including three goals. Barton continues
to lead the Nailers with nine goals and
17 points in 11 games.
-- Tom Venesky
W H E E L I N G WAT C H
Hot Chupp and Barton
lead the way for Nailers
One of the trends in goal-
tending over the years has
seen certain geographic re-
gions seeming to churn out
top netminders in droves.
It began in the 1980s, when
Patrick Roy joined the Mon-
treal Canadiens and opened
the floodgates for French-
Canadian netminders into the
NHL.
Years later goaltenders
from Finland took over the
league, led by Calgary’s Mik-
ka Kiprusoff, Minnesota’s
Niklas Backstrom and, most
recently, Pekka Rinne of
Nashville.
And now, according to
Penguins goaltender devel-
opment coach Mike Bales,
Sweden is becoming a goalie
hotbed with players such as
Henrik Lundqvist (Rangers),
Jonas Gustavsson (Toronto)
and Jhonas Enroth (Buffalo).
“It does run in trends,”
Bales said. “In Finland, for
example, those guys have an
advantage because they were
one of the first countries to
have goalie coaches for young
players.
“The Quebec thing was a
trend for a while, and lately
it’s been more of the Finnish
and Swedish guys. But there’s
good goalies everywhere, it’s
just a matter of finding them.”
-- Tom Venesky
Goaltender
trend shifts
to Sweden
Bales
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguin
goaltending stats as of Nov. 17
(games played, record, goals
against average, save percent-
age, shutouts):
Brad Thiessen
13 games 9-3-0, 2.17 GAA; .914
save percentage; 2 shutouts
Scott Munroe
3 games 1-1-1, 1.82 GAA; .928 save
percentage; 2 shutouts
G O A L I E S TAT S
C M Y K
PAGE 10C SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
We Will Pay Top Dollar For The Following:
We Will Pay Top Dollar For The Following:
We Buy Broken & Unworn Gold 10K,
14K, 18K, 22K and Platinum Jewelry
Used New/Mint
Indian heads, Coronets, Liberties, Eagles, St. Guadens -- WE BUY THEM ALL!
ALL COMMEMORATIVE
COINS, ROLLS, SETS,
CERTIFIED & PROOFS
(1964 & Earlier)
WILL PAY
UP TO
2200%
OF FACE
VALUE
Dimes
Half Dollars
Quarters
Silver Eagles
Ingots
SILVER COINS
999 & 925
Silver Bars
& Ingots
Wheat & Indian
Pennies
1749-1803 ...................................................................... up to
$
50,000
1836-1839 ...................................................................... up to
$
5,000
1840-1873 ...................................................................... up to
$
5,000
Trade dollars ................................................................ up to
$
2,500
1878-1904 ...................................................................... up to
$
12,500
1921-1935 ...................................................................... up to
$
5,000
" Half CT Diamond-Up to $1K
" 1 CT Diamond-Up to $6K
" 2 CT Diamond-Up to $20K
" 3 CT Diamond-Up to $35K
" 5 CT Diamond-Up to $150K
We have a great demand RIGHT NOW for diamonds of all sizes, and
especially for diamonds of five carats or more. We buy old mine cut
or European cut stones. Due to large contracts, our buying power is
stronger now than ever before! We will buy your diamonds with or
without a G.I.A. Certificate. Your diamonds can be mounted in gold
or platinum. We also buy old mountings that have had the stones
removed.
We buy diamonds: All sizes and shapes, loose or mounted, with or without a GIA certificate
PARTIAL CHECKLIST OF ITEMS WE BUY!
TAKE A FEW MOMENTS TO CHECK OFF THE ITEMS YOU HAVE THAT OUR BUYERS NEED...
JEWELRY COINS & PAPER MONEY
~ Silver dollars
~ Silver coins (pre 1964)
~ Silver bars
~ U.S. Gold coins
~ Foreign coins
~ Gold bullion coins
~ Proof sets
~ Mint sets
~ Coin collections small or large
~ Indian head pennies
~ Trade dollars
~ All silver & gold coin
~ Wheat pennies
~ Buffalo nickels
~ All older coins
~ Certified graded coins
~ All Paper money (1860-1957)
~ Confederate paper money
~ Wrist watches
~ Pocket watches
~ Dental gold
~ Class rings (gold)
~ Gold rings
~ Rolex & Patek Philippe
~ Vintage gold-filled jewelry
~ Gold Pins
~ Filigree rings
~ Silver jewelry
~ Flatware sets
~ Single flatware items
~ Tea sets
~ Antique items all kinds
~ Franklin Mint
~ Danbury Mint
~ Trophies
~ Pitchers
~ Scrap
~ Medallions
For Questions Call 1-888-465-3031
Ara Cash For Gold " 243 Route 70 East, Cherry Hill NJ 08034
10K, 14K, 18K, 22K, 24K
Scrap Gold...............................up to...
$
1,000
Pendants...................................up to...
$
1,500
Watch Cases ............................up to...
$
600
Chains & Necklaces ................up to...
$
5,500
Charm Bracelets......................up to...
$
3,000
Class Rings...............................up to...
$
1,500
Wedding Bands .......................up to...
$
600
Other Rings..............................up to...
$
400
U.S. SINGLE COINS OR COMPLETE SETS
up to...............
$
2,000
up to...............
$
3,000
up to...............
$
3,000
up to...............
$
2,000
up to..................
$
600
up to..................
$
400
up to..................
$
550
up to..................
$
550
up to...............
$
2,500
up to.............
$
21,000
up to.............
$
12,000
up to.............
$
12,000
up to...............
$
8,000
up to.............
$
10,500
up to...............
$
4,500
up to.............
$
12,000
up to...............
$
9,000
up to.............
$
50,000
up to...............
$
9,500
Silver halves - 1934 & older ...............
Silver quarters - 1932 & older ...........
Silver dimes - 1934 & older................
Half dimes - 1873 & older ..................
Nickels - 1938 & older.........................
Three cent pieces - 1889 & older .......
Two cent pieces - 1873 & older ..........
Indian head 1 cents - 1909 & older....
Large cents - 1857 and older..............
Half cents - 1857 and older.................
Standing Liberty 25 cents...................
Walking Liberty 50 cents
Flying Eagles/ Indian Cents
Barber dimes .......................................
Lincoln cents........................................
Buffalo nickels .....................................
Mercury dimes ....................................
Morgan dollars....................................
Peace dollars........................................
GOLD U.S. & FOREIGN COINS
Gold Bullion........................... Price based on market value
Krugerrands .......................... Price based on market value
U.S. Eagles ............................. Price based on market value
Canadian Maple Leafs.......... Price based on market value
Mexican 50 Pesos................... Price based on market value
Chinese Pandas...................... Price based on market value
$
1.00 1849-1889.....up to.....
$
2.50 1796-1834.....up to.....
$
3.00 1854-1899.....up to.....
$
5.00 1795-1804.....up to.....
$
10.00 1795-1804...up to.....
$
20.00 1850-1933...up to.....
$
50.00 1915 Pan-Pac up to..
$
1,200.......................
$
10,500
$
5,000.......................
$
17,000
$
2,500.......................
$
10,000
$
10,000...................... 50,000
$
10,500...................... 50,000
$
12,000.....................
$
50,000
$
11,000...................... 50,000
1958 & Older
Pay 20% & up over face
value
All kinds, all eras, all conditions: Up to:
Cameos.................................................................................................................
$
600
Brooches...............................................................................................................
$
600
Necklaces...........................................................................................................
$
7,000
Charm Bracelets...............................................................................................
$
5,500
Pendants..........................................................................................................
$
14,000
Victorian .........................................................................................................
$
12,000
Earings ..............................................................................................................
$
8,000
Bracelets..........................................................................................................
$
10,000
Cocktail Rings ................................................................................................
$
12,000
925 STERLING & SILVER
~ Cameos
~ Charm bracelets
~ Pendants
~ Omega & Cartier
~ Hat Pins
~ Marcasite Items
~ Earrings
~ Necklaces
~ Cuff Links 14kt.
WE BUY SILVER
SILVER DOLLARS
Pins & Brooches ......................up to...
$
2,000
Mountings ................................up to...
$
600
Dental Gold..............................up to...
$
300
Antique Items ..........................up to...
$
4,500
Earring..................................up to..
$
550/pair
VINTAGE & FINE JEWELRY WE BUY DIAMONDS
CASH FOR GOLD
CASH FOR COINS
Receive an
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Excluding Coins
&Diamonds
. n o p u o c s i h t h t i W
Comes to
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FREE ADMISSION • NO WAITING • NO APPTS NECESSARY
4 DAYS ONLY. Sun. Nov. 20th • 10-4, Mon. Nov. 21 - Wed. Nov. 23rd • 10-6PM
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 11C
All kinds, all eras, all conditions.
Scrap, medallions, collectibles
WE BUY THEM ALL
We buy all types of sterling silver by
all manufacturers and make with
emphasis on finer, more ornate pieces.
" Flatware Sets
" Serving Trays
" Candelabra
" Julep Cups
" Tea Sets
" Baskets
" Bowls
" Frames
" Trophies
We pay premium prices for Tiffany, Jensen, and Cartier!
Bring in your sterling silver pieces for a CASH offer!
WE BUY ONLY STERLING SILVER ITEMS... No silver plate please.
Rolex.................................................................................... up to $15,000
Cartier.................................................................................up to $10,000
Vacheron Constantin............................................................up to$3,500
Patek Phillipe......................................................................up to $25,000
Pocket Watches .................................................................... up to $6,000
Movado.................................................................................. up to $2,800
International......................................................................... up to $4,000
Le Coultre............................................................................. up to $2,600
Universal Geneve ................................................................. up to $3,800
Omega ................................................................................... up to $2,500
We buy Rolex, Cartier, Patek Phillippe, Vacheron Constantin, Le Coultre, Bulova,
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WE BUY WATCHES IN ANY CONDITION, WORKING OR NOT!
a g e m O r e i t r a C e p p i l i h P k e t a P g n i l t i e r B t e u g i P s r a m e d u A Rolex
US Large Size Bills
US Small Size Bills
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Fractional Currency
$500 Bill
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Prices are based
on condition and rarity
Earrings, Bracelets and Necklaces, All Gold, Gold and Diamond,
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We are interested in signed or designer pieces, AND we pay a premium for
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IMPORTANT: All prices are based on rarity & condition. If an item is in poor condition, it’s value will be low. If an item is very rare, and in superb
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Full flatware sets .....................................up to $5000
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Best Western Genetti
1341 N. Church St.
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Directions (570) 454-2494
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C M Y K
PAGE 12C SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
OUTDOORS
➛ WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
There’s more than just steaks,
chops and hamburger in the deer
that luckyhunters will dragout of
the woods during the two-week
rifle season.
Sure, the aforementioned op-
tions are standard fare when it
comes to getting a deer butch-
ered, but there are plenty of other
ways to transform venison into
table fare.
Kevin Naugle, owner of Nau-
gle’s Custom Butchering and
Deer Processing in Hunlock
Creek, offers hunters 15 choices
when they bring a deer into his
shop. In addition to the basic
steaks, chops and hamburger,
Naugle makes venison hot dogs,
kielbasa, salami and red hots – a
smoked bratwurst, among other
things.
“The choices have grown and
hunters like the variety,” Naugle
said. “We even have people that
get their deer butchered else-
where but bring us some of the
boneless meat for specialty
items. That’s grown tremendous-
ly.”
Those specialty items include
kielbasa filled with cheddar
cheese or a combination of jala-
peno and cheese and even
cheese-filled hot dogs.
Naugle has been processing
deer for 28 years and has added
equipment to his shop to offer
more varieties. While there may
be 15 different choices now, that
list is likely to growinthe near fu-
ture.
“There’s going to be more,”
Naugle said. “We’re always look-
ing to try new products.”
The larger selection means ex-
tra work for Naugle and his em-
ployees during deer season, who
workinthe shopfrom7 a.m. to10
p.m. With four refrigerated cool-
ers and two walk-in freezers, cus-
tomers will have all of their meat
ready to pick up in five to seven
days, he said.
And while Naugle and his em-
ployees work long hours to make
sure the meat is ready in a timely
manner, there are steps that hun-
ters can take to help speed up the
Venison processing has turned into more than just steaks
In addition to favorites, local
butcher also makes hot dogs,
kielbasa, salami and red hots.
By TOM VENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Kevin Naugle skins a buck in his shop. Naugle processes several
hundred deer each season. See VENISON, Page 13C
Naugle processes several hundred
deer each season, and it doesn’t
leave him much time to hunt. He
does get out in the morning on
opening day but has to be back
before the first successful hunters
arrive.
Despite a lack of time in the
woods, Naugle has a pretty good
perspective of just how well Penn-
sylvania’s deer herd is doing based
on what comes into his shop.
The recently concluded archery
season was a successful one, he
said, with a lot of heavy-bodied
bucks with large antlers.
“It’s a big improvement from past
years,” Naugle said. “The heaviest
archery buck brought in weighed
215 pounds field-dressed, which
would put it between 250-260
pounds live weight.
“We’ve had a lot of very huge
bucks come in, and my back feels
every bit of it.”
A G O O D P E R S P E C T I V E
Hunting opportunities
aren’t limited to deer in some
parts of the northeast.
Hunters who have a valid
bear license can harvest a bear
during the first week of the ri-
fle deer season during an ex-
tended season. In Wildlife
Management Units 3D, 4C, 4D,
4E, 5B and 5C the extended
bear season runs from Nov. 30
to Dec. 3.
In WMU’s 3A, 3C and por-
tions of 3B and 2G the extend-
ed bear season is open from
Nov. 28 to Dec. 3 (check the
2011-12 Hunting and Trapping
Digest for specific locations).
PGC spokesman Tim Con-
way said the extended seasons
are designedtooffer additional
hunting opportunities and re-
duce the bear population in ar-
eas where complaints are on
the rise.
“It’s a great opportunity for
those deer hunters who have a
valid bear license,” Conway
said. “There are a lot of bears in
these extended season areas,
and we’re hoping they harvest
some that are causingnuisance
problems in the area.”
As long as the weather coop-
erates, Conway predicted
bears will still be very active
during the extended season
due to the heavy mast crop of
beech nuts in the woods.
The presence of thousands
of deer hunters in the woods
will help as well, he said.
“The first two days and the
Saturday when the masses of
hunters are out there could get
the bears moving,” Conway
said. “The extended season is
one excellent opportunity to
harvest a bear.”
Northeast Region Bear
Check Stations for the extend-
ed season:
Nov. 28-30 and Dec. 3, noon
to 8 p.m. (Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday and Saturday):
Lackawanna County – Lack-
awanna State Park
Bradford County – Wysox
Fire Company
SullivanCounty – Hillsgrove
Ranger Station
Wednesday, Nov. 30toSatur-
day, Dec. 3, noon to 8 p.m.:
Carbon County – Beltzvilel
State Park Maintenance Build-
ing
Monroe County – State
Game Lands 127 Building
Pike County – State Game
Lands 180 Shohola Building
Monday, Nov. 28 to Satur-
day, Dec. 3, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Luzerne County – Northeast
Region Office, intersection of
routes 415 and 118 in Dallas
Bear can
still be on
the move
Some areas allow bear
harvesting from November
30 to December 3.
By TOM VENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
A lot of work goes into growing that trophy set
of antlers that lures hunters into the woods during
the two-week rifle deer.
It takes years of effort, in fact, combining genet-
ics, nutrition and age. Even the buck’s mother
plays an important role in the development of
antlers.
It’s a complicated process – one that Don Wagn-
er has watched every day of the year as manager
of the Penn State Deer Research Center in State
College.
The 22-acre fenced enclosure is home to 80
white-tailed deer, including bucks that top the
200-inch range in Boone and Crockett scoring.
Working daily with deer has given Wagner an
inside look at the factors that go into producing a
big buck. Here’s his take on the three most impor-
tant areas when it comes to antler growth:
Genetics
The research center has conducted extensive
studies on genetics and antler growth, and Wagn-
er said does contribute more to antler growth of
their fawns than the males. He’s seen it firsthand
with the breeding program in place at the center.
“If you take a doe that has produced offspring
that develop into large bucks, and breed it with a
small, inferior buck, she’ll still produce fawns that
“GENETICS ARE ONE AREA that you can do the least about when
it comes to managing deer in the wild.”
RACK ’EM UP
JOE KOSACK/PENNSYLVANIA GAME COMMISSION
The number of large bucks in the region appears high for the upcoming rifle deer season, which begins on Nov. 28.
Many factors in determining size of bucks’ antlers
By TOM VENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
See RACK, Page 14C
It’s a pretty good indication of
just how important the first day
of deer season is to the approxi-
mately 800,000 hunters who
will hit the woods on Monday,
Nov. 28: On the homepage of
the Pennsylvania Game Com-
mission’s website, there is a
clock counting down the days,
hours, minutes and seconds to
the first day of the rifle deer
season.
The countdown began on
Tuesday.
“I’ve said for a long time that
the Monday after Thanksgiving
is Pennsylvania’s unofficial holi-
day,” said PGC spokesman Jerry
Feaser.
Many school districts close
for the day, countless vacations
are scheduled around deer sea-
son and there is even a union in
central Pennsylvania whose
contract includes a day off for
the Monday after Thanksgiving.
Even the PGC’s headquarters
in Harrisburg transforms into a
barren place on the opening day
of deer season.
“We usually draw straws,”
Feaser said, adding that those
who filled their tags in archery
or the early muzzleloader sea-
sons are the ones that come to
work, along with essential per-
sonnel such as dispatchers and
media relations staff.
“We feel the same anticipation
for the first day that the nearly
800,000 hunters feel,” Feaser
said.
In the northeast, there is
plenty of reason for anticipation.
Spokesman Tim Conway said
based on reports from local
Wildlife Conservation Officers,
deer numbers are better than
they’ve been in more than five
years.
“They’re seeing a lot of nice
deer as well,” Conway said.
“Some are using the word slam-
Plenty of anticipation for start of deer season
By TOM VENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
Deer season will open with a five-
day, antlered deer-only season in
Wildlife Management Units (WMUs)
2A, 2C, 2D, 2E, 2F, 2G, 3B, 3C, 4B, 4D
and 4E from Nov. 28-Dec. 2. It is
followed in these WMUs by seven
days of concurrent, antlered and
antlerless deer hunting beginning
Dec. 3, and continuing through Dec.
10. The rest of the state follows the
two-week concurrent, antlered and
antlerless season – Nov. 28-Dec. 10 –
that has been in place since 2001.
Hunters must wear 250 square
inches of fluorescent orange materi-
al on the head, chest and back
combined at all times while afield
during the seasons. It’s also illegal to
hunt, chase or disturb deer within
150 yards of any occupied building
without the occupant’s permission if
they are using a firearm, or 50 yards
if they are using a bow or crossbow.
All hunters who take a deer must fill
out their harvest tag and attach it to
the deer’s ear before moving the
carcass. The tag can be secured to
the base of the ear with a string
drawn very tightly, if the hunter
plans to have the deer mounted.
Cutting a slit in the ear to attach the
tag will require additional work by a
taxidermist.
Successful hunters have 10 days to
report deer. Hunters can report their
kill using the postage paid card
supplied with their 2011-12 Digest, or
online using the Internet at
www.pgc.state.pa.us, or calling
1-855-PAHUNT1 (1-855-724-8681).
A Q U I C K G L A N C E AT D E E R S E A S O N
See DEER, Page 13C
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 13C
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mers to describe the bucks
they’ve been seeing.”
Weather is the main factor
when it comes to making the
openingdaya success or a bust. A
rainy, fog-laden day reduces visi-
bility and forces many hunters in-
doors,” Feaser said, while a snow-
fall makes deer easier to spot and
track, thus keepinghunters inthe
woods.
Aside from rain and snow,
there is another aspect – specifi-
callya behavior –that factors into
the rifle season: the rut.
In the northeast region, Con-
waysaidthat kickedinduringthe
last week of archery season and
could continue into the rifle sea-
son.
“The deer are very active right
now, and with that activity and
the overall numbers, it’s probably
going to end up being a good sea-
son,” he said.
DEER
Continued from Page 12C
process and insure that the veni-
son is top quality.
Cleanliness is the top priority,
Naugle said.
When field dressing a deer, it’s
important that the heart and
lungs are removed from the
body cavity and it is washed out
and cooled. The hide should be
left on, Naugle added, and if the
deer should be hung with the
head up so the blood can drain
out of the chest cavity.
“Youlookat theold-timehunt-
ing photos and they hang their
deer from the neck,” Naugle
said. “That’s the right way to do
it.
“I do inspect every deer that
comes inandI have turnedsome
people away if the meat isn’t up
to our standards.”
Cleanliness, proper field dress-
ing and leaving the hide on are
easy ways to make sure the veni-
son is up to par, and there is one
moresimplestepthat hunters can
follow: bring their deer to the
processor in a timely manner.
“It’s alright to leave it hang if
the weather is cool, but don’t
throw it in the trunk and drive
around for days with it,” Naugle
said.
VENISON
Continued from Page 12C
Joe Shenk wasn’t going to bear
hunt this year.
It wasn’t until his brother, Ger-
ald, suggested on Friday that he
should drive up and join him at
their Sullivan County camp that
Shenk decided to buy a license at
the last minute and head up.
It was a good choice.
By 7:30 a.m. on the Saturday
opener, Shenk saw two bears and
shot the second – a male that had
a live weight of 171 pounds.
“Today was the first time I ever
saw a bear, much less two, in the
woods during bear season,” said
Shenk, who resides in Shermans-
dale, just outside of Harrisburg.
“My brother saw two bears at
camp the day before and said I
needed to come up. I’m glad I
did.”
Shenkwas oneof manysuccess-
ful bear hunters in the area to take
advantage of the sunny weather
on Saturday’s opening day.
Dan Balliet of Drums has hunt-
ed bears since 1972 without any
luck.
That changed at 8:30 a.m. on
Saturday when he spotted a large
bear on State Game Lands 187 in
Dennison Township. Balliet was
walking along a trail when he no-
ticed a bear nearby in thick brush.
He moved ahead of the bear and
was able to get a clean shot when
it stepped into an open area.
“For all thebears I’veseeninthe
woods, this one
looked like a big,
black ball,” Balliet
said. “This region
has some of the
largest black bears
intheworld, andI al-
ways wanted to get
onenice, largePenn-
sylvania black bear.
This might be the
only one I ever get.”
Balliet’s bear – a
female – dressed at
216 pounds and had
an estimated live
weight of 255
pounds.
The bear was
tagged and also had
acollar –oneof 50inthestatethat
the Pennsylvania Game Commis-
sion collared last year to track the
movements of bruins in suburban
areas. Balliet turned the collar in
to the PGC when he brought the
bear to the check station at the
agency’s regional office in Dallas.
Information from the bear’s tags
indicated it was trapped in May in
the Crestwood Industrial Park by
Wildlife Conservation Officer
Dave Allen. At that time the bear
weighed 175 pounds.
Sixty seven bears were brought
to the Dallas check station on Sat-
urday, slightly above last year’s
opening day total of 59. PGCbiol-
ogist Kevin Wenner said most of
the bears were harvested in State
Game Lands 57 in the Forkston
Township area, and Davidson
Township on State
Game Lands 13 in
Sullivan County.
Wenner said the
heaviest bear
brought in on Satur-
day had a dressed
weight of 401
pounds and an esti-
mated live weight of
473 pounds. It was
taken in Huntington
Mills, Luzerne
County.
In his district of
southern Luzerne
County, Allen said
hunting pressure
was light through-
out the day with
most of the activity on game
lands.
This year’s bear season is four
days long, Nov. 19 and Nov. 21-23.
In certain Wildlife Management
Units an extended season will be
heldfromNov. 28toDec. 3or Nov.
30 to Dec. 3, depending on the
unit.
Allen is hoping for a good har-
vest in his district because the
bear population is high and so are
complaints, he said.
“The amount of human/bear
conflicts is rising due to the fact
there’s more people,” Allen said.
“I’dliketoseemorehunter partici-
pation.”
So would WCO’s JimJolley and
Jerry Kapral, who also cover Lu-
zerne County.
Jolley, who covers the northern
part of the county, said hunter
numbers on Saturday were on par
with previous seasons, but many
of them didn’t stay in the woods
all day.
“Todaywas aperfect dayweath-
er-wise for hunting,” Jolley said. “I
hope it picks up.”
Kapral’s district includes the
Wyoming Valley. He said hunting
pressurewaslight andthingswere
quiet as far regarding violations.
Kapral also said he didn’t re-
ceive any reports of hunters bag-
ging the bear that passed through
Edwardsville on Nov. 1.
He said the bruin may have
denned up.
“Bears here are denningupnow
due to a lack of food,” Kapral said.
“Food sources such as acorns are
pretty much exhausted in some
areas.”
Like Allen, Kapral is hoping
that some of the bears generating
complaints in urban areas are har-
vested by hunters this season.
“People don’t want to tolerate
bears anymore,” he said. “I’d rath-
er see themharvested by a hunter
who will utilize it rather than get
hit by a car or shot by someone
and run off.”
O P E N I N G D AY O F B E A R S E A S O N
Late decision leads to hunter bagging a bear
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Ray Sabatini of Wyoming poses with a 153-pound bear shot by his
brother Ron at the Pennsylvania Game Commission Regional
Office in Dallas Saturday afternoon.
Sixty-seven bears
taken to Dallas office
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
“This region has
some of the large-
st black bears in
the world, and I
always wanted to
get one nice, large
Pennsylvania
black bear. This
might be the only
one I ever get.”
Dan Balliet
Drums resident
C M Y K
PAGE 14C SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
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turnout tobelargebucks,” Wagn-
er said. “The doe has equal or
more influence on the genetic
characteristics of antlers.”
As a result, genetics in wild
deer are hard to manage. Antler
restrictions mayplaya small role,
Wagner said, but it’s the doe that
is the determining factor.
“Genetics are one area that you
can do the least about when it
comes to managing deer in the
wild,” Wagner said. “But our
gene pool in Pennsylvania has a
lot of diversity, especially with
the far-reaching dispersals of
bucks. There’s a good mix of ge-
netics out there.”
Age
The general consensus among
hunters is antler restrictions are
producing larger-racked bucks by
allowing the small ones to live
longer. That may be true to a cer-
tain extent, Wagner said, but most
Pennsylvania bucks still don’t live
long enough to reach their full po-
tential.
Antler restrictions generally al-
low the one-and-a-half year old
bucks to survive a hunting season,
but they are usually only gaining
an extra year before they become
legal to harvest.
“We’re just at the tip of the iceb-
erg of what’s possible with antler
growth,” Wagner said.
In order for a buck to achieve
monster status, it needs to reach
the four to six year age range.
“Four to six years old is when a
whitetail peaks,” Wagner said.
“With antler restrictions, we’re
protecting those yearlings and get-
ting themto two years old, but it’s
still no where near the age they
need to become a monster buck.”
While it would be difficult to
achieve statewide, Wagner said
there are things hunters can do
when managing their own proper-
ties to increase the age of bucks.
While antler restrictions consider
points, Wagner saidspreadrestric-
tions will also help bucks live long-
er. Most yearling bucks have a
spread that is inside its ears, he
said.
“Even a buck with five points on
one side, if its spread is still inside
the ears that’s probably not at that
older age class yet,” Wagner said.
If the spread extends past the
years, Wagner said it’s likely that
buckis at least twoyears old. Inor-
der to narrow the age down even
more, physical characteristics
shouldbeconsidered. Wagner sug-
gested looking at the width of the
neck, chest andshoulders todeter-
mine if it’s an older buck.
“With younger bucks their legs
will look longer because they’re
not as thick throughout the body,”
he said.
Nutrition
This is a big factor when it
comes toantler growth–one that
Wagner has researcheddowntoa
science. A buck needs a diet that
consists of 16 percent protein. In
the early stages of antler growth,
protein is the main requirement,
but achieving that 16 percent lev-
el can be difficult in large forests.
Food plots do help, Wagner
said, but supplemental or winter
feeding doesn’t give a buck a con-
sistent diet to have much of an
impact.
Factors that occur throughout
the year affect antler growth, and
that begins with the rut.
“Bucks won’t eat much and
they’re always on the move, so
they lose some body weight.
Then you get into winter and the
food just isn’t there, so they may
lose 10 to 30 percent of their
weight,” Wagner said. “The fol-
lowing spring, they will work to
regain their body weight first and
what’s left goes into antler
growth.”
If a buck is able to make it
through the winter without suf-
fering much weight loss, it will
have less rebuilding to do in the
spring and it can direct more nu-
trients to antler growth.
But evengrowingaset of antlers
can be draining on a buck. Protein
is utilized in the early stages of
growth – April and May. In the lat-
er stages of antler growth–usually
August –Wagner saidmoreminer-
als are needed.
“A buck will take minerals from
its skeletal system – specifically
the ribs – and transfer it to the an-
tlers,” hesaid. “That helps withan-
tler density.”
After theantlerslosetheir velvet
– usually in September – bucks
won’t fight for several weeks.
“The skeletal system needs to
recover from that last push of an-
tler growth,” Wagner said. “It’s a
process that really occurs all year
long.”
Other factors
When the buck was born has a
lot to do with the size of its first
few sets of antlers, according to
Wagner. Male fawns born early
in the year have a head start, and
that helps produce a better set of
antlers, he said.
“If we have fawns born in July
and August, they’re almost al-
ways spikes or small three and
four-points,” Wagner said. “As
they get older, their racks catch
up.”
Even the health of the mother
impacts that first set of antlers.
“Years ago we had a doe that
had intestinal parasites. It was
bred to a 200-inch buck,” Wagn-
er said. “The first year, it’s fawn
produced a three-inch spike. At
three years old, the buck was a10-
point that would’ve scored in the
160’s.
“The health and nutrition levels
of the mother while she is nursing
her fawns will showup in that first
set of antlers.”
Injuries to the body will also im-
pact antler growth, evenif it’s early
in the year. Wagner said the buck’s
body will use minerals and nutri-
ents to heal the injury, taking it
away from development of the an-
tler on the opposite side of the
wound.
“If a buck in the spring gets hit
on its right leg, it’s usually the op-
positesideantler that’s deformed,”
Wagner said.
When the antlers are in velvet
they are susceptible to damage as
well. Evenalight bumponavelvet-
covered antler can cause severe
nerve damage and lead to a defor-
mity in the rack.
Damage can also occur to the
rack after it is hardened. Wagner
has seeninstances where anantler
was broken off at the base of the
skull, damaging the pedicle (tis-
sue) resultingina deformedantler
for several years.
“When the antlers are growing
the buck can feel them with the
nerves. But what I noticed here is
in that last week of growth the
nerves die off and the bucks get a
little careless,” Wagner said.
“That’s when you see some dam-
age occur. I don’t know how a
large buck in the wild makes it
through with an un-damaged
rack.”
RACK
Continued from Page 12C
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 15C
➛ S P O R T S
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
"The West Pittston
Rams Harley David-
son Raffle has been
cancelled. The
Rams will refund the
monies collected
from the sale of the
raffle ticket(s) to
those individuals
who present their
ticket stub. The
owner of the ticket
stub should retain a
copy of the stub(s)
for themselves and
forward the original
stub(s) to our mail-
ing address : West
Pittston Rams, P.O.
Box 3127, West
Pittston, PA 18643.
Please be sure to
include your full
name, address and
phone number on
each of the original
stubs your return.
Should you wish to
donate the raffle
ticket amount you
purchased back to
the Association,
please follow the
above procedure
and include a note
indicating your
desire to donate.
Please submit
refund requests
prior to 12/31/2011.
For more informa-
tion, visit
www.west-
pittstonrams.com
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Dallas, PA 18612
(570) 639-1885
E.O.E
551 Other
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570-497-8109
566 Sales/Retail/
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Plymouth
573 Warehouse
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in Hazleton!
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570-497-8109
573 Warehouse
WAREHOUSE
Full time.
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112 Brown Street
Pittston Township
Forklift Experience
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906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
Not in Flood Zone
Single family house,
2 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, oil heat,
unfinished base-
ment, small yard,
$35,000
Call 570-457-3340
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
151 W. River St.
NEAR WILKES
1st floor. 2 bed-
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Appliances includ-
ed. Sewer & trash
paid. Tenant pays
gas, water & elec-
tric. Pet friendly.
Security deposit &
1st months rent
required. $600.
570-969-9268
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORT
1 bedroom, excel-
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newly remodeled.
Sunken living
room. Oak floors
kitchen and bath
and w/w. Incl.
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dishwasher. Coin-
op laundry in
building. Off street
parking. $750 incl
all utilities.
570-779-4609 or
570-407-3991
947 Garages
WEST PITTSTON
5 locking garages/
storage units for
rent. 9’x11’ & 9’x14’.
$50/month.
Call 570-357-1138
950 Half Doubles
GLEN LYON
* Renovated Apartment *
3 bedroom. Wash-
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Off street parking.
New furnace. Yard.
Application process
required. Tenant
pays utilities &
security.
$500/mos
570-714-1296
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Completely remod-
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carpet. Stove,
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first, last & security.
Includes water,
sewer & trash. No
pets. No smoking.
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check.
570-824-3223
269-519-2634
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570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE – Elena Stambone
scored 19 points to lead Wilkes to a
96-50 victory over Penn State Wilkes-
Barre on Saturday at Wilkes’ Marts
Center.
With the win, the Lady Colonels
pushed their winning streak to three
and won their home opener.
Five players scored in double fig-
ures to lead the way for Wilkes. Elena
Stambone finished with19 points,
Whitney Connolly had 14, Angela
Palmerio netted 14 and Besiana Shesi
chipped in 13 points.
Tiara Braithwaite led the Mountain
Lions attack with 12 points and 11
rebounds.
Allegheny 61, Misericordia 59
Allegheny scored with one second
remaining to hand Misericordia a loss
in the championship game of the
Allegheny Invitational.
Jesse Robinson led the Cougars
with 15 points and 11 rebounds while
Tyann McDaniel and Hannah Seely
added 12 points each. Seely had nine
rebounds and was named to the all-
tournament team.
Rutgers-Newark 49, King’s 42
Jade Howard scored finished with
13 points and nine rebounds to lead
Rutgers-Newark to a win against
King’s in the championship game of
the John J. Adams Tip-Off Classic.
Celia Rader led the Lady Monarchs
with 11 points and four rebounds
while Paige Carlin followed with 10
points.
MEN’S BASKETBALL
Purchase 72, King’s 70
Kyle Stackhouse scored 18 points as
King’s dropped a decision in the con-
solation game of the Stevens Institute
Tip-Off Classic on Saturday.
Kyle Hammonds scored 17 points
with nine rebounds while Nick Reisig
chipped in with 12 points and seven
boards.
Wilkes 79, PSU-Harrisburg 68
Paul Huch scored 18 points and
grabbed 24 rebounds to lead Wilkes
to the win in the consolation game of
the Days Inn Tip-Off Tournament at
Dickinson College.
Jourdon Wilson contributed to the
win with 14 points and four assists
while Tyler Breznitsky had 10 points.
Wilkes dominated the paint ou-
trebounding PSU Harrisburg 56-37 in
the contest including a season-best 17
offensive boards.
DeVry 92, Luzerne CCC 85
David Thompson netted a game-
high 31 points to lead DeVry Uni-
versity to a win over Luzerne County
Community College. Daryl Wood
followed with 26 points.
For LCCC, Nahjee Brown finished
with 21 points while Chris Beauvoir
had 20 points. Tim Butler contributed
with 19 points.
PSU-Wilkes 50, Williamson Trade 47
Jacob Bronder was selected to the
all-tournament team as he helped
lead Penn State Wilkes-Barre to a
victory over Williamson Trade in the
consolation game of the Messiah
College Men’s Basketball Tourna-
ment.
SWIMMING
Cougars sweep
Dana Hallam (200 free) and Bree
Grzech (100 back) picked up wins for
the Lady Cougars as they defeated
King’s 150-82. Nick Essington (400
IM, 1000 free) and Adam Grzech (100
back, 200 back) led the men to a
138-87 win over the Monarchs.
For King’s, Patricia Manning won
the 200 breast and 400 IM while
Shannon Johnson won the 200 back.
For the men, Michael Sweeney took
the 100 breast and Kyle Newton won
the 200 breast.
C O L L E G E R O U N D U P
Wilkes women hoops
win third consecutive
The Times Leader staff
SYRACUSE, N.Y. —Playing
for the first time since an assist-
ant coach was accused of sex
abuse, No. 5 Syracuse romped to
a 92-47 win over Colgate on
Saturday.
It was business as usual for the
Orange (4-0) on the court, even
as the programwas trying to
come to grips with molestation
allegations against assistant
coach Bernie Fine.
Syracuse placed Fine on ad-
ministrative leave “in light of the
newallegations” that he mo-
lested two former ball boys for
years. Fine dismissed the allega-
tions as “patently false,” and
expressed confidence he would
be vindicated.
Fine’s usual seat behind coach
JimBoeheimwas left vacant
At the Carrier Dome, a sub-
dued crowd came to watch
hoops, not make protest signs or
chant for the absent coach.
No. 2Kentucky 85,
Penn State 47
UNCASVILLE, Conn. —Do-
ron Lamb had 26 points and No.
2 Kentucky beat Penn State 85-47
Saturday in the Hall of Fame
Tip-Off tournament in Connecti-
cut.
Kyle Wiltjer added19 points
and Terrence Jones had15
points, nine rebounds and five
assists for Kentucky (3-0), which
didn’t put five players in double
figures for the first time this
season.
They didn’t need to.
The Wildcats held Penn State
without a field goal for more than
11
1
⁄2 minutes during the first half,
opening up a 34-point lead, and
never looked back.
TimFrazier had11points, six
rebounds and six assists to lead
Penn State (3-1), which had
opened the season with three
wins.
The Nittany Lions shot 27
percent fromthe field, 16 percent
in the first half.
No. 8Louisville 69, Butler 53
INDIANAPOLIS —Kyle Kuric
scored17 points and Chris Smith
had15, leading No. 8 Louisville
to a 69-53 victory Saturday at
Butler.
The Cardinals (3-0) were the
highest-ranked teamto play at
Hinkle Fieldhouse since No. 5
North Carolina visited Indianapo-
lis in1992.
Butler (1-2) was led by Khyle
Marshall with 20 points and
Chase Stigall, who scored all 11of
his points in the first half.
The Bulldogs led almost the
entire first half, but after Louis-
ville took a 29-28 halftime lead on
Jared Swopshire’s driving layup
with 2.4 seconds left, the Cardi-
nals dominated the second half.
No. 14Wisconsin 69,
Wofford 33
MADISON, Wis. —Josh Gass-
er scored16 points and No. 14
Wisconsin finished the first half
on a19-2 run to take control in a
69-33 victory over Wofford on
Saturday night.
The Badgers (3-0) came in
shooting 52 percent from3-point
range, but they often settled for
outside shots early in the game
and opened 2 of 9 frombeyond
the arc. Wisconsin led just 13-10
midway through the first half,
then started playing more of an
inside-outside game and began to
pull away.
No. 18Vanderbilt 86,
North Carolina St. 79
EASTRUTHERFORD, N.J. —
John Jenkins scored 28 points
and No. 18 Vanderbilt closed the
game on a10-2 run for an 86-79
victory over North Carolina State
on Saturday night in the semi-
finals of the TicketCity Legends
Classic.
Jenkins, who missed the Com-
modores’ last game with a
sprained right ankle, had 20
points in the first half of a game
that was close until Vanderbilt
(3-1) took the lead for good with
a spurt that started with 2:16 to
play.
Presbyterian 56,
No. 20Cincinnati 54
CINCINNATI —Khalid Muta-
kabbir led Presbyterian’s come-
back froma15-point deficit and
hit a go-ahead 3-pointer with 7.6
seconds left Saturday, rallying
the Blue Hose to a 56-54 upset of
No. 20 Cincinnati for one of their
biggest wins in five years of Divi-
sion I basketball.
The Blue Hose (3-2) trailed
by15 with10 minutes to go.
Mutakabbir hit one big shot
after another, including his 3
fromthe left wing that gave
Presbyterian its first lead of the
second half. He matched his
career high with 25 points.
Virginia 49, Drexel 35
ST. THOMAS, U.S. Virgin
Islands —Mike Scott scored
21points and grabbed10 re-
bounds, and Joe Harris played
strong down the stretch Sat-
urday to lift Virginia to a 49-35
win over Drexel in the Paradise
Jam.
Harris scored seven of his 12
points in the final 5:20 of the
game.
Frantz Massenat led Drexel
with12 points. Samme Givens
added10 points and10 re-
bounds.
Providence 87,
Florida A&M65
PROVIDENCE, R.I. —Prov-
idence’s Bryce Cotton scored
eight of his career-high 26
points before Florida A&Mgot
on the scoreboard in an 87-65
Friars win Saturday
C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L R O U N D U P
Amid allegations Syracuse romps
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Syracuse’s Michael Carter-Williams (1) crosses the teamlogo as he dribbles the ball up court dur-
ing the second half of Saturday’s game against Colgate in Syracuse, N.Y.
MANCHESTER, New Hamp-
shire – For the second straight
night Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
needed a shootout to decide a
winner. And for the second
straight game the Penguins were
forced to settle for a single point.
Jordan Nolan scored the game-
winner in the fourth round of the
shootout to lift the Manchester
Monarchs to a 4-3 win in front of
7,508at theVerizonWireless Are-
na.
Friday night the Penguins
dropped a 3-2 shootout decision
to the Portland Pirates. That loss
ended their season-opening
eight-game road winning streak.
“I think it was a really challeng-
ing game,” said Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton head coach John
Hynes. “Credit to Manchester.
They played really hard. They re-
ally pushed us in certain areas of
the game.”
David Meckler and Marc-
Andre Cliche were also success-
ful in the penalty shots while Ja-
son Williams was the only mem-
ber of the Pens to beat Manches-
ter goaltender Jeff Zatkoff.
The Monarchs carried the ma-
jority of the play in the opening
20 minutes, outshooting the vis-
itors by a 12-7 count, but it was
the Penguins who emerged from
the period with a 1-0 lead.
A pair of Monarchs penalties
led to a two-man advantage for
the Penguins in the waning mo-
ments of the period. The second
infractionledtoanoffensivezone
faceoff with 13 seconds remain-
ing. The Penguins controlled the
draw, setting up Niko Dimitrakos
for a blue-line blast that sailed
cleanly through traffic and past
Zatkoff with 4.4 seconds left in
the period. Williams and Ben
Street drew assists on Dimitra-
kos’ fifth of the season.
Manchester survived another
extended two-man disadvantage
to open the second before tying
the game 3:36 into the period.
Dwight King came up with the
puck deep in the Pens end and
quickly fed to the front where
Linden Vey redirected it past
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton goalten-
der Brad Theissen to even things
at 1.
Some good offensive zone
pressure allowed the Monarchs
to grab a 2-1 lead with 4:08 left in
the second when Andrew Camp-
bell’s shot from the point beat
Theissen high to the blocker
side.
However, only 67 seconds later
the Pens answered as Eric Tan-
gradi forced a turnover deep in
the Monarchs end. The puck
came free to Street who beat Zat-
koff high on the glove side to tie
the game at 2. For Street, the goal
marked his fourth in the last six
games after going scoreless in his
first eight games of the season.
“I like our response when we
went through some adversity,”
said Hynes.
The Monarchs lurchedback in-
to the lead midway through the
third on a controversial power-
play goal. Joey Mullin’s shot from
the point was deflected into the
pads of Theissen, who thought
he had it covered. The referee
ruled the puck was still loose and
Jordan Nolan was there to poke it
over thelinegivingtheMonarchs
a 3-2 lead.
But for the second time in the
game the Pens had a quick an-
swer. Just 1:16 later a Robert Bor-
tuzzo shot from the blue line
found the back of the net and the
game was even at 3.
A H L
Penguins drop 2nd
straight shootout
After eight consecutive road
wins to open season, WBS has
now last 2 in a row.
By MARK JEANNERET
For The Times Leader 4
MONARCHS
3
PENGUINS
C M Y K
PAGE 16C SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ W E A T H E R
7
2
4
4
6
0
ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data ©2011
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 51/32
Average 48/33
Record High 71 in 1921
Record Low 14 in 1924
Yesterday 23
Month to date 368
Year to date 853
Last year to date 900
Normal year to date 1010
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s
mean temperature was below 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.00”
Month to date 0.88”
Normal month to date 2.01”
Year to date 54.89”
Normal year to date 33.90”
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 4.78 -0.27 22.0
Towanda 2.85 -0.28 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 2.86 0.54 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 3.61 -0.18 18.0
Today’s high/
Tonight’s low
TODAY’S SUMMARY
Highs: 55-59. Lows: 37-40. Mostly cloudy
and mild today. Cloudy skies tonight.
The Poconos
Highs: 62-66. Lows: 48-51. Partly sunny
and mild today. Mostly cloudy tonight.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 52-57. Lows: 21-33. Cloudy with a
slight chance of showers today. Chance
of showers tonight.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 63-65. Lows: 49-49. Mostly cloudy
today. Chance of showers tonight.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 63-66. Lows: 51-54. Partly sunny
today. Chance of showers tonight.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 2/-9/.00 17/2/sn 8/2/c
Atlanta 54/43/.00 69/55/c 73/58/t
Baltimore 55/26/.00 63/50/c 55/48/sh
Boston 53/36/.00 62/40/pc 48/37/pc
Buffalo 54/41/.00 52/31/c 44/35/c
Charlotte 58/23/.00 67/54/c 73/55/c
Chicago 55/44/.00 45/39/pc 46/39/pc
Cleveland 54/42/.01 55/39/pc 48/39/sh
Dallas 79/63/.00 81/66/t 77/63/t
Denver 49/20/.00 47/32/pc 52/34/pc
Detroit 50/37/.00 52/35/pc 44/37/sh
Honolulu 85/77/.00 82/71/pc 83/71/pc
Houston 79/65/.00 83/70/c 82/71/c
Indianapolis 58/45/.00 57/45/sh 55/43/pc
Las Vegas 63/50/.00 58/45/pc 59/44/pc
Los Angeles 60/55/.00 60/53/sh 64/53/pc
Miami 83/75/.00 82/72/pc 82/70/pc
Milwaukee 51/39/.00 41/36/pc 44/35/pc
Minneapolis 37/27/.17 28/26/pc 37/21/pc
Myrtle Beach 66/39/.00 74/56/pc 73/57/pc
Nashville 67/41/.00 68/60/t 72/60/t
New Orleans 79/57/.00 81/65/c 80/65/c
Norfolk 62/33/.00 68/54/pc 66/53/c
Oklahoma City 76/56/.00 49/42/sh 53/44/t
Omaha 50/29/.00 40/22/pc 46/30/pc
Orlando 81/63/.00 82/62/pc 82/61/s
Phoenix 75/53/.00 69/56/pc 67/52/pc
Pittsburgh 56/30/.00 55/45/sh 53/44/sh
Portland, Ore. 43/37/.01 41/36/pc 45/41/r
St. Louis 62/50/.00 49/43/t 57/43/c
Salt Lake City 37/30/.06 42/25/sf 45/29/pc
San Antonio 82/66/.00 82/69/c 83/68/c
San Diego 64/59/.00 63/54/c 64/55/s
San Francisco 55/43/.00 56/46/sh 58/47/pc
Seattle 41/33/.00 42/34/pc 47/42/r
Tampa 82/68/.00 84/65/pc 84/63/pc
Tucson 70/52/.00 69/50/pc 63/44/pc
Washington, DC 55/37/.00 63/51/c 57/49/sh
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 50/32/.00 40/36/c 46/37/sh
Baghdad 75/50/.00 71/49/s 68/48/s
Beijing 46/32/.00 48/27/s 49/26/pc
Berlin 46/37/.05 37/33/pc 42/32/pc
Buenos Aires 90/66/.00 85/65/t 87/59/sh
Dublin 55/54/.00 54/48/c 49/40/sh
Frankfurt 54/37/.00 38/30/pc 42/32/pc
Hong Kong 84/75/.00 77/70/pc 74/69/pc
Jerusalem 55/46/.15 60/46/sh 58/45/sh
London 55/43/.00 52/45/pc 55/49/sh
Mexico City 77/52/.00 73/51/pc 75/49/pc
Montreal 50/32/.00 57/18/sh 28/21/s
Moscow 36/32/.00 33/20/sf 25/19/s
Paris 57/37/.00 55/41/pc 55/45/sh
Rio de Janeiro 77/68/.00 76/67/s 79/68/s
Riyadh 84/61/.00 85/62/s 80/57/s
Rome 61/37/.00 69/47/s 68/49/c
San Juan 84/78/.01 83/76/t 84/75/sh
Tokyo 72/57/.00 67/51/sh 57/45/s
Warsaw 39/32/.00 36/28/c 35/27/pc
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowflurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
65/49
Reading
63/46
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
56/37
57/39
Harrisburg
59/45
Atlantic City
64/50
New York City
63/48
Syracuse
54/31
Pottsville
56/42
Albany
58/32
Binghamton
Towanda
55/33
57/35
State College
55/40
Poughkeepsie
61/37
81/66
45/39
47/32
71/49
28/26
60/53
55/47
43/36
32/18
42/34
63/48
52/35
69/55
82/72
83/70
82/71
20/18
17/2
63/51
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 6:57a 4:41p
Tomorrow 6:58a 4:40p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 1:20a 1:31p
Tomorrow 2:32a 2:03p
New First Full New
Nov. 25 Dec. 2 Dec. 10 Dec. 24
Cloudy skies and
rain showers will
be in the fore-
cast for the next
few days. This
morning will be
cloudy and
breezy. On
Monday, we will
have cloudy con-
ditions with the
chance of show-
ers late in the
day. Clouds and
rain will stick
around all day
Tuesday. We
could see a few
flurries early
Wednesday
morning with a
mix of rain. The
day should warm
up and skies will
begin clearing in
the afternoon.
The sun returns
on Thursday,
making it a cool
morning. The
sun will stick
around through
the weekend
with partly
cloudy condi-
tions.
- Michelle Rotella
NATIONAL FORECAST: A cold front will generate showers in the interior Northeast today, with some
of the rain changing to snow later in the day. Rainfall will be heavier from the Ohio Valley to the
southern Plains where thunderstorms are also expected. A Pacific storm off the coast of California
will bring wet weather to much of that state with snow expected in the Sierra Nevada.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport
Temperatures
Heating Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Cloudy
MONDAY
Cloudy,
late
showers
50°
38°
WEDNESDAY
Early
rain,
late sun
48°
43°
THURSDAY
Mostly
sunny
48°
27°
FRIDAY
Partly
sunny
50°
33°
SATURDAY
Partly
cloudy
55°
47°
TUESDAY
Rain,
clouds
53°
39°
57
°
36
°
C M Y K
BUSINESS S E C T I O N D
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011
timesleader.com
W
ith the high holidays of con-
sumption beginning this week,
it’s a good time to examine a
couple of commonly held beliefs that
seem to encourage opening our wallets
as an exercise in patriotism.
First up is the seemingly unavoidable
statement that “consumer spending is
about 70 percent of the U.S. economy.”
Unless stripped out by editors — I try
my hardest — you will read something
like this is in nearly every national
story about retail sales, gross domestic
product or other of the myriad reports
that pour out of Washington weekly. Is
it true?
No, says Michael Mandel, Chief
Economic Strategist for the Progres-
sive Policy Institute and former chief
economist for Business Week maga-
zine. He points out that the outlays
that go into government estimates of
consumer spending include lots of stuff
that isn’t, such as Medicare and Med-
icaid, which are in fact government
spending, or money spent by nonprofit
organizations and political campaigns.
Does it matter?
“This is not harmless,” Mandel told
me this week, because, “This leads to
thinking about the economy the wrong
way.”
And that leads to what Mandel con-
tends is a myth: “You cannot have
growth unless the consumer is spend-
ing.”
The kind of spending matters, too,
Mandel believes. When you carry that
new television out of Best Buy this
weekend, you will have supported the
domestic economy to the extent that
some of the profit is converted to the
salary of the helpful salesperson; he or
she will take that money and perhaps
spend some on lunch. If enough people
do that, the restaurant may be able to
hire additional wait staff, and their
spending may help the local jeweler.
And on and on.
That’s great, but what about the
money Best Buy pays to the overseas
manufacturer? That, Mandel contends,
is lost to our economy, even though the
entire purchase price is counted in
GDP.
Strip out the items that don’t belong
in the category and adjust for imported
goods and Mandel says consumer
spending comes in at around 40 per-
cent of the economy, a figure that is
consistent with what other 70-percent
skeptics say, and more in line with
other developed nations.
So if indiscriminate spending won’t
drive the economy, what will? Mandel
says production, an area that has been
getting far too little attention, possibly
because there’s such a focus on goosing
spending. “What we want to do is
spend on things that add to produc-
tion,” he said, and that’s not limited to
factories.
Research and development and edu-
cation, which he terms an investment
in future earnings, fit the category. A
barber cutting hair is production; build-
ing a shopping mall that sells largely
imported goods is not.
Mandel goes one step further, and
what he says rings true to my post-
World War II ears; “People have to start
thinking of their primary role as pro-
ducers” rather than consumers. That’s
what I grew up with, and if I didn’t get
the message from my Depression-era
parents it rang through loud and clear
in President John F. Kennedy’s chal-
lenge to “ask not what your country
can do for you” exhortation.
Does this mean we’d be better off as
a nation of misers? Or course not, but
when your heart begins to race at the
thought of that big screen hanging on
your living room wall, it might be wise
to make sure buying it doesn’t put you
in the hole.
Borrowing the money we spend is a
formula that will bring ruin in record
time, and already has for too many
Americans.
RON BARTIZEK
B U S I N E S S L O C A L
Spending fine,
as long as we
have the cash
Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor,
may be reached at rbartizek@timeslead-
er.com or 570-970-7157.
BLACK FRIDAY IS
approaching and that
means retailers will
be putting out their
best sales of the
season on big-ticket
items to lure custom-
ers to their registers.
The Black Friday ads will be in The
Times Leader throughout the week,
mainly on Thanksgiving day, but I can
offer you a sneak peak, obtained
through a variety of sources, on what
you can expect when you brave the
cold and dark Thursday night or Fri-
day morning.
Here’s a store-by-store look at the
best offers:
• Walmart will have an Emerson 40-
inch, 1080p resolution, 60 Hz, LCD
television for $248. If 30 inches is
more your size, the stores have the
same brand’s 720p resolution LCD
television for $188. The store Walmart
also will start selling Amazon Kindle’s
for $79 when its Black Friday electron-
ics sale kicks off at 12:01 a.m.
• Best Buy also has a great deal on
televisions. Line up early to snag a
Sharp 42 inch LCD1080p HDTV for
$199.99. And when I say early, I mean
on Thursday morning, since doors
open at midnight. The store will pass
out tickets for its big sales items two
hours before doors open. If you really
want to go big, get an LG 3.7 cubic
feet, nine-cycle front-load washing
machine or 7.3 cubic feet, nine-cycle
electric dryer for $549.99 each.
They’re typically $999.99 apiece.
• Lowe’s opens at 5 a.m. Friday and
has a Whirlpool 3.4 cubic foot high
efficiency washer and 7 cubic foot
front loading electric dryer for $698,
total.
• HH Gregg also has a washer dryer
special when doors open at midnight.
Get a Maytag 3.5 cubic foot washer
and 6.7 cubic foot electric dryer for
$699.99. If something a bit smaller is
in order, get a Sony 14.1 megapixel
digital camera with 4x optical zoom
for $49.99 after mail-in rebate. They
retail for $119.99.
• Kohl’s has its entire stock of toys
50 percent off. Doors open at mid-
night and the sale runs to 1 p.m. Fri-
day. Also for kids, the entire stock of
Jumping Beans hooded bath towel
wraps, typically $29.99, is on sale for
$7.99.
• JC Penney opens at 4 a.m. and if
toys are your thing, then head there.
All Fisher Price, Nerf and Fisher-Price
toys regularly priced between $12.99
to $19.99 are on sale for $3.99. The
sale lasts until items sell out or 1 p.m.
And don’t forget, as they’ve done for
years, the first few hundred shoppers
at each location will get a free Disney
collectable snow globe just for stop-
ping in.
• Toys R Us and Babies R Us have
its brand diapers, the value box size,
on sale for $10 with a limit of four.
Doors open Thursday night at 9 and
the sale runs through 1 p.m. Friday.
Not only are these boxes typically
twice that price but they also contain
$38 worth of coupons.
• If it’s an XBOX 4GB, 360 game
system you seek, to Target you should
go. Pay $139.99 when the doors open
Friday at midnight. Get Cars 2 or
Transformers Dark Side of the Moon
on DVD while you’re there for $13.
• If you prefer PlayStation 3, then
Kmart should be your destination at 5
a.m. Friday. The system, plus games
included in the special holiday pack, is
on sale for $199.99 as part of the retail-
er’s Blue Friday sales event. Supplies
are limited.
STEALS AND DEALS
A N D R E W M . S E D E R
Big-ticket items hot commodities during Black Friday shopping
Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff
writer, will be out and about on Black Friday
talking with shoppers. If you’re heading out
and are willing to be interviewed for a story,
send an email to aseder@timesleader.com.
HANNOVER, Germany — Wear
Milk? Anke Domaske says why not.
The 28-year-old German is the de-
signer of an award-winning newtextile
made entirely frommilk that’s environ-
mentally friendly as well as soothing to
people with skin allergies. Called
“Qmilch,” it drapes and folds like silk,
but can be washed and dried like cot-
ton.
The biochemist and fashion design-
er has so far used the fabric only to
make dresses for her ownMCCfashion
line. But next year Domaske has plans
tobeginmass producing—andseveral
companies have already expressed in-
terest in using the fabric.
Qmilch — a combination of quality
and the German word for milk — won
the innovation award of Germany’s
Textile Research Association, which
recognized it as a new, sustainable fi-
ber that could revolutionize the cloth-
ing industry.
Currently, apparel depends heavily
on byproducts from oil, or natural re-
sources such as water — used in the
thousands of gallons to produce just a
bolt of cotton.
“We know that everything that is
based on oil has a limit, that materials
likecottonthat takeupalot of land, wa-
ter and chemicals are limited, so we
need to think about how we can pro-
duce fabrics and textiles in the future,”
said Klaus Jansen, who heads the Tex-
tile Research Association.
“She has showed us how this can
work.”
Tatjana Berthold, a seamstress for
Domaske’s MCC fashion line has been
These milk duds do a body good
By MELISSA EDDY
Associated Press
See MILK, Page 4D
ROME — They line up at soup
kitchens by the thousands. Individu-
al debt is rising, savings are eroding
and many young people have simply
given up, staying home without
studying or even looking for a job.
They are Italy’s invisible poor, un-
seen by tourists, ignored by the coun-
try’s fat-cat politicians and living in a
reality that’s a far cry from former
Premier Silvio Berlusconi’s descrip-
tion of an affluent country where “the
restaurants are full.”
Or in the words of Francesa Zucca-
ri, who runs a soup kitchen in Rome:
“There is another city out there
where people can’t get to the end of
the month.”
This is the Italy facing Mario Mon-
ti, the economics professor tapped to
form an interim technocratic govern-
ment after Berlusconi was forced to
resign last weekend. International
markets andthe EuropeanCommuni-
ty decided the 75-year-old media mo-
gul lacked the political clout to enact
needed reforms to head off a debt cri-
sis and get the economy moving.
Monti wonsupport fromItaly’s two
largest parties, but the question re-
mains whether politicians will back
his expected painful reformmeasures
at the risk of social peace.
On the one hand, Italy’s elite manu-
facturers are girding for an increase
in luxury exports and some wealthy
Italians are looking to move their
money into the real-estate markets in
New York, Miami and Paris.
On the other, the state statistics in-
stitute ISTAT says 8 million Italians,
almost 14 percent of the population,
are living in “relative poverty.”
While tourists may not see the
poor as they visit Tuscany’s rolling
hills, Venice’s waterways or the Amal-
fi coast’s picturesque villages, they
are increasingly visible on Italian city
streets.
Many Italians have begun taking
their money out of banks, fearing re-
ports that measures to help fight the
sovereign debt crisis might include
deductions from bank accounts, as
was done in the 1990s.
AP PHOTO
Customers look for bargains at a
street market in Milan, Italy.
Poor side
of Italy’s
population
See POOR, Page 5D
By COLLEEN BARRY
Associated Press
B
arely15months after a$54
million stock sale that
made it the only company
based in Wilkes-Barre
with publicly traded
shares, the executives running Penn
Millers Holding Corp. were worried.
At a Jan. 26, 2011 board meeting to
review business plans for the coming
year, managers suggested a newprod-
uct line was not a good long-term fit
for the company built on providing in-
surance to the agricultural industry.
Independent directors were con-
cerned about the insurer’s “lack of
scale,” a market that was holding
downpremiumprices andpressure on
the bottom line from expenses associ-
ated with being a small public compa-
ny. The discussion was colored by the
company’s failure to meet perform-
ance goals in two of the previous three
years. When the meeting broke up it
was agreed the challenges facing the
company demanded immediate atten-
tion.
These and other observations that
followaretakenfromdocuments Penn
Millers filedinSeptember withthe Se-
curities and Exchange Commission
about its proposed merger with the
much larger ACEAmerican Insurance
Co. The company’s report onthe back-
ground of the merger reveals a man-
agement group rushing to complete
the deal — which was not a merger
but a sale — in the face of ballooning
claims, a persistent “soft market” for
premium price increases, potentially
hostile investors and the threat of a
downgrade in its investment quality
rating.
The tone is far different from the
confidence expressed in the prospec-
tus for the stock sale in October 2009.
“We believe we are positioning the
companytotakeadvantageof theprof-
itable growth opportunities we antici-
pate will occur when prices increase
during the hard market,” the docu-
ment read.
A “hard market” is one in which in-
surers findit easytoraisepremiums. A
soft market is the opposite. The insur-
ance business usually moves in cycles
between the two, but the financial cri-
sis that began in 2007 disrupted the
typical pattern.
Company CEO Douglas Gaudet
saidat thetimehewas confident every
one of the 6,095,000 shares being of-
fered at $10 each would be sold. That,
Gaudet said, wouldprovidethecapital
needed for Penn Millers to grow.
Mounting concerns
At the next meeting, held on March
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Penn Millers Insurance, headquarted on North Franklin Street in Wilkes-Barre, is being sold to Swiss-based ACE Ltd.
Making of a deal
Penn Millers’ directors pressed sale of insurer
By RON BARTIZEK rbartizek@timesleader.com
See PENN, Page 2D
Unexpected losses, weak
performance, ‘soft’ price
market pushed decision.
C M Y K
PAGE 2D SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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David Wright, Trucksville, has been
named Employ-
ee of the
Month for
November at
Golden Tech-
nologies,
Scooters De-
partment in
Kingston. He
was selected
because of his excellent attend-
ance record, cooperative atti-
tude and attention to quality.
John E. Koury, Principal and Vice
President of
The Quandel
Group Inc., a
local construc-
tion firm, was
recently nomi-
nated to serve
on the Board of
Directors for
the Modern
Transit Partnership. John’s
three-year term begins in Janu-
ary 2012.
Katarzyna Kwiatkowski of Kem-
per Insurance has obtained the
CPCU designation. Insurance
professionals who earn the
CPCU designation must pass
rigorous examinations, meet
experience
requirements
and agree to
be bound by a
strict code of
professional
ethics.
Psychologist
Jeffrey Fremont, Forty Fort, has
been nominated by Pennsylvania
Gov. Tom Corbett to the State
Board of Psychology. The nomi-
nation must be approved by the
state Senate.
PNC Financial Services Group
recently inducted new members
into its 25 Year Club. This year, 12
employees joined the more than
100 current active members of
the club. Inductees are Terri A.
Bissol, Lawrence J. Crimi, Jane
L. Deiter, Roseann Dymond,
Stephanie M. Fulton, Karen A.
Geraets, Candice K. Ide, Ray-
mond F. Lowery Jr., Linda D.
Mader, Gretchen L. Mamon,
Barbara E. Narvid and Mark
Voionmaa.
HONORS & AWARDS
Wright
Koury
Kwiatkowski
Submit announcements of business
honors and awards to Business
Awards by email to tlbusiness@time-
sleader.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250; or by fax
to (570) 829-5537. Photos in jpg
format may be attached to email.
POOLING, FAIR OR FORCED:
Tuesday, 7-9 p.m., at the Tunk-
hannock Middle School audi-
torium, 200 Franklin Ave. Terry
Engelder, Professor of Ge-
oscience at The Pennsylvania
State University and a propo-
nent of pooling natural gas
interests, will explain the tech-
nical processes that are at work
and why it makes sense to
implement fair/forced pooling.
Call 570-836-3196 for more
information.
LANDLORDS HELPING LAND-
LORDS: Nov. 29, 7:30 p.m.,
Ramada Inn on Public Square,
Wilkes-Barre. Constable Larry
Karis will discuss a constable’s
role in regards to landlords and
tenants. $10 at the door or dues
of $60 yearly. Call 570-240-
6475 or email benjamin_cor-
by@hotmail.com for more
information.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
DEVELOPMENT FORUM: Nov.
29, 8:30 a.m.-noon, Marywood
University, Nazareth Student
Center, 2300 Adams Ave.,
Scranton. Learn the benefits of
growing internationally and
about assistance available from
the federal and state govern-
ment. Free, continental break-
fast included. Register by Nov.
23; call 570-207-2881 or 1-877-
346-5721.
GREATER HAZLETON BUSI-
NESSPERSONS HOLIDAY
MIXER: Dec. 8, 5-7 p.m., Drag-
onfly Cafe, 9 E. Broad St. Hors
d’oeuvres and drinks included in
$10 per person fee. Proceeds
benefit downtown improvement
activities. For reservations, call
570-455-1509 by Dec. 5.
BUSINESS AGENDA
Send announcements of upcoming
events by e-mail to tlbusiness@time-
sleader.com; by mail to Business
Agenda, Times Leader, 15 N. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711 or by fax to
829-5537. Include a contact phone
number and e-mail address. The
submission deadline is Wednesday
for publication on Sunday.
EASTERN PENN SUPPLY
COMPANY
Marc Malvizzi has been named
vice president-elect of the East-
ern Region.
Malvizzi has
been in the
industry for 27
years and has
served the
National Asso-
ciation of
Electrical
Distributors
Eastern Region
Council since 2008.
METZ CULINARY
MANAGEMENT
Jim Dickson has been promoted
to Senior Vice President of
Corporate Dining, Higher Educa-
tion, Independent and K-12
Schools. Previously, he was Vice
President of the Corporate
Dining and Higher Education
divisions.
Vanessa Weaver has been promot-
ed to Director of Marketing and
Sales. Weaver develops market-
ing programs and promotional
materials that benefit clients
ranging from K-12 schools, higher
education facilities, hospitals
and restaurants.
ALLIED SERVICES
Charlotte Wright, Moscow, recent-
ly joined the rehabilitation hospi-
tal as a business and corporate
development
coordinator,
and is working
with the Foun-
dation as well
as Vocational
Services. For
three years
before joining
Allied, she
worked at the
American Red Cross of Lacka-
wanna County, most recently as
Director of Community Affairs.
CORPORATE LADDER
Malvizzi
Wright
23, 2011, management and the
board were looking in opposite
directions. Gaudet and Chief Fi-
nancial Michael O. Banks, noting
that PennMillers had$20million
in excess capital beyond what
was needed for operations, sug-
gested either returning the mon-
eytoinvestors or usingit tomake
an acquisition.
But directors, concerned that
performance projections were in-
adequate, questioned whether
thecompanyshouldremaininde-
pendent. Management was in-
structed to study both acquisi-
tion opportunities and to com-
pare the value of remaining inde-
pendent with “linking up with a
strategic partner.”
As would several more meet-
ings, this one endedwithanexec-
utive session from which man-
agement was excluded.
Two developments in April
would push the board to look
more closely at selling the com-
pany. On April 21, Gaudet and
Banks learned that Penn Miller’s
A- financial strength rating from
A.M. Best would likely be af-
firmed, but with a “negative out-
look” due to the company’s low
profitability compared to a peer
group of larger firms. Any reduc-
tion in the rating could lead to
higher borrowing and reinsu-
rance costs.
Then, on April 29, a private eq-
uity fund with a history of at-
tempting hostile takeovers dis-
closed that it had purchased ap-
proximately 8 percent of Penn
Millers’ outstanding shares.
In response, at a May 9 meet-
ing the board decided to retain
the law firm of Ballard Spahr as
special counsel to independent
directors and to seek a financial
advisor. By mid-May the board
contracted with Willis Capital
Markets &Advisory andappoint-
ed a special committee of five di-
rectors – Heather Acker, F. Ken-
neth Ackerman Jr., Dorrance Be-
lin, Donald Pfizer and John Cole-
man – to work with them and
Ballard.
An intense series of meetings
followed; by May 21 Willis had
developed a list of 27 potential
buyers. Some pressure was re-
lieved when Best, after being in-
formed of the company’s poten-
tial sale, affirmed Penn Millers’
A- rating with a stable outlook.
On May 27, for the first time, the
boarddiscussedatimelinefor the
sale process.
By mid-June Willis had con-
tacted 49 potential buyers and
several of them had indicated in-
terest in buying Penn Millers. A
month later, six potential bids
had been received, with valua-
tions between$15.95 and$22 per
share, all hefty premiums over
the $10 initial offering price.
“Significant” catastrophic loss-
es in the second quarter and a
continued challenging sales mar-
ket led the special committee to
reaffirmits recommendationthat
“a sale appeared to be the best al-
ternative to prevent destruction
of shareholder value …” By early
August a final bid deadline of the
25th was set.
Concerned that word of an im-
pending deal would leak, the
company issued a statement on
August 15 saying Penn Millers
was reviewing strategic alterna-
tives “aimed at enhancing share-
holder value.” The statement ac-
knowledgedthe company’s small
size, the soft market for premi-
ums and increased catastrophic
storm activity.
Final push
Management made one last at-
tempt to sway the board toward
independence. At an August 20
meeting, Gaudet presented a
planthat calledfor major restruc-
turing, expense reductions and
significant cuts in staffing. Com-
mittee members were not im-
pressed; they believed the plan
would not provide much value
and carried high risks to share-
holders.
By August 26 PennMillers had
received three bids, with ACE of-
fering$20per share incash. “Bid-
der B” offered a cash bid of
$18.50-$19 per share, subject to
further reviewof PennMillers’ re-
cords, and “Bidder C” offered
$20.75 per share, subject to a 30-
day due diligence period.
Despite not being the highest
bid, the committee believed ACE
was the best partner because of
its ability to fund the acquisition
fromoperating funds rather than
by borrowing. Swiss-based ACE
is one of the largest insurance
companies in the world and has
its main U.S. operations in Phila-
delphia.
Now facing more losses in the
aftermath of Hurricane Irene,
Penn Millers’ management and
board decided to pursue a deal
with ACE, which seemed far bet-
ter prepared to consummate a
merger andhadgivenassurances
it would maintain the company’s
Wilkes-Barre location, where
about 100 people worked.
ACE asked for a four-week ex-
clusive negotiating period; Willis
suggested cutting that to a week.
ACE agreed and raised its bid to
$21per share, which was later re-
duced to $20.45 in light of claims
caused by the storms and other
expenses.
Penn Millers countered with
an agreement at $20.75 per
share, but on Sept. 7 ACE pre-
sented a final bid of $20.50. See-
ing no better alternative, the
board accepted the offer and an-
nounced the agreement with
ACE on Sept. 8.
The next day, A.M. Best an-
nounced it was reviewing Penn
Millers’ rating with positive im-
plications.
Ironically, in their remarks
about the takeover, ACE officials
said on Sept. 30 that the pricing
climate had strengthened in the
June-September quarter, and the
company had been able to im-
poserateincreases of about 3per-
cent in many of its lines. On Oct.
26, the company raisedits annual
profit estimate by 9 percent.
Completion of the transaction
is expected in the first quarter of
2012. At the bid price sharehol-
ders will have doubled their in-
vestment inalittlemorethantwo
years.
Key officers will make out even
better. In addition to the share
priceappreciationGaudet, Banks
and six other officers will share
$8.1 million in “golden para-
chute” payments triggered by a
change in control of the compa-
ny.
Banks declined to comment
for thisarticleandGaudet didnot
respond to an interview request.
PENN
Continued from Page 1D
Ron Bartizek, Times Leader busi-
ness editor, may be reached at
570-970-7157.
Read the Penn Millers merger
proxy at www.timesleader.com
ON THE WEB
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 3D
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ROCK HILL, Mo. — Bobby
Tessler’s temper sizzled just as
much as his chicken wings as he
stood over his deep fryers and
thought about the money that re-
cently greased the pockets of
thieves instead of his own.
Sinceheopenedhis business St.
Louis Wing Co. in April, thieves
have siphoned hundreds of
pounds of grease froma container
behindhisbusiness, deprivinghim
of about $2,000 that a grease ren-
dering company would have paid
him.
“It’sabigdeal. There’sahugeun-
dergroundout there for this stuff,”
he said.
Grease thefts have been on the
rise since the introduction of bio-
fuels to the market once dominat-
ed by animal feed and soap indus-
tries. Combating the thefts is diffi-
cultbecausethepenaltiesaremini-
mal despite environmental and
financial concerns, said Tom
Cook, president of the National
Renderers Association.
“Othershavesaidthat thisislike
the new copper,” Cook said.
“These thieves are getting more
sophisticated. It’s a multimillion-
dollar business for them.”
Tessler knew something was
amiss after he calledhis rendering
company to ask why he had not
beenpaidfor thegreasehehadput
in their container during the first
six months he was open.
“Theytoldusour container nev-
er had anything in it,” he said.
He called police, who then spot-
ted three teenagers removing
grease from Tessler’s restaurant
and other restaurants in the early
hours of Sept. 26. “It’s a crime that
nobody really cares about,” said
John Kostelac, who co-owns Kos-
telacGreaseServicewithhisbroth-
er, Jim Kostelac. “When copper
thieves get caught they are sent to
prison, but when somebody gets
caught stealing grease, they get a
slap on the hand and are turned
loose and are out stealing again.”
Kostelac saidhis drivers cantell
when a business has been hit be-
cause the thieves often leave a
greasy mess behind. They usually
have 1,000-gallon tanks on trucks
anddo not carry cleaning supplies
withthemincaseof aspill, hesaid.
It’s also hardto estimate the val-
ue of the stolen grease. It is a com-
modity; the purer the product, the
more it is worth, Kostelac said.
“Most people think, ‘Oh, that
stuff isn’t important because no-
body gets hurt,’ so they don’t wor-
ryaboutit,”Kostelacsaid. “Butitis
a big concern when they’re steal-
ing your material. We employ 20
people, and it’s hurting their job,
and it’s lost revenue for the restau-
rant.”
Tessler said the company that
buys his grease pays him$1.15 per
gallon. He estimates that he uses
about 60to70gallonsof greaseper
week.
Nationally, Cook said grease is
selling for about 40 to43 cents per
pound, or roughly $3 per gallon.
“Whenit usedtobe15 cents per
pound, they weren’t stealing it,”
Cook said.
Slick thieves steal grease from restaurants
By CHRISTINE BYERS
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
MCT PHOTO
Bobby Tessler, owner of St. Louis Wing Co. restaurant in Rock Hill,
Mo., fries chicken wings. Tessler, who uses around 70 gallons of
cooking oil per week, estimates he has lost around $2,000 in
income from spent grease that was stolen from the container
behind his restaurant.
“When copper thieves get caught they are sent to
prison, but when somebody gets caught stealing
grease, they get a slap on the hand and are turned
loose and are out stealing again.”
John Kostelac
Co-owner of Kostelac Grease Service
C M Y K
PAGE 4D SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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cutting and sewing the fabric in-
to dresses for the past year.
“At first I didnot believe that it
was made from milk, but when
you work with it, you notice that
it feels different fromnormal fab-
rics,” said Berthold. She cast Do-
maske a sly sideways glance,
then confessed to have privately
made a pair of pajamas from a
scrap she had been given.
“When you look it, you can’t
see such a big difference, but
when you wear it, you feel the
difference,” Berthold said.
The quest for a natural, non-ir-
ritating fabric began after watch-
ing her stepfather suffer through
terrible skin irritations while be-
ingtreatedfor cancer. “There are
so many people who really suffer
just by wearing normal clothing.
I wanted to find a way to help
them.”
She focused her research on
milk protein, or casein. Al-
though textiles made with milk
fibers have been around since
the 1930s, she said most of them
relied heavily on acrylics.
“I thought it must be possible
tomake a fabric that is complete-
ly organic,” said Domaske.
After two years of trial and er-
ror, working with a research lab,
Domaske and her team of six fi-
nally landed on a process of re-
ducing milk to a protein powder
that is then boiled and pressed
into strands that can be woven
into a fabric.
The strands, she says, can be
spun rougher for a heavier tex-
ture, or shiny smooth, to create a
soft jersey that drapes and feels
like silk.
She uses only organic milk
that cannot be consumed be-
cause it has failed Germany’s
strict quality standards.
Domaskeconcedes that at (eu-
ro) 20 ($28) per kilogram (2.2
pounds), her fabric costs moreto
produce than even organic cot-
ton, which goes for about 40 per-
cent less. But she hopes local
productionwill keepdowntrans-
port costs and reduce the overall
price.
She also notes that only a half
gallon of water is needed to pro-
duce 1 kilogram of fabric,
enoughtomakeseveral standard
dresses. By comparison, the
same amount of cotton requires
more than 10,000 liters of water.
Lynda Grose, a consultant and
associate professor at the Cali-
fornia College of the Arts in Oak-
land, California, who specializes
in ecologically responsible de-
sign, notes that the fashion in-
dustry is dependent on the idea
of disposal, of people always
wanting new designs.
“There is a tremendous
amount of waste in the fashion
world,” Grosesaidina telephone
interview. She noted that by
rethinking how such waste can
be used will help make the fash-
ion and textile industry more ec-
ologically friendly.
MILK
Continued from Page 1D
AP PHOTO
German fashion designer Anke
Domaske, 28, is the designer
of an award-winning new tex-
tile made entirely from milk.
BOSTON—Baby boomers ful-
ly embraced the stock market by
riding its ups and downs through-
out their peak income years.
But now that the oldest boom-
ers are turning 65, their focus has
turned toward ensuring a steady
income from their investments.
And they’re likely to find the an-
swer is to put money in bonds
rather than stocks, as recent mar-
ket volatility shows.
Consider that bonds have made
stock returns look puny in recent
years. Broadly diversified bond
mutual fundshaveprovidedinves-
tors an average annualized return
of nearly 5.6 percent over the past
five years. That’s better than all of
the domestic stock fund catego-
ries that Morningstar tracks.
Withretirement just aroundthe
corner for such a sizeable popula-
tion, it’s understandable that in-
vestors have deposited a net $670
billion into bond mutual funds
since January 2009, while consis-
tently pulling their money out of
stock funds. Fidelity Investments
says its clients alone have added
$100 billion in new cash to bond
investments over the past three
years.
But dothestock-savvyboomers
and others who have flocked to
fixed-income investments really
understand bond investing, and
the potential risks and rewards?
Many fund companies believe
there’s a pressing need for inves-
tors to bone up on their bond ba-
sics, so the companies are putting
more resources into the invest-
ment products that have been
drawingthe most newcash. Fidel-
ity upgraded its online resources
for bond investors in September,
and Nuveen Investments made a
similar move this month.
It’s a recognition that bonds are
more complex than stocks, with
more moving parts that influence
investment returns — yield,
price, and interest rates, for start-
ers.
Interest rates are perhaps the
most critical risk for bond inves-
tors now. Short-term rates are
near zero, andhave nowhere togo
but up. Whentheyeventuallyrise,
if the economic recovery really
gets going, expect to see lower
bond returns and possibly losses.
The economy is growing so
slowly that interest rates aren’t
likely to spike in the short run.
Any increase would be unwel-
come for investors.
“It’s a phenomenon that bond
fund investors haven’t faced in a
very long time,” says analyst Lo-
ren Fox of the fund industry con-
sultancy Strategic Insight. “Some
will be surprised and disappoint-
ed when it happens.” Indeed, in-
vestors have become accustomed
to declining rates for the better
part of 30 years.
Boomers flock to bonds,
but do they know basics?
By MARK JEWELL
AP Personal Finance Writer
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 5D
➛ B U S I N E S S
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Q: I seem to be at a crossroads
in my career. My boss recently
told me that I am on track to be-
come a partner in our firmin two
to three years. However, my hus-
bandandI arealsoreadytostart a
family. If I have a baby, I’m not
sure how I will feel about contin-
uing to work full-time.
Although cutting back to 20 or
30 hours a week would not be a
problem financially, I’m afraid it
might endanger my ability to
make partner. All of our partners
are men who work very long
hours and may not understand
my need for a reduced schedule.
Ideally, I would like to have
both a successful career and time
with my family. Does that seem
possible or will I have to give
something up?
A: I wish I could say that, pre-
sented with the proper persua-
sive arguments, your industrious
male colleagues will warmly em-
brace the idea of keeping you on
the partner track with fewer
hours. However, that wouldprob-
ably be a trip to Fantasyland.
In the type of firm you de-
scribe, senior partners typically
expect younger associates to
“earn their stripes” by racking up
lots of billable time. Unless your
skills are irreplaceable, simply
raising the issue of a lighter
schedule could dampen your ca-
reer prospects. That may not be
fair, but it’s often true.
For better work-life balance,
consider finding a firmwitha his-
tory of promoting women who
have children. When you are jug-
gling the demands of work and
motherhood, a more family-
friendly environment will be
much less stressful.
Q: After a recent meeting, my
boss called me into his office and
slammedthedoor. Hegot right in
my face, backed me against the
wall, and said, “Don’t ever make
another comment like the one
you just made in that meeting.”
When I stated that I was only
expressing my personal opinion
on a business issue, he shook his
finger at me and repeated, “Don’t
ever, ever do that again.” His an-
ger scared me, so I left quickly.
In the three years that we have
worked together, nothing like
this has ever happened before.
DoyouthinkI shoulddiscuss this
withmyboss or just report himto
human resources?
A: Regardless of what you said,
your manager’s aggressive reac-
tion was completely inexcusable.
But since this is one isolated in-
cident in a three-year relation-
ship, you should probably give
him a chance to explain.
For example: “Bob, we’ve
worked together for a long time,
so I was really taken aback when
you got so angry with me the oth-
er day. To be perfectly honest, I
was rather frightened. Can you
help me understand what was so
upsetting?”
No matter what he says, listen
calmly without arguing or debat-
ing. An apology would be nice,
but that may not happen. Hope-
fully, this unexpected outburst
will be a one-time occurrence,
but if your boss ever threatens
you again, you should definitely
inform human resources.
OFFICE COACH
Future family time may
affect job advancement
By MARIE G. MCINTYRE
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace
coach and the author of “Secrets to
Winning at Office Politics.” Send in
questions and get free coaching tips
at http://www.yourofficecoach.com.
“They are putting it under the
mattress, or even inside empty
wine jugs in the cellars. We are a
country of farmers,” said Elio
Lannutti, president of consumer
protection group Adusbef.
An American service organiza-
tion in Rome asked its members
to spend their Thanksgiving ho-
liday next week making food
packages for the poor. Zuccari
said demand for food parcels had
risen 20 percent in the last few
years, with well-dressed Italians
now joining immigrants in line.
Caritas, the Roman Catholic
church’s charity arm, says grow-
ing numbers of families can’t
meet a surprise expense of euro
700 ($947) without turning to
borrowing.
“What is really dramatic is the
geographic division,” said Cari-
tas’ Walter Nanni, pointing to
figures that Italy’s south remains
severely impoverished.
While only 18 percent of fam-
ilies in the Alpine province of
Trento could not meet such an
unexpected payment for medi-
cal expenses or car repairs, the
figure rises to 48 percent in Sici-
ly.
A gerontocracy dominates Ita-
ly’s key professional posts, mak-
ing workers even well into their
40s still considered up-and-com-
ing. In the highest political cir-
cles, Monti is 68, Berlusconi is
75 and the president of Italy,
Giorgio Napolitano, is 86.
Many younger Italians in
fields like medicine, science and
technology leave for countries
that have more professional op-
portunities and mobility.
And the prospects for those
who have not left are eroding
fast. The Bank of Italy this
month reported that nearly one
in four Italians under 30 — a to-
tal of 2.2 million people — nei-
ther study nor work.
The great majority of the Ital-
ian NEET’s — short for “Not in
Education, Employment or
Training” —live at home with at
least one parent, and a full 25
percent are living in a family
where no one is working, the
bank said.
A university degree does little
to alleviate their plight: A full 20
percent of college graduates are
without a job.
“At least with Monti there is
some hope since he is not a poli-
tician subject to pressure from
the lobbies,” said Francesco Bu-
reca, who graduated from an
elite school but can’t land a job.
But hardline leftists expect no
improvement for Italy’s poor,
even from the new government.
“The Monti government is
born from a mandate of Confin-
dustria (a powerful business lob-
by) and the banks,” said Marco
Ferrando, leader of the tiny
Communist Workers Party.
He called for newprotests. Ita-
ly’s last major economic protest
this fall ended in a bloody riot on
the streets of Rome.
POOR
Continued from Page 1D
“There is another city
out there where people
can’t get to the end of
the month.”
Francesa Zuccari
Who runs a soup kitchen in Rome
C M Y K
PAGE 6D SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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➛ B U S I N E S S
MarketPulse
AP
FEARING FOR FRANCE
Until now, jittery investors have focused on
the debt crisis affecting Greece, Spain and It-
aly. Harris Bank Chief Investment Officer
Jack Ablin says they should worry about
France, too. The widening difference be-
tween the yield on high-quality French bonds
and German bonds is cause for concern,
says Ablin. France is thought of as one of the
large European economies that’s in a posi-
tion to help its teetering neighbors. But some
doubt the country’s own debt quality. Stan-
dard & Poor’s issued a downgrade to France
on Nov. 10, but then said that it had done so
by mistake. S&P maintained the country’s
Triple-A debt rating. Ablin said the clerical er-
ror reveals that S&P is preparing to take
some type of action on France. If France’s
debt lost its Triple-A rating, the bailout fund
would be dealt a severe blow.
SOMETHING’S FISHY IN
UTAH
Utah’s next big industry: Gold-
fish crackers. Demand for the
cheddar-flavored snack has
been rising says Pepperidge
Farm, the division of Campbell
Soup Co. that produces the
crackers. The company is
beefing up its Goldfish pres-
ence in Utah. Pepperidge
Farm will create 54 new jobs at
its cracker factory in rural Rich-
mond. Some other states
might also benefit from future
Goldfish growth: Pepperidge
Farm has Goldfish-producing
facilities in Pennsylvania, Flori-
da and Ohio that it’s consider-
ing expanding as well.
JEANS BLUES
The incoming CEO of teen retailer
American Eagle Outfitters knows jeans,
but can he turn around a stock on pace
to fall for the fourth time in five years?
American Eagle last week said Robert
Hanson would be its new boss, effective
Jan. 30. As global president of the
Levi’s brand, he has experience selling
clothes. But he wasn’t running a big re-
tailer, Nomura analyst Paul Lejuez
wrote in a report. Levi’s has only about
500 company-owned retail stores;
American Eagle has more than double
that in North America alone. Hanson al-
so didn’t have to deal with the challeng-
es of running a publicly traded compa-
ny: Levi’s is privately held. Lejuez says
Hanson’s background is solid, but the
transition could be bumpy.
Price-earnings ratio: 14
(based on last 12 mos.)
Market value: $10.8m
Dividend yield: 3.4%
Target price: $34.30
Avg. broker rating:
BUY SELL HOLD
52-week price range
$29.69 $35.66
$33.65
Friday’s close
SOURCE: FactSet SOURCE: FactSet
Price-earnings ratio: 16
(based on last 12 mos.)
Market value: $2.7m
Dividend yield: 3.2%
Target price: $13.93
Avg. broker rating:
BUY SELL HOLD
52-week price range
$10.00 $17.37
$13.60
Friday’s close
Rich Howard is more interested in
a stock when it’s beaten down than
when it’s soaring. That’s one rea-
son why he likes gold miners, even
though many are down this year
when gold’s price is up 20 percent.
The strategy has helped his Pros-
pector Capital Appreciation
(PCAFX) fund return 18 percent
annually over the last three years.
Is owning
miners a
way to in-
vest in gold
without
having to
pay the
high price
for the met-
al itself?
Gold was
close to
$600 when
we started
the fund (in 2007 and is now about
$1,700 per ounce). Gold mining
stocks, we haven’t had much profit
from them. I think gold miners
have a couple things going for
them: They could do well just be-
cause they catch up with gold pric-
es. They could do well because
credit problems come up (which
would drive up gold prices further),
and they could do well if the dollar
continues to debase (which leads
to higher gold prices), and I think
all those things are possible.
I also see that payroll company
Automatic Data Processing is one
of your top holdings. There are
many reasons to dislike it, start-
ing with the weak job market.
That stock had done nothing for
close to 10 years. You don’t have
employment growth, and that hurts
you. And you don’t have high inter-
est rates, and that hurts you a lot,
because they have a three to sev-
en day float where companies pay
into them before they pay it out to
employees. (ADP can take advan-
tage by investing that cash for
those three to seven days.) So by
having short-term interest rates
collapse the way they have, it’s re-
ally hurt their growth.
But they still do gradually add
customers. And it’s real growth: It’s
mostly internal growth. I much pre-
fer internal growth to acquisitions.
Because acquisitions are
expensive?
Because acquisition growth tends
to bring with it cultural problems
and accounting gimmickry and
things like that that end up biting
you as a shareholder. For every
FirstEnergy, which is the only com-
pany I can think of that has done
well growing through acquisitions,
there’s five Enrons.
Why do you own so few banks?
I hate banks. You just have no idea
what’s going on in a bank. There
are plenty of people who say they
know what’s going on in banks, but
they are just way too dangerous.
Does that philosophy stretch
back to 2008, when banks blew
up, or further?
It stretches back to 1971 when I
got my first job. Banks have been
good dividend payers, and people
have made money on them, but I
want no part of them.
DuPont is one of your top hold-
ings, but won’t demand for its
chemicals be hurt by the weak
economy?
DuPont is one company, but there
are two big drivers. There’s the ag-
ricultural driver and the specialty
chemicals. I think the agriculture
economy is going to be so power-
ful for such a long period of time
that it’s worth owning DuPont. And
this is another stock that’s done
nothing for years.
Every year, they become more
powerful in ag (through their seed
production). If you think about how
the world has changed over the
last 10 years, with the tremendous
increase in the standard of living of
China, Brazil, India, people want
decent food. And there’s no more
land, so you gradually have to im-
prove your farming.
Buying low
InsiderQ&A
Howard
Stan Choe Kristen Girard AP
Wild swings in stock prices have many profes-
sional and individual investors sitting out the market.
That has sent daily trading volume sharply lower.
Volume on the New York Stock Exchange has
fallen since mid-October, when Europe’s debt crisis
worsened. Volume is down 15 percent from the 4.9
billion shares it has averaged since the bull market
began March 10, 2009. On Monday, it was down by a
third at 3.2 billion shares.
It’s not just a U.S. phenomenon: Monthly trading
volume of large companies on the Tokyo Stock
Exchange fell last month to 36.1 billion shares, the
lowest level since September 2007. Average daily
trading volume sank to 1.8 billion shares, its lowest
level since August 2010.
“There’s just so much uncertainty that people are
just in a look-and-see” mode, says Jerry Zhang, senior
portfolio manager with Wells Capital Management.
Investors are waiting to see how Europe will
resolve its debt problems. And they want to see if the
U.S. congressional committee named to cut the
budget deficit succeeds by next Wednesday’s
deadline.
The takeaway for investors: Expect light trading to
lead to more volatility. When fewer shares are being
traded, prices can have sharper swings. But keep in
mind that a big drop means you may be able to pick
up the stocks you want more cheaply.
“Those can be opportunities, when people are
frozen, when people are paralyzed, when people are
not trading,” says Richard Ross, global technical
strategist for Auerbach Grayson.
SOURCE: FactSet Data through Nov 14
2011 2010 2009
0
4
8
12 billion shares on NYSE
Trading volume has dropped in November and is well below its average since the bull market began.
Nov. 27, 2009
The day after
Thanksgiving
May 6, 2010 The Dow plunged
600 points in seven minutes in what
was later called the "flash crash."
Volume’s on mute
Average since bull market began on March 10, 2009
Nov. 27, 2010
The day after
Thanksgiving
Dec. 31, 2010
The day before New Year’s
Aug. 8, 2011 Investors
rushed to sell on the
first trading day after
Standard & Poor's
downgraded the U.S.
credit rating.
Dec. 24, 2009
The day before a three-
day Christmas weekend
Air Products APD 72.26 4 98.01 81.08 -5.38 -6.2 t s -10.9 —2.73 3 5.2 14 2.9
Amer Water Works AWK 23.84 9 31.49 30.45 -0.48 -1.6 t s 20.4+31.01 118.3a 17 3.0
Amerigas Part LP APU 36.76 5 51.50 43.68 0.74 1.7 t s -10.5 —1.93 3 12.4 29 6.8
Aqua America Inc WTR 19.28 6 23.79 21.69 -0.57 -2.6 t s -3.5 +6.39 2 0.2 22 3.0
Arch Dan Mid ADM 23.69 4 38.02 28.90 -0.61 -2.1 s s -3.9 —.79 3 -1.6 9 2.4
AutoZone Inc AZO 246.26 9341.89 329.40 -8.26 -2.4 s s 20.8+31.15 1 23.5 17 ...
Bank of America BAC 5.13 1 15.31 5.78 -0.43 -6.9 t t -56.7—50.26 5-27.4 ... 0.7
Bk of NY Mellon BK 17.10 2 32.50 18.92 -2.59 -12.0 t t -37.4—30.81 4 -9.2 9 2.7
Bon Ton Store BONT 3.01 1 17.49 2.83 -0.97 -25.5 t t -77.6—76.50 5-36.8 ... 7.1
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 29.45 9 39.50 38.16 -1.08 -2.8 s s 9.7+25.56 1 6.5 15 1.3
Cigna Corp CI 35.46 4 52.95 42.09 -1.68 -3.8 t s 14.8+15.42 1 0.9 9 0.1
CocaCola KO 61.29 6 71.77 67.39 -0.73 -1.1 t s 2.5 +8.46 2 9.8 12 2.8
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 19.19 3 27.16 21.43 -1.09 -4.8 t s -2.0 +6.28 2 -3.3 15 2.1
Community Bk Sys CBU 21.67 6 28.95 25.69 -0.13 -0.5 s s -7.5+10.16 2 4.2 13 4.0
Community Hlth Sys CYH 14.61 2 42.50 19.35 -2.04 -9.5 s t -48.2—40.30 4-10.6 7 ...
Entercom Comm ETM 4.61 2 13.63 5.54 0.52 10.4 t s -52.2—31.52 4-22.5 5 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 10.25 3 21.02 13.15 -1.37 -9.4 t s -15.8 +3.46 2 -4.4 9 ...
Frontier Comm FTR 5.27 1 9.84 5.30 -0.39 -6.9 t t -45.5—33.52 4 -6.6 35 14.2
Genpact Ltd G 13.09 5 18.16 15.34 -0.95 -5.8 t s 0.9 +5.57 228.1a 21 1.2
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 7.00 4 13.74 9.15 0.02 0.2 s s -28.3—23.98 4-16.2 13 3.5
Heinz HNZ 46.99 6 55.00 51.07 -2.57 -4.8 t t 3.3 +9.84 2 6.2 17 3.8
Hershey Company HSY 45.67 8 60.96 56.38 -0.61 -1.1 t s 19.6+24.03 1 3.5 21 2.4
Kraft Foods KFT 29.80 8 36.30 34.77 -0.80 -2.2 t s 10.3+16.96 1 2.6 19 3.3
Lowes Cos LOW 18.07 6 27.45 23.31 0.20 0.9 s s -7.1+10.03 2 -3.8 17 2.4
M&T Bank MTB 66.40 3 91.05 71.76 -2.15 -2.9 t s -17.6 —4.14 3 -6.8 10 3.9
McDonalds Corp MCD 72.14 9 95.45 92.74 -2.02 -2.1 s s 20.8+20.45 1 19.5 18 3.0
NBT Bncp NBTB 17.05 5 24.98 20.94 -0.92 -4.2 t s -13.3 —4.61 3 -0.1 12 3.8
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 4.25 9 10.28 9.11 -0.23 -2.5 s s 52.1+81.47 1 16.9 ... ...
PNC Financial PNC 42.70 5 65.19 52.69 -1.18 -2.2 t s -13.2 —4.25 3 -2.8 8 2.7
PPL Corp PPL 24.10 9 30.27 29.53 -0.71 -2.3 s s 12.2+19.56 1 1.2 11 4.7
Penn Millers Hldg PMIC 13.16 0 20.63 20.36 0.16 0.8 s s 53.9+53.08 1 ... ... ...
Penna REIT PEI 6.50 3 17.34 9.44 -0.32 -3.3 s t -35.0—25.79 4-16.2 ... 6.4
PepsiCo PEP 58.50 5 71.89 63.89 0.61 1.0 s s -2.2 +1.71 2 3.1 16 3.2
Philip Morris Intl PM 55.85 0 73.46 73.09 1.45 2.0 s s 24.9+27.47 127.7a 15 4.2
Procter & Gamble PG 57.56 6 67.72 63.24 -0.65 -1.0 t s -1.7 +1.99 2 2.4 16 3.3
Prudential Fncl PRU 42.45 3 67.52 48.53 -4.07 -7.7 t s -17.3 —6.13 3 -7.7 6 3.0
SLM Corp SLM 10.91 4 17.11 13.07 -1.13 -8.0 t s 3.8+13.42 2-22.0 14 3.1
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMpB 39.65 1 60.00 41.25 -1.04 -2.5 t t -5.9 ... 0.0 ... 11.2
Southn Union Co SUG 23.60 9 44.65 41.93 -0.19 -0.5 s s 74.2+72.82 1 10.3 21 1.4
TJX Cos TJX 42.55 9 61.71 59.54 -1.80 -2.9 t s 34.1+31.49 1 16.2 17 1.3
UGI Corp UGI 24.07 6 33.53 29.44 0.03 0.1 s s -6.8 +.73 3 4.4 14 3.5
Verizon Comm VZ 31.60 7 38.95 36.46 -1.06 -2.8 t s 1.9+17.68 1 6.9 15 5.5
WalMart Strs WMT 48.31 9 59.40 57.23 -1.97 -3.3 s s 6.1 +8.61 2 5.7 13 2.6
Weis Mkts WMK 36.52 5 42.20 39.29 -0.61 -1.5 s s -2.6 +6.31 2 2.4 15 3.1
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
SOURCE: FactSet
Hot oil
Stock
Screener
Last Wednesday, the price of oil hit $100 a
barrel for the first time since July. Crude is up 12
percent since the beginning of the year. The S&P
500 is down nearly 4 percent.
Most of oil’s rally has happened in the last six
weeks. Oil is up 24 percent since Oct. 6, when
traders regained confidence in
the U.S. economy and stopped
predicting a financial meltdown in
Europe. Without a global slowdown or a second
recession for the U.S., demand for oil is expected
to keep growing.
Energy stocks in the S&P 500 are up 4 percent
in the last month. This screen shows the oil and
gas stocks in the index that have gone up the
most this year. The top stock, Cabot Oil & Gas,
more than doubled. Analysts say Cabot’s produc-
tion could grow more than 55 percent next year
as the company drills in the Marcellus shale de-
posit under Pennsylvania, New York, West Virgin-
ia and Ohio. Analysts polled by FactSet think
Cabot will reach $94.68 in the next two years, a
14.5 percent gain.
Data through Nov 16
Cabot Oil & Gas COG 126.68% $85.19 0.1% $9.0
El Paso EP 80.60 24.71 0.2 19.2
Southern Union SUG 74.62 41.92 1.4 5.2
Gulfport Energy GPOR 64.21 36.18 0.0 1.8
Hornbeck Offshore Services HOS 55.75 32.04 0.0 875.7
CARBO Ceramics CRR 48.89 155.94 0.6 3.6
Helix Energy Solutions Group HLX 45.06 17.12 0.0 1.9
Tesoro TSO 44.82 24.22 0.0 3.7
SM Energy SM 41.85 83.51 0.1 5.3
CLOSE
MARKET
VALUE
IN MILLIONS COMPANY TICKER
YTD
PRICE
CHANGE
DIVIDEND
YIELD
American Funds BalA m ABALX 17.83 -.50 -.7 +4.6/A +2.1/B
American Funds BondA m ABNDX 12.51 -.03 +.8 +4.7/C +3.5/E
American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX 48.50 -.98 -.5 +1.2/B +1.1/C
American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX 31.83 -1.28 -2.1 -7.8/D -.5/B
American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX 35.76 -1.57 -2.2 -12.2/C -.5/A
American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX 34.60 -1.35 -.9 +.1/D +.3/A
American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX 28.45 -1.18 -1.8 -2.2/E -.8/D
American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX 16.31 -.36 -.1 +3.9/A +1.5/C
American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX 26.47 -.99 -.9 -.5/D -1.2/C
American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX 26.15 -1.18 -2.2 -5.5/C +1.1/A
American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX 27.34 -.99 -.4 +7.0/A -.5/B
BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX 18.55 -.57 -.7 -1.2/C +4.2/A
BlackRock GlobAlcC m MCLOX 17.27 -.53 -.7 -1.9/C +3.4/B
BlackRock GlobAlcI d MALOX 18.65 -.57 -.7 -.9/B +4.5/A
Dodge & Cox Income DODIX 13.34 -.03 +.8 +4.1/D +6.3/B
Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX 29.84 -1.46 -4.1 -14.8/D -2.4/A
Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX 98.12 -4.24 -1.8 -2.9/E -4.4/E
Fidelity Contra FCNTX 66.53 -2.74 -1.6 +2.0/C +2.4/A
Fidelity DivrIntl d FDIVX 26.14 -1.25 -2.2 -11.0/B -3.5/C
Fidelity Free2020 FFFDX 13.36 -.34 -.4 +.7/C +1.1/B
Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX 82.31 -4.05 -3.2 +5.0/A +3.6/A
Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX 35.20 -1.40 +.1 +3.4/A +2.3/A
Fidelity Spartan 500IdxInv FUSEX 43.15 -1.68 -.6 +3.6/A -.7/B
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX 2.06 -.04 +1.0 +2.6/B +2.7/C
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX 2.07 -.04 +.5 +1.6/D +2.1/D
FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX 18.63 -.61 -1.5 -10.7/B -.5/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX 12.77 -.26 -1.3 -.9/E +9.6/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX 12.73 -.26 -1.3 -.7/E +9.9/A
Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX 53.11 -2.51 -2.3 -9.8/A +.3/A
Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX 27.37 -.61 +1.3 +3.1/B +4.4/A
PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX 11.91 -.21 +1.4 +3.0/ +5.6/
PIMCO ComRlRStI PCRIX 7.74 -.27 -.4 +4.1/B +2.6/A
PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX 10.30 -.03 +.3 +.7/D +5.1/A
PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX 10.80 -.07 +.7 +1.3/E +7.2/A
PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX 10.80 -.07 +.7 +1.5/E +7.5/A
PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX 10.80 -.07 +.8 +1.8/E +7.7/A
PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX 10.80 -.07 +.7 +1.5/E +7.4/A
T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX 22.29 -.80 -.4 +1.9/B -1.4/B
T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX 31.47 -1.44 -1.6 +1.9/C +1.2/B
T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX 6.40 -.07 +1.9 +1.9/D +6.3/B
T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX 56.80 -2.35 -.1 +3.8/B +5.1/A
Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX 112.31 -4.37 -.6 +3.7/A -.7/B
Vanguard 500Inv VFINX 112.29 -4.37 -.6 +3.5/A -.8/B
Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX 11.14 +.04 +.8 +6.3/A +6.8/A
Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX 111.56 -4.35 -.6 +3.7/A -.7/B
Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX 111.57 -4.34 -.6 +3.7/A -.6/B
Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX 13.79 -.01 +.9 +6.8/B +4.7/B
Vanguard Prmcp d VPMCX 63.26 -2.48 -1.2 +1.1/C +1.8/B
Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX 10.65 -.03 +.3 +1.6/B +4.5/B
Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX 12.32 -.36 -.6 +1.2/B +1.2/A
Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX 11.00 +.01 +.9 +6.0/A +6.4/B
Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX 11.00 +.01 +.9 +6.0/A +6.4/B
Vanguard TotIntl d VGTSX 13.45 -.64 -3.2 -12.6/C -2.5/B
Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX 30.41 -1.17 -.3 +3.4/B -.1/B
Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX 30.41 -1.17 -.3 +3.4/B -.1/B
Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX 30.40 -1.17 -.3 +3.2/B -.2/B
Vanguard Welltn VWELX 30.56 -.78 -.3 +3.6/A +3.1/A
Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX 52.79 -1.34 -.3 +3.7/A +3.2/A
Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX 25.01 -.98 +.4 +3.5/B -1.6/B
Wells Fargo AstAlllcA f EAAFX 12.01 -.24 -.1 +2.7/ +2.5/
MutualFunds
FRIDAY WK RETURN/RANK
GROUP, FUND TICKER NAV CHG 4WK 1YR 5YR
Dow industrials
-2.9%
-0.1%
Nasdaq
-4.0%
-2.5%
S&P 500
-3.8%
-1.8%
Russell 2000
-3.4%
+1.0%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
q
q
p
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
p
q
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
+1.9%
-3.0%
-3.3%
-8.2%
Yields rise but mortgage rates fall
Uncertainty over the stability of Greek talks to re-
place its prime minister eased, sending Treasury
prices lower. The yield on the 10-year Treasury,
which rises when its price falls, rose. Bond trad-
ing was closed on Friday for the Veterans Day
holiday. The average rate on the 30-year fixed
mortgage fell to 3.99 percent from 4 percent the
previous week.
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxable—national avg 0.01
Flex-funds Money Market/Retail 0.10 $ 2,500 min (800) 325-3539
Tax-exempt—national avg 0.01
BofA Muni Reserves/Instit Cap 0.10$ 100,000 min (800) 345-6611
Broad market Lehman 2.36 -0.01 t s -0.32 3.29 2.15
Triple-A corporate Moody’s 3.83 -0.10 t t -1.14 5.31 3.73
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 3.77 0.07 t s -0.02 4.22 3.36
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 5.03 0.03 s r -0.48 5.95 4.87
U.S. high yield Barclays 8.62 0.12 t s 1.01 10.15 6.61
Treasury Barclays 1.08 -0.03 t t -0.59 2.46 0.96
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.01 0.00 t r -0.12 0.16
1-year T-Bill 0.14 0.01 t s -0.12 0.34 0.07
6-month T-Bill 0.03 0.01 t s -0.15 0.20 0.01
2-year T-Note 0.28 0.05 s s -0.20 0.83 0.16
5-year T-Note 0.92 0.01 t s -0.56 2.39 0.78
10-year T-Note 2.01 -0.05 t t -0.89 3.72 1.72
30-year T-Bond 2.99 -0.12 t t -1.29 4.77 2.72
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
Rank: Fund’s letter grade compared with others in the same performance group;
an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.
C M Y K
PAGE 8D SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ B U S I N E S S
C M Y K
VIEWS S E C T I O N E
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011
timesleader.com
DAVID BRODER,
veteran reporter, co-
lumnist, author and
lecturer, won the Pu-
litzer Prize for Com-
mentary in1973. He
appeared on NBC’s
“Meet the Press” 401
times, more than any other individual,
save four of the long-running program’s
11 moderators. You often saw him on
the PBS news show, “Washington
Week,” and his political columns were
syndicated to more than 300 newspa-
pers nationwide.
Often referred to as the dean of the
Washington, D.C., press corps, the
81-year-old Broder died earlier this year.
For almost half a century Broder was
one of the most respected commenta-
tors on the national scene. President
Barack Obama called him “the most
respected and incisive political com-
mentator of his generation.”
Broder once noted, “The old maxim
that ‘good government is the best poli-
tics’ has special force and relevance at
the start of a new administration, espe-
cially one, like that now beginning,
which brings a new party to power.”
In Luzerne County it is far more than
a new administration taking over; it is a
new framework of government, and it
will grab the reins of power on Jan. 2.
That’s when the 11 men and women you
elected will assume their seats on coun-
cil, signaling a new beginning for Lu-
zerne County.
The voters are to be congratulated.
Considering the 55 candidates who
eventually ran for county council, 49
original candidates plus six third-party
entrants, the voters performed extraor-
dinarily well. In sifting through all the
noise, they cobbled together a council
consisting of many highly educated,
talented and accomplished men and
women.
The makeup of county council can
accurately be conveyed in a variety of
ways. The panel consists of nine men
and two women. Ten of the 11 are col-
lege graduates. Seven are older than 50.
Five live in the Kingston area, two live
near Hazleton and only three are from
Wilkes-Barre. There are four sexagenar-
ians, five educators and six have never
held elective public office. There is also
one resident of Dallas, one lawyer, one
architect and one septuagenarian.
Describe them as you will. There are
any number of combinations. Just don’t
label them Democrats (six), Repub-
licans (four) or registered Independent
(one).
If this council is to build upon the
natural goodwill that extends to every
candidate-elect and earn the continuing
trust of a deserving people, the mem-
bers need to avoid the traps of partisan-
ship, grandstanding, destructive coali-
tions and heels-dug-in, too deep, too
quickly and too often.
Such was the dismal performance of
the previous government that voters
abolished.
Those on council need to remember
not every issue is tantamount to Arma-
geddon, believe it or not. Measure your
words. The people of Luzerne County
already have begun measuring you.
They are on the lookout for workhorses,
show horses, fissures and serious indi-
viduals.
Spout your most poetic lines at the
procedural minutia surging in your
direction and what will you have at the
ready when an issue equal in weight to
the refurbished dome rests on your
collective shoulders as the clerk calls for
the inexorable “yeas” and “nays”? Who
heeds a clanging symbol?
“Good government is the best poli-
tics.” That enduring tenet “has special
force and relevance at the start of a new
administration.” David Broder penned
those words on Jan. 20, 1969, following
the inauguration of President Richard
Nixon. More officers in the new admin-
istration should have read and paid
close attention to Broder’s words.
Four years later, Broder was awarded
the Pulitzer Prize for his “clear and
compelling commentary” on an emerg-
ing topic called “Watergate.”
Honorable members of council, good
government is the best politics.
KEVIN BLAUM
I N T H E A R E N A
Good governing
is what makes
the best politics
Kevin Blaum’s column on government, life
and politics appears every Sunday. Contact
him at kblaum@timesleader.com.
DES MOINES, Iowa — For
weeks, it was the other Texan who
was shaking things up as a front-
runner in the Republican presiden-
tial race.
Now, while Gov. Rick Perry
struggles to reverse his plunge in
the polls, Rep. Ron Paul is the Tex-
an on the march after pushing his
way into the top tier of candidates
for the Jan. 3 Iowa caucuses.
A Bloomberg News poll this
week showed Paul, Herman Cain,
Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich
are about even as the top choices of
likely Iowa Republican caucus par-
ticipants. Perry, Texas’ longest
serving governor, was in fifth place,
with 7 percent support.
For true believers like Ani De-
Groot, Paul’s surge was no surprise.
In 2007, someone had scrawled
“Google Ron Paul” on the chalk-
board of her astrophysics class at
the University of Iowa. She accept-
ed the challenge and soon became
an enthusiastic volunteer in Paul’s
2008 presidential race.
With her candidate waging his
third bid for the White House, De-
Groot, now23, has put her universi-
ty studies on hold to be Midwest re-
gional director of Youth for Ron
Paul. She’s based in the campaign’s
state headquarters, a tiny suburban
strip-mall office where a handwrit-
ten sign proclaims, “Ron Paul
Rocks.”
The Bloomberg poll showed
Cain, an Atlanta businessman who
has been dogged by sexual harass-
ment allegations, at the top of the
field with 20 percent. Paul was in
second place with19 percent. Rom-
ney, a former Massachusetts gover-
nor who is widely portrayed as the
man to beat in the Republican race,
had 18 percent. And Gingrich, the
former House speaker whose candi-
dacy has surged in recent weeks,
had 17 percent.
But it is Paul who seems to have
the most dependable base of core
supporters. Nearly 70 percent of
those who supported him in the
2008 caucuses are standing behind
him in the 2012 race, according to
the poll. Among caucus-goers who
say they’ve firmly decided on a can-
didate, Paul leads with 32 percent.
Paul’s electoral appeal some-
times mystifies establishment poli-
ticians. Unlike Perry, whose rugged
good looks often drawcomparisons
to the Marlboro Man, Paul is the ol-
dest candidate in the race and is far
from being the flashiest.
But the candidate’s libertarian
message, which includes opposi-
tion to the wars in Iraq and Afghan-
istan and a sharp retrenchment in
federal spending, attracts followers
from a diverse socioeconomic
range.
“His message just keeps catching
on and it’s growing steady, steady,
steady,” said Drew Ivers, who was
Paul’s Iowa campaign chairman in
2008 and has resumed that role in
the 2012 campaign.
Arthur Sanders, a political sci-
ence professor at Drake University
in Des Moines, said Paul has re-
tained the nucleus of ardent liber-
tarians who have always embraced
his past campaigns, while picking
up support from more traditional
Republicans.
“He’s been saying the same thing
on the issues for a long time, and to
many of his supporters, that initself
is a refreshing change to a majority
of these candidates, who seem to
change their minds often about
where they stand,” Sanders said.
At the same time, Sanders and
other analysts say Paul’s chances of
becoming the nominee are a long
shot at best.
MCT PHOTO
Ron Paul speaks during a cam-
paign meeting in Midtown Manhat-
tan, New York City.
Ron Paul
supporters
hold strong
By DAVE MONTGOMERY
McClatchy Newspapers
C
HICAGO — Victims of sexual ha-
rassment often remain in the shad-
ows for one simple reason: fear. •
Fearof accusationsbecomingpublic,
of having their entire lives scrutinized. Fear they
may be judged uncharitably by people who don’t
knowthem. •Examplesof thosefearsweremade
real as the political scandal engulfing Republican
presidential candidate Herman Cain swirled
through the media in recent weeks, reminding
peoplewhohaveexperiencedsexual harassment,
along with their attorneys and advocates, how
emotionally devastatingit canbe tostepforward.
“It’s horrible,” said Laura Beth Nielsen, a researcher
at the American Bar Foundation and an associate pro-
fessor of sociology and law at Northwestern Universi-
ty. “I can’t tell you how many (accusers) have gone
bankrupt, gottendivorcedor start (having)drinkingor
drug-use problems. ... Most people are unprepared for
how long it’s going to take and the emotional toll it’s
going to have.”
Sexual harassment complaints often take years to
end, result in small compensation payments and leave
the reputations of the accuser andthe accusedscarred.
Attorneys say many cases are settled early in the proc-
ess for a few thousand dollars, and a 2004 bar founda-
tionstudyfoundthat onceemployment discrimination
cases get to court, they were settled for an average of
$30,000.
“Evenif theywin, theyfeel like they’ve lost,” Nielsen
said. “Some say, ‘I’m glad I made the point that they
couldn’t do that.’ But by and large, they feel pretty
chewed up and spit out by the justice system.”
Twenty years after Anita Hill’s sexual harassment
claim against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Tho-
mas brought the issue out in the open, multiple allega-
tionsof inappropriateworkplacebehavior byCainhave
reignited a national discussion of the problem.
Cain has denied sexually harassing anyone. But
since news broke that two sexual harassment claims
against Cainwere settledwhile he was president of the
National Restaurant Association, at least two other
women have come forward with similar allegations.
Anumber of conservativepundits havepaintedCain
as the victim of a smear campaign, and the female ac-
MCT PHOTO
Denise Mastro at the tutoring firm she founded in
Oak Park, Ill., was part of a class-action sexual
harassment suit against IPA from her time as a
telemarketer there.
By ROBERT MCCOPPIN, BONNIE MILLER RUBIN
AND BARBARA BROTMAN
Chicago Tribune
See SILENCE, Page 6E
K
PAGE 2E SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
“If … that building collapses, then
everybody will be here
complaining that the
commissioners didn’t do
anything.”
Walter Griffith
The Luzerne County controller still questions the handling of the failed
Hotel Sterling restoration project but defended county commissioners
Thursday before they approved a $1 million allocation to demolish the
landmark structure.
NOVEMBER is the peak
month for collisions be-
tween cars and deer, ac-
cording to the Insurance
Institute for Highway Safe-
ty.
Insurance groups esti-
mate that about one in every 100 drivers
will be involved in a deer-vehicle collision at
some point in his or her life. A fatal crash
late last month in Indiana illustrates how
heartbreaking such encounters can be.
Seven people – including four children –
were killed after their minivan hit a deer
and was subsequently struck by a semi-
trailer.
While hunters invariably point to such
tragedies as justification for killing even
more deer, the blame for deer-vehicle colli-
sions falls at least partly on their shoulders.
Pennsylvania-based Erie Insurance, which
has analyzed deer-vehicle collision data in
the state for more than a decade, found that
the opening day and opening Saturday of
deer hunting season are “(t)wo of the most
dangerous days to drive.” According to the
Missouri Insurance Information Service,
increased deer activity associated with
hunting is a “major factor” in the rise in
deer-vehicle collisions in the last three
months of the year. With more people (hun-
ters) in the woods, deer are spooked out of
wooded areas – often out onto the road.
Hunting also increases deer populations
– which increases the likelihood that deer-
car collisions will occur. While several stud-
ies have suggested that sterilization pro-
grams might provide an effective, long-term
solution to controlling deer populations,
hunting only makes the problem worse. It’s
been shown, for example, that in hunted
populations, does are more likely to have
twins rather than single fawns and are more
likely to reproduce at a younger age. Imme-
diately following a hunt, there’s less compe-
tition for food. The surviving deer are bet-
ter nourished, which can lead to a higher
reproductive rate and lower neonatal mor-
tality.
The state agencies responsible for wild-
life “management” know this, of course, but
they’re primarily run by hunters, who hard-
ly have the animals’ best interests in mind.
So, instead of setting up sterilization pro-
grams, they destroy the deer’s homes by
clear-cutting to increase the amount of
vegetation for the deer to eat – further
increasing their population. Such programs
help to ensure that there are plenty of ani-
mals for hunters to kill (not to mention
plenty of revenue from the sale of hunting
licenses).
Simple, nonlethal methods can reduce
the risk of deer-vehicle collisions. A team of
scientists from the University of Alberta
found that simply placing warning signs in
hotspots where deer are known to cross
roads can reduce collisions by 34 percent.
Other communities are experimenting with
roadside sensors that trigger lights and
whistles as cars approach to scare deer
away and with laser beams that sound
alarms to alert motorists to the presence of
deer.
Drivers also should slow down and watch
the road carefully – especially during hunt-
ing season. Scan the side of the road for
wildlife and use high-beam headlights at
night when there is no oncoming traffic.
Also be aware that deer tend to travel in
groups, so if you see one deer, slow down
and watch for more. In many deer-vehicle
accidents, the driver slowed down for one
deer, then sped up and hit another one.
Hunters like to say that killing deer is the
only way to prevent traffic collisions with
them, but it’s not. When hunting season
turns deer territories into a war zone, it’s no
wonder that the animals panic and run –
often right out onto our roadways.
Driver beware: Hunting increases deer-car collisions
Paula Moore is a senior writer for The People for
the Ethical Treatment of Animals Foundation, 501
Front St., Norfolk, Va. 23510; visit online at
www.PETA.org.
COMMENTARY
P A U L A M O O R E
Simple, nonlethal methods can reduce the
risk of deer-vehicle collisions.
I HATE to break this to my
fellow progressive-conserva-
tives, but those of us who
believe in progressive social
values and conservative
economics won’t have a
presidential candidate who
satisfies us next November.
Barack Obama made noise about going
this way in 2008. But the president has em-
braced the progressive part of the code more
than the conservative side. He even has gone
populist.
And Republicans, wow. They’re bent on
electing a candidate who’ll satisfy the conser-
vative economic part of the equation but
completely reject the progressive aspect. No
compassionate conservatism or McCain-like
independence this time around.
But those who want a humane immigra-
tion system, stronger public schools, a place
for gays in the military – plus debt reduction,
entitlement reforms and private-sector-led
growth – need not sit out this cycle. Progres-
sive-conservatives can start now to create an
agenda that would encourage fellow travelers
to compete in future elections. It also would
allow the numerous current officeholders
who are quiet about their center/right beliefs
to come out of the closet.
Here are a few suggestions:
• Press for better public schools: Partner
with civil rights groups and business leaders
who, like us, believe Washington should hold
local schools accountable. The Obama ad-
ministration started strong in this direction
but has faded, and Republicans are distanc-
ing themselves from federal involvement
altogether.
By standing up for testing that shows
whether children are learning at grade level,
prog-cons will stand on the side of minority
students whose public schools have left them
behind. But accountability isn’t enough. Also
delve into what makes schools work, starting
with how districts develop principals and
teachers as leaders – and retain them.
• Welcome immigrants: The top goal is
immigration laws that create more permits
for foreign workers to come here legally and
a process for illegal immigrants to become
citizens. But that priority has been hard to
achieve and will be until at least 2013.
So, start working with churches, schools
and other mediating institutions to integrate
the many immigrants from Latin America
into our culture. The school part especially
matters.
• Let the private sector grow jobs: Obama
had to stimulate the economy, but he relied
too much on government to grow jobs. Bet-
ter to let the private sector lead. The place to
start is the energy industry. Numerous states
have natural gas reserves. Push for access to
them – and press producers to invest in envi-
ronmental technologies.
• Also, flatten the tax code. Create two
rates, scrap many exemptions and lower
firms’ cost of capital.
• Go gonzo about the debt: Progressive-
conservatives should hope Congress’ super-
committee succeeds in reducing the debt by
$4 trillion. But even if the panel hits a homer,
entitlement programs such as Medicare and
Social Security need attention.
Former GOP Sen. Pete Domenici and
former Clinton adviser Alice Rivlin have the
best Medicare idea. Keep traditional Medi-
care for seniors who want it, but give others
a voucher they could use to buy private
insurance. The choice model could control
costs.
The 2012 race might be less than satisfying
for those of us who lean left on cultural is-
sues but right on economics. But this is the
time for the muscular middle to create its
future.
In hands of voters, today’s candidates are like putty
WilliamMcKenzie is an editorial columnist for The
Dallas Morning News. Readers may write to him at
the Dallas Morning News, Communications Center,
Dallas, Texas 75265; email: wmckenzie@dallas-
news.com.
COMMENTARY
W I L L I A M M C K E N Z I E
M
AKE “GIVING” A literal part of your Thanksgiving
ritual, as muchasliceof thelate-November holidayas
gorging on turkey, game-watching and visiting gran-
ny.
Give directly to someone in need. Or give to the Greater
WyomingValley’s nonprofit groups that supplypeople withfood,
shelter, clothing, health care and other critical services. These
charitableprograms typicallylacktheextrabucks topayfor high-
profile appeals; but they rely onyour awareness – andkindness –
for contributions of money, material goods and volunteer labor.
The full list of worthwhile agencies can’t be crammedinto this
space, so consider this a representative sample. Each is a bless-
ing. Findthe one, or ones, most important to youandshare what
you can.
• American Red Cross Wyoming Valley Chapter. Internet:
wyomingvalley.redcross.org. Phone: 823-7161.
• Catherine McAuley House for homeless women and chil-
dren. Internet: catherinemcauleycenter.org. Phone: 779-2801.
•CatholicSocial Services of theDioceseof Scranton. Internet:
cssdioceseofscranton.org. Phone: 822-7118.
• Children’s Service Center of Wyoming Valley. Internet:
cscwv.org. Phone: 825-6425.
• Commission on Economic Opportunity’s Weinberg Food
Bank. Internet: ceopeoplehelpingpeople.org. Phone: 826-0510.
• Domestic Violence Service Center. Internet: domesticvio-
lenceservice.org. Phone: 1-800-424-5600.
• Family Service Association of Wyoming Valley. Internet:
fsawv.org. Phone: 823-5144.
• Jewish Family Service of Greater Wilkes-Barre: Internet:
jfswb.org. Phone: 823-5137.
•Ruth’s Place for homeless women. Internet: ruthsplace.com.
Phone: 822-6817.
• St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen. Internet: stvincentwb.org.
Phone: 829-7796.
• The Salvation Army of Wilkes-Barre. Phone: 824-8741.
• Volunteers in Medicine free medical and dental clinic.
Phone: 970-2864.
• Volunteers of America. Internet: voapa.org. Phone: 825-
5261.
• Wyoming Valley Children’s Association. Internet: wvcakid-
s.org. Phone: 714-1246.
Get informationabout theregion’s manyother foodbanks, free
medical clinics and social service programs by contacting Help
Line at 1-888-829-1341. Or visit www.helpline-nepa.info.
Thanks for giving. And caring.
OUR OPINION: HELP NONPROFITS
Give bountifully
this Thanksgiving
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and InterimCEO/Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
Editorial Board
QUOTE OF THE DAY
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and Interim CEO/Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
RICHARD DEHAVEN
Vice President/Circulation
ALLISON UHRIN
Vice President/
Chief Financial Officer
W
HEN THE joint
Select Commit-
tee on Deficit Re-
duction was
formed in August, there were
high hopes that the “super-
committee” would mimic the
process in which politics was
largely brushed aside to close
excess military bases across
the nation.
Pennsylvanians will recall
how then-Gov. Ed Rendell
usedevery maneuver he could
think of, including a lawsuit,
to try to keep Willow Grove
Naval Air Station open. But in
the end, the decision of the
Base Realignment and Clo-
sure Commission prevailed.
The BRAC process, which
began around 1990 and con-
cluded in 2005, was strength-
ened by a mandate that Con-
gress must agree to imple-
ment all of that special com-
mittee’s recommendations or
none of them. There was little
wiggle room for politics.
Unfortunately, there’s a lot
of wiggling going on with the
deficit supercommittee. So
muchso, it looks doubtful that
what it produces by Thurs-
day’s deadline will provide a
meaningful cut to the spend-
ing that seems to have the
country on course to a fiscal
tsunami.
It was hoped that a higher-
minded supercommittee,
with an equal number of Re-
publicans and Democrats,
would reject the partisanship
that has thwarted agreement
on a deficit-reduction plan. In-
stead, the panel has been em-
broiled in the same tax hikes-
vs.-spending cuts argument.
The supercommittee will
likely come up with some-
thing to avoid blowing its
deadline. But unless some-
thing changes drastically in
less than a week, Americans
shouldn’t expect much. Each
day closer to the 2012 elec-
tions seems to further erode
any zeal to make budget deci-
sions that might inflame a fac-
tion of voters.
What a sad commentary
that is, that the panelists
would rather do nothing than
risk an election loss.
The Philadelphia Inquirer
OTHER OPINION: U.S. DEFICIT
Election clouds
debt panel work
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 3E
➛ F O R U M
IN 2008, the
slogan was
“Yes We Can.”
For 2011-12,
it’s “We Can’t
Wait.” What
happened in
between?
Candidate Obama, the vessel
into which myriad dreams
were poured, met the reality of
governance.
His near-$1 trillion stimulus
begat a stagnant economy with
9 percent unemployment. His
attempt at Wall Street reform
left in place a still too-big-to-
fail financial system as vul-
nerable today as when he came
into office. His green energy
fantasies yielded Solyndra
cronyism and a cap-and-trade
regime not even a Democratic
Congress would pass.
And now his signature
achievement, “Obamacare,” is
headed to the Supreme Court,
where it could very well be
struck down, just a week after
its central element was over-
whelmingly repudiated (2-1)
by the good burghers of Ohio.
So what do you do when you
say you can, but, it turns out,
you can’t? Blame the other
guy. Charge the Republicans
with making governing impos-
sible. Never mind that you had
control of the Congress for
two-thirds of your current
tenure. It’s all the fault of Re-
publican rejectionism.
Hence: “We Can’t Wait.” We
can’t wait while they obstruct.
We can’t wait while they dither
with my jobs bill. Write Con-
gress today! Vote Democratic
tomorrow!
We can’t wait. Except for
certain exceptions, such as the
1,700-mile trans-USA Keystone
XL pipeline, carrying Alberta
oil to Texas refineries, that
would have created thousands
of American jobs and increased
our energy independence.
For that, we can wait, it
seems. President Obama de-
creed that any decision must
wait 12 to 18 months – post-
poned, by amazing coinci-
dence, until after next year’s
election.
Why? Because the pipeline
angered Obama’s environ-
mental constituency. But their
complaints are risible. Global
warming from the extraction of
the Alberta tar sands? Canada
will extract the oil anyway. If it
doesn’t go to us, it will go to
China. Net effect on the cli-
mate if we don’t take that oil?
Zero.
Danger to a major aquifer,
which the pipeline traverses? It
is already crisscrossed by
25,000 miles of pipeline,
enough to circle the Earth.
Moreover, the State Depart-
ment had subjected Keystone
to three years of review – the
most exhaustive study of any
oil pipeline in U.S. history –
and twice concluded in volumi-
nous studies that there would
be no significant environmen-
tal harm.
So what happened? “The
administration,” reported The
New York Times, “had in re-
cent days been exploring ways
to put off the decision until
after the presidential election.”
Exploring ways to improve the
project? Hardly. Exploring
ways to get past the election.
Obama’s decision was meant
to appease his environmental-
ists. It’s already working. The
president of the National Wild-
life Federation told The Wash-
ington Post (online edition,
Nov. 10) that thousands of
environmentalists who were
galvanized to protest the pipe-
line would now support Oba-
ma in 2012.
It’s hard to think of a more
clear-cut case of putting poli-
tics over nation. This from a
president whose central cam-
paign theme is that Repub-
licans put party over nation,
sacrificing country to crass
political ends.
Nor is this the first time
Obama’s election calendar
trumped the national interest:
• Obama’s decision to wind
down the Afghan surge in
September 2012 is militarily
inexplicable. It comes during
the fighting season. It was
recommended by none of his
military commanders. It is
explicable only as a talking
point for the final days of his
re-election campaign.
• At the height of the debt-
ceiling debate last July, Obama
pledged to veto any agreement
that was not long term. Defini-
tion of long term? By another
amazing coincidence, any deal
large enough to get him past
Election Day (and thus avoid
another such crisis next year).
• Tuesday it was revealed
that last year the adminis-
tration pressured Solyndra, as
it was failing, to delay its
planned Oct. 28 announce-
ment of layoffs until Nov. 3 –
the day after the midterm
election.
A contemporaneous email
from a Solyndra investor
noted: “Oddly they didn’t give
a reason for that date.” The
writer was clearly born yester-
day. The American voter was
not – and (s)he soon gets to
decide who really puts party
over nation and re-election
above all.
We can’t wait.
Country over politics:
We can’t wait for that
COMMENTARY
C H A R L E S
K R A U T H A M M E R
Charles Krauthammer’s email
address is letters@charleskrauth-
ammer.com.
T
he world changes all around, but you defy expectations, even gravity. The
waiting worm and hungry buck are out of luck. Hang tough, friend. Hang
tough.
ANOTHER VIEW
A photograph by Don Carey and
words by Mark E. Jones
IMAGINE YOU
were one of
them.
Imagine you
were 10 years
old. A coach
you trusted. A
man you liked.
A guy with white hair. An “older”
person.
Imagine he led you. Imagine
you listened. Imagine you didn’t
want to. Imagine you did what
you were told.
Imagine the setting. A bath-
room. A shower. Imagine he said
it was OK. Imagine his tone.
Imagine his eyes.
Imagine the disbelief. The
horror. The pain. The tears.
Imagine the shame. The confu-
sion. The rage.
Imagine going home. Lying in
your bed. Eating dinner with
your family. Going to school –
elementary school, fourth or fifth
grade.
Imagine years passing, seeing
the event, again and again, when-
ever you close your eyes. Imagine
the nightmares. Imagine the loss.
Now imagine keeping all this
to yourself.
Because most people do.
The damage done by former
Penn State defensive coordinator
Jerry Sandusky, if the charges
against him prove to be true, is
almost unimaginable – except for
the roughly 14 percent of boys
and 33 percent of girls, according
to some estimates, who have
been molested before the age of
18.
That’s right.
A third of all girls. A seventh of
all boys.
And most abuse goes unreport-
ed.
This horror did not begin with
Penn State. It will not end with
Penn State. It is an ugly under-
belly of adult behavior that has
been around forever and is only
increasing with the Internet and
the spread of pornography.
Many were mistaken at Penn
State.
But one man was responsible.
The damage done.
Did you watch the Nittany
Lions game against Nebraska
that Saturday? Was it not surreal?
Think about, in a matter of days,
the lives Sandusky knocked over
with his alleged behavior.
Here, for the first time in 62
seasons, was a Penn State team
without Joe Paterno, who was
watching, presumably, on a tele-
vision set somewhere. He was
weeks from a potentially glorious
retirement, a celebration of all he
had done and represented at his
school. Gone now. Vaporized by
the mere allegations against
Sandusky – not a trial, not a
conviction, just the charges alone.
The mere idea that Paterno did
not take more serious action if
aware of Sandusky’s behavior was
enough to ban him forever from a
sideline and to punt seven dec-
ades of football into a cesspool.
The damage done.
The school president, Graham
Spanier, one of the longest-serv-
ing university presidents, is gone,
ousted. Same for Tim Curley, the
athletic director, and another
high-ranking school official, both
of whom, in 2002, allegedly heard
from a graduate assistant about
Sandusky having relations with a
boy in the showers of the football
building.
That graduate assistant, now
an assistant coach, is on leave,
hiding somewhere, the object of
death threats.
All this from Sandusky’s al-
leged lust.
The current players, who had
no part of any of this, are now
altered, their experience shad-
owed. The university and the
townspeople, once unified by
Blue and White, are split over
who to blame and who to pity.
So many affected. One man’s
actions.
The damage done.
Imagine you are one of them.
Imagine these last few weeks.
Imagine being questioned by
authorities. Imagine having to
relive the nightmare. Imagine
anger. Imagine relief. Imagine
fury. Imagine surrender.
Imagine saying, “Finally.”
Imagine saying, “What took so
long?” Imagine seeing rallies in
support of those who knew – or
might have known. Imagine
thinking you will be blamed and
hated for bringing down a pro-
gram.
Imagine wishing to have your
story told. Imagine wishing no
one would ask you anything.
Imagine pain and confusion, all
over again.
Imagine wondering, “Why
me?”
This is not a football story.
This is not a Joe Paterno story.
This is a daily story, an American
story, an international story, a
human tragedy. The shame, pain,
hurt and confusion are no differ-
ent for Sandusky’s suspected
victims than they are for the
dozens of cases reported last
week, or the hundreds last
month, or the thousands last
year.
Fingers point. Blame is an
arrow. And the months to come
will unfold an already wincing
story. But you need only survey
the landscape to see what hap-
pens when an adult robs a child
of innocence.
One man. A million little piec-
es.
The damage done.
For victims, Penn State story is horror relived
COMMENTARY
M I T C H A L B O M
Mitch Albom is a columnist for the
Detroit Free Press. Readers may
write to him at: Detroit Free Press,
600 W. Fort St., Detroit, MI. 48226, or
via email at malbom@freepress.com.
This is not a football story. This
is not a Joe Paterno story. This
is a daily story, an American
story, an international story, a
human tragedy.
Mayor Leighton
humbled, thankful
I
thank the people of Wilkes-
Barre for entrusting me
with their safety, security
and general welfare for anoth-
er four years. I am humbled to
have received such over-
whelming support from the
people during this last elec-
tion.
I did not seek a third-term
lightly and I will assume the
office of mayor in January
fully aware of its extraordinary
responsibility. I ran to contin-
ue to serve as your mayor
because I believe that this city
has made important invest-
ments in its future and that
there are many goals yet to be
accomplished. We have come
so far as a community, and I
firmly believe that the team I
have assembled at City Hall
will be able to deliver the
results that Wilkes-Barre resi-
dents demand and expect over
the next four years.
During the campaign, I
presented a bold, concrete
agenda that charted the future
progress of the city. I will not
wait until a new term to begin
implementing my agenda. The
issues that our community
faces are too great for us to
remain idle. I will work tire-
lessly to execute my agenda,
but we also will develop new
ideas and initiatives over the
next four years. My guiding
principle in the next term will
be only this: What will im-
prove the future for all Wilkes-
Barre residents? That is my
benchmark of success.
I also must thank my two
opponents in the campaign.
They both ran spirited cam-
paigns and, although we had
competing visions for Wilkes-
Barre, I think the residents of
this city benefited from hear-
ing a full exchange of ideas.
The future of Wilkes-Barre
is bright. It cannot be
achieved by any one mayor or
a single administration, but
only through the collective
dedication of the city govern-
ment and the people. Togeth-
er there is no project too dar-
ing, there is no idea too fool-
ish, there is no dream unob-
tainable.
I humbly ask for your sup-
port in the coming years. We
can make Wilkes-Barre a shin-
ing example of a proud city in
Pennsylvania.
Thomas M. Leighton
Mayor
Wilkes-Barre
On the mend and
grateful to many
I
thank the medical staff at
Geisinger Wyoming Valley
for the excellent care I re-
ceived while I was hospital-
ized for 12 days with double
pneumonia.
A grateful thanks to physi-
cian assistant Monica Lynn of
Intermountain Medical Group
for realizing how ill I was and
making sure I got to the hospi-
tal. Thanks to the two para-
medics from the Wilkes-Barre
Fire Department who trans-
ported me to the hospital.
A special thanks to the
Geisinger nurses who were
assigned to Room 300 and
Room 311B for the compas-
sion and care they showed me
during my stay. They truly are
a credit to the Geisinger
Health System.
Thanks also to the two
ladies who brought my meals
every day. Thanks, Katherine
and Jane.
May almighty God continue
to bless all of you for your
kindness.
Jack Morgan
Hanover Township
Incumbent obliged
for all the support
I
am honored to be re-elected
to the Forty Fort Borough
Council.
I thank my family for its
support and the many friends
and neighbors who took time
to pass out my campaign fliers
and work at the polls passing
out cards. Thanks also to
“BOSS” who helped make my
name known.
To the residents of Forty
Fort, I say, “thank you.” I will
continue to do my best to
make those decisions that best
benefit all of Forty Fort and
pledge to work with my fellow
council members to continue
progress in our town.
Frank Michaels
Forty Fort
TL news coverage
beefed up sales
O
n behalf of the residents,
staff and Little Sisters of
the Poor at Holy Family
Residence, I thank The Times
Leader for publicizing our
recent roast beef dinner hon-
oring Bill Gerrity and the late
Harold Jordan.
The publicity increased
awareness about the event and
helped us to sell more than
900 dinners.
The money raised will be
used to help us provide sup-
port, meals and activities for
the residents entrusted to our
care.
With the rising cost of
health care, it is challenging to
meet our operating expenses.
But with the help of friends
like you and the good people
of Northeastern Pennsylvania,
we can do it!
May God bless you.
Sister Maureen Weiss
Little Sister of the Poor
Holy Family Residence
Scranton
Big ‘shout-out’
to Mr. Gonzalez
I
send a thank-you to the
man who found my mom’s
checkbook, ID and other
vital cards that she very much
needs.
Just when you think this
Valley has lost its heart, some-
one surprises you.
My mom didn’t even know
she lost the items until a
phone call from a man named
Alex Gonzalez, who said he
had found them. He wouldn’t
take a reward offered by my
sister, Sandy, and was happy
to return everything inside.
I give Alex Gonzalez a
shout-out and a sincere thank-
you. God bless.
Margaret Geskey and family
Wilkes-Barre
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Mountain Laurels is a regular series of letters from readers
conveying thanks to individuals or groups for their support, help or
kindness.
MOUNTAIN LAURELS
C M Y K
PAGE 4E SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ P E R S P E C T I V E S
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7
2
3
5
1
8
Reader faults
Corbett’s priority
G
ov. Tom Corbett reported-
ly knew about the allega-
tions of child sexual abuse
at Penn State University in
2009 when he was attorney
general.
Why did he not act on those
allegations at that time? I
believe that his run for gover-
nor superseded his need to
protect Pennsylvania’s chil-
dren.
Irene Sankey
Harveys Lake
Talking turkey
on Thanksgiving
E
very year at Thanksgiving
in the United States, hun-
dreds of thousands of
turkeys are slaughtered to
celebrate the American Colo-
nists’ survival in their new
homeland. Most of these ani-
mals are raised under inten-
sive factory farm conditions.
In factory farm conditions,
turkeys undergo acute phys-
ical, social and psychological
stress and deprivation.
Animal suffering is not the
only issue involved in the
traditional Thanksgiving din-
ner, however. There also are
the problems of human health,
world hunger and environ-
mental disasters. More than
40 percent of the antibiotics
produced in this country go
into animal feeds. In the case
of poultry, almost 100 percent
are given antibiotics to coun-
teract the risk of disease,
which arises largely from the
stress attendant upon inten-
sive confinement conditions.
Even more important, it is
common practice to make use
in the animal food industry of
a host of chemical flavorings,
coloring agents and antispoi-
lants, many of which are
known carcinogens.
Giving thanks for the Amer-
ican Colonists’ survival by
eating meat is also a moral
contradiction, given the world
hunger situation. While peo-
ple in America consume tur-
key on Thanksgiving, thou-
sands upon thousands of
Third World people go with-
out adequate protein and
nutrition.
We can no longer afford to
be so parochial in our diet and
oblivious to the world sit-
uation. The use of land for
raising animals for slaughter –
land that could be better used
for growing high-protein vege-
table crops and the feeding of
these foods to “food animals,”
which could be used instead
for feeding hungry people – is
not in the spirit of a true
world Thanksgiving Day.
Patricia Marks
Wilkes-Barre
Sterling lot ripe
with potential
W
ith the inevitable de-
struction of the once
grand Hotel Sterling on
the horizon, county, city and
community leaders should put
together a concrete plan for
the empty lot that will be left
behind. That lot is too impor-
tant to allow it to remain
vacant.
I have had an idea to trans-
form that lot into the region’s
first and only “urban market-
place.”
After visiting The Reading
Terminal Market in Philadel-
phia many times and seeing
how successful and vibrant it
is, I believe the same can be
done in downtown Wilkes-
Barre. We already have a very
successful, seasonal Farmers
Market on Public Square.
This project would allow
the Farmers Market and its
merchants to operate year
round and out of the weather.
I envision a stylish new par-
kade (perhaps with a clock
tower attached to make it look
good) on the site where the
crumbling hotel now stands.
The ground-floor level of the
parkade would be the actual
urban market, with the par-
kade being above.
The parkade would not only
serve as much-needed parking
for downtown and the market-
place, but also would play a
dual role as being a main
parking area for The River
Common.
Why can’t our leaders deliv-
er what so many other com-
munity leaders can? It is our
time to shine and have some-
thing of which to be proud.
Our leaders should be col-
lectively working and brain-
storming to come up with a
prominent, large-scale, lasting
idea for the huge void that will
be left behind when the old
hotel is razed.
The Wyoming Valley Mar-
ketplace is my “grand” idea.
What are some of yours?
Bill Cook
Wilkes-Barre
River dredging
benefits revisited
W
here were you when Mrs.
Johns was fighting the
U.S. Army Corps of Engi-
neers to have the Susquehan-
na River dredged, thereby
protecting your homes? Look
at your homes today; if you
would have supported her, you
would have been spared.
The corps claims the levees
protected the Wyoming Valley
during the September flood-
ing. If this were so, why is
there so much damage in West
Pittston, Duryea, Plymouth
Township and Shickshinny?
Are these not part of the
Wyoming Valley? People from
these areas have helped to pay
for the levees that seemingly
contributed to the destruction
of their homes.
The river bed is getting
higher every year. Are we
going to spend tax dollars to
raise the levees every time we
have bad storms? They esti-
mate it will cost $1 million to
repair these levees.
Why not do what is right
and dredge the river to protect
all of the Wyoming Valley?
Our governor has allocated
$14 million to dredge the
Delaware River. Now, if it is
good for the Delaware River,
why not dredge the Susque-
hanna River?
Ed Gill
Wilkes-Barre
New county DA
faces challenges
W
hat were Luzerne Coun-
ty’s voters thinking?
The ugly kids-for-cash
scandal once more raised its
ugly head on Election Day
when the voters ousted Dis-
trict Attorney Jackie Musto
Carroll for what apparently
was deemed noncompliance.
When the Interbranch Com-
mission on Juvenile Justice
put a plaque on DA Carroll’s
back for failure to do nothing
in the scandal, her fate was
sealed. However, voting her
out and placing the prose-
cuting system in the county
with someone without any
true experience is ludicrous.
This is tantamount to putting
a high school quarterback in
to play Sunday for the Green
Bay Packers.
So where do we go from
here?
Attorney Stefanie Salavan-
tis’ campaign ad claimed she
will be hardworking and hon-
est. So was President Jimmy
Carter, one of our most inept
presidents.
My advice for attorney
Salavantis would be to ask
District Attorney Carroll for
access to her office for the
next two months. Get in the
locker room before you get on
the playing field.
Next, do what President
Franklin Roosevelt did in the
Great Depression: Form a
“brain trust.” That is, don’t
hire lawyer friends, but in-
stead surround yourself with
the best and brightest at-
torneys you can find.
For our soon-to-be district
attorney: I wish you the best
of luck – and always remem-
ber you are only as good as
the people who work for you.
Congratulations.
Robert “Doc” Phillips
Kingston
Gauging response
to river flooding
L
ike so many people with
properties along the North
Branch of the Susquehanna
River, I am an “anxious” river-
watcher during hurricanes,
snowmelts and tropical
storms.
When potential flooding is
imminent, I typically use the
U.S. Geological Survey data
that instantaneously monitors
the hydraulic gauge height for
many rivers and streams. Of
particular interest to me is the
Towanda station, since I have
property slightly south of
Wyalusing. This website has
historical data that dates to
1865. Additional stations of
interest to me are the gauge
heights of Wilkes-Barre, Tunk-
hannock and the Lackawanna
River/streams.
For Tropical Storm Lee, this
data projected a crest at To-
wanda at 32 to 33 feet.
Tropical Storm Lee pro-
duced a Towanda crest of 33
feet, and typically the river
level in Towanda produces a
crest in Wilkes-Barre of nine
to 10 feet higher, or approxi-
mately 43 feet. So the projec-
tion of 38.6 feet in Wilkes-
Barre should have been recog-
nized as erroneous based on
the historical hydraulic data
and river crests upriver of
Wilkes-Barre.
Second, once the Wilkes-
Barre gauge was fixed, it re-
corded a height of 42.6 feet,
and declared a “new” record
over Agnes. Again, I don’t
believe that Lee produced a
new record, since the USGS
website indicated a gauge
height in Wilkes-Barre at 44
feet.
A telephone pole near my
property is accurately marked
(using a transit and flood
levels on buildings) with the
floods of 1972, ’75, ’96 and
2011. Lee’s level was 13 inches
below Agnes, so I propose that
the Agnes record still stands.
There is much speculation
about river-dredging to im-
prove the channel. However
because of cost, this proposal
is quickly shelved. A “quick”
observation can be made re-
garding the formation of is-
lands. As silt and debris col-
lect and vegetation grows,
more debris accumulates.
These islands expand, which
further chokes the channel
and artificially raises gauge
heights over historical data.
It’s like adding stones to a
glass of water. I’m sure if
topographical mapping of
these islands existed today
and they were compared with
much older Pennsylvania data,
the impact of this “island
expansion” could be deter-
mined.
In addition, as many of
these islands expand, they
eventually become part of the
shoreline – with further reduc-
tion of the river channel.
One might say that these
islands are insignificant in
raising gauge heights, but
without any data or observa-
tion, another “guessing game”
is apparent.
So, what if the vegetation
and debris on these islands
were burned? Then a small
excavator could be used to
remove burned remnants and
allow the river to purge itself
and to get back to its original
channel.
The Susquehanna River has
a lot of potential, but it needs
our attention and respect!
Sandy J. Mattei
Dupont
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 5E
➛ P E R S P E C T I V E S
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& Saturday,Nov.26
Thornhurst faces
expansion threat
I
n an effort to update electric
service, PPL is proposing to
erect a 230-kilovolt trans-
mission line through Thorn-
hurst Township. While resi-
dents aren’t opposed to more
efficient, reliable service,
many people who live and
visit here are concerned that
colossal metal towers will
spoil a rare natural setting
enjoyed by Pennsylvania resi-
dents for more than a hundred
years.
Thornhurst is three-quar-
ters pristine state forest, with
access to the Lehigh River and
its tributaries. This is public
land regularly used by people
from Wilkes-Barre, Scranton
and surrounding communities
to connect with nature and
enjoy outdoor recreation.
Whether it is to hunt, fish,
hike, swim, picnic, boat, cross-
country ski or engage in other
activities, this natural setting
is a gem that embraces and
nurtures all who come here.
If the PPL proposed route is
given the nod by the Public
Utility Commission, 145-foot
towers will be lined up along
the route. These towers will
form a veritable highway of
steel and electric lines. A
surrounding, 150-foot-wide
swathe will be devoid of trees,
and herbicides will be used to
maintain clearance.
Residents are concerned
that herbicides leaching into
ground water eventually will
make their way into the Le-
high River and its tributaries,
affecting fish and other wild-
life. The Pennsylvania Legisla-
ture has, after decades of
arduous work by local resi-
dents and others, recently
designated 219 miles of the
Lehigh River and its trib-
utaries as “exceptional value”
– the highest standard of wa-
ter quality given to streams.
The threat of herbicidal
contamination is just another
reason why this line shouldn’t
travel through Thornhurst
Township. Other possible
options exist that would be
less intrusive into natural
landscapes: using existing
power lines to carry electricity
but inserting more poles be-
tween them to accommodate
heavier wire load, using old
railroad beds or running lines
along existing highways and
roadways.
These or other alternatives
could leave a rare and histor-
ically beautiful environment
unspoiled for generations to
come.
Ashley Peterson
Thornhurst
Postal hearing
slated for Tuesday
A
public input meeting on
the proposed moving of
mail processing oper-
ations from the Scranton Post
Office to the Lehigh Valley
Post Office will be held from
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at
the Scranton High School.
This will affect all residents
in the 184-188 ZIP code areas.
The postal service also is
conducting similar sessions in
Reading, Williamsport and
across the country.
It’s imperative that resi-
dents, businesses, local mail-
ers and government officials
attend this meeting to express
opposition to what amounts to
nothing more than the in-
tentional dismantling of the
postal service.
As a 25-year employee of
the postal service and know-
ing, along with my co-work-
ers, what is actually happen-
ing on the workroom floor,
there are some things I’d like
you to consider.
These actions, along with
others being considered –
such as reducing delivery from
six days to five, raising rates
while reducing service, in
effect having customers pay
first-class rates for second- and
third-class service and elim-
inating 75 percent of door-to-
door delivery – are what the
postal service is doing to
“save” the organization.
This is your chance to stop
these ill-advised and unsup-
ported actions, and to stop the
postal service from becoming
the next Enron.
Remember, cut the fat, cut
the waste, but don’t cut the
service!
Constantine Wayda
Ashley
Reader warns
the end is nigh
O
ur time is up. Our civi-
lization is coming to an
end.
We have fallen short of our
goal and purpose on this plan-
et. In fact, we have gone in the
opposite direction.
The two most powerful
value systems on this planet
are science and economics.
Science has replaced the
mythical gods. It would have
you believe that it and it alone
knows what is best for each of
us and for the planet. Science
accepts only what can be seen
and proven, otherwise it
doesn’t exist. Science believes
that our existence is an acci-
dent. It is the coming together
of the right elements, which
then form greater compounds,
etc.
The economic value system
has absorbed all of our in-
stitutions globally. Its creed is
profit, power and greed. It is
no more concerned with our
well-being and with the com-
mon good of the planet than
the Man in the Moon.
Together these two systems
have absolutely nothing to do
with our real purpose and why
we are here. In fact, they have
plunged us into a meaningless
existence.
George Albert
Jenkins Township
Obama job efforts
deemed lacking
P
resident Obama’s massive
expenditures haven’t been
met with positive results.
Job growth and employ-
ment are still at alarmingly
low levels, but the president
has failed to take this as a
message. By continuing to
spend at a startling rate and
proposing new job-killing
taxes, he’s failed to listen to
the American people.
It’s time for the adminis-
tration to listen up. Americans
want government to start
taking drastic steps to limit
overspending in the interest of
our nation’s future.
Small business is the private
sector’s number-one employer,
and by introducing new taxes
and industry regulations to
pay for his unprecedented
spending President Obama is
killing job growth.
A Balanced Budget Amend-
ment is a must. It will force
the president and the rest of
Washington to behave like the
rest of us and only spend the
money it has.
We have congressmen in the
area, Rep. Lou Barletta and
Rep. Tom Marino, who “get it”
that we must curtail the ab-
surd spending in Washington
for the future of our nation.
Joseph Olivetti
Olyphant
Paterno’s impact
on PSU lauded
J
oe Paterno, Penn State
University’s football coach,
was made a scapegoat in
the university’s child sexual
abuse scandal.
The board of trustees jump-
ed to judgment. Paterno re-
ported the incident to his
superiors; they allegedly failed
to report it to authorities.
There are a lot of people at
fault. This scandal apparently
went on for years, and I be-
lieve someone on the board of
trustees knew about it and
kept quiet. The governor of
Pennsylvania, Tom Corbett,
knew the details when he was
state attorney general. And,
what about the district at-
torney who had the case be-
fore him?
Remember the words of
Christ when they stoned the
prostitute: “Those without
sin, cast the first stone.”
For all the good he has done
Penn State, Paterno should
have been treated much better
and been allowed to finish out
the season.
He has engaged a fine law-
yer. I hope he takes his name
off the library and asks for his
three and a half million dollars
that he had donated to it.
Moreover, there is a new
building being constructed in
the name of Sue Paterno, Joe’s
wonderful wife. And she, too,
should ask that her contribu-
tion be returned.
I believe Joe Paterno should
sue Penn State for rushing to
judgment in disgracing a fine
and charitable family man.
Penn State does not deserve in
any way to have any kind of
credit ascribed historically to
Paterno, who has given 60
years of his life to be “Penn
State proud.”
And, if they decide to take
down his statue, I proudly will
take it and put it on my front
lawn.
Jim Bussacco
Pittston
Dairy marketing
bill commended
O
n Oct. 26, more than 20
members and friends of
the Progressive Agricul-
ture Organization traveled to
Washington, D.C., to discuss
the “Casey Bill” with the aides
of several congressmen and
senators.
U.S. Sen. Robert P. Casey
Jr., of Scranton, already has
introduced the Federal Milk
Marketing Improvement Act
of 2011 (S-1640) into the U.S.
Senate. The Pro-Ag members
anticipate that some of the
other senators who had their
aides present for the briefing
will join forces and start to
move the legislation forward.
Pro-Ag officials continued
to impress upon the aides that
S-1640 is the only proposed
bill that will cover the dairy
farmers’ cost of production as
well as return a potential
profit to dairy farmers.
Equally as important,
S-1640 is the only dairy bill
that will not cost the U.S.
government any money!
Pro-Ag members are contin-
ually making calls to U.S.
senators and congressmen in
an attempt to move along
S-1640. We urge the public to
make calls to their members
of Congress in support of the
Federal Milk Marketing Im-
provement Act of 2011.
Pro-Ag can be reached at
(570) 833-5776.
Arden Tewksbury
Meshoppen
U.S. becoming
another Europe!
T
he pendulum has swung
too far left. Look at Eu-
rope. It is in worse shape
than the United States and its
problems are having an ill
effect on the U.S. economy.
Why?
Its social programs reward
people for less work and less
productivity. For example, a
35-hour work week, four
weeks vacation, excessive sick
and personal days. Sound
familiar?
The United States is no
longer a manufacturing coun-
try. Ford and GM assemble
vehicles in Mexico! Northeast-
ern Pennsylvania no longer
has shoe, furniture, dress,
cigar, steel or railcar factories.
Many people now retire at
age 55 with pensions of 50 to
90 percent of their former
salaries. The city of Philadel-
phia has more people collect-
ing pensions than are current-
ly working for the city. Any-
one remember the term
“featherbedding”? We are
killing the “golden goose.”
It’s time to swing the pendu-
lum back to center and right!
Let’s think about our chil-
dren and grandchildren. Ad-
mit it, extended unemploy-
ment compensation is a nega-
tive incentive to look for or go
back to work.
Union members: Do not be
a puppet. Please vote your
conscience, not as directed by
union leaders.
The United States is at a
crossroad. We all must sacri-
fice. As a 60-plus-year-old man
and one of five siblings, I
remember my father worked
as a coal miner and a baker,
plus did odd jobs on the side.
My mom also worked. I didn’t
realize, until I was a teenager,
that we were poor.
Joseph J. Mrozoski
Wilkes-Barre
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
C M Y K
PAGE 6E SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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cusers who have been identified
have had their backgrounds and
personal lives scoured by the Cain
campaign and the media.
On Wednesday, one of the wom-
enwho receiveda settlement from
the restaurant association, Karen
Kraushaar, told The New York
Times: “Anyone should be able to
report allegations of sexual harass-
ment without fear that their lives
and careers will be put on public
display and laid open to public
scrutiny.”
Though never caught in a pub-
licity whirlwind the likes of which
Cain’s accusers have seen, Cheryl
Lockard said she experienced gut-
wrenching sexual harassment in a
small central Illinois town.
Lockard was the treasurer of
First Baptist Church in Canton.
She accused the pastor of harass-
ing her starting in 2003 by,
among other things, making sex-
ual remarks, massaging her
shoulders without her permis-
sion and informing her that the
office dress code required her to
wear halter tops and miniskirts.
She also alleged that the church
tried to cover up the situation,
then terminated her position
when she took her complaints to
board members.
Lockard’s case dragged on for
six years before she ultimately got
satisfaction when the state’s Hu-
man Rights Commission awarded
her about $63,000 in September
2009. But the emotional toll was
immense.
In such a small community, it
was difficult to be anonymous. At
thesupermarket, shewouldrunin-
to acquaintances who would turn
around and go the other way. Peo-
ple called her a liar and accused
her of destroying the church. They
wrote letters tothe editor of the lo-
cal paper questioning her charac-
ter and motives.
“It did hurt to read those let-
ters,” Lockard said. “You wonder
how people can say things like, ‘I
know (the pastor) didn’t do this’
or, ‘This is a disgruntled employ-
ee.’ How can they make a state-
ment and call it a fact, when they
weren’t eventhere? But peoplejust
don’t want tobelievethis stuff goes
on.”
Ananalysis of statistics fromthe
U.S. Equal Employment Opportu-
nity Commission shows that the
number of sexual harassment com-
plaints filed nationally has gone
down by 26 percent since 1997.
Last year, 11,717 cases were filed.
Experts believe there are two
primary reasons for the drop. One
is increased workplace education.
Another is simply a desire by both
sides toresolve the issue andavoid
the emotional toll that comes with
litigation.
Monica Brennan has worked in
human resources in the Chicago
area since 1996 and said she has
dealt with many sexual harass-
ment cases.
“Going into these situations, I
don’t want anyone to have to seek
legal counsel,” she said. “It be-
comes dirty and nasty and every-
one’s reputation is at stake: the
company, the accused and the ac-
cuser. If I can do anything to make
sure that it’s resolved amicably, I
will.”
In past cases — none of which
she said occurred at her current
employer, Bear Construction Co.,
in Rolling Meadows — Brennan
has seen wildly varying resolu-
tions, fromthe firing of anaccused
harasser to the reassigning of one
of the people involved in a com-
plaint to a different department.
Attorney Joan Eagle and Zev Ei-
gen, anassistant professor of lawat
Northwestern University, have
each represented defendants in
sexual harassment suits. Theysaid
accusations can wreak havoc on
the lives of those falsely accused.
Long after a case is settled, the ac-
cused must live with co-workers
and family members wondering if
there’sanysubstancetotheclaims.
The attorneys said some cases
arebaseless attempts toget money
out of employers — sometimes
small payouts are issued to make
cases likethat goaway, demonstra-
tinghowasettlement isnoproof of
guilt. However, Eagle said, repeat-
ed settlements may hide a serial
harasser behind confidentiality
clauses that prevent an airing of
the issues.
Denise Mastro saidshe endured
10 months of harassment before fi-
nally quitting her job in telephone
sales at International Profit Associ-
ates, a Buffalo Grove consulting
business knownas IPAthat agreed
last year to pay $8 million to settle
a class-action suit brought by the
EEOC.
“It was like walking into hell,”
said Mastro, 49, one of 81 women
in the class when the parties set-
tled.
The suit alleged that women
were regularly propositioned, of-
fered money for sex, groped,
slapped, pinched and subjected to
attempted rape. The company ad-
mitted last year in court filings
that it had engaged in “an unlaw-
ful pattern or practice of tolerat-
ing sexual harassment” for nearly
eight years.
SILENCE
Continued from Page 1E
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011
C M Y K
timesleader.com
etc.Entertainment Travel Culture S E C T I O N F
If anyone believes laughter is the best medi-
cine, it’s Jeannine Luby.
Luby, 40, of Scranton, has made the art of
chuckling her full-time job, founding Laugh to
Live LLC, a company that promotes the benefits
of laughter to reduce stress and promote healthy
and happy living among organizations that span
workplaces, community groups and schools.
Through Laugh to Live, Luby offers laughter
yoga sessions, which combine laughter with yo-
gic breathing. She is a Laughter Leader certified
by the World Laughter Tour and a Laughter Yoga
Leader certified by the American School of
Laughter Yoga. She also formed the Humor Ther-
apy Fund at the Scranton Area Foundation in
2005 as part of a graduate-student project at Ma-
rywood University.
Luby is now taking a break from her “Keep
Wine-ing, He Might Start to Look Like Prince
Charming!” comedy tour, the title of which is
based on her 2010 dating manual, “He’s Not
Prince Charming When …” She will begin a sec-
ond round of shows, at venues such as Wood Win-
ery, MountainViewVineyardandVintner’s Circle,
in the spring.
•••
• Why is laughter so important?
“It’s somethingwe cancontrol. Eventhoughit’s
not always easy, depending on the day we’re hav-
ing, we canalways choose to laugh. It doesn’t cost
us anything, the effects are instant, andit cando a
lot for our health. The power of laughter is kindof
incomparable; there are fewthings with that kind
of power over our body, mind and spirit. If we
could really tap into the power, we would be un-
stoppable.”
• If you could make any person laugh, who
would it be, and what joke would you tell them?
“I’d like to make Jesus laugh. The joke I would
test out on himis the following that I’mcurrently
doing in my act: I’m starting a campaign called
‘WWJP: What Would Jesus Post,’ to imagine
Facebook back in biblical times. I’mthinking on a
Saturday night that Jesus might post something
like this: ‘11:30 p.m. - This party in Cana is off the
hook. 11:50 p.m. – Oh, snap they just ran out of
wine. 11:55 p.m. - Goodthing I’mhere, party’s still
rocking.’ I think he would appreciate it.”
• Finish this sentence: He is Prince Charming
when…
“He’s real, he doesn’t pretend, is patient, and
wants to knowthe real you and showyou the real
him.”
• Best advice anyone has ever given you?
“I’ve been on this personal-growth thing the
past couple years, and I read a book by Eckhart
Tolle, ‘Awakening to Your Life’s Purpose.’ From
that I found I really like the idea of wherever
you’re at is your starting point. Don’t worry about
‘What if I don’t reach this goal?’ You just go from
where you’re at. You always look towards your
next goal.”
• If you could bring your act to any venue,
where would it be?
“I’mtotally in love with the French culture. I’ve
beenover there. I haveafriendinFranceI’mgoing
to visit in 2012, so I would love to have a show at
the Eiffel Tower. I’d need a translator, but I don’t
care, because that’s where I’d want to be.”
• What’s the best part about hearing others
laugh?
“As far as the stand-up goes, it’s a bit of stroking
the ego. I feel very proud when I hear people
laugh. I write my own material; it’s a lot of myself
beingveryvulnerable andopen, soI feel a sense of
pride about it. On a secondary level, it’s this con-
nection with people. When laughter happens
there’s usually this, ‘Oh I get it; I get what you’re
saying,’ and I like that connection with people.
They understand me, and it’s like we’re sharing a
moment.”
ON THE SCENE
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Local comedian Jeannine Luby finds great value
in making others laugh.
By SARA POKORNY
spokorny@timesleader.com
Dose of laughter
is best medicine
On The Scene is an occasional feature that will in-
troduce someone you’re likely to encounter during the
more leisurely part of your life in Northeastern Penn-
sylvania. If you know a good candidate, contact Sara
Pokorny at spokorny@timesleader.com.
When the studios talk about the
movies they are opening for this holi-
day season, they really mean holi-
days. There was a time when the big
movies were released after Thanks-
giving. Then it got pushed back to
the beginning of November. This
year’s holiday films started before
Halloween.
Still, if you’re a traditionalist who
considers a “holiday movie” one that
arrives around Thanksgiving or
shortly thereafter, here’s what you
have to look forward to in coming
weeks:
•••
WEDNESDAY:
“ARTHUR CHRISTMAS”
Stars: James McAvoy, Hugh Lau-
rie, Jim Broadbent
Director: Sarah Smith
Plot: Santa’s misfit son goes on a
mission to deliver a present before
Christmas morning.
What to expect: The idea seems as
dated as last year’s Christmas gifts.
•••
“THE MUPPETS”
Stars: Jason Segel, Amy Adams,
Kermit the Frog
Director: James Bobin
Plot: The Muppets reunite for
“The Greatest Muppet Telethon Ev-
er” to raise money to save their thea-
ter.
What to expect: Muppet fans will
reunite to raise big box-office num-
bers.
•••
“HUGO”
Stars: ChloeMoretz, JohnnyDepp,
Jude Law, Emily Mortimer
Director: Martin Scorsese
Plot: An orphan living in the walls
of a train station in the ’30s gets
pulled into a mystery.
What to expect: It’s hard to bet
against a Scorsese movie.
•••
DEC. 9:
“NEW YEAR’S EVE”
Stars: Michelle
Pfeiffer, Ashton
Kutcher, Halle Ber-
ry, Jessica Biel
Director: Garry
Marshall
Plot: A group of
New Yorkers cross
paths as they prepare to
greet the new year.
What to expect: This semi-sequel
to “Valentine’s Day” certainly has
star power.
•••
“THE SITTER”
Stars: JonahHill, Ari Graynor, Sam
Rockwell
Director: David Green
Plot: Ababysitter and three young-
sters end up on an adventure that
leads toa wildchase throughthe city.
What to expect: Doesn’t look like
the kind of movie you’ll be willing to
pay a babysitter so you can go see it.
•••
DEC. 16:
“YOUNG ADULT”
Stars: Charlize Theron, Patrick
Wilson
Director: Jason Reitman
Plot: A writer of teen literature re-
turns to her hometown to find love.
What to expect: At least the dia-
logue should be smart, as it’s written
by Diablo Cody.
•••
“SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME
OF SHADOWS”
By RICK BENTLEY
McClatchy Newspapers
See MOVIES, Page 5F
Your ticket to holiday movies
ALNUT CREEK,
Calif. — When it comes
to fairy-tale cred, Snow
White is in a league of her
own. With the staunch support of
her seven little BFFs, she trumped
evil, rose from the dead, did the whole
royal-wedding thing and made global head-
lines as the “fairest of them all.”
Witha resume like that, you’dthinkMs.
White would have her own reality TV
show, or at least a guest spot on “Glee.”
Instead, she’s spent recent years in relative
obscurity while other literary goddesses,
namely Cinderella, hogged the limelight.
But that’s about to change in a big way. The
sweet-natured lass, who has hung around for centu-
ries, is poised to become Hollywood’s newest “it” girl.
Again.
The SnowWhite comeback tour kicked off recently when she —in
theformof actress Ginnifer Goodwin—assumedmajor prominence
in “Once Upon a Time,” an enchanting ABC drama from two for-
mer “Lost” writers. Reviews mostly have been positive, with
Rolling Stone lauding Goodwin for making history as the first
“hot” Snow White.
Things heat upevenmore next year whenrival live-action
projects arrive at the cineplex. First up in March is a yet-to-
be-titled filmfromRelativity Media that casts Lily Collins
in the role (and Julia Roberts as the Evil Queen). Then, in
June, comes Universal’s “Snow White and the Hunts-
man,” with Kristen Stewart as the snowy one.
But that’s not all. Set for 2012 is a Disney live-action
version that aims to dramatically reinvent the saga.
It remains to be seen if these new productions will
make box-office magic or get rejected like a batch of
poison apples. But one thing is clear: Snow White
hasn’t been in this much demand since1937, when she
enjoyed a breakout performance in Walt Disney’s
“Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” the landmark
animated classic that thrills and terrifies children
even now.
Snow White’s the new ’it’ girl.
Actresses portraying the fair-
est role of all are: Lily Col-
lins, above; Ginnifer Good-
win, left, and Kristen
Stewart, above right.
Goodwin kicked off
the comeback
with ’Once
Upon a
Time.’
See SNOW, Page 4F
By CHUCK BARNEY
Contra Costa Times
C M Y K
PAGE 2F SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ D I V E R S I O N S
NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE
BONUS PUZZLE
DIAGRAMLESS
CRYPTOGRAMS
The Sunday Crossword
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
Puzzle Answers
on 3F
HOROSCOPE
HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
You have a white-hot burn-
ing desire to accomplish
a certain goal. You will do
whatever it takes for as
long as it takes to bring
this outcome into being.
You are, in short, driven.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
You probably already know
that your sign can be stub-
born about learning from
others. When you have a
mentor you really trust,
the only sensible thing to
do is let go of your defens-
es and learn all you can.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You
have a talent for noticing
big obstacles ahead and
steering to avoid them. It’s
the small obstacles and
unanticipated problems
that could bog you down
now if you let them. Stay
positive, and you’ll keep
moving ahead.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
Whatever happened in
the past, leave it there.
You are what you make of
yourself. Remember that
you’re in charge, and don’t
let other people or circum-
stances determine your
destiny.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You
give your love whole-
heartedly. That could be
overwhelming for certain
people. Not everyone
knows how to open up to
love. Be patient, and try to
give your attention in eas-
ily acceptable doses.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). As
you deal with loved ones,
it may occur to you that
there has got to be a bet-
ter way to communicate.
The secret is in vicinity
and eye contact. Whenever
possible, be close and con-
nected to one another.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
You’ll decide that your
expressions need to be
heard. What you wear and
how you carry yourself will
be as much a part of that
expression as what you
say, write and present.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
Drop your uncertainty
about the future. You can
be sure that you’ll rise to
the occasion because said
“occasion” is one that you
have been thinking, wish-
ing and dreaming about
for ages.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21). To some extent, this
day is a study in contrast:
the poor against the rich,
the infantile next to the
wise. You’ll be prompted to
form some kind of conclu-
sion from all that plays out
before you.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). You feel a respon-
sibility to make people
happy. Start with yourself.
Ultimately, you’re the only
one you can really control.
But if you can do that,
you’ll strongly influence
others to enjoy life.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).
Someone will do a good
deed for you that is kind
of a mixed blessing. On
the one hand, you enjoy
the perk. On the other,
your impetus to return the
favor is quite substantial.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
What you are called on to
handle today is not the
same old crisis of the past.
It’s something new and
exciting. You’ll have to
release the past in order
to see this for the oppor-
tunity it really is.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Nov.
20). You are not afraid to
fail, and therefore, you’ll
succeed at a faster rate.
You’ll spend many happy
hours with a true friend
next month and into the
new year. January brings
the completion of a proj-
ect, and you’ll set new
exciting goals, too. A vic-
tory for someone close to
you will affect you favor-
ably in March. Scorpio and
Capricorn people adore
you. Your lucky numbers
are: 20, 14, 33, 1 and 19.
PAIR OPTIONS
Don Gagliardo and C.C. Burnikel
11/20/11
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 3F
➛ D I V E R S I O N S
For information about WonderWord volumes and Treasuries, call Universal Press Syndicate at 1-800-255-6734.
WONDERWORD
By David Ouellet
Cryptograms New York Times
Bonus Puzzle Diagramless
JUMBLE
GOREN BRIDGE
LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE ANSWERS
By Henri Arnold and
Mike Argirion
WITH OMAR SHARIF
& TANNAH HIRSCH
©1995 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU KIDS
MINUTE MAZE
PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION
PREVIOUS SUNDAY’S SOLUTION
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069
11/20
11/20
11/20
11/20
11/20
1. We love family picnics out in the
woods. At the last one, we invited
some funny actors over to ham it up.
2. Ken was looking forward to the
big spread at the fancy annual
picnic. He was quite eager to try the
Barbieque.
3. The picnic was a very regal affair.
We had cucumber tarts, great
scones, butter, cream and mugs of
tea, and it was presided over by the
Earl of Sandwich.
4. The picnic fare was perfect: lots of
spicy meatballs, hot peppers,
tomatoes and brownies, with a tasty
side of antacid!
DEAR ABBY
Parents must maintain
contact with daughter
Dear Abby:
Late last
winter, a
sheriff called
to tell me
that my
daughter
“Amy” had been found stand-
ing, bruised and battered,
on a street corner in upstate
New York. Her arm had
been broken. He was con-
vinced that the man she
was living with had beaten
her and kicked her outside
to freeze. Her sister (my
other daughter) paid to put
her up in a hotel for the
night.
My husband and I were
convinced early on in this
relationship that this mon-
ster was determined to
have us support him finan-
cially, because he would
leave us long, threatening
messages demanding money,
or else our daughter would
be “homeless.”
Amy moved back in
with him, and I heard
from her sister that the
creep was bringing other
women home for sex.
It raised my hopes that
Amy would give up on
him. Instead, she became
pregnant.
Now Amy is hurt that
I don’t call her and share
in this exciting event. When
I try to explain how I feel,
she tells me, “It’s not about
YOU, Mom.” She’s right.
It’s about the baby. I am
ashamed to not be able to
change this baby’s future.
What can I do?
— Paralyzed With Fear
Out West
Dear Paralyzed: Make every
effort to prevent your daugh-
ter and grandchild from
becoming isolated from your
family. Some abusers delib-
erately impregnate their vic-
tims in order to keep them
dependent. Keep the contact
and the conversation going,
so that when Amy finally
realizes that her boyfriend
is a danger not only to her
but also to her baby, she can
come to you for help.
Dear Abby: What would you
say is the difference between
a friendship and an emo-
tional affair?
— Unhappy Wife
in Pennsylvania
Dear Unhappy Wife: A
friendship is a relationship
in which the spouse feels
included. An emotional
affair is one during which
the spouse writes to Dear
Abby and signs her question
“Unhappy.”
To receive a collection of Abby’s
most memorable — and most fre-
quently requested — poems and
essays, send a business-sized, self-
addressed envelope, plus check
or money order for $3.95 ($4.50
in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keep-
ers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
A D V I C E
C M Y K
PAGE 4F SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ E T C .
You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
NO PASSES
TWILIGHT SAGA:
THE BREAKING
DAWN
TWILIGHT SAGA: THE BREAKING
DAWN (XD) (PG-13)
1:25PM, 4:25PM, 7:25PM, 10:25PM
A VERY HAROLD & KUMAR CHRISTMAS (3D) (R)
12:25PM, 2:40PM, 4:55PM, 7:10PM, 9:25PM
HAPPY FEET TWO (3D) (PG)
12:20PM, 1:10PM, 2:50PM, 3:40PM, 5:15PM,
6:10PM, 7:50PM, 8:40PM, 10:20PM, 11:05PM
HAPPY FEET TWO (DIGITAL) (PG)
11:30AM, 2:00PM, 4:30PM, 7:00PM, 9:30PM
IMMORTALS (3D) (R)
12:45PM, 1:55PM, 3:20PM, 4:40PM, 5:55PM,
7:30PM, 9:15PM, 10:10PM
IMMORTALS (DIGITAL) (R)
6:30PM, 9:05PM
IN TIME (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
(12:00PM, 5:05PM NOT SHOWN ON SAT. 11/19),
10:30PM
J. EDGAR (DIGITAL) (R)
12:55PM, 2:25PM, 4:00PM, 5:45PM, 7:20PM,
9:00PM, 10:35PM
JACK AND JILL (DIGITAL) (R)
12:35PM, 1:50PM, 3:05PM, 4:05PM, 5:20PM,
6:25PM, 7:40PM,8:45PM, 9:55PM, 11:00PM
PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3 (DIGITAL) (R)
(2:45PM NOT SHOWN ON SAT. 11/19), 7:45PM
PUSS IN BOOTS (3D) (PG)
12:50PM, 3:10PM, 5:30PM, 7:55PM, 10:15PM
PUSS IN BOOTS (DIGITAL) (PG)
12:10PM, 1:30PM, 2:30PM, 3:45PM, 5:00PM,
7:15PM, 9:35PM
TOWER HEIST (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:05PM, 2:35PM, 5:05PM, 7:35PM, 10:05PM
TWILIGHT SAGA: THE BREAKING DAWN
(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:10AM, 11:35AM, 11:55AM, 12:40PM,
2:10PM, 2:35PM, 2:55PM, 3:40PM, 5:10PM,
5:35PM, 5:55PM, 6:40PM, 8:10PM, 8:35PM,
8:55PM, 9:40PM, 11:10PM
Don’t just watch a movie, experience it!
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***$2.50 Additional Charge for 3D Attractions.***
No passes, rain checks, discount tickets accepted to these features
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SPECIAL EVENTS
The Metropolitan Opera: Satyagraha LIVE
Saturday, November 19
th
at 12:55pm only
A Special screening of the family classic A Christmas Story - PG - 94 min.
Will be presented on Saturday, November 19th at 10:00am only
Admission is the donation of an unwrapped toy (one per family)
To Benefit Toys For Tots
Sponsored jointly by the Downtown Wilkes Barre Business
Association and R/C Theaters
***Happy Feet Two in 3D - PG - 110 min.
(12:40), (3:00), (5:20), 7:40, 10:00
*Happy Feet Two - PG - 110 min.
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*The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn
Part 1 - PG13 - 130 min.
(12:40), (1:00), (1:20), (1:50), (3:40), (4:00), (4:30),
(4:40), 7:00, 7:20, 7:40, 8:00, 9:40, 10:00, 10:20
***Immortals in 3D - R - 120 min.
(1:20), (4:15), 7:20, 10:15
Immortals in 3D D-Box - R - 120 min.
(1:20), (4:15), 7:20, 10:15
J. Edgar - R - 150 min.
(12:30), (3:30), 7:00, 10:00
**Jack and Jill - PG - 100 min.
(12:50), (1:10), (3:00), (3:40), 7:00, 7:40,
9:10, 9:50
Tower Heist - PG13 - 115 min.
(1:10), (3:45), 7:20, 10:10
***A Very Harold &Kumar
3D Christmas - R - 100 min.
(1:40), (3:50), 7:40, 9:55 (No 1:40 or 3:50 show
on Saturday, November 19
th
)
***Puss in Boots in 3D - PG - 100 min.
(1:15), (3:25), 7:15, 9:25
Puss in Boots - PG - 100 min.
(1:45), (4:00), 7:30
Paranormal Activity 3 - R - 95 min.
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“‘Snow White’ is ground zero
for fairy tales. It’s where they all
grow from,” says Adam Horo-
witz, who created “Once Upon a
Time” with longtime writing
partner Edward Kitsis. “It was
the first movie I saw as a kid. Ev-
erybody loves the character and
loves the story so much that it’s
going to be continually retold in
new and different ways.”
Indeed, while the Disney ver-
sionof “SnowWhite” has roots in
afablecollectedandpublishedby
German brothers Jacob and Wil-
helm Grimm in the early 1800s,
numerous takes on the tale have
been handed down in oral and
written form over the years. But
why is Hollywood suddenly pil-
ing on now? Maria Tatar, a Har-
vard University professor who
has written extensively about
fairy tales and children’s litera-
ture, believes the “Shrek” movie
series is partially responsible.
Those wildly popular computer-
animated films put fun newspins
on the old standards.
“Before that, Cinderella sto-
ries, in various forms, were all
over the cinematic landscape,”
she says. “ ‘Shrek’ reminded ev-
eryone that there’s a whole wide
range of fairy tale characters, and
that there’s more to life than rags-
to-riches.”
It probably didn’t hurt, either,
that director TimBurton’s recent
reboot of “Alice in Wonderland”
grossed $1.02 billion worldwide.
At a point when the supply of
comic-book superheroes seem-
inglyis close todepletion, screen-
writers are now turning to the
stories we used to hear at bed-
time.
“Hollywood is reading the
mood of the public and, in these
tough times, people want hope
and fantasy,” Kitsis says. “Fairy
tales are like the lottery. It’s the
belief that you can change your
crappy life in an instant.
Snow White’s adventures con-
tinue to fascinate audiences for a
number of reasons, literary ex-
perts say.
“It’s a gruesome story with a
strong heroine and sublime end-
ing. What’s not tolike?” asks Kate
Bernheimer, who founded the
“Fairy Tale Review” (www.fairy-
talereview.com). “It presents a
world where we can experience
terror, adventure and bliss. Good
will survives amid terrible prob-
lems. The underdog will win. It’s
an adventure story, and its magic
is spare: a talking mirror, a shiny
object that speaks the truth.”
SNOW
Continued fromPage 1F
’Snow White and the
Seven Dwarfs’ was an
enormous hit in 1937.
1812: The Grimm Brothers
publish their dark tale, derived
from earlier versions in various
European countries. Originally,
the young heroine is victimized
by the jealousy of her natural
mother, later changed to her
stepmother.
1916: Marguerite Clark stars in
a silent-film version of “Snow
White.” It makes an indelible
impression on a young Kansas
City boy by the name of Walt
Disney.
1937: Defying naysayers who
claim the project will lead to his
financial ruin, Disney takes a
major risk with “Snow
White and the Seven
Dwarfs.” It’s the first
feature-length, full-
color animated film
produced in America.
It’s also an enormous
hit.
1943: Warner Bros. releases
“Coal Black and de Sebben
Dwarfs,” a controversial short
film that parodies the Disney
version with an all-black cast
and sexual overtones. It is later
removed from circulation.
1961: The story is parodied
again in “Snow White and The
Three Stooges.” The leading
lady is Olympic figure-skating
champ Carol Heiss.
1987: “The Charmings,” an ABC
sitcom, whips up a tale in which
Snow White and Prince Char-
ming find themselves living in
the suburbs of Southern Cali-
fornia.
1989: It’s an Oscars telecast
moment that lives on in infamy:
An off-key Rob Lowe is accom-
panied by a ditsy Snow White
(Eileen Bowman) during a
cheesy opening number. Disney
threatens legal action.
1997: Things turn really creepy
in the horror movie “Snow
White: A Tale of Terror,” star-
ring Sigourney Weaver and
Sam Nell. Ominous ads for the
film claim, “The fairy tale is
over.”
2007: In “Shrek the Third,”
Snow White (voiced by Amy
Poehler) goes from meek push-
over to kick-butt action hero,
using her syrupy singing voice
to seduce forest animals into
following her command.
2011: The new ABC drama
“Once Upon a Time” (8 p.m.
Sundays) has Snow White
(Ginnifer Goodwin) banished to
the modern world, thanks to a
curse by the Evil Queen.
SNOW WHITE THROUGH THE YEARS
“ ‘Snow White’ is ground zero for fairy tales. …
Everybody loves the character and loves the story so much that it’s going to
be continually retold in new and different ways.”
AdamHorowitz
Who created ‘Once Upon a Time’ with
longtime writing partner Edward Kitsis
W
e get it already: Michael Jackson was
kind of a weird dude.
In the weeks, months and now years
since the music icon’s death, news consumers
across the globe have been inundated with ex-
aminations of Jackson’s life. And frankly, too
muchof it has focusedonthe sensational aspects
of his 50 years on Earth.
Luckily, for those of us who prefer to remem-
ber Jackson as a once-in-a-generation entertain-
er and the undisputed King of Pop and not so
much for his sometimes peculiar personal choic-
es, we have Joseph Vogel in our corner.
Vogel, who writes about popular culture, mu-
sic and politics for The Huffington Post and
teaches at the University of Rochester, has writ-
ten a book that focuses solely on Jackson’s cre-
ative output.
“Man in the Music” is thankfully all about just
that — the music.
And it’s really good.
Vogel takes the reader album-by-album, song-
by-song and examines in exhaustive detail how
Jackson produced a lifetime’s worth of music
that became a soundtracktothe lives of millions.
Jackson’s Motown years, in-
cluding his work with The
Jackson 5, isn’t covered in
“Man in the Music,” which fo-
cuses on the singer’s solo
work, beginning with 1979’s
mega-selling “Off the Wall” all
the way through “Invincible”
in 2001.
Vogel, relying on news ar-
chives, Jackson’s words and
interviews with those who
collaborated on the albums,
opens the door to the studio
and provides an in-depth pic-
ture of the artist’s creative
process. Each song Jackson recorded during his
solo career is examined with a critical eye.
It’s a fascinating read and really a must-have
for any Jackson fan.
“I wanted to write something historically and
critically rigorous, but approachthe subject with
less cynicism and curiosity,” Vogel writes in the
preface.
Mission accomplished, sir.
By MIKE HOUSEHOLDER Associated Press
It’s a FASCINATING
read and really a
MUST-HAVE for
any Jackson fan.
‘Man in the
Music: The
Creative Life
and Work of
Michael Jack-
son’ (Sterling
Publishing), by
Joseph Vogel
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 5F
BOOKS
➛ timesleader.com
HARDCOVER FICTION
1. 11/22/63. Stephen King. Scribner,
$35
2. The Litigators. John Grisham.
Doubleday, $28.95
3. Zero Day. David Baldacci. Grand
Central, $27.99
4. The Best of Me. Nicholas
Sparks. Grand Central, $25.99
5. 1Q84. Haruki Murakami. Knopf,
$30.50
6. The Christmas Wedding. James
Patterson & Richard DiLallo.
Little, Brown, $25.99
7. The Alloy of Law. Brandon
Sanderson. Tor, $24.99
8. The Snow Angel. Glenn Beck.
Threshold, $21
9. The Prague Cemetery. Umberto
Eco. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt,
$27
10. Hotel Vendome. Danielle Steel.
Delacorte, $28
11. The Marriage Plot. Jeffrey
Eugenides. Farrar, Straus &
Giroux, $28
12. Lost December. Richard Paul
Evans. Simon & Schuster, $19.99
13. The Affair. Lee Child. Delacorte,
$28
14. Out of Oz. Gregory Maguire.
Morrow, $26.99
HARDCOVER NONFICTION
1. Steve Jobs. Walter Isaacson.
Simon & Schuster, $35
2. Killing Lincoln. Bill O’Reilly &
Martin Dugard. Holt, $28
3. Back to Work. Bill Clinton.
Knopf, $23.95
4. Nearing Home. Billy Graham.
Thomas Nelson, $19.99
5. Jack Kennedy. Chris Matthews.
Simon & Schuster, $27.50
6. Spontaneous Happiness. An-
drew Weil. Little, Brown, $27.99
7. No Higher Honor. Condoleezza
Rice. Crown, $35
8. SEAL Target Geronimo. Chuck
Pfarrer. St. Martin’s, $25.99
9. Catherine the Great. Robert K.
Massie. Random House, $35
10. Unbroken. Laura Hillenbrand.
Random House, $27
11. Guinness World Records 2012.
Guinness World Records, $28.95
12. Blue Nights. Joan Didion.
Knopf, $25
13. Boomerang. Michael Lewis.
Norton, $25.95
14. Paula Deen’s Southern Cook-
ing Bible. Paula Deen with Melis-
sa Clark. Simon & Schuster,
$29.99
MASS MARKET
1. Crescent Dawn. Clive Cussler &
Dirk Cussler. Berkley, $9.99
2. The Perfect Christmas. Debbie
Macomber. Mira, $7.99
3. What the Night Knows. Dean
Koontz. Bantam, $9.99
4. The Guardian. Sherrilyn Ke-
nyon. St. Martin’s, $7.99
5. Secrets to the Grave. Tami
Hoag. Signet, $9.99
6. Cross Fire. James Patterson.
Vision, $9.99
7. Gideon’s Sword. Douglas Pres-
ton & Lincoln Child. Vision, $7.99
8. Bring Me Home for Christmas.
Robyn Carr. Mira, $7.99
9. Touched by Angels. Debbie
Macomber. Avon, $7.99
10. Holiday in Stone Creek. Linda
Lael Miller. HQN, $7.99
11. The Valcourt Heiress. Cathe-
rine Coulter. Jove, $7.99
12. Miracle Cure. Harlan Coben.
Signet, $9.99
13. The Athena Project. Brad Thor.
Pocket Star, $9.99
14. Making Spirits Bright. Fern
Michaels, Elizabeth Bass, Rosa-
lind Noonan & Nan Rossiter.
Zebra, $7.99
TRADE
1. The Next Always. Nora Roberts.
Berkley, $16
2. The Help. Kathryn Stockett.
Berkley, $16
3. Heaven Is for Real. Todd Burpo
with Lynn Vincent. Thomas
Nelson, $16.99
4. Sing You Home. Jodi Picoult.
Atria/Emily Bestler, $16
5. The Girl with the Dragon Tat-
too. Stieg Larsson. Vintage,
$15.95
6. The Immortal Life of Henrietta
Lacks. Rebecca Skloot. Broad-
way, $16
7. Sarah’s Key. Tatiana de Rosnay.
St. Martin’s Griffin, $13.95
8. Water for Elephants. Sara
Gruen. Algonquin, $14.95
9. Outliers. Malcolm Gladwell.
LB/Back Bay, $16.99
10. The Tiger’s Wife. Tea Obreht.
Random House, $15
11. Cutting for Stone. Abraham
Verghese. Vintage, $15.95
12. Moneyball. Michael Lewis.
Norton, $15.95
13. Assholes Finish First. Tucker
Max. Gallery, $16
14. The Art of Racing in the Rain.
Garth Stein. Harper, $14.99
◆ B E S T S E L L E R S
Stars: Robert Downey Jr., Jude
Law
Director: Guy Ritchie
Plot: Sherlock Holmes finally
meets his equal in Professor Mo-
riarty.
What to expect: The original
filmwas a hit despite the trade of
action for intellect.
•••
“ALVIN AND THE CHIP-
MUNKS: CHIP-WRECKED”
Stars: Anna Faris, Amy Poeh-
ler, Jesse McCartney
Director: Mike Mitchell
Plot: The Chipmunks and Chi-
pettes are marooned on a tropi-
cal island.
What to expect: Never under-
estimate the draw of the singing
chipmunks.
•••
DEC. 21:
“THE GIRL WITH THE
DRAGON TATTOO”
Stars: Rooney Mara, Daniel
Craig, Joely Richardson
Director: David Fincher
Plot: A reporter and a hacker
look into a 40-year-old case.
What to expect: The filmhas a
lot to live up to, as the original is
so powerful.
•••
“MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE —
GHOST PROTOCOL”
Stars: Tom Cruise, Jeremy
Renner, Simon Pegg
Director: Brad Bird
Plot: Ethan Hunt and his team
must go undercover to clear the
IMF.
What to expect: The mission
to be a box office hit looks very
possible.
•••
“THE ADVENTURES OF
TINTIN”
Stars: Jamie Bell, Daniel
Craig, Simon Pegg
Director: Steven Spielberg
Plot: Tintin goes against the
Red Rackham.
What to expect: The unique
animation style, combined with
the popularity of the character,
will make it a Christmas treat.
•••
DEC. 25
“WAR HORSE”
Stars: Emily Watson, David
Thewlis
Director: Steven Spielberg
Plot: A horse and man form a
friendship during World War I.
What to expect: The film will
put Spielberg into the running
for an Oscar.
MOVIES
Continued fromPage 1F
’The Adventures of Tintin’ is a real Christmas treat.
The seven video screens in the new
youngadult thriller “DarkEden” flicker in
black and white — not only as described
in the book’s text but through an accom-
panying downloadable
app that plays out the
story’s action in video
snippets viewable on
iPhones, iPods, iPads
and Android devices.
Thebackcover of thelat-
est multimedia creation
from bestselling author
Patrick Carman also in-
corporates a QRcode al-
lowing readers to watch
the ominously creepy
“Dark Eden” trailer.
Isit abook?Afilm?An
audio book? “Dark
Eden”isall three—aneffort toencourage
reluctant readers to embrace the written
wordthroughtechnological enticements.
“Dark Eden” is a compelling read that
transposes the best aspects of classic hor-
ror storytelling onto a modern back-
woods adventure experienced by seven
terrified teens.
Each of them suffers from a fear — of
rabid dogs, rickety ladders, kidnapping.
None of them understands why, despite
years of psychotherapy. So their doctor
corrals themtogether, driving themdeep
intoa woodedarea onL.A.’s outskirts and
droppingthemoff, saying, “Acure is wait-
ing for each of you down that path.”
Their doctor refers to themas “The 7.”
All of themare15years old. They’re a mix
of hormone-addled boys and girls, some
of whom are inevitably romantically in-
volved. None had met before being
packed into their doctor’s van. They’re
panicked to discover their cellphones are
out of service range and even more
freaked that the first person they meet is
Mrs. Goring — a crotchety woman of in-
determinate age whose first words of ad-
vice are: “Act like grown-ups and I won’t
spit in your oatmeal.”
Mrs. Goring is one of just two people
living at Fort Eden — a compound that
consistsof buildingsnotableonlyfor their
bunker-esque architecture and sturdy
iron doors. Rainsford also lives on the
premises, perfecting his cure for fear,
though the details of how he does so are
unclear.
Facedwithloomingdarknessandalack
of survival skills, sixof thekids venturein-
to the appropriately named fort, but Will
Besting stays behind. Will, it turns out, is
scaredof peopleandfindscomfort intech-
nology, specifically vintage video games
and the audio recording device he
brought with him. The Recorder, as he
calls it, was cobbled together from old
iPods and digital cameras he bought on
Craigslist and reassembled into a device
he uses to record audio and video.
Readers can hear and watch what he’s
recorded through the “Dark Eden” app,
the first episode of which consists of sha-
ky video footage of the teens’ walk
through the woods and audio files of the
seven’s psychotherapy sessions that Will
surreptitiously downloaded fromhis doc-
tor’s computer. The first episode is free.
Subsequent chapters can be purchased
for 99 cents apiece or in their entirety for
$9.99.
As befits a story taking place just out-
sideof L.A., all of thecharacters intheapp
are Hollywood-slick. Andso are the video
and audio production values, which am-
plify, rather than detract from, Carman’s
inventive storytelling. “Dark Eden” is a
fast-pacedthrill ride that ends withbigre-
veals about why the seven were taken to
the fort and subjected to Rainsford’s ther-
apy. Readers will need to wait until the
second, andfinal, bookintheseriestofind
out if the fear cure actually works.
Fear factor
times seven
By SUSAN CARPENTER
Los Angeles Times
“Dark Eden” by
Patrick Carman;
Katherine
Tegen Books
(316 pages,
$17.99 ages 13
and up)
C M Y K
PAGE 6F SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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P
lanning a vacation with two generations — par-
ents andkids —canbe tricky. Planninga vacation
with three generations — grandparents, parents
and kids — can be daunting. With family get-to-
gethers coming up over the holidays, and some families al-
ready planning next year’s trips, here are three first-person
stories about different types of multi-generation vacations
—a roadtrip, a house rental anda cruise —as recountedby
Associated Press reporters.
Road trip
Some of my happiest child-
hood memories are of the road
trips I took with my grandpar-
ents, mother and brother in the
1960s. One year we made a loop
through the Pacific Northwest;
another year we visited national
parks including Yellowstone and
the Grand Tetons. I remember
the unreal blue of Crater Lake
andthewell-thumbedAAAguide
that steered us to inexpensive
motels.
After my daughter was born, it
seemed natural to return to
three-generation vacationing. In
thepast fiveyears mymother, my
daughter and I have crisscrossed
much of the United States. We’ve
been to Colonial Williamsburg,
Mount Rushmore and Yellow-
stone —again. We’ve been to the
White Mountains of New Hamp-
shire and the Great Smoky
Mountains of Tennessee.
My mother, a historian as well
as the captain of our expeditions,
has aimed to balance kid-friendly
activities with the historical and
cultural attractions she craves. A
museum one day, a trail ride the
next. It hasn’t always gone
smoothly, but it’s been fun.
Williamsburg’s 18th-century
re-enactments were right up my
mother’s cobblestone alley. My
daughter was 8 that year, and her
attention wavered. A brickmak-
ingdemonstrationinterestedher
more than a tour of the Gover-
nor’s Palace. But a promise that
the following day would be spent
at a water park kept grumbling in
check.
We went to Mount Rushmore
in 2008. I had not seen it before
and was suitably awestruck. My
daughter thought it was cool. In
planningthe trip, my mother had
not realized that our stay in
South Dakota would coincide
with the Sturgis Rally, which at-
tracts hundreds of thousands of
motorcycle riders annually.
As we drove through Colora-
do, Wyoming and South Dakota
that August it seemed we were
the only non-bikers on the road.
The restaurants and motels were
full of beefy, tattooed men in
Sturgis T-shirts. Members of a
biker church sold bottled water
at a rest stop. They could not
have been nicer to us. One of my
abiding memories of that trip is
my 10-year-old taking turns on
the indoor water slide at a hotel
in Rapid City with a biker who
seemed to enjoy the splashdown
as much as she did.
Earlier this year, we visited
Tennessee and the Civil War bat-
tlefields of Stones River and Shi-
loh. Exhibits and ranger talks
brought wartime heroism to life,
though my daughter’s attention,
once again, flagged. But she liked
the zipline course at Ruby Falls,
near Chattanooga, and all of us
enjoyed the Lookout Mountain
Incline Railway, which has a 72.7
percent grade and bills itself as
the world’s steepest passenger
railway. Families that visit the ar-
ea should consider staying, as we
did, at the Chattanooga Choo
Choo hotel, where the lobby is
the city’s lovingly restored his-
toric trainstationandyoucaneat
dinner in a repurposed dining
car.
We’ll do another trip next year,
destination as yet unplanned. I
can’t wait.
-- By Associated Press Writer
Karen Matthews
House rental
As an American, I’m used to
the “If it’s Tuesday, this must be
Belgium” style of travel, running
frenetically from place to place.
But when the British side of
the family proposed spending
two weeks relaxing on a rustic
property outside a small town in
Tuscany, I had to confess it
sounded idyllic.
We were 20-odd family mem-
bers and partners, from an 18-
month-old to an 87-year-old,
coming in from London, New
York, Boston, Madrid and the
Italian city of Padua.
We stayed in three stone
houses atop those lovely Tuscan
hills. We were 45 minutes from
the nearest big tourist attraction
— the medieval city of Siena —
and we had no plans, other than
swimming, reading, cooking,
eating and spur-of-the-moment
excursions if we felt like it.
We had no cooks coming in, as
some do. Instead, in a brilliant
system devised by two young
members of our group, we divid-
edintoteams of twoor three peo-
ple. Each team was responsible
for meal duty one day a week.
The teamwould do all shopping,
cooking, serving and cleanup.
And everyone else would relax,
knowing they soon would have a
turn.
There was an indoor kitchen,
but we never used it. All meals
were cooked in an outdoor kitch-
en that boasted a wood-fired grill
and eaten on a stone deck. Din-
ners were long and leisurely —
come to think of it, so were
lunches —always with a fewbot-
tles of nice Tuscan wine. Nobody
watched television. Instead we
talked, played cards and read
books, thoughI have toadmit my
youngkids, deprivedof their usu-
al electronics, were addicted to
games on their father’s iPad (to
his annoyance.)
On days where the sun and the
pool seemed a bit too much, or
when we feared our kids were
getting too noisy, we packed
them up in the car and took off.
We brought the kids into Siena
for an afternoon stroll one day,
then came back ourselves —just
parents — to see the art and
amazing mosaic floor of the ca-
thedral. (I am forever grateful to
the older family members who
babysat the kids.)
Though this holiday was not
planned around kids — Europe-
ans, sensibly, do that much less
than Americans —there were in-
teresting places for them to see,
too. On a trip to Pisa to pick up
her older sister, our young
daughter enjoyed seeing the
Leaning Tower, which has been
shored up, but still leans. And
they loved Bomarzo, a 16th-cen-
tury “Park of Monsters,” full of
scary stone sculptures. (They al-
so liked a nearby complex of out-
let stores —much less romantic,
but there you have it.)
One of my favorite events was
also the most unexpected: An
evening talent show. Nobody got
a pass; everyone had to have an
act. Performances took place on
the deck where we ate. We had
three judges, “American Idol”
style, and cream pies to throw at
the judges at the end.
But the biggest surprise for me
was somethingmany people take
for granted. In the decade since I
had become a mother, I had nev-
er once been able to read a book
on holiday. This time, with the
help of a huge crew to entertain
the kids, I actually read an entire
book: “Life,” by Keith Richards.
Cover to cover. Victory!
—By Associated Press Nation-
al Writer Jocelyn Noveck
Cruise
My brothers and I had not
shared a vacation since we were
kids. Now we were grown, with
eight children from 12 to 27 be-
tween us, all standing on the
deck of a cruise ship as it pulled
away from the Seattle harbor,
headed toward Alaska.
It was my mother’s idea. Acou-
ple of years had passed since my
father’s death, and I believe the
trip was her way of saying, “Your
father isn’t here anymore, but
we’re still a family.”
My brothers and our wives
trieddifferent things fromwhale-
watching to sea kayaking to vis-
iting the art galleries and gift
shops in port towns. On the ship,
diversions ranged from photog-
raphy classes to a talent show to
an Elton John tribute act — he
was actually good. And a bonus:
My younger brother won the
ship’s blackjack tournament.
The seven grandchildren went
on many of the same trips, but
what they enjoyed most was the
freedom to roam the ship, eating
what they wanted when they
wanted it. The prepaid all-you-
can-drink soda cards made the
younger ones such as my son, 12
at the time, feel like big shots,
and they’re a bargain compared
with paying by the glass.My
daughter, then 17, said there
could have been more activities
for teens. The club and game
roomonthe HollandAmerica ms
Oosterdamwere aimed at young-
er kids.
The cruise lines are trying to
fight the image that they appeal
mostly to older people by adding
new entertainment acts (Norwe-
gian brags about the Blue Man
Group), amusement areas com-
plete with a carousel (Royal Ca-
ribbean’s Allureof theSeas), rock
climbing walls, 3-D movies and
other attractions. Disney has its
own cruise line.
Sometimes, just the route
might make a difference for
younger family members. Onour
tripalongthe Alaska coast, it was
cold enough most days that the
kids didn’t want to swim on the
ship, and of course snorkeling ex-
cursions were out of the ques-
tion.
A cruise is a good option if
there are family members who
have limited mobility. It also
eliminates the need to pack and
unpackeveryday, yet thescenery
changes with every destination.
Bigships tendtohavemoreactiv-
ities, and they have a range of
room sizes and prices — an im-
portant consideration for many
multi-generation family trips.
While everyone in our group
trieddifferent activities eachday,
we gathered as a family for din-
ner, just as we did years ago at
home. It’s those memories of
spending time together that will
endure long after the excursions
have ended.
— By AP Business Writer Da-
vid Koenig
AP PHOTOS
The Leaning Tower, right, and the Duomo basilica are seen during celebrations for the official ceremony marking the end of the tower
restoration in Pisa, Italy. Planning a vacation with three generations - grandparents, parents and kids - can be tricky. Renting a home
in Italy and seeing the sights is one option.
Associated Press writer Jocelyn Noveck and some 20 others in an extended family enjoyed a two-
week vacation based at this home with a pool in Tuscany, Italy.
Traveling
with three
generations
The MS Oosterdam is docked
outside the town of Loutraki,
Greece, 50 miles west of Ath-
ens. A fisherman stands at
right.
The George Washington face on
Mount Rushmore National
Memorial near Keystone, S.D.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 1G
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
IF YOU WANT TO SIMPLY SAVE BIG ON YOUR NEXT NEW VEHICLE
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412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
Pre-Owned Cars
100,000-Mi l e/7-Year Power t rain Limi ted
Warrant y. Fully Transferable. No Deductible.
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M-TH 8-7 • F 8-5 • SAT 8-1
The power of engineering.
Stock #300017
*See dealer for details. Includes $500 rebate and $500 Suzuki Owner Loyalty.
NOVEMBER
MANAGER’S SPECIAL
2012 SUZUKI
SX4 AWD
CROSSOVER
AMERICA’S
#
1 WARRANTY
100,000-mile/7-year*
2010 Suzuki
Kizashi SE AWD
23K Miles
$18,995
2008 Jeep Grand
Cherokee
Freshly Serviced
$15,995
2011 Chevrolet
2500 Cargo Van
18K Miles
$21,995
2008 Toyota
Tacoma 4x4
60K Miles
$16,995
1997 Ford
F-150 Ext Cab
Freshly Serviced
$8,995
2006 Chrysler
PT Cruiser
$7,995
MSRP $18,019
SPECIAL
$15,995
2004 Chevrolet
Impala LS
Freshly Serviced
$8,995
2005 Suzuki Grand
Vitara LX
$CALL$
2004 Suzuki
XL-7 LX 4x4
$9,995
PAGE 2G SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
250 General Auction 250 General Auction 250 General Auction
LEGAL NOTICE
SEALED proposals will be received at the
Luzerne County Office of County Manager
/ Chief Clerk, 200 North River Street,
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 18711, until
4:00 p.m., Prevailing Time, Monday,
December 5, 2011 for:
LUZERNE COUNTY TAX REVENUE
ANTICIPATION LOAN FOR THE YEAR
2012
THE COUNTY IS SOLICITING PROPOSALS
FOR INTEREST RATES ON A TAX REVENUE
ANTICIPATION LOAN IN AN AMOUNT NOT
TO EXCEED EIGHTEEN MILLION DOLLARS
($18,000,000) FOR THE YEAR 2012.
Bids will be opened at 4:15 p.m., Prevailing
Time, Monday, December 5, 2011 in the
office of the County Manager / Chief Clerk,
Court House, Wilkes-Barre, PA.
Bid envelopes to be plainly marked on the
outside stating service offered and
name of company or individual bidding.
The Luzerne County Commissioners
reserve the right to reject any and all
responses, to modify the scope, to nego-
tiate with one or more of the respondents,
to solicit other proposals, to select one or
more providers and to waive any/or all
requirements determined to be in the best
interest of the County.
All interested parties must contact the
County’s Office of Budget & Finance, for
proposal specifications, at (570) 825-1557
or electronically at
JoanMarie.Pusateri@luzerne
county.org.
The County of Luzerne does not discrimi-
nate on the basis of race, color, national
origin, sex, religion, age, family and handi-
capped status in employment or the provi-
sion of services.
THE COUNTY OF LUZERNE IS AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
EMPLOYER.
Douglas A. Pape
Luzerne County Manager / Chief Clerk
PUBLIC NOTICE
Official Notice is hereby given that the
County of Luzerne is soliciting Requests
for Proposals from qualified entities for the
following:
Development of central services
cost allocation plans that identify the
various costs incurred by Luzerne
County to support and administer
federal programs. The plans will
contain a determination of the allow-
able costs of providing each sup-
porting service, such as purchasing,
legal counsel, disbursement pro-
cessing, etc.
Proposals must be submitted to Luzerne
County Chief of Budget and Finance Joan
Marie Pusateri, Luzerne County Court-
house, 200 North River Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18711, by 4:00 p.m. on Decem-
ber 9, 2011.
Interested parties can obtain specifica-
tions information in person at the office of
the Chief of Budget and Finance of the
County of Luzerne, located in the Court-
house, 200 North River Street, Wilkes-
Barre, or by calling (570) 825-1557 to
request specifications by mail or facsimile.
By order of Douglas A. Pape
Luzerne County Manager/Chief
Clerk
The Luzerne County Courthouse is a facil-
ity accessible to persons with disabilities.
Please notify the Luzerne County Commis-
sioners Office, no later than 48 hours in
advance, if special accommodations are
required.
SPECIAL MEETING NOTICE
BOROUGH OF WEST PITTSTON
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a
Special Meeting of the Borough Council of
the Borough of West Pittston shall con-
vene on Tuesday, November 22, 2011 at
7:00 PM prevailing time in Council Cham-
bers, 555 Exeter Avenue, West Pittston,
Pennsylvania, for the purpose of authoriz-
ing and directing the Borough Engineer to
prepare plans and specifications and to
advertise for bids for the cleaning of
storm/sanitary inlets that were affected as
a result of Tropical Storm Lee. Borough
Council will also entertain any other busi-
ness, which may lawfully come before
them.
The Borough of West Pittston
does not discriminate on the basis of
Race, Color, National Origin, Sex, Religion,
Age, Disability or Family Status in Employ-
ment or the Provision of Services.
Any person with a disability
requiring special accommodation to
attend this meeting should notify the Bor-
ough Secretary’s Office at 570-655-7782,
as early as possible prior to the meeting.
The Borough of West Pittston is
an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action
Employer.
ELLEN RIDDLE, SECRETARY
BOROUGH OF WEST PITTSTON
Octagon
Family Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
Try our
C CABBAGE ABBAGE
P PAGACH AGACH
Cabbage, Onion,
Bacon & Cheese
Home of the Original ‘O-Bar’ Pizza
MADE
TO
ORDER!
COOK & COOK AUCTIONS
HIGH QUALITY MODERN AUCTION
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2011
29 EAST CAREY STREET, PLAINS, PA 18705
PREVIEW 3:00PM AUCTION 5:00 PM
This is an auction you don’t want to miss! We are loaded with merchandise.
Keep watch on auctionzip.com for further updates.
High end modern furniture to include 10 foot oak wall unit, beautiful
Maitland-Smith inlaid dresser, dining room furniture, desks, chairs, child’s
bedroom furniture, other bedroom furniture, dressers, couches including
leather, occasional tables, mirrors, artwork, lamps, huge flatscreen TV &
others, like new Amana fridge, LGB trains, Jim Beam train, NIB porcelain
dolls, quality skiing equipment & exercise equipment to include Precor, Life
Cycle, Life Fitness & others, Brunswick pool table & accessories, 3 sets of
golf clubs, Approx. 400 Dept. 56 villages & snow throwers & so much more.
AUCTION BY:
COOK & COOK AUCTIONS
AH-001892 • 570-270-9239
Visit Our Retail Showroom
www.cookandcookauctions.com
or www.auctionzip.com ID#20298
WAYNE STEELE - AU3916L
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
468 Auto Parts
RADIATOR for Ford
truck fits ‘73 to ‘80,
large size, $30.
STARTER for ‘73
Ford truck, $15.
570-823-6829
SNOW TIRES,
excellent condition,
used 4 mos, P185-
75R14. $50 Firm.
570-333-5144
TIRES, 4 Bridge-
stone Blizzak Revol
215/60 R16, $40
each. 4 Michelin,
225/55 R16, $50
each 570-655-2443
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Like New
Tires
$15 & UP!
Like New
Batteries
$20 & UP!
Carry Out Price
288-8995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
LAW
DIRECTORY
Call 829-7130
To Place Your Ad
Don’t Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
310 Attorney
Services
AGGRESSIVE &
Affordable DUI
Defense
Law Office of
Michael P. Kelly
570-417-5561
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Bankruptcy $595
Guaranteed LowFees
www.BkyLaw.net
Atty Kurlancheek
825-5252 W-B
310 Attorney
Services
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
ESTATE PLANNING
/ADMINISTRATION
Real Estate &
Civil Litigation
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK CARS
WANTED!!
ŠCALL ANYTIME
ŠHONEST PRICES
ŠFREE REMOVAL
ŠCA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vito & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
110 Lost
Lost 9 year old
Black Lab, last
seen 11/15, in the
Main Road,
Sweet Valley area.
No collar. Please
call 570-477-1307
LOST MALE CAT
Name is Austin, he
is a domestic medi-
um hair, grey with
black stripes and a
white belly and
paws. Has blue/
grey eyes. Weighs
17 lbs. Missed dear-
ly. Reward if
returned.
570-696-4325
LOST, M&T Bank
Envelope with cash
inside on Tuesday,
Nov-15 in Wilkes-
Barre, Kingston,
Edwardsville or
Forty Fort area.
570-817-1941
LOST.
Chihuahua/Terrier
mix. Small, all white
except for half his
face & ear. Named
DJ. Lost near sports
complex on Coal St.
in WB.
570-351-4614
LOST.Grey/black
striped Tabby cat.
Missing since early
October. Last seen
on McHale St.,
Swoyersville.
REWARD
Call 570-331-4444
120 Found
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
FOUND, Cat, small-
er framed, Calico, in
Nanticoke area.
570-740-1392
To place your
ad call...829-7130
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
LEGAL NOTICE
"The West Pittston
Rams Harley David-
son Raffle has been
cancelled. The
Rams will refund the
monies collected
from the sale of the
raffle ticket(s) to
those individuals
who present their
ticket stub. The
owner of the ticket
stub should retain a
copy of the stub(s)
for themselves and
forward the original
stub(s) to our mail-
ing address : West
Pittston Rams, P.O.
Box 3127, West
Pittston, PA 18643.
Please be sure to
include your full
name, address and
phone number on
each of the original
stubs your return.
Should you wish to
donate the raffle
ticket amount you
purchased back to
the Association,
please follow the
above procedure
and include a note
indicating your
desire to donate.
Please submit
refund requests
prior to 12/31/2011.
For more informa-
tion, visit
www.west-
pittstonrams.com
150 Special Notices
Want a real
show-stopper
at your wed-
ding? Oyster’s
flaming dessert
displays are
always a part of
your Oyster
Wedding!
bridezella.net
COOKS PHARMACY
OF SHAVERTOWN
Is looking for
people who
have had knee
replacements
for a study to try a
new product
called WilloMD, a
mini computer to
help with knee
pain. Free of
charge.
Interested? Please call
570-675-1191
Ask for Meagan
150 Special Notices
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
C.C. Ryders
should have
some steamed
clams and cold
beer at a good
price...Dugan's
has a great
menu and is a
friendly place to
watch football...
Bo Brothers
burgers and
bloody mary's
are out of this
world...Just
some ideas for
the westside
slides.
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
Psychic Readings
by Doreena
Find answers and
peace of mind
thru psychic &
spiritual readings
and chakra bal-
ancing meditations
Call today for a
better tomorrow!
Mention this ad
for $10 off!
610-377-5114
310 Attorney
Services
360 Instruction &
Training
ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from home.
*Medical *Business
*Paralegal* Comput-
ers *Criminal Jus-
tice. Job placement
assistance. Com-
puter available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. Call
888-220-3984
www.
CenturaOnline.com
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
CAN-AM`07 CAN-
AM RALLY 2X 200
A MUST SEE
Like new Can-Am
Rally 2x 200cc.
$2000.00 OR
BEST OFFER
(570)287-2203
HONDA`09 REKON
TRX 250CC/Electric
shift. Like New.
REDUCED
$3,650.
(570) 814-2554
TOMAHAWK`10
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
409 Autos under
$5000
CHEVY ‘95 BLAZER
4 door. 92 K.
New brakes &
gas tank. New
inspection.
$3,895
DODGE ‘01 GRAND
CARAVAN EX
Loaded. 7 pas-
sengers. Rear
bucket seats.
New inspection.
$3,995.
FORD `05 TAURUS
V6. 4 door. Front
wheel drive. Excel-
lent shape. 93k
miles. $4,700
570-709-5677
570-819-3140
FORD `95 F150
4x4. 6 cylinder.
Automatic. 8 ft.
modified flat bed.
90k miles. Runs
great. $4,900
(570) 675-5046
Call after 6:00 p.m.
FORD `99 TAURUS
White, new battery,
104,000 miles, auto-
matic, front wheel
drive, power win-
dows, AM/FM radio,
cassette player,
$1,800
570-212-2410 or
570-299-7712
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER
4 door 4x4. New
inspection.
$3,695
SATURN `04 VUE
65K, Auto, Loaded.
Needs transmis-
sion/airbags. Book
value $10,000. Sell
$3,000 or best offer
(570) 829-2875
(570) 332-1252
409 Autos under
$5000
FORD ‘99 ESCORT
STATION WAGON
One owner, 91k,
new inspection.
$3,495
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
HYUNDAI ‘00 ACCENT
4 cylinder. 5
speed. Sharp
economy car!
$2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
JEEP ‘95 WRANGLER
4x4. 6 cylinder.
Auto. Air. 1 owner.
Hard & soft top.
Good condition.
$2,400
FORD ‘89 F150
4x4. Nice looking.
$1,800.
(570) 542-5823
LEO’S AUTO SALES
92 Butler St
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
PONTIAC ‘01 SUNFIRE
2 door, 4 cylinder,
auto, new tires,
excellent condition
$2,150
HYUNDAI ‘02 ACCENT
4 door, 4 cylinder,
auto. 91,000 miles
$1,850
GMC ’00 JIMMY
4 door, 6 cylinder,
auto, 4x4.
$2,150.
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
NISSAN 01 SENTRA
4 door. Auto.
Power galore.
New inspection.
$4,495.
SUBARU `98 OUTBACK
Wagon. New Tires.
Inspection good till
July 2012. 155,000
miles. $3,900.
(570) 899-8725
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `06 TL
4 Door 3.2 VTEC 6
Cylinder engine
Auto with slapstick.
Navigation system.
57k miles. Black
with Camel Leather
interior. Heated
Seats. Sun Roof,
Excellent condition.
Satellite Radio, Fully
loaded. $18,000.
570-814-2501
AUDI `05 A4 1.8T
Cabriolet Convert-
ible S-Line. 52K
miles. Auto. All
options. Silver.
Leather interior.
New tires. Must
sell. $17,500 or best
offer 570-954-6060
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $20,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
BMW ‘04 325 XI
White. Fully
loaded. 120k
miles. $10,500
or best offer.
570-454-3287
CHEVY `08 MALIBU
LT. Imperial blue,
sunroof, trans-
ferrable warranty to
100K miles. 19,700
miles. Loaded.
$15,999 negotiable.
Call 570-862-1799
412 Autos for Sale
BUICK `05 LESABRE
Garage kept. 1
owner. Local driv-
ing, very good
condition.
53,500 miles.
Asking $9,700
(570) 457-6414
leave message
CADILLAC `05 SRX
All wheel drive,
traction control,
3.6 L V-6, power
sunroof, auto-
stick, leather inte-
rior, auto car
starter, factory
installed 6 CD disc
changer, all
power, memory
seat. 39,000
miles.
$21,000
570-453-2771
CADILLAC ‘06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 55,000 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$16,500
570-881-2775
CHEVROLET `04
CORVETTE COUPE
Torch red with
black and red
interior. 9,700
miles, auto, HUD,
removable glass
roof, polished
wheels, memory
package, Bose
stereo and twilight
lighting, factory
body moldings,
traction control,
ABS, Garage kept
- Like New.
$25,900
(570) 609-5282
CHEVROLET `08
IMPALA
Excellent condition,
new tires, 4 door,
all power, 34,000
miles. $13,995.
570-836-1673
CHEVROLET ‘06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 4,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell $45,900
570-299-9370
CHEVY '99 MALIBU
Classic. 6 cylin-
der. Auto. Many
options. 48K.
Warrantied.
$4,895.
BUY * SELL * TRADE
D.P. MOTORS
1451 SHOEMAKER
AVE, W. WYOMING
570-714-4146
CHEVY `07 AVEO LT
Power window/door
locks. Keyless
entry. Sunroof. A/C.
Black with tan
leather interior.
22,000 original
miles. AM/FM/CD.
New tires.
$12,000
(570) 287-0815
CHEVY `08 IMPALA
Metallic gray, sun-
roof, leather, Bose
Satellite with CD
radio, heated seats,
traction control, fully
loaded. Remote
Start. 50k miles.
$16,995. Call
(570)639-5329
CHEVY `95 CORVETTE
Yellow, auto, 67,300
miles. New tires &
brakes. Removable
top, leather. Good
condition. $10,000.
570-287-1820
CHEVY `97 ASTROVAN
Beautiful, 4 door.
Power steering &
brakes. 8 cylinder.
Excellent condition.
$3,000. Negotiable.
570-762-3504
CHEVY ‘11 MALIBU LT
Moonroof.
7K miles.
$17,990
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5 QUATTRO
CONVERTIBLE
Sprint blue/black
& tan leather,
auto, 7 speed,
turbo, 330 HP,
Navigation,(AWD)
09 CHRYSLER SEBRING
4 door, alloys,
seafoam blue.
08 PONTIAC GRAND
PRIX SE
blue, auto V6
07 HYUNDAI SONATA
GLS navy blue,
auto, alloys
07 CHRYSLER 300
LTD AWD silver,
grey leather
06 PONTIAC G6
black, auto, 4 cyl.
06 DODGE STRATUS SXT
RED.
05 DODGE NEON SXT
Red, 4 cyl. auto
05 CHEVY IMPALA LS
Burgundy tan
leather, sunroof
05 VW NEW JETTA
gray, auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MALIBU
Maxx White, grey
leather, sunroof
04 NISSAN ALTIMA SL
3.5 white, black
leather, sun roof
03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO
Mid blue/light grey
leather, Naviga-
tion, (AWD)
01 PONTIAC AZTEK
4 door. Auto. Grey
01 VW JETTA GLS
green, auto, 4 cyl
01 VOLVO V70 STATION
WAGON, blue/grey,
leather, AWD
98 MAZDA MILLENIA
green
98 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS black
98 HONDA CIVIC EX,
2 dr, auto, silver
97 BUICK PARK
AVENUE, black/tan
leather
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4’s
08 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB, white,
5.7 Hemi, 4 door,
4x4.
08 JEEP PATRIOT
SPORT silver
5 speed 4x4
08 CADILLAC ESCALADE
Blk/Blk leather, 3rd
seat, Navgtn, 4x4
07 DODGE DURANGO
SLT blue, 3rd
seat, 4x4
07 CHEVY UPLANDER
silver, 7 passen-
ger mini van
07 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN SXT Blue
grey leather, 7
passenger mini van
06 MITSUBISHI
ENDEAVOR XLS,
Blue auto, V6, awd
06 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN ES, red,
4dr, entrtnmt cntr,
7 pass mini van
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LT, black,
sunroof, 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LT, blue, grey
leather, 4x4
05 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT blue 4x4
05 FORD ESCAPE LTD
tan, tan leather,
sunroof, 4x4
05 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Blue, auto, 4x4
05 FORD F150 XLT
SUPER CREW TRUCK
Blue & tan, 4 dr. 4x4
05 BUICK RANIER CXL
gold, tan, leather,
sunroof (AWD)
04 DODGE DAKOTA
CLUB cab, black,
auto, V-8, 4x4
04 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER, silver,
black leather, 3rd
seat, AWD
04 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER, black,
black leather,
3rd seat, 4x4
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE OVERLAND
Graphite grey,
2 tone leather,
sunroof, 4x4
04 CHEVY SUBURBAN
LS, pewter silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
03 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO,
silver, V6, 4x4
03 FORD WINDSTAR LX
green 4 door, 7
passenger mini van
02 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY 7 pas
senger, mini van,
gold AWD
02 CHEVY 2500 HD
Reg. Cab. pickup
truck, green,
auto, 4x4
00 CHEVY BLAZER LT
Black & brown,
brown leather 4x4
00 ISUZU RODEO
silver, auto 4x4
00 CHEVY 1500
SILVERADO XCAB
2wd truck,
burgundy & tan
98 EXPLORER XLT
Blue grey leather,
sunroof, 4x4
97 DODGE RAM 1500
XCAB TRUCK
red, auto, 4 x 4
96 CVEVY BLAZER
black 4x4
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
CHEVY ‘95 ASTRO
MARK III CONVERSION
VAN. Hightop. 93K.
7 passenger.
TV/VCP/Stereo.
Loaded. Great con-
dition. $4,995
(570) 574-2199
CHEVY`10 CAMARO
SS2. Fully load, V8,
jewel red with white
stripes on hood &
trunk, list price is
$34,500, Selling for
$29,900. Call
570-406-1974
CHRYSLER `04
SEBRING
LXI CONVERTIBLE
Low miles - 54,000.
V6. Leather interior.
Great shape. A/C.
Power door locks.
$7,500. Negotiable
(570) 760-1005
412 Autos for Sale
CHRYSLER ‘04
SEBRING CONVERTIBLE
Silver, 2nd owner
clean title. Very
clean inside &
outside. Auto,
Power mirrors,
windows. CD
player, cruise,
central console
heated power
mirrors. 69,000
miles. $4900.
570-991-5558
CHRYSLER ‘08 SEBRING
Leather. Heated
seats. DVD Player.
$12,450
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
DODGE `00 STRATUS
Automatic, 4 door,
all power, well kept,
Summer and Winter
tires, each used 3
seasons. $3,400.
570-675-9949
570-606-9926
EAGLE `95 TALON
Only 97,000 Miles.
Full custom body kit,
dark green metallic
with gray interior.
Dual exhaust, 4 coil
over adjustable
struts. All new
brakes, air intake
kit, strut brakes,
custom seats, cus-
tom white gauges, 2
pillar gauges, new
stereo, alarm, cus-
tom side view mir-
rors. 4 cylinder
automatic, runs
excellent. $8,500.
Call 570-876-1355
or 570-504-8540
(evenings)
412 Autos for Sale
‘10 Dodge Cara-
van SXT 32K. Sil-
ver-Black. Power
slides. Factory war-
ranty. $17,899
‘09 DODGE
CALIBER SXT 2.0
Automatic, 24k
Factory Warranty!
$12,499
‘08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS Only 18K! One
Owner - Estate
Sale. $14,699
‘08 SUBARU
Special Edition
42k, 5 speed, AWD.
Factory warranty.
$13,699
‘08 CHEVY
SILVERADO 1500
4x4, Regular Cab,
63K, Factory War-
ranty $13,699
‘08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS 4 door, only
37K! 5 Yr. 100K fac-
tory warranty
$12,099
‘08 CHRYSLER
SEBRING CONVERTIBLE
4 cylinder, 40k
$11,799
‘08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS 60k. Factory
warranty. $10,199
‘05 HONDA CRV EX
One owner, just
traded, 65k
$13,299
‘05 Suzuki
Verona LX Auto.
64K. Factory war-
ranty. $5,599
‘01 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR Executive 74K
$5,899
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W WE E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL L NNL NNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LLE LE LE LE LE LE LE LLE LE EEE DER.
timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 3G
229M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
www.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA
*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib lefo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs .
All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils . **As perN is s a n M o nthlySa les V o lu m eR epo rta s o f Oc t2 0 11.
®
K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
2011 NISSAN ROGUE S AWD 2011 NISSAN ROGUE S AWD
STK#N20680
M O DEL# 22211
M SRP $23,905
B U Y FO R
$
20 ,995
*
W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
O R $
199
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
P lu s Ta x.
*$199 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea rw / $2300.08 d o w n + $601.92 in fee
= $2,902 to ta l d u e a td elivery; Res id u a l= $12,669.60; S a le p rice p lu s ta x in clu d es $1,000 Nis s a n Reb a te.
S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d e $1000 Nis s a n Reb a te. M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1.
2011 NISSAN MAXIMA S SEDAN 2011 NISSAN MAXIMA S SEDAN
STK#N19800
M O DEL# 16111
M SRP $31,910
B U Y FO R
$
26,395
*
W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
& $50 0 N IS S AN B L ACK FR ID AY B O N U S CAS H
O R
$
239
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
2011 NISSAN PATHFINDER S 4X4 2011 NISSAN PATHFINDER S 4X4
STK#N20841
M O DEL# 25011
M SRP $31,580
B U Y FO R
$
27,995
*
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
O R $
299
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
P lu s Ta x.
*$239 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea rw / $3202 d o w n ; Res id u a l= $16,274.10;
M u s tq u a lify tier1. $1800 NM AC L ea s e Ca s h & $500 Nis s a n Bla ck F rid a y Bo n u s Ca s h in clu d ed . S a le p rice
p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $2,500 Nis s a n Reb a te & $500 Nis s a n Bla ck F rid a y Bo n u s Ca s h.
*$299 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l=
$13,895.20; M u s tq u a lifyT ier1. $2,499 Du e & Reg fees = $2702 to ta l. In clu d es $3000
L ea s e Ca s h. S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $2,000 Nis s a n Reb a te.
2012 NISSAN FRONTIER KC SV 4X4 2012 NISSAN FRONTIER KC SV 4X4
STK#N21104
M O DEL# 31412
M SRP $26,645
B U Y FO R
$
22,495
*
O R $
229
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
V6, Au to , 4x4,
A/ C, Cru is e, T ilt,
Allo yW heels ,
K eyles s
*$229 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l=
$16,253.45; M u s tq u a lifyT ier1. $1999 Du e a td elivery p lu s Reg F ees = $2202.
S a le Price + ta x & ta gs in clu d es $2500 Nis s a n Reb a te.
S C AN
HERE
FO R
S ERVIC E
S PEC IAL S
#
1
#
1
M O DEL NISSA N DEA LER
IN PENNSY LV A NIA **
**BA SED O N NISSA N SA LES V O LUM E TO TA L FO R O C T.2011
YOUR
W O NDER FU L DEA LS
Y O U W O N’T FO R G ET!
P R ESENTS:
2012 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S 2012 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts
STK#N20533
M O DEL# 13112
V IN# 404067,403451
M SRP $23,820
B U Y FO R
$
18 ,995
*
O R $
149
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$149 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 24 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea rw / $1697.88 d o w n + $504.12 in fee = $2,202 to ta l d u e a td elivery; Res id u a l=
$15,721.20; $350 NM AC L ea s e Ca s h & $500 Nis s a n Bla ck F rid a y Bo n u s Ca s h in clu d ed . S a le p rice p lu s ta x in clu d es $1,250 Nis s a n Reb a te & $500 NM AC
Ca p tive Ca s h. S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d e $1000 Nis s a n Reb a te & $500 Nis s a n Bla ck F rid a y Bo n u s Ca s h. M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1.
20 20 20
A T THIS A T THIS A T THIS
P RICE P RICE P RICE
W / $50 0 N IS S AN B L ACK FR ID AY B O N U S CAS H
JU ST A NNO U NC ED
$500NISSA N
B LA C K FR IDA Y
B O NU S C A SH O N
A LTIM A A ND M A XIM A
2011 NISSAN MURANOCROSS CABRIOLET CONVERTIBLE 2011 NISSAN MURANOCROSS CABRIOLET CONVERTIBLE
STK#N20839
M O DEL# 27011
M SRP $48,020
B U Y
FO R
$
40 ,995
*
3
TO CHOOS E
FROM
*S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs . In clu d es $2000 Nis s a n Reb a te.
2011 NISSAN MURANO S AWD 2011 NISSAN MURANO S AWD
STK#20706
M O DEL# 23211
M SRP $32,130
B U Y FO R
$
26,8 95
*
W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
O R $
299
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$299 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $15,101.10; M u s t
q u a lifyT ier1. $1557.88 Do w n p lu s $644.12 in fees = 2202.00 to ta l d u e a td elivery. L ea s e in clu d es
$1375 NM AC L ea s e Ca s h. S a le Price + ta x & ta gs in clu d es $2500 Nis s a n Reb a te.
2011 NISSAN TITAN CREW CAB SV 4X4 2011 NISSAN TITAN CREW CAB SV 4X4
8 Cyl, Au to , PW ,
PL , A/ C, Cru is e,
S p la s h Gu a rd s ,
Bed lin er
STK#N20874
M O DEL# 36411
M SRP $37,470
B U Y FO R
$
27,995
*
*S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs . In clu d es $4250 Nis s a n Reb a te & $1350 Va lu e T ru ck Bo n u s Ca s h.
PAGE 4G SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
(570) 341 -1 400 • 1 -800-822-21 1 0 (570) 341 -1 400 • 1 -800-822-21 1 0 (570) 341 -1 400 • 1 -800-822-21 1 0
M onda y - T hu rs da y 9-8:00 • F rida y 9-5 & S a tu rda y 9-3:30 M onda y - T hu rs da y 9-8:00 • F rida y 9-5 & S a tu rda y 9-3:30
1 1 1 0 W Y O M I N G A V E . • S C R A N T O N , PA 1 8509 1 1 1 0 W Y O M I N G A V E . • S C R A N T O N , PA 1 8509
w w w .m a ttbu rnehonda .com
M ATT B U R N E H O N D A PR E -O W N E D CE N TE R M ATT B U R N E H O N D A PR E -O W N E D CE N TE R
SH OP AT W W W .M ATTBURNE H OND A.COM SH OP AT W W W .M ATTBURNE H OND A.COM CAL L :1-800-NE XTH OND A CAL L :1-800-NE XTH OND A
M ATT BURNE H O NDA
M ATT BURNE H O NDA M ATT BURNE H O NDA
1110 WYOMINGAVE. • SCRANTON • 1-800-NEXT-HONDA
www.MattBurneHonda.com
*BAS E D ON 2008-2009 E PA M IL E AGE E S T IM AT E S , RE F L E CT ING NE W E PA F UE L E CONOM Y M E T HODS BE GINNING W IT H 2008-2009 M ODE L S . US E F OR COM PARIS ON PURPOS E S ONL Y . DO NOT
COM PARE T O M ODE L S BE F ORE 2008. Y OUR ACT UAL M IL E AGE W IL L VARY DE PE NDING ON HOW Y OU DRIVE AND M AINT AIN Y OUR VE HICL E . AL L OF F E RS E XPIRE 1/ 3/ 2012.
G AS
M ILEAG E
17CITY/ 24HW Y
• 250-hp 24-V alve SO HC i-V TEC ® • 5-Speed A utom atic Transm ission • 8 Passenger
Seating • V ariable Torque M anagem ent® 4-W heelDrive System (V TM -4® )
• V ehicle Stability A ssist
TM
(V SA ® ) w ith Traction C ontrol• Pow er W Indow s/Locks/
M irrors • Front and Rear A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration System • 229-W att
A M /FM /C D A udio System w ith 7 Speakers including Subw oofer • Rem ote Entry
• A BS • Dual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags (SRS) • Front Side A irbags
w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant Position Detection System (O PDS)
2012 Hon d a
A CCORD L X
• M odel#C P2f3C EW • 177-hp 16-V alve DO HC i-V TEC ® Engine • 5-Speed
A utom atic Transm ission • Pow er W indow s/Locks/M irrors • Rem ote Entry
• C ruise C ontrol• A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration System • 160-W att A M /
FM /C D A udio System w ith 6 Speakers • V ehicle Stability A ssist
TM
(V SA ® )
w ith Traction C ontrol• A BS • Sual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags
(SRS) • Dual-C ham ber Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant
Position Detection System (O PDS) • Side C urtain A irbags
G AS
M ILEAG E
21CITY/ 27HW Y
2011 Hon d a
CR-V L X
• M odel#RE4H3B32 • 180-hp,DO HC i-V TEC ® 4-cylinder engine • 5-speed
autom atic transm ission • RealTim e
TM
4W D system • V ehicle Stability A ssist
TM
(V SA ® ) w ith traction control• A nti-lock braking system (A BS) • Dual-stage,
m ultiple-threshold front airbags (SR5) • Front side airbags w ith passenger-
side O ccupant Position Detection System (O PDS) • Side curtain airbags w ith
rollover sensor • C D Player • Pow er W indow s/Locks/M irrors • A /C
• M odel#FB2F5C EW • 140-hp 16-V alve SO HC i-V TEC ® • 5-Speed A utom atic
Transm ission • A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration System • Pow er W indow s/
Locks/M irrors • C ruise C ontrol• Rem ote Entry • 160-W att A M /FM /C D A udio
System w ith 4 Speakers • A BS • Dual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front
A irbags (SRS) • Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant Position
Detection System (O PDS) • Side C urtain A irbags
G AS
M ILEAG E
28CITY/ 39HW Y
$0DO W N
$
239/M O.*
$
239/M O.*
$
239/M O.*
*LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS , 3 6K THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE
AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $14,612.55
$0DO W N
****LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $18,219.20
2012 Hon d a
P IL OT L X
$
309/M O.****
$
309/M O.****
$
309/M O.****
D isclosure:1.9% - 36 m os,2.9% - 60 m osthru A .H .F.C .W -A -C on C ertified A ccords.C ertified H onda’shave
1yr - 12k B asic W arranty.B alance of7yr - 100K P ow ertrain W arranty from in-service date.
06 PILO T EXL N avi,B lue,57K..............................NO W $18,950
07 PILO T EXL N avi,R ed,39K...............................NO W $22,750
09 PILO T EX B lack,35K........................................NO W $24,950
09 PILO T EXL S ilver,35K.....................................NO W $27,500
09 PILO T EXL S ilver,29K.....................................NO W $27,950
09 PILO T TO URING D V D /N avi,R ed,45K................NO W $29,950
11 PILO T EXL G old,17K......................................NO W $32,500
PIL OT 4W D
H O N D A ’S
07 ELEM ENT EX R ed,67K M iles.........................NO W $14,500
08 ELEM ENT LX R ed,68K M iles.........................NO W $15,500
08 ELEM ENT LX S ilver,56K...............................NO W $16,500
EL EM EN T 4W D
10 INSIG HT EX B lue,21K M iles...........................NO W $17,500
10 INSIG HT EX G ray,22K...................................NO W $18,950
IN S IGHT HYBRID
07 C RV LX G reen,70K............................................NO W $15,350
06 C RV EX B lack,44K.............................................NO W $16,950
07 C RV EXLG old,78K...........................................NO W $17,500
09 C RV LX G reen,34K............................................NO W $19,250
09 C RV LX Titanium ,33K........................................NO W $19,250
08 C RV EXLR ed,63K............................................NO W $19,750
09 C RV EXLB lack,37K..........................................NO W $22,500
11 C RV SER ed,11K...............................................NO W $22,500
CRV 4W D
07A C C O RD SESDN G ray,62K..................................NO W $13,500
06A C C O RD EXLV 6SDN G old,56K.....................NO W $13,950
07A C C O RD EX SDN G ray,51K..................................NO W $16,750
08A C C O RD EXLV 6SDN N avy,55K.....................NO W $16,950
10A C C O RD LX SDN S ilver,28K................................NO W $17,500
09A C C O RD LXP SDN B urgandy,26K..............................NO W $17,950
09A C C O RD LX SDN R ed,13K..................................NO W $17,950
09A C C O RD EX SDN S ilver,35K................................NO W $17,950
08A C C O RD EX SDN S ilver,42K................................NO W $17,500
10A C C O RD LX SDN W hite,19K................................NO W $18,950
10A C C O RD LXP SDN N avy,14K.............................NO W $19,500
09A C C O RD EX SDN G reen,21K...............................NO W $18,950
09A C C O RD EX SDN B lack,19K................................NO W $19,500
09A C C O RD EXLSDN R ed,21K...............................NO W $19,950
09A C C O RD EXLSDN N avy,29K..............................NO W $19,950
10A C C O RD EXLSDN W hite,25K............................NO W $21,500
ACCORDS
$
219/M O.**
$
219/M O.**
$
219/M O.**
$0DO W N
**LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $13 ,540.50
2.9%
60 m os
1.9%
36 m os
A CCO R D S
1
.9%
1
.9%
36 M O S. 36 M O S. 2
.9%
2
.9%
60 M O S. 60 M O S.
09 O DY SSEY LX M oss,25K..............................NO W $20,950
10 O DY SSEY TO URING N avi,R .D V D ,G ray,26K NO W $33,500
ODYS S EY
CIV IC
08 C IV IC EX SDN W hite,41K,5 S peed...................NO W $15,500
08 C IV IC LX SDN G old,12K...............................NO W $15,950
09 C IV IC LX C PE N avy,30K................................NO W $16,350
09 C IV IC LX SDN R ed,21K................................NO W $16,250
09 C IV IC LX SDN G ray,19K................................NO W $16,750
10 C IV IC LX SDN S ilver,17K.............................NO W $16,950
10 C IV IC LXS SDN S ilver,16K...........................NO W $17,250
09 C IV IC EX SDN B lue,22K................................NO W $17,950
G AS
M ILEAG E
23CITY/ 34HW Y
***LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S
DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $12,23 7.75
$
209/M O.***
$
209/M O.***
$
209/M O.***
$0DO W N
03 HO NDA A C C O RD
EXL V 6 SDN
G old,73K M iles,W as$13,500
Now $11,500
07 SUBA RU
IM PREZA A W D
S ilver,39K,W as$17,950
Now $16,950
09 HY UNDA I
SO NA TA G LS SDN
B row n,40K M iles
Now $13,950
08 PO NTIA C
G 6 SDN
B lack,41K M iles,W as$13,950
Now $13,250
10 TO Y O TA
C A M RY LE SDN
G old,28K M iles
Now $15,950
07 FO RD EXPLO RER
BA UER 4W D
62K M iles,B row n
Now $16,500
07 M A ZDA C X-7
TO URING A W D
B lack,58K M iles
Now $17,950
08 DO DG E G RA ND
C A RA V A N SXT
W hite,79K M iles
Now $12,950
05 FO RD EXPLO RER
BA UER 4X4
W hite,72K,W as$14,500
Now $11,950
08 TO Y O TA TA C O M A
C LUB C A B TRD 4X4
N avy,46K M iles,W as$26,500
Now $24,500
08 NISSA N
A LTIM A “S” SDN
W hite,13K M iles,W as$18,950
Now $16,500
06 C HEV Y
TRA ILBLA ZER 4W D
S ilver,61K,W as$13,750
Now $12,950
07 DO DG E RA M 1500
Q UA D SLT 4X4
S ilver,61K,W as$17,950
Now $16,750
09 SUBA RU
IM PREZA A W D
B lue,46K M iles
Now $16,750
02 TO Y O TA C A M RY
LE SEDA N
G ray,79K M iles
Now $9,500
09 TO Y O TA
C O RO LLA LE SDN
G ray,34K M iles
Now $13,500
03 DO DG E DA KO TA
C LUB C A B SXT 4X4
G ray,56K M iles
Now $11,950
06 INFINITI
G 35 A W D SDN
G old,62K M iles
Now $16,500
W e’re Ta lking
Tu rkey!
B ronze,54K M iles
Now $7,250
02 BUIC K
C ENTURY SEDA N
08 NISSA N
Q UEST “S”
G ray,48K M iles
Now $16,750
08 SUBA RU
LEG A C Y 2.5I
Tan,28K M iles
Now $17,950
00 TO Y O TA
C A M RY LE SDN
S age,74K M iles
Now $7,950
0.9 for24-36 m on ths a n d 1.9% for37
to 60 m on ths on a ll n e w A c c ord , Civic
(e xc lud e s Hyb rid s ), Cros s tour, CR-V ,
Od ys s e y, a n d P ilotm od e ls .
2012 Hon d a
CIV IC L X
04 SUBA RU
IM PREZA W RX SDN
S ilver,68K M iles
Now $13,500
08 SC IO N TC
C O UPE
B lack,40K M iles
Now $13,250
06 M ERC URY M O UNTA INEER
PREM IER A W D DV D-NA V I
S ilver,44K M iles
Now $16,950
03 HO NDA C IV IC
EX C O UPE
G old,121 K M iles
A s Traded $8,750
02 HO NDA
O DY SSEY EXL
G reen,124K M iles
A s Traded $7,950
08 JEEP LIBERTY
SPO RT 4W D
B lack,20K M iles
Now $18,250
R ed,62K,N avi
Now $14,950
06 FO RD EXPLO RER
EDDIE BA UER 4X4
07 M ERC URY M ILA N
V 6 PERM IER SDN
G ray,22K M iles
Now $13,750
09 LEXUS IS
250 A W D
B lack,7K M iles
Now $29,500
02 EX,S ilver,98K $10,250
04 LX,R ed,72K $10,950
HO NDA C RV 4W D
06 RIDG ELINE RTS B lue,50K M iles.................NO W $18,950
RIDGEL IN E 4W D
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 5G
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
/Ok /Ok/ /N/Ok//!/ON, v/5/! ¥O0k /OC// 5/OwkOO/!Ou/¥ Ok /C0k/.CO/.
* See dea|er Ior warranty detaì|s. Warranty Iromorìgìna| ìn-servìce date. © 2011 Acura. Acura and 1L are trademarks oI Honda Motor Co., Ltd.
7
2
2
1
1
0
197 West End Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
825-7577
YOMING VALLEY
AUTO SALES INC. AA
SERVICED, INSPECTED, & WARRANTIED
FINANCING AVAILABLE
www.WyomingValleyAutos.com
MANY MORE TO CHOOSE FROM
30th Anniversary Sale
07 BMW X3 Panoramic Roof ....
$
17,500
08 CHEVY AVEO38K................
$
9,900
08 CHEVY COBALT 61K...........
$
7,995
02 FORD MUSTANG CONV
$
6,995
05 KIA SEDONA LX 70K ........
$
5,995
04 MITSUBISHI GALANT.....
$
5,995
02 DODGE NEON52K...............
$
5,995
00 OLDS BRAVADA AWD, One Owner
$
5,995
04 FORD TAURUS 81K.............
$
5,975
04 SATURN WAGON..............
$
5,250
01 NISSAN SENTRA..............
$
4,495
99 SUBARU OUTBACK......
$
3,850
00 FORD ESCORT.....................
$
3,575
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$300 AND UP
$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN,
DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!
412 Autos for Sale
FORD `07 MUSTANG
CONVERTIBLE
34K. V6. 17”
wheels. Shaker. 6
disc. Satellite.
Mileage computer.
New winter tires.
Power seat/leather.
$17,500.
(570) 474-0943
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
FORD ‘06 MUSTANG
GT CONVERT.
One owner. Extra
clean. Only 15K
miles. $18,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD ‘08 FOCUS SE
Auto. Alloys. CD
Player. $11,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
HONDA `05
ACCORD EX-L
V6 sedan, auto-
matic transmis-
sion with naviga-
tion. Graphite
exterior, grey lath-
er interior, cruise
control, power
bucket seats, tint-
ed glass, remote
keyless entry, anti-
lock brakes,
airbags - driver,
passenger &
sides. Sun roof /
moon roof. Rear
window defogger,
air conditioning
front & rear,
power steering,
alloy wheels, Multi
CD changer, navi-
gation system, fog
lights, premium
sound excellent
condition, timing
belt changed.
$9,500.
Top Off The Line
570-814-0949
412 Autos for Sale
HONDA `07 ACCORD
V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1
owner with mainte-
nance records.
Slate blue with
leather interior. Sun-
roof. Asking $12,500.
Call 570-239-2556
HONDAS
‘08 Accord LX-P
42K. Burgundy.
Reduced! $16,500
‘08 Accord LX
34K. Silver.
Reduced! $15,200
‘08 Civic LX
30K. Bronze.
Reduced.
$13,900 OBO
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
HYUNDAI `02
ELANTRA
129,995 miles,
manual, 4 door,
anti-lock brakes, air
conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors, CD
player, leather inte-
rior, sun roof, rear
windshield wiper,
tinted windows,
GREAT ON GAS.
REDUCED $3,000.
570-654-8469
HYUNDAI ‘10
ELANTRA GLS
Only 8,200 miles!
1 Owner.
$15,995
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
LEXUS `08 ES 350
Beautiful. Burgundy
with doeskin interi-
or. All options. 26k.
Mint condition -
flawless. Looking to
sell for trade in
value of $22,000.
570-479-6722
412 Autos for Sale
JAGUAR `00 S TYPE
4 door sedan. Like
new condition. Bril-
liant blue exterior
with beige hides.
Car is fully equipped
with navigation sys-
tem, V-8, automatic,
climate control AC,
alarm system,
AM/FM 6 disc CD,
garage door open-
er. 42,000 original
miles. $9,500
Call (570) 288-6009
JAGUAR `02
S-TYPE
Fully loaded, 67,000
miles, like new,
upgraded mesh grill,
Jaguar chrome
wheel package, sun
/moon roof, tinted
glass, ipod, immac-
ulate in and out,
must see. $11,000.
570-903-8511
LEXUS ‘04 ES 330
Excellent condition,
71K miles, black with
black leather interi-
or, garage kept,
$12,500.
(570) 650-1037
LINCOLN 06
Town Car Limited
Fully loaded.
50,000 miles,
Triple coated
Pearlized White.
Showroom
condition.
$16,900.
(570) 814-4926
(570) 654-2596
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MERCEDES `92 500 SEL
White with gray
leather interior, 17”
custom chrome
wheels, 4 new tires,
new breaks front &
rear. Full tune-up, oil
change & filters
done. Body and
interior are perfect.
Car has all the
options. 133,850
miles. Original price:
$140,000 new. This
is the diplomat ver-
sion. No rust or
dings on this car -
Garage kept. Sell for
$9,500.
Call: 570-876-1355
or 570-504-8540
Evenings
412 Autos for Sale
MERCEDES-BENZ `95
SL 500
Convertible, with
removable hard
top, dark Blue,
camel interior,
Summer Driving
Only, Garage Kept.
Very Good
Condition,
No Accidents.
Classy Car.
New Price!
$5,000
or trade for
SUV or other.
570-388-6669
MITSUBISHI `01
MONTERO SPORT
Silver, 4 wheel
drive, excellent
condition.
$4,500
570-287-7035
NISSAN `08 XTERRA
Grey, Mint condition.
35K miles. New, all-
season tires. Sirius
radio. 2 sets of
mats, including
cargo mats.
$18,400. Call
570-822-3494 or
570-498-0977
PONTIAC ‘02 SUNFIRE
2 door. Very
clean! Warrantied.
75K. $5,695.
BUY * SELL * TRADE
D.P. MOTORS
1451 SHOEMAKER
AVE, W. WYOMING
570-714-4146
PONTIAC `04 VIBE
White. New manual
transmission &
clutch. Front wheel
drive. 165k highway
miles. Great on gas.
Good condition,
runs well. $3,000 or
best offer
570-331-4777
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
PONTIAC 01 GRAND AM
4 cylinder. Auto.
Sharp Sharp Car!
$2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
PORSCHE `85 944
Low mileage,
110,000 miles, 5
speed, 2 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, power
windows, power
mirrors, AM/FM
radio, CD changer,
leather interior, rear
defroster, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $8,000.
(570) 817-1803
412 Autos for Sale
SAAB `06 93
A E R O s p o r t .
Leather interior.
Heated seats. Sun-
roof. Good condi-
tion. $8,000. Seri-
ous inquiries only.
Call 570-760-8264
SUBARU `02 FORESTER
L. AWD. Red.
$2,850. Hail dam-
age. Runs great.
Auto, air, CD, cas-
sette, cruise, tilt. All
power. 174K miles.
Mechanical inspec-
tion welcomed. Call
570-561-9217
SUBURU ‘06 LEGACY
GT LIMITED SEDAN
4 door, black,
approximately
76,000 miles. 2.5
liter engine, auto.
asking $12,000.
570-510-3077
TOYOTA `10
Camry SE. 56,000
miles. Red, alloy
wheels, black cloth
interior. Will consid-
er trade. $14,200
(570) 793-9157
TOYOTA 07 CAMRY LE
Low miles. One
owner. $13,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TOYOTA ‘09 COROLLA S
Auto. 4 Cylinder.
$16,450
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
VOLKSWAGEN `09
Beetle. Excellent
condition. $16,500.
CHEVY EQUINOX
‘05. Very good
shape, new brakes.
$13,000
(570) 262-8863
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
Very Good
Condition!
Low miles!
$7500. FIRM
570-905-7389
Ask for Lee
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY`75 CAMARO
350 V8. Original
owner. Automatic
transmission. Rare -
tuxedo silver / black
vinyl top with black
naugahyde interior.
Never damaged.
$6,000. Call
570-489-6937
Chrysler ‘68 New Yorker
Sedan. 440 Engine.
Power Steering &
brakes. 34,500
original miles.
Always garaged.
$6,800
(570) 883-4443
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. REDUCED TO
$6,500.
570-579-3517
570-455-6589
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES 1975
Good interior &
exterior. Runs
great! New tires.
Many new parts.
Moving, Must Sell.
$2,300 or
best offer
570-693-3263
Ask for Paul
OLDSMOBILE
`68
DELMONT
Must Sell!
Appraised
for $9,200
• All original
45,000 miles
• 350 Rocket
engine
• Fender skirts
• Always
garaged
Will sell for
$6,000
Serious
inquires only
570-
690-0727
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
OLDSMOBILE ‘53
98 SEDAN
72K original miles.
Rocket V8 motor.
Hydromatic trans-
mission. Mechani-
cally sound. Antique
tags. Excellent Dri-
ver. Must see to
appreciate! Asking
$7,200
Or best offer.
(570) 855-3040
MODEL “A” FORD PARTS
Too many to list.
Call for list:
570-655-0607
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY `04 DUMP TRUCK
36k miles. 9’6” Boss
power angle plow.
Hydraulic over elec-
tric dump box with
sides. Rubber coated
box & frame. Very
good condition.
$22,500 firm. Call
570-840-1838
FORD `90 TRUCK
17’ box. Excellent
running condition.
Very Clean. $4,300.
Call 570-287-1246
439 Motorcycles
BMW ‘07 K1200 GT
Low mileage. Many
extras. Clean.
$9,000
(570) 646-2645
DAELIM 2006
150 CCs. 4,700
miles. 70 MPG.
New battery & tires.
$1,500; negotiable.
Call 570-288-1246
or 570-328-6897
HARLEY 2011
HERITAGE SOFTTAIL
Black. 1,800 miles.
ABS brakes. Securi-
ty System Package.
$16,000 firm.
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
570-704-6023
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY ‘73
Sportser 1000cc
"Bobber" Must see!
3,000 obo. Call
(570) 510-7231
for pics!
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
100th Anniversary
Edition Deuce.
Garage kept. 1
owner. 1900 miles.
Tons of chrome.
$38,000 invested. A
must see. Asking
$18,000. OBO
570-706-6156
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
NIGHTTRAIN
New rear tire. Very
good condition. 23K
miles. $8,500. Call
570-510-1429
HARLEY
DAVIDSON ‘01
Electra Glide, Ultra
Classic, many
chrome acces-
sories, 13k miles,
Metallic Emerald
Green. Garage
kept, like new
condition. Includes
Harley cover.
$12,900
570-718-6769
570-709-4937
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘03 Dyna Wide Glide
Excellent condition -
garage kept! Gold-
en Anniversary - sil-
ver/black. New
Tires. Extras.
19,000 miles.
Must Sell!
$10,000.
570-639-2539
KAWASAKI ‘03
KLR 650. Green.
Excellent condition.
6K Miles. $3,000
(570) 287-0563
MOTO GUZZI `03
1,100 cc. 1,900
miles. Full dress.
Shaft driven. Garage
kept. Excellent condi-
tion. $6000. Health
Problems. Call
570-654-7863
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995
570-905-9348
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Kawasaki` 93
ZX11D NINJA
LIKE NEW
8900 Original
miles. Original
owner. V@H
Exhaust and Com-
puter. New tires.
$3,800.
570-574-3584
439 Motorcycles
UNITED MOTORS
‘08 MATRIX 2 SCOOTER
150cc. Purple &
grey in color. 900
miles. Bought brand
new. Paid $2,000.
Asking $1,600 or
best offer.
(570) 814-3328 or
(570) 825-5133
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
442 RVs & Campers
AEROLITE
16 FOOT EXPANDABLE
TRAVEL TRAILER
Mint condition. 2
queen beds. Full
bath. A/C. Fridge,
stove & microwave.
Outside shower &
grill. Sleeps 5. New
tires. $5,495 neg.
570-883-1324
SUNLINE SOLARIS `91
25’ travel trailer A/C.
Bunk beds. New
fridge & hot water
heater. Excellent
condition. $3,900.
570-466-4995
PAGE 6G SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Cc|| ¡e|| Free 1·8óó·35ó·º383 º MeIerWer|d Drìve 1usI O|| |nIersIcIe 81, Wì|kes·8crre
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H27046A
B9234B
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J4740B
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H27178A
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H27261A
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DP15570
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B9307A
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DP15453
D0351A
P15437
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TP15408
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B9201B
T28238A
T28432A
H26871A
T28340A
T28402A
DP15565
T28325B
DP15574
KP15456
HP15487
KP15491
JP15557
KP15549
KP15548
KP15547
JP15582
2002
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2007
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2006
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2002
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2011
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2011
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2011
2010
2011
2011
2011
2010
Chrysler.......
Chevrolet....
Kia.................
Ford..............
Kia.................
Dodge..........
Scion............
Chevrolet....
Pontiac........
Ford..............
Nissan..........
Toyota..........
Jeep.............
Dodge..........
Hyundai.......
Nissan..........
Mazda..........
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Hyundai.......
Hyundai.......
Ford..............
Dodge..........
Kia.................
Hyundai.......
Hyundai.......
Hyundai.......
Toyota..........
Hyundai.......
Hyundai.......
Nissan..........
Toyota..........
Toyota..........
Ford..............
Chevrolet....
Ford..............
Mitsubishi...
Chevrolet....
Dodge..........
Hyundai.......
Ford..............
Dodge..........
Kia.................
Honda..........
Honda..........
Dodge..........
Hyundai.......
Honda..........
Honda..........
Honda..........
Lexus...........
Dodge..........
Dodge..........
Dodge..........
Ford..............
Jeep.............
Toyota..........
Scion............
Hyundai.......
Toyota..........
Suzuki..........
Hyundai.......
Lexus...........
Scion............
Hyundai.......
Nissan..........
Toyota..........
Toyota..........
Toyota..........
Honda..........
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Toyota..........
Chevrolet....
Dodge..........
Ford..............
Jeep.............
Jeep.............
Honda..........
Honda..........
Nissan..........
Toyota..........
Jeep.............
Jeep.............
Jeep.............
Toyota..........
Chevrolet....
Honda..........
Honda..........
Honda..........
Hyundai.......
Toyota..........
Toyota..........
Nissan..........
Toyota..........
Dodge..........
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Honda..........
Suzuki..........
Jeep.............
Ford..............
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Chevrolet....
Nissan..........
Toyota..........
Honda..........
Honda..........
Hyundai.......
Dodge..........
Jeep.............
Dodge..........
Hyundai.......
Honda..........
Hyundai.......
Jeep.............
Hyundai.......
Hyundai.......
Hyundai.......
Jeep.............
4dr LX ........................................................
4dr Sdn......................................................
4dr Sdn Auto EX........................................
4dr Sdn SE.................................................
4dr Sdn EX Auto........................................
4dr Grand EX 119” WB..............................
4dr HB Manual ..........................................
4dr Sdn......................................................
4dr Sdn G6.................................................
4dr Sdn SES...............................................
4dr Sdn I4 CVT 2.0 S .................................
4dr Sdn LE Auto.........................................
4WD 4dr Sport ..........................................
4dr Grand Sport 119” WB.........................
4dr Sdn GLS V6 Auto.................................
4dr Sdn I4 CVT 2.0 S .................................
4dr Sdn Man i Sport..................................
4dr AT LX...................................................
4dr Sdn LE Auto.........................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto GLS..................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto GLS..................................
4dr Sdn SE.................................................
4dr Sdn SXT FWD......................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LX ....................................
4dr Sdn Auto GLS......................................
4dr Sdn GLS V6 Auto.................................
2dr Cpe Auto GS........................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.....................................
...................................................................
...................................................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn Auto LE.........................................
4dr Sdn Auto LE.........................................
2dr Cpe Deluxe..........................................
2dr Cpe LS.................................................
4dr Sdn S...................................................
4dr Sdn CVT ES .........................................
2dr Cpe SS.................................................
4dr HB SXT................................................
4WD 4dr V6 Auto SE.................................
4dr Sdn SE.................................................
4dr Sdn SXT...............................................
4dr LWB Auto EX.......................................
2dr Auto LX................................................
2dr I4 AT LX...............................................
4dr HB SXT................................................
AWD 4dr Auto GLS ...................................
4dr I4 Auto LX............................................
4dr I4 Auto LX............................................
4dr Man EX................................................
4dr Sdn......................................................
4dr Sdn R/T ...............................................
4dr Sdn R/T ...............................................
4dr Sdn R/T ...............................................
4dr Sdn SEL...............................................
4WD 4dr Sport ..........................................
5dr HB........................................................
2dr HB Auto...............................................
AWD 4dr Auto GLS *Ltd Avail* ................
4dr Sdn Auto S..........................................
AWD 4dr Premium ....................................
AWD 4dr Auto GLS *Ltd Avail* ................
4dr Sdn......................................................
2dr HB Auto...............................................
4dr Sdn Auto GLS......................................
4dr Sdn I4 CVT 2.5.....................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.....................................
...................................................................
...................................................................
4dr Auto LX................................................
4dr I4 Auto LX............................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.....................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.....................................
4dr Sdn LS.................................................
4dr Sdn R/T ...............................................
4dr Sdn SE FWD........................................
4dr Laredo 4WD........................................
4WD 4dr Sport ..........................................
5dr HB Auto Sport .....................................
4dr I4 Auto EX-L PZEV...............................
...................................................................
...................................................................
4WD 4dr Sport *Ltd Avail*.......................
4WD 4dr Sport *Ltd Avail*.......................
4WD 4dr Laredo........................................
4dr Sdn Auto S..........................................
Ext Cab 143.5” WB 4WD Work Truck .......
4dr Auto EX ...............................................
4dr I4 Auto EX ...........................................
4dr I4 Auto LX............................................
4dr Sdn 2.4L Auto GLS..............................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.....................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto XLE ..................................
4dr Sdn I4 CVT 2.5 SL................................
4dr Sdn Limited.........................................
4dr Wgn SE ...............................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn Auto S..........................................
4dr I4 Auto EX ...........................................
AWD 4dr Luxury w/3rd Row.....................
2dr X..........................................................
4WD 4dr V6 Auto XLT ...............................
4dr I4 Auto LX............................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto SE....................................
2dr Cpe......................................................
4dr Sdn V6 CVT 3.5 SL ..............................
4WD Reg I4 MT.........................................
4dr I4 Auto EX ...........................................
4dr I4 Auto LX-P ........................................
4dr Sdn 2.4L Auto GLS..............................
4WD 4dr SE...............................................
4WD 4dr Sport ..........................................
4WD 4dr SXT *Ltd Avail* .........................
...................................................................
...................................................................
...................................................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn 2.4L Auto GLS..............................
4dr Sdn 2.4L Auto GLS..............................
4dr Sdn 2.4L Auto GLS..............................
...................................................................
Voyager..........
Impala............
Spectra...........
Focus..............
Spectra...........
Caravan..........
xA...................
Malibu............
G6...................
Focus..............
Sentra ............
Corolla ...........
Compass........
Caravan..........
Sonata............
Sentra ............
Mazda3 ..........
Civic ...............
Camry ............
Sonata............
Sonata............
Focus..............
Avenger .........
Optima...........
Elantra............
Sonata............
Tiburon..........
Camry ............
Elantra............
Elantra............
Versa ..............
Corolla ...........
Corolla ...........
Mustang.........
Cobalt.............
Focus..............
Lancer ............
Monte Carlo...
Caliber............
Tucson ...........
Focus..............
Avenger .........
Sedona...........
Civic ...............
Accord............
Caliber............
Santa Fe.........
Accord............
Accord............
Civic ...............
ES 330............
Avenger .........
Avenger .........
Avenger .........
Focus..............
Compass........
Prius...............
tC....................
Santa Fe.........
Corolla ...........
XL7.................
Santa Fe.........
ES 330............
tC....................
Elantra............
Altima ............
Camry ............
Camry ............
Camry ............
Civic ...............
Accord............
Camry ............
Camry ............
Cruze..............
Avenger .........
Fusion ............
GranChero.....
Liberty............
Fit ...................
Accord............
Altima ............
Camry ............
Patriot ............
Patriot ............
GranChero.....
Corolla ...........
Silverado1500
Civic ...............
Accord............
Accord............
Sonata............
Camry ............
Camry ............
Altima ............
Avalon............
GrandCaravan
Accord............
Corolla ...........
Accord............
XL7.................
Wrangler........
Escape............
Accord............
Camry ............
Corvette .........
Altima ............
Tacoma ..........
Accord............
Accord............
Sonata............
Nitro...............
Patriot ............
Nitro...............
Sonata............
Accord............
Sonata............
Compass........
Sonata............
Sonata............
Sonata............
Compass........
89,120
76,549
83,282
69,810
66,216
53,458
77,257
65,791
76,484
67,271
65,781
36,399
84,838
56,338
83,287
69,852
57,752
77,785
77,313
46,179
63,192
64,433
64,873
49,571
27,252
59,023
28,301
50,040
33,837
27,539
32,082
36,052
21,000
38,789
16,190
14,380
52,601
64,173
33,430
49,814
20,788
29,790
47,892
42,743
36,480
29,155
80,094
35,785
25,672
23,632
56,360
33,942
34,206
28,583
33,249
24,136
53,806
45,479
45,728
39,398
33,330
55,786
65,085
41,049
17,876
43,250
20,486
32,086
33,768
14,292
19,901
32,873
30,454
3,810
21,743
22,546
52,977
58,691
22,410
47,559
17,703
26,265
24,728
32,424
45,211
19,638
38,814
16,771
18,365
33,277
24,190
21,747
30,624
36,661
54,519
17,707
45,945
25,380
17,658
46,762
32,303
45,785
12,459
10,679
40,379
30,799
29,462
34,843
16,183
13,241
20,408
6,530
34,701
22,573
33,739
22,384
30,235
20,438
22,813
22,531
28,142
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
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MILES
MILES
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MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
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MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
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MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
$5,995
$7,400
$7,995
$7,995
$8,995
$9,499
$9,995
$9,995
$9,995
$10,400
$10,995
$10,995
$11,489
$11,989
$11,989
$11,989
$11,995
$12,200
$12,989
$12,995
$13,489
$13,489
$13,499
$13,589
$13,900
$13,989
$13,995
$13,995
$13,995
$13,995
$13,995
$14,100
$14,100
$14,400
$14,499
$14,499
$14,979
$14,995
$14,995
$14,995
$14,999
$15,200
$15,489
$15,499
$15,499
$15,600
$15,979
$15,995
$15,995
$15,995
$15,995
$15,995
$15,995
$15,995
$15,995
$15,995
$15,995
$15,999
$16,200
$16,295
$16,300
$16,400
$16,489
$16,499
$16,499
$16,499
$16,500
$16,900
$16,900
$16,995
$16,995
$16,995
$16,995
$16,995
$16,995
$16,995
$16,999
$16,999
$17,300
$17,400
$17,400
$17,400
$17,700
$17,700
$17,800
$17,979
$17,989
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995
$17,999
$18,100
$18,400
$18,489
$18,499
$18,500
$18,700
$18,900
$18,900
$18,900
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$19,200
$19,200
$19,200
$19,300
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J4623A
M7952A
K12249A
K12356A
C3485A
JP15558
H26390B
T28555A
CP15566
T28730A
H27197A
J4685A
A10794B
H26214A
CP15563
T27767B
H27034A
A10970A
HP15553
T28489A
LP15511A
K12304A
HP15499
K12361A
T28535A
JP15472A
J4742A
HP15560
T27831A
T28335A
T28431A
J4789B
T28590A
T28391A
B9299A
L11298A
L11333A
H27242A
AP15259
A10852A
H26913A
T28016B
T28593A
J4768A
D0238A
T28141A
T28455A
A10963A
CP15581
DP15580
H27233A
A10945A
A10927A
DP15583
H26810A
H27230A
H27241A
M7929A
LP15573
H26835A
T28438A
L11271A
A10955A
A10968A
A10923A
D0193A
K12165A
A10964A
T28081A
L11289A
H26747A
T28236A
C3483A
JP15230
J4835A
TS0341
JP15230
JP15224
H27115A
JP15224
B9173A
JP15522
H27162A
T27713B
A10992A
H27204A
T28005A
JP15226
JP15226
BP15268
JP15232
JP15232
C3463A
L11285A
L11278A
L11270A
H26924A
AS0345
B9212A
BP15539
L11391A
BP15542
C3471A
A10941A
L11342A
BP15540
H26391A
C3447B
T28465A
BS0338
B9305B
P15604
L11364A
H26995A
H27234A
J4619A
J4760A
BP15612
B9168A
SR0018A
C3497A
2007
2008
2011
2011
2007
2010
2010
2008
2010
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2009
2007
2008
2010
2007
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2007
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2007
2007
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2011
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2007
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2011
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2011
2010
2011
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2011
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2008
2010
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2007
2011
2011
2008
2011
2011
2009
2009
2009
2005
2009
2010
2010
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2009
2009
2009
2009
2009
2009
2011
2010
2011
2011
2010
2011
2009
2010
2010
2009
2008
2010
2010
2010
2010
Jeep.............
Hyundai.......
Hyundai.......
Hyundai.......
Cadillac........
Jeep.............
Toyota..........
Subaru.........
Chrysler.......
Honda..........
Honda..........
Honda..........
Lexus...........
Honda..........
Chrysler.......
Toyota..........
Honda..........
Honda..........
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Subaru.........
Hyundai.......
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Toyota..........
Ford..............
Subaru.........
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Nissan..........
Subaru.........
Chevrolet....
Acura...........
Honda..........
Honda..........
Honda..........
Acura...........
Honda..........
Acura...........
Acura...........
Subaru.........
Toyota..........
Toyota..........
Jeep.............
Dodge..........
Mazda..........
Acura...........
Nissan..........
Chrysler.......
Dodge..........
Honda..........
Acura...........
Acura...........
Dodge..........
Honda..........
Honda..........
Honda..........
GMC.............
Lexus...........
Toyota..........
Toyota..........
BMW............
Acura...........
Acura...........
Acura...........
Ford..............
Chevrolet....
Acura...........
Lexus...........
Lexus...........
Acura...........
Toyota..........
Cadillac........
Jeep.............
Jeep.............
Toyota..........
Jeep.............
Jeep.............
Honda..........
Jeep.............
Lexus...........
Jeep.............
Ford..............
Acura...........
Acura...........
Honda..........
Ford..............
Jeep.............
Jeep.............
MB................
Jeep.............
Jeep.............
Acura...........
Lexus...........
Lexus...........
Lexus...........
Honda..........
Acura...........
Acura...........
MB................
Lexus...........
MB................
Infiniti ..........
Acura...........
Lexus...........
MB................
Honda..........
Chevrolet....
Honda..........
MB................
MB................
Cadillac........
Lexus...........
Toyota..........
Lexus...........
GMC.............
Cadillac........
MB................
MB................
MB................
BMW............
4WD 4dr Overland.....................................
AWD 4dr Auto GLS ...................................
4dr Sdn 2.4L Auto GLS PZEV.....................
4dr Sdn 2.4L Auto GLS PZEV.....................
4dr Sdn V8.................................................
4WD 4dr Sport *Ltd Avail*.......................
5dr HB I......................................................
4dr H4 Auto Ltd.........................................
4dr Wgn Touring........................................
4dr Auto LX-S............................................
4WD 5dr LX...............................................
EX-L Sedan 4 Door ....................................
4dr Sdn......................................................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L.......................................
4dr Wgn Touring........................................
4WD Access I4 MT ...................................
4dr I4 Auto EX-L PZEV...............................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L PZEV..............................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L PZEV..............................
5dr HB........................................................
4dr Auto X L.L. Bean Ed PZEV *Ltd Avail*
4dr Sdn 2.4L Auto Ltd................................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L.......................................
5dr HB........................................................
4WD 4dr V6 SR5 .......................................
4dr SEL AWD.............................................
4dr Man WRX w/Premium Pkg.................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L.......................................
4WD 4dr V6 5-Spd AT...............................
4WD King Cab SWB SE ............................
4dr Auto 2.5X Premium.............................
4WD Ext Cab 134.0” LT w/1LT..................
4dr Sdn Auto .............................................
4WD 5dr LX...............................................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L w/Navi ..........................
4WD 5dr EX...............................................
4dr Sdn Auto .............................................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L.......................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn Auto .............................................
4dr Sdn H4 Auto Limited Pwr Moon.........
4dr Wgn I4 FWD........................................
4dr Wgn I4 FWD........................................
4WD 4dr Unlimited Sahara.......................
4WD Quad Cab 160.5” SLT.......................
AWD 4dr Grand Touring............................
AWD 4dr Tech Pkg ....................................
AWD 4dr SL...............................................
4dr Wgn Touring........................................
4dr Wgn Crew...........................................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L.......................................
4dr Sdn Auto .............................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto .........................................
4dr Wgn Crew...........................................
5dr EX........................................................
4WD 5dr EX...............................................
4WD 5dr EX-L............................................
AWD 4dr SLE-1 .........................................
4dr Sdn......................................................
4WD 4dr V6 5-Spd AT Ltd.........................
4WD 4dr Sport ..........................................
4dr Sdn 328xi AWD...................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto .........................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto .........................................
AWD 4dr....................................................
4WD SuperCab 145” XLT..........................
AWD 4dr LT w/1LT ....................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto .........................................
4dr Sdn......................................................
4dr Sport Sdn Auto AWD..........................
AWD 4dr....................................................
4WD 4dr Auto ...........................................
AWD 4dr V6 ..............................................
4WD 4dr Laredo........................................
4WD 4dr Sport ..........................................
5dr 8-Pass Van V6 LE FWD .......................
...................................................................
4WD 4dr Laredo........................................
5dr EX........................................................
...................................................................
4dr Sport Sdn Auto AWD..........................
4WD 4dr Laredo........................................
4dr Limited AWD.......................................
4WD 4dr ....................................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto .........................................
5dr LX ........................................................
4WD SuperCrew 150” Lariat ....................
4WD 4dr Laredo........................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn 3.0L Sport 4MATIC.......................
4WD 4dr Laredo........................................
4WD 4dr Laredo........................................
4dr Sdn 2WD.............................................
4dr Sport Sdn Auto AWD..........................
AWD 4dr....................................................
4dr SUV 4WD............................................
4WD 4dr EX-L w/RES................................
FWD 4dr ....................................................
4dr Sdn 2WD.............................................
4dr Sdn 3.0L Luxury 4MATIC.....................
4dr Sport Sdn Auto AWD..........................
4dr Sdn 3.0L Sport 4MATIC.......................
AWD 4dr....................................................
AWD 4dr....................................................
AWD 4dr....................................................
4dr Sdn 3.0L Sport 4MATIC.......................
4WD 4dr EX...............................................
4WD 4dr 1500 LT.......................................
5dr EX-L.....................................................
4dr Sdn 3.0L Sport 4MATIC.......................
4dr Sdn 3.0L Sport 4MATIC.......................
4dr Sdn 3.0L Luxury AWD.........................
AWD 4dr....................................................
4WD 4dr V6 Limited..................................
AWD 4dr....................................................
4WD 4dr ....................................................
AWD 4dr....................................................
4dr Sdn Luxury 3.5L 4MATIC.....................
4dr Sdn Luxury 3.5L 4MATIC.....................
4MATIC 4dr 4.6L........................................
2dr Conv 650i ............................................
GranChero.....
Santa Fe.........
Sonata............
Sonata............
DTS ................
Patriot ............
Prius...............
Outback..........
T & C..............
Civic ...............
CR-V...............
Accord............
ES 350............
Accord............
T & C..............
Tacoma ..........
Accord............
Accord............
Accord............
Prius...............
Forester..........
Sonata............
Accord............
Prius...............
4Runner .........
Edge...............
ImprezaSedan
Accord............
RAV4 ..............
Titan...............
Forester..........
Silverado1500
TL ...................
CR-V...............
Accord............
CR-V...............
TSX ................
Accord............
TSX ................
TSX ................
Legacy............
Venza..............
Venza..............
Wrangler........
Ram 1500.......
CX-9 ...............
RDX................
Murano..........
T & C..............
GrandCaravan
Accord............
TSX ................
TSX ................
GrandCaravan
Odyssey.........
Element..........
CR-V...............
Terrain............
ES 350............
RAV4 ..............
Highlander.....
3-Series..........
TSX ................
TSX ................
RDX................
F-150...............
Traverse.........
TSX ................
ES 350............
IS 250 .............
RDX................
FJ Cruiser.......
SRX................
GranChero.....
WranglerUnltd
Sienna............
GranChero.....
GranChero.....
Odyssey.........
GranChero.....
IS 250 .............
GranChero.....
Edge...............
MDX...............
TSX ................
Odyssey.........
F-150...............
GranChero.....
GranChero.....
C-Class...........
GranChero.....
GranChero.....
TL ...................
IS 250 .............
RX 350............
GX 470 ...........
Pilot ................
RDX................
TL ...................
C-Class...........
IS 250 .............
C-Class...........
FX35...............
MDX...............
RX 350............
C-Class...........
Pilot ................
Tahoe .............
Odyssey.........
C-Class...........
C-Class...........
CTS.................
RX 350............
Highlander.....
RX 350............
Yukon Hybrid.
Escalade.........
E-Class ...........
E-Class ...........
GL-Class .........
6-Series..........
MILES
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$19,479
$19,479
$19,499
$19,499
$19,499
$19,500
$19,500
$19,600
$19,700
$19,979
$19,979
$19,979
$19,995
$19,995
$19,995
$19,995
$20,000
$20,295
$20,499
$20,499
$20,995
$20,995
$20,995
$21,479
$21,495
$21,499
$21,995
$21,995
$21,995
$21,995
$22,100
$22,300
$22,400
$22,479
$22,500
$22,800
$22,995
$22,999
$23,400
$23,495
$23,995
$23,995
$23,995
$23,995
$23,995
$23,995
$23,995
$23,999
$24,300
$24,499
$24,979
$24,995
$24,995
$24,995
$24,995
$25,479
$25,479
$25,800
$25,900
$25,900
$25,999
$26,400
$26,400
$26,495
$26,495
$26,499
$26,499
$26,500
$26,995
$26,995
$26,995
$27,479
$27,479
$27,499
$27,499
$27,499
$27,499
$27,979
$27,979
$27,979
$27,995
$27,995
$27,999
$27,999
$28,300
$28,479
$28,499
$28,500
$28,500
$28,599
$28,600
$28,600
$28,995
$28,995
$28,995
$28,999
$29,479
$29,979
$29,995
$29,995
$30,979
$30,995
$30,995
$30,995
$31,499
$31,900
$31,995
$32,995
$32,995
$33,499
$34,979
$34,995
$36,479
$36,999
$38,479
$41,499
$43,499
$45,479
$46,479
$57,579
$65,499
75,808
17,637
42,139
26,881
52,729
27,978
15,618
55,850
28,534
11,305
44,518
42,275
61,702
34,212
28,353
30,799
24,641
26,571
42,614
35,483
38,273
13,188
19,647
7,644
67,425
44,679
21,604
23,847
34,788
47,507
26,656
39,002
38,190
13,182
28,554
30,471
30,709
20,783
44,570
26,950
8,680
55,821
29,108
28,006
31,323
32,766
52,582
28,934
8,231
18,674
14,065
16,342
32,557
14,337
24,482
9,068
30,077
15,400
29,985
27,719
60,900
33,355
31,879
8,265
27,642
38,400
31,203
14,947
40,122
33,579
26,461
24,183
37,849
26,222
20,287
11,693
26,222
17,523
17,469
17,523
29,650
19,739
35,839
42,930
13,265
5,282
43,586
21,948
21,948
24,606
28,054
28,054
34,105
35,912
36,589
60,526
31,641
18,920
21,490
23,713
30,901
20,251
31,375
31,783
35,349
25,754
12,103
34,355
14,405
17,193
16,367
15,097
7,888
22,151
23,782
20,945
30,410
25,543
15,253
16,351
8,311
Pre·Owned 5upersIere 14 8rcnds p Pre·Owned 5up 14 8rcnds
*ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TAG, & TITLE. FINANCING AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. WARRANTY ON SELECT MAKES AND MODELS. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. UNITS MAY BE SOLD PRIOR TO PRINTING. OFFERS EXPIRE 11/30/11.
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 7G
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES*****
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!
Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!!
DRAWING TO BE HELD NOVEMBER 30
Harry’s U Pull It
www.wegotused.com
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
39 Prospect St • Nanticoke
570-735-1487
WE PAY
THE MOST
INCASH
BUYING
11am
to 11pm
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
‘10 JEEP PATRIOT
Approximately
18,000 miles.
Power windows
and doors,
remote start,
heated seats,
cruise, MP3 play-
er, 4 WD. $16,500
570-606-5634
CADILLAC `07
ESCALADE ESV
Black with extended
cab. Fully loaded.
Low miles. Extra set
of tires & rims.
Leather interior.
$32,000.
(570) 357-1383
CADILLAC `99
ESCALADE
97k miles. Black
with beige leather
interior. 22” rims.
Runs great. $8,500
Call 570-861-0202
CHEVROLET `10
SILVERADO 1500
Extended Cab V71
Package 4x4. Bed-
liner. V-8. 5.3 Liter.
Red. Remote start.
Garage kept. 6,300
miles $26,000
(570) 639-2539
CHEVROLET `97
SILVERADO
with Western plow.
4WD, Automatic.
Loaded with
options. Bedliner.
55,000 miles.
$9,200. Call
(570) 868-6503
CHEVY ‘00 S-10
2WD. 4 Cylinder. 5
speed. $3,895.
BUY * SELL * TRADE
D.P. MOTORS
1451 SHOEMAKER
AVE, W. WYOMING
570-714-4146
CHEVY `00 S-10
4x4. 56K original
miles. Extended cab.
Automatic 6cyl. A/C.
Recent safety &
emissions inspec-
tion. Excellent con-
dition. No rust.
Clean inside & out.
Purchased from an
estate. Garage
kept. Well main-
tained. $7,495.
Trade in’s accepted.
570-466-2771
CHEVY `99 SILVERADO
Auto. V6 Vortec.
Standard cab. 8’
bed with liner. Dark
Blue. 98,400 miles.
$6,200 or best offer
570-823-8196
CHEVY ‘10
EQUINOX LT
Moonroof. Alloys.
1 Owner. $23,777
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
CHEVY ‘95 ASTRO
AWD. Good tires.
V6. Auto. 149,000
miles. Power every-
thing. Heavy duty
tow package. Runs
good. Just passed
inspection. Kelly
Blue Book $2,500.
Selling: $1,650
(570) 855-8235
CHEVY ‘99 BLAZER
Sport utility, 4
door, four wheel
drive, ABS, new
inspection. $4200.
570-709-1467
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHRYSLER 02
TOWN & COUNTRY
V6. Like new!
$5,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
DODGE `00
CARGO VAN 1500
88,500 miles. V6.
Automatic. Good
Condition. $2,300
(570) 793-6955
DODGE ‘97 2500
4X4, CUMMI NS
Extended Cab.
Good Shape.
$9,500 negotiable.
(570) 954-7461
FORD `00 WINDSTAR
Excellent condition,
8 passenger, new
starter. $2,900.
570-655-2443
GMC `05 SAVANA
1500 Cargo Van.
AWD. V8 automatic.
A/C. New brakes &
tires. Very clean.
$11,950. Call
570-474-6028
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
FORD `04 EXPLORER
Eddie Bauer Edition
59,000 miles,
4 door, 3 row
seats, V6, all power
options, moon roof,
video screen
$12,999.
570-690-3995 or
570-287-0031
FORD ‘05 ESCAPE XLS
4 Cylinder. 5
speed. Front
wheel drive. air.
Warranted.
$7,895.
BUY * SELL * TRADE
D.P. MOTORS
1451 SHOEMAKER
AVE, W. WYOMING
570-714-4146
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘00 EXPLORER
XLT. CD. Power
seats. Extra
Clean! $3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD ‘02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 02 F150
Extra Cab. 6
Cylinder, 5 speed.
Air. 2WD. $4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 02 RANGER EDGE
Extra cab. 5
speed. 6 cylinder.
2 wheel drive.
Extra sharp truck!
$4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD 03 RANGER
$7,900
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD 08 EDGE SEL
Leather. Auto.
$18,940
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD ‘99 EXPLORER
Leather.
Moonroof. 4x4.
New Inspection.
$3,995
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘99 F150
Shortbox. 1 owner.
New truck trade!
$4,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
GMC '02 SAFARI
CARGO VAN
AWD. Auto. War-
rantied. $5,195
BUY * SELL * TRADE
D.P. MOTORS
1451 SHOEMAKER
AVE, W. WYOMING
570-714-4146
HONDA 06 CRV SE
Leather &
Moonroof.
$15,872
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP `04
CHEROKEE
135,000 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, $6,500.
(570) 237-6979
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
HONDA ‘09 CRV LX
AWD. 1 owner.
$18,940
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
HYUNDAI '04 SANTA FE
4 Cylinder. Auto.
Front wheel drive.
78K. Very clean!.
Warrantied.
$7,795.
BUY * SELL * TRADE
D.P. MOTORS
1451 SHOEMAKER
AVE, W. WYOMING
570-714-4146
HYUNDAI ‘06
SANTE FE LTD
Leather. Moon-
roof. One owner.
$14,580
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP ‘04
GRAND CHEROKEE
4.0 - 6 cylinder.
Auto. 4x4. Air.
Many options -
very clean! 1
owner. War-
rantied. $9,295.
BUY * SELL * TRADE
D.P. MOTORS
1451 SHOEMAKER
AVE, W. WYOMING
570-714-4146
JEEP `03 LIBERTY
SPORT. Rare. 5
speed. 23 MPG.
102K highway miles.
Silver with black
interior. Immaculate
condition, inside and
out. Garage kept.
No rust, mainte-
nance records
included. 4wd, all
power. $6,900 or
best offer, trades
will be considered.
Call 570-575-0518
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 04 LIBERTY
Auto. V6.
Black Beauty!
$6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
JEEP ‘07 GRAND
CHEROKEE
4WD & Alloys.
$16,995
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP 08 COMPASS
4 WD. Auto. CD.
$13,992
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
4X4 SUV SALE
‘08 Chevy Trail-
blazer LT 15K
miles. Moonroof.
Black. $19,995
‘08 Jeep Grand
Cherokee Laredo
42K miles. Black. 6
cylinder. $16,995
‘08 Honda CRV
EX White. Moon-
roof. $19,900
‘08 Chevy Trail-
blazer LT 29K
miles. Tan. Moon-
roof. $17,995
‘06 Chevy Trail-
blazer LT EXT
Gray. 82K miles.
$12,495
‘04 Jeep Grand
Cherokee Laredo
SE Blue. Moonroof.
Leather. 74K miles.
$10,200
‘04 Jeep Grand
Cherokee 6 cylin-
der. Auto. 102K
miles. Gray. $8,995
‘04 Chrysler
Town & Country
Van Limited 78K
miles. Blue. Every
available factory
option. $9,500
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
MAZDA 03 MPV VAN
V6. CD Player.
1 owner vehicle!!
$2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
NISSAN `10 ROGUE SL
AWD. Gray. Sun-
roof. Bose stereo
system. Black,
heated leather
seats. Sunroof
6,800 miles.
$24,000
(570) 696-2777
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
MERCURY `07
MARINER
One owner. Luxury
4x4. garage kept.
Showroom condi-
tion, fully loaded,
every option
34,000 miles.
GREAT DEAL
$14,500
(570)825-5847
MITSUBISHI ‘06
OUTLANDER
Very nice! 4 cylin-
der. Auto. 4WD.
$8,395
BUY * SELL * TRADE
D.P. MOTORS
1451 SHOEMAKER
AVE, W. WYOMING
570-714-4146
NISSAN `04
PATHFINDER
ARMADA
Excellent condition.
Too many options to
list. Runs & looks
excellent. $13,995
570-655-6132 or
570-466-8824
NISSAN ‘08 ROGUE S
AWD. Auto
$17,990
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
RANGE ROVER
‘07 SPORT
Supercharged
59,000 miles, fully
loaded. Impeccable
service record.
$36,000
570-283-1130
SUZUKI `03 XL-7
85K. 4x4. Auto.
Nice, clean interior.
Runs good. New
battery & brakes. All
power. CD. $6,800
570-762-8034
570-696-5444
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
TOYOTA 09 RAV 4
Only 13K miles!
Remote Starter.
$21,750
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
VOLVO `08 XC90
Fully loaded, moon
roof, leather, heat-
ed seats, electric
locks, excellent
condition. New
tires, new brakes
and rotors. 52,000
miles highway
$26,500/ best offer.
570-779-4325
570-417-2010 till 5
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid In Cash!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
KINGSTONS
CHILDREN’S BOUTIQUE
FOR SALE
TURN KEY
BUSINESS
570-714-2229
610 Business
Opportunities
JAN-PRO
Commercial Cleaning
Of Northeastern PA
Concerned about
your future?
BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Work Full or Part
time. Accounts
available NOW
throughout Luzerne
& Lackawanna
counties. We guar-
antee $5,000 to
$200,000 in annual
billing. Investment
Required. We’re
ready – are you?
For more info call
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
BOYDES BEARS,
(3), $3 each. MILK-
GLASS BOWL, (2)
Fenton, large with
handles, $15 each.
SILVERWARE, gold
plated, 8 place set-
ting plus 6 serving
pieces, $30.
570-287-3662
PICTURE, 24x36
framed pictures by
Marquis Galleries in
1986. It has six 8x10
pictures of old
Wilkes Barre
scenes, one of a
coal mine breaker.
Good shape. $25.
570-655-9474.
SEWING MACHINE.
(1) Singer Vintage
factory with sewing
table. $150 OBO. (1)
Singer touch and
sew with sewing
table. $50 OBO.
570-824-7314
A unique piece of
local history for sale
Bound office
archive copy of
“Sunday
Independent”,
“Wilkes-Barre
Record”,
1910 to 1978.
Birth/wedding/death
announcements.
Unique birthday or
anniversary gift.
www.ebay.com
Search Sunday
Independent
570-822-8162
710 Appliances
A P P L I A N C E
PA R T S E T C .
Used appliances.
Parts for all brands.
223 George Ave.
Wilkes-Barre
570-820-8162
DISHWASHER,
Portable, Kenmore,
Black with Butcher
Block top, $200.
570-333-4494
DISHWASHER/
RANGE/VENT:
Almond glass top
range, dishwasher,
and vent hood in
great condition.
$200.
570-655-1606
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
RETIRED REPAIRMAN
Top loading
Whirlpool & Ken-
more Washers, Gas
& Electric Dryers.
570-833-2965
570-460-0658
710 Appliances
DRYER, Gas, May-
tag, white, commer-
cial quality, super
capacity, quiet
series, intellidry
sensor, 7 cycle,
$225. PEDESTAL,
under washer, stor-
age drawer, white,
$50. RANGE, gas,
Maytag Magic Chef
RS-1, bisque, 30
inch, sealed burn-
ers, self cleaning,
$200. DISHWASH-
ER, GE Nautilus,
bisque, 2 energy
options, multiple
washing cycles,
$100. MICROWAVE,
GE, over the stove,
bisque, 1 cu ft,
Spacemaker XL
1800, $100. WATER
COOLER and dis-
penser, Sunbeam,
White, 3 tempera-
ture options, 3 or 5
gallon, bottom
refrigerator, $35.
All excellent condi-
tion. 570-451-1612
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and inex-
pensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money, Let
us take a look at it
first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
712 Baby Items
CHANGING TABLE,
3 tier wood, $30.
CRADLE, wood with
pad, $30.
570-288-9843
714 Bridal Items
NECKLACES: Heart
and Cross Pendant
with chains. $3.00.
570-332-7933
716 Building
Materials
FLOOD CONTROL
USED CONCRETE
BARRIERS FOR SALE
Available for pick up
in Clarks Summit
12’x52” $10/l.f.
12’x34” $8/l.f.
20’x34” $12/l.f.
Delivery Available @
$100 per hour.
Grabber Rental
Fee $400
570-586-2145
HOOD, above the
range, all Cherry
wood. Never used.
Retails for $500
selling for $200.
Does not include
vent. 570-825-3269
SINK, bathroom,
blue with fixtures,
$30. 570-825-2599
WINDOWS, 2 double
hung, vinyl, 28 3/4 x
53 5/8 $60. Picture
Window, 37 x 50”,
$40. Picture Win-
dow, plate glass, 48
x 78”, $40.
570-655-2443
720 Cemetery
Plots/Lots
MEMORIAL SHRINE
CEMETERY
2 lots, side by side.
$350. each
(570) 675-0708
MEMORIAL SHRINE
CEMETERY
6 Plots Available
May be Separated
Rose Lawn Section
$450 each
570-654-1596
MEMORIAL SHRINE
LOTS FOR SALE
6 lots available at
Memorial Shrine
Cemetery. $2,400.
Call 717-774-1520
SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY
726 Clothing
BOOTS, Skechers
Twinkle Toes,
brown, girls sizes 1
& 2, new in box,
$25/each. SNEAK-
ERS, Skechers Girls
Rainbowlicious, new
girls sizes 2 & 3,
$20. 570-696-4020
COAT, Ladies,
Leather, with hood,
size large, $100.
570-592-5007
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
COMPUTER, Win-
dows XP, includes
tower, monitor, key-
board & mouse.
$80. 570-824-7354
732 Exercise
Equipment
EXERCISE EQUIP-
MENT, works all
parts stand up $20.
570-852-0675
GYM Home Weider
$150.
570-829-2599
736 Firewood
FIREWOOD, oak,
split, delivered.
Almost 1 cord. $105.
570-655-2178
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
OIL BURNER, EFM &
motor, good condi-
tion. $40.
570-823-6829
PELLET STOVE,
brand new, Sum-
mers Heat, 1500 sq
ft, $975.
570-474-9127
RADIATOR. Cast
iron, steam heat.
Small with enclo-
sure with valve. 25”
H. $35 OBO
570-735-7331
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BUNK BEDS with
attached desk and
drawers, $300.
570-333-4494
COFFEE TABLE-47”
Cherry drop-leaf
coffee table. Excel-
lent condition. $100.
570-852-0675
DESKS: 5 total,
wooden. $50-$100
each; METAL FILE
CABINETS, different
sizes $50-$150;
Office waiting room
padded chairs $15;
Metal Office Coat
Hanger $25. Call
570-239-8206
ENTERTAI NMENT
CENTER gorgeous
oriental piece,
double doors
top opens 40” w for
TV bottom holds
stereo components.
deep cranberry
gold hand painted
design brass hard-
ware original price
$3000. sell $800.
570-693-2570
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER, Riverside,
excellent condition,
Oak finish, paid
$899 + tax new, 5
years old, very solid,
41”WX 751/2” L X 21” D.
$150. 570-333-4321
FULL BED SET:
Complete. Pur-
chased new last
year. Excellent con-
dition. $125.
570-674-0926
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
FURNITURE, FREE,
(4) kitchen chairs,
3/4 folding rollaway
bed, single bed cot,
complete baby crib.
570-696-1454
AFFORDABLE
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $159
Full sets: $179
Queen sets: $199
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
ROCKER, Swivel,
light blue plaid,
great condition,
$35. 570-696-4020
SOFA,$30 LOVE
SEAT, $25, blue,
slightly worn, END
TABLE, $35, END
TABLE octagon,
$40, DRAPES, vari-
ous colors and
types, $10 to $25
pair. 570-693-2329
TABLE & 4 chairs,
Antique, Oak, $65.
SOFA, Broyhill, flo-
ral, like new, $190.
570-740-1392
CARVERTON
1632 West 8th St.
Sat., Nov. 19th
& Sun., Nov. 20th
8 am - 3 pm
Multi-family garage
sale. From attic to
garage, including
collectibles. 2 miles
past Carverton Rd.
EXETER
455 Roosevelt St.
(off Slocum St.
“The Back Road”)
Sat., Nov. 19th
9am-3pm
Sun., Nov. 20th
10am-2pm
Fridge, stove, wash-
er & dryer, sofas,
chairs, cedar chest,
Snap-On tools and
tool chest, tables,
lamps, desk, bed-
room set, toys,
games, glassware,
kitchen, bikes, lawn-
mower, snow
thrower, saddle,
Christmas, fishing,
jewelry, die cast
cars & trucks and
much more. House
is full, don’t miss this
one!
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Upper Askam
Corner of Front &
Bauer Street
Saturday, Nov. 19
10am - 3pm
Last sale of the
year!
KINGSTON
42 3rd Ave.
Saturday 10-4 &
Sunday 10-2
Baby furniture &
items. Men’s,
women’s, juniors, &
toddler boys’ cloth-
ing. Women's size
10 shoes. Purses
galore. Knick
knacks, christmas
items, toys.
Jewelry - costume
& sterling.
LARKSVILLE
CLEARVIEW DR ACROSS
FROM VOLKSWAGEN
Route 11, Narrows
Fri, Sat & Sun
CONTINUING 2 WEEKS
Furniture-most all
clothing & shoes only
25¢ each.
Basement is filled!
4 Family
Basement
& Garage Sale
LEHMAN TOWNSHIP
102 Ide Road
Saturday & Sunday
November 19 & 20
9am - 2pm
Turn on Meeker Rd
at Cook’s store at
Lehman center. Go
1.3 miles to Ide
road, house is 1/2
mile on left.
SHAVERTOWN
INDOOR SALE
106 Village Drive
Sat., Nov. 19th, 9-1
Sun., Nov 20th, 9-4
New and gently
used clothes, jewel-
ry, household items,
utility shelving, furni-
ture, and much
more.
WEST WEST WYOMING WYOMING
6th Street
OPEN YEAR ROUND
SPACE
AVAILABLE
INSIDE & OUT
ACRES OF
PARKING
OUTSIDE
SPACES - $10
INSIDE SPACES -
$60 AND UP
(MONTHLY)
Saturday
10am-2pm
Sunday
8am-4pm
FLEA
MARKET
750 Jewelry
RINGS &
NECKLACES: Rings
for sale and neck-
lace both very nice.
Rings are between
$1 and $2. Neck-
laces are $3 each.
570-332-7933
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SNOWBLOWER:
21 inch 1 stage, 4.5
hp. Works very well.
$150. 570-763-9874
756 Medical
Equipment
CRUTCHES, Excel-
lent condition, $15.
570-852-0675
HOSPITAL BED,
older, adjustable,
with side rails, $150.
570-883-4443
758 Miscellaneous
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
COMFORTER, (2),
matching, twin bed,
$40. Jug Lamp, $10.
Ironing Board, $10.
570-829-2599
DISHES service for
8 + serving pieces.
White with delicate
pink rose pattern.
$35. 570-654-3755
lorrainehastie@
verizon.net
FLAGS, 3 US Cotton
Embroidered, 5ft x
9ft, new $50 each.
2 Nylon PA State, 3ft
x 5ft, new, $15 each.
BOBBLE HEADS,
SWB Barons & WBS
Penguins, 60 for
$400 negotiable.
570-881-7284
FLOOR STEAMER/
CLEANER, Euroflex,
brand new - in box.
$75. 570-740-1392
FOAM ART pack-
ages, winter, $3
each. Backrest,
massaging, Home-
dics, $5, Head-
board, white wicker,
twin, $30. Scarves,
various 20 total, $2
ea. 570-693-2329
MUGS. (2) Shirley
Temple. Small size.
$25 takes both.
Excellent condition.
570-686-1036
758 Miscellaneous
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private party
merchandise only
for items totaling
$1,000 or less. All
items must be
priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No ads
for ticket sales
accepted. Pet ads
accepted if FREE
ad must state
FREE.
One Submission per
month per
household.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA. Sorry
no phone calls.
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVER
ITEMS
Rocking Horse,
$120, Santa lawn
ornament, $10, Doll-
House with furni-
ture, $15, Skating-
Ginny Doll, $15,
Lionel Barrel Loader
with car, $100,
Lionel ice station,
$100, 1977 Orphan
Annie Doll, $12
570-655-2992
OIL TANK, FREE, in
good condition,
empty, for home or
scrap. 570-825-5115
PICNIC TABLE, blue,
folding, 33x25 top.
Great for camping.
$15. Three 2 x 4 flu-
orescent lights/ lens
& 6’ wire whip $10.
each
570-696-3528
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
REFRIGERANT: R-12
30lb. Unopened
container. Plains
area. $400.00.
570-262-1279
REINDEER on
wagon small lights.
white, new condi-
tion. $15 GRILL elec-
tric ceramic 12x12,
non stick, smoke
free, new in box
$15. AIR COMPRES-
SOR DC 12 volt new
in box $10. PAPER
SHREDDER Arora,
like new $10.
570-655-2154
SEWING MACHINE,
Singer, Model 2502
in wooden stor-
age/work table
$350 570-592-5007
SNO THROWER,
MTD, 4.5/21, runs
great, $60. GRILL,
gas, Char-Broil, 4
burner + side burn-
er, $60.
570-655-2443
STOOL SET, Sponge
Bob, $10.
570-852-0675
TABLE TOP. Oval
glass. 40x51.5” $35
OBO. 570-735-7331
762 Musical
Instruments
KNABE BABY
GRAND PI ANO
(5’1”) with bench
seat. Mahogany tra-
ditional style. Made
in Baltimore, MD in
1944. Same owner
since 1968. Tuned in
September. $3200.
570-696-9818
PIANO, Story &
Clark console with
matching bench.
Delivered. Excellent
condition. Just
tuned. $500. Call
570-474-6362
PIANO. Wurlitzer
upright, good condi-
tion, needs tuning.
$650. Call after 5:00
570-283-0535
SAXOPHONE,
Selmer AS500 Alto
with case, excellent
condition, $475.
570-574-2853
SPEAKERS, (2) 15”
Audio Centron with
tripods & covers.
26”H x 19”W. 8
Ohms, 400 Watts.
High frequency.
Very good condition.
$300 for all.
570-824-3077
770 Photo
Equipment
CAMERA, Mamiya
C330S, 2 1/4 film
camera, 55mm.80
mm, 180mm lenses,
Flash unit, exposure
meter, aluminum
case, numerous fil-
ters & other acces-
sories. Mint condi-
tion. $500.
570-696-2864
776 Sporting Goods
BICYCLE, 10 speed,
female, good
shape, needs to be
cleaned, $75.
570-829-2599
776 Sporting Goods
FISHING ROD,
Anglers Touch 7’ 2
piece rod & Zebco
Spin Cast Omega
Z03 Reel $65. Micro
Lite IMG Graphite 8’
2 piece rod & Shi-
mano Symetre Reel
$60. Fenwick 6’ 6” 2
piece rod & Shi-
mano spinning side
Stab Reel $35.
SafeT Back Snow
Outfit 1 piece large
Orange Hunting/Ice
Fishing $25. Call
after 5pm.
570-825-7251
778 Stereos/
Accessories
SPEAKERS, (2)
Bose Interaudio
4000, excellent
condition, covers,
still like new. $100.
CD CHANGER, Sony
5 disc, $35
570-574-5193
782 Tickets
BUS TRIPS
RADIO CITY MUSIC
HALL CHRISTMAS
SPECTACULAR
12/2, 1:00 pm Show
2nd Mezz. $91
12/4, 1:00 pm Show
Orch. $156
12/9,1:00 pm Show
2nd Mezz. $91
12/11,2:00 pm
Show, Orch. $156
3rd Mezz. $101
12/16,1:00 pm Show
Orch. $106
2nd Mezz. $91
12/17 11:30am Show
Orch. $156
2nd Mezz. $121
DECK THE HALLS
WINE TOUR
at Seneca Lake
Sat. 12/3. $186
per couple
Receive a Free
Christmas Wreath
NEW YORK CITY
SHOPPING
11/28, 12/4 &
12/10
Only $35
BASKETBALL
AT MSG
12/10
DUKE VS.
WASHINGTON
PITTSBURGH VS.
OKLAHOMA
STATE
$85 or $115
COOKIE’S
TRAVELERS
570-815-8330
570-558-6889
cookiestravelers.com
786 Toys & Games
AIR HOCKEY TABLE,
$200.
570-639-1354
BIKES, 2 boys new
for ages 3+, $65 -
$85. Helmet,
McQueen, $5.
570-288-3799
DOLL CRADLE,
wooden, $20.
570-829-2599
DOLLHOUSE, Fisher
Price Twin time, with
furniture and family
members, great
condition, $45.
570-696-4020
DOLLS, American
Girl look a likes, var-
ious models, $12
each; Doll furniture,
chair, $5, love seat
$8, new. STUFFED
ANIMALS, new $2-
$10. 570-693-2329
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
GI JOES. Boxed, 12”
figures. $10 each.
570-823-7396
788 Stereo/TV/
Electronics
VHS TAPES, 100+,
variety, take all $75.
570-740-1392
794 Video Game
Systems/Games
MODERN WARFARE 3
Call of Duty: Modern
Warfare 3. I pur-
chased three days
ago and already fin-
ished the game.
$50. Call or text.
570-814-3383
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING COINS,
gold, silver & all
coins, stamps,
paper money, entire
collections worth
$5,000 or more.
Travel to your home
CASH paid. Marc
1-800-488-4175
Mr. Peanut &
Planter Peanut
Items.
(570) 868-6895
NEED CASH?
We Buy:
Gold & Gold coins,
Silver, Platinum,
old bills, Watches,
Old Costume Jew-
elry, Diamonds,
Gold Filled, Ster-
ling Silver Flat-
ware, Scrap Jew-
elry, Military items,
old Tin & Iron
Toys, Canadian
coins & paper
money, most for-
eign money
(paper/coin).
PAYING TOP DOLLAR
FOR GOLD & SILVER
COINS FROM VERY
GOOD, VERY FINE &
UNCIRCULATED.
Visit our new loca-
tion @ 134 Rt. 11,
Larksville
next to WOODY’S
FIRE PLACE
& PRO FIX.
We make house calls!
Buyer & seller of
antiques! We also
do upholstering.
570-855-7197
570-328-3428
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
PAGE 8G SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
A Benson Family Dealership
Bad Credit, No Credit
New Credit Hotline
WE CAN HELP!
1-855-313-LOAN
T
O
L
L
F
R
E
E
!
Get
Cash
Now
WE BUY
CARS!
2010 JEEP PATRIOTS & COMPASS 4X4s
Starting at Only $15,995
NEW CARS
HOURS:
Monday Thru Thursday
8:00am - 8:00pm
Friday & Saturday
8:00am - 5:00pm
A Benson Family Dealership
*In stock vehicles only. Prices plus tax & Tags, All rebates applied. See Salesperson for Details. Financing must be approved thru ally bank. See dealer for details.
USED CARS
2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING
Low Miles............................................ $14,995
2010 DODGE CHARGER
Must See............................................. $16,995
2010 JEEP GR. CHEROKEE LAREDO
4X4, 25K Miles ..................................... $21,995
2011 BUICK REGAL CXL
Heated Seats, 2 In Stock........................ $22,995
2011 CHEVY MALIBU
Stk#1799, Only..................................... $15,995
2010 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING
Stk#1797, Reduced................................ $16,995
2010 DODGE GR. CARAVAN
Stk#1796, Only..................................... $17,995
2010 JEEP WRANGLER 4DR
4X4 .................................................... $22,995
2009 SUBARU FORESTER LIMITED
Local Trade, Heated Leather Seating, Moonroof .. $21,995
2011 FORD ESCAPE XLT
4X4 .................................................... $26,995
2010 DODGE JOURNEY RT
Leather ............................................... $21,995
2010 DODGE SEBRING CONV
Sharp ................................................. $17,995
2011 BUICK LUCERNE CXL
Hard to Find ........................................ $24,995
2010 GMC SIERRA 1500 CREW CAB
4x4, Local One Owner Trade, 5.3L V8, Power Tech Pkg. $27,995
2010 CHEVY MALIBU
Stk#1740, 1 Owner ................................ $15,995
2010 DODGE AVENGER R/T
Leather, Must See!................................ $15,995
2010 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR
4X4 .................................................... $18,995
2011 FORD ESCAPE LIMITED
4X4, Leather ........................................ $24,995
2011 BUICK LACROSSE CXL
Just 24K Miles, Extra Clean!................... $24,995
2010 CHEVY TRAVERSE
4X4 .................................................... $24,995
2010 JEEP COMMANDER
4X4 .................................................... $21,995
2010 TOYOTA COROLLA
1 Owner .............................................. $15,995
2010 KIA RIO
2 In Stock............................................ $11,995
2010 CHEVY TAHOE
Stk#1681, 20” Chromes ......................... $32,995
2010 HYUNDAI ACCENT
26K Miles............................................ $11,995
2011 CHEVY SUBURBAN
4X4, 17K Miles ..................................... $35,995
2010 FORD EXPLORER XLT
14K Miles, 4x4...................................... $22,995
2010 CHEVY EXPRESS CARGO VANS
2 In Stock............................................ $18,995
2010 MERCURY GR. MARQUIS
17K Miles ............................................ $16,995
2010 HONDA CIVIC
14K Miles, Only .................................... $16,995
2011 NISSAN ROGUE AWD
22K Miles, Balance of Factory Warranty ............. $19,995
2010 DODGE RAM CREW CAB
4X4, 13K Miles ..................................... $24,995
2010 FORD TAURUS LIMITED
12K Miles ............................................ $24,995
2011 HYUNDAI TUCSON AWD
15K Miles, Heated Seatsd ...................... $22,995
2010 MERCEDES BENZ 300C
All Wheel Drive, 13K Miles, Stunning................ $30,995
2009 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500
Extended Cab, 4x4, 12K Miles................. $24,995
2000 CHEVY SILVERADO XCAB 4X4
Just Traded, Leer Custom Cap, Power Galore, As Traded .. $6,995
2009 PONTIAC G5
21K Miles, Only.................................... $12,995
2009 CHEVY IMPALA
Only 31K Miles..................................... $14,995
2006 FORD 500
Only 16K Miles, Don’t Miss It .................. $13,995
2010 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS
36K Miles, Alloy Wheels, Sharp! .............. $13,995
2006 CHEVY COBALT LS CPE
Only 49K Miles, Local Trade, Extra Clean...... $8,995
2011 JEEP LIBERTY “JET EDITION” 4X4
Black Beauty, Only 3K Miles, Moonroof, Navigation. $22,995
2011 GMC YUKON 4X4
$
37,391
SLE Equipment Pkg, Pure Silver Beauty!
0%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
SAVE $6,564
2011 GMC YUKON XL
4X4
$
47,995
SLT Equipment Pkg, Moonroof,
Heated & Cooled Leather
Seating, 20” Polished Wheels
0%
for 72 mos
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
SAVE $7,515
2011 BUICK REGAL CXL
TURBO
$
28,741
Choose From 3, Too Many Options To List
FROM
0%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
SAVE $4,449
2011 BUICK ENCLAVE
CXL
$
39,980
All Wheel Drive, Leather, Moonroof, Chrome Wheels
0%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
SAVE $4,405
2012 BUICK LACROSSE
CXL
$
31,960
Leather Group, Moonroof, Chrome Wheels
1.9%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
SAVE $2,460
2011 GMC ACADIA SLT-2
AWD
$
41,413
Moonroof, Tow Pkg, Heated & Cooled
Seats, “Too Many Options to List!
LAST
2011
DEMO
SAVE $4,582
2012 GMC ACADIA DENALI
ALL WHEEL DRIVE
$
43,995
White DiamondTri Coat Paint Over Cashmere Leather
SAVE $3,490
2012 GMC CANYON
CREW CAB 4X4
$
28,073
Choose from 3, SLE Pkg, Z-71 Pkg
SAVE $2,752
2011 GMC SIERRA
EXT CAB 1500 4X4
$
27,850
Power Tech Pkg, Choose
From 15, Ext & Crew Cabs
FROM
0%
for 72 mos
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
1.9%
for 72 mos
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
0%
for 72 mos
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
SAVE $7,110
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 9G
*Tax & tags additional. Price includes all rebates. LowAPR in lieu of rebates. CRUZE LS w/ manual trans.- “S” Tier (800+) lease for 39 mos. at $199 per month plus tax, 12K miles per year $0 due at signing to
qualified buyers; MALIBU - “S” Tier (800+) - lease for 39 mos. at $229 per month plus tax, 12K miles per year $0 due at signing to qualified buyers; EQUINOX FWD LS “S” Tier (800+) lease for 39 mos. at $299
per month plus tax, 12K miles per year, $1000 due at signing to qualified buyers; TRAVERSE LS FWD - “S” Tier (800+) Lease for 39 months at $299 per month plus tax, 12K miles per year, $0 due at signing to
qualified buyers. †Prior sales excluded. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Must take delivery by November 30, 2011. Not responsible for typographical errors.
2012 C HE V Y IM P AL A
L S S E D AN
M S R P
$26,665
Stk. #12039,3.5L V 6 A utom atic,D ual Z one A ir
C ond itioning,Stabilitrak,Six-W ay Pow er D river Seat,
PW ,PD L ,T ilt,O nStar,X M Satellite R ad io
3 0
M P G
h wy
S TAR TIN G AT
$
22,999
*
2011-2012 C HE V Y M AL IBU
1L S S E D AN
M S R P
$23 ,21 0
Stk. #11719,2.4L D O H C M F I A utom atic,
A ir,R em ote K eyless E ntry,A M /F M /C D /
M P3,PW ,PD L ,O nStar,X M Satellite
O
R
3 3
M P G
h wy
$
1 9,3 99
* S TAR TIN G AT
P er
M o . L EAS E
F OR
$
2
2
9
F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
AP R AP R AP R
Stk. #11471,4.8L V 8,A ir C ond itioning,A M /F M
Stereo,L ocking R ear D ifferential,16” W heel,F ull
F loor C overing,C ustom C loth Seats
2011 C HE V Y E X P RE S S
2500 C ARG O V AN
M S R P
$27 ,61 5
$
2
4
,5
9
9
* S TAR TIN G AT
L O W AP R L O W AP R L O W AP R
AV AIL ABL E AV AIL ABL E AV AIL ABL E
2011 C HE V Y S IL V E RAD O
1500 E X T C AB 4W D
Stk. #11971,V 8 AT ,A /C ,Stabilitrak,
PosiR ear,C ruise,T inted G lass,O n/
O ffT ires,40/20/40 Seatings
M S R P
$3 1 ,655
$
2
5
,9
9
9
*
S TAR TIN G AT
2011 C HE V Y S IL V E RAD O
1500 4W D C RE W C AB
Stk. #11136,V 8 AT ,A /C ,Stabilitrak,B ed liner,R ail Protector,
W heel H ouse L iner,M old ed M ud F lap s,H D F loor M ats
M S R P
$3 5,458
$
2
8
,9
9
9
*
S TAR TIN G AT
2011 C HE V Y S IL V E RAD O
1500 4W D RE G UL AR C AB
Stk. #111003,4.3L V 6 4 Sp eed A utom atic,A ir
C ond itioning,L ocking R ear D ifferential,
17” SteelW heels,Stabilitrak
M S R P
$26,050
S TAR TIN G AT
$
20,999
*
2011 C HE V Y TRAV E RS E
FW D & AW D
F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
AP R AP R AP R
Stk. #11738
M S R P
$3 0,280
L S • LT • LT Z
S TAR TIN G AT
$
26,999
* P er
M o .
$
299
O
R
L EAS EF OR
2012 C HE V Y C AM ARO
C O UP E
1LT • 2LT • 1SS • 2SS
C O N V E R T IB L E
$
2
3
,9
9
9
*
S TAR TIN G AT
3 0
M P G
h wy
4
CAM AR O
CON V ER TIBL ES
AV AIL ABL E
Stk. #12088
N EW
2011 S IL V E RAD O HD
D URAM AX D IE S E L S
IN S TO C K !!
S AV EOV ER $7 000
OV ER 1 00 S ILV ER AD OS
L O W AP R L O W AP R L O W AP R
AV AIL ABL E AV AIL ABL E AV AIL ABL E
M S R P
$55,400
V IS IT US 24/7 W W W .V A L L E YCHE V ROL E T.COM
08 P ON TIA C G6
#Z2460,O nly 36K M iles..................................
$
15,999
*
08 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 1500 E XT CA B
#Z2410,4W D,O nly 33K M iles..........................
$
22,999
*
08 S A TURN OUTL OOK XE A W D
#Z2485,O nly 25K M iles .................................
$
23,495
*
07 CHE V Y M A L IBU L S
#Z2464,49K M iles........................................
$
12,999
*
07 CHE V Y IM P A L A L TZ
#11655A ,32K M iles......................................
$
14,999
*
08 CHE V Y A V A L A N CHE L TZ
#11998A ,O nly 34K M iles................................
$
38,499
*
07 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 4W D RE G CA B
#11552A ,O nly 31K M iles................................
$
19,999
*
10 CHE V Y HHR P A N E L TRUCK
#Z2439,Low M iles........................................
$
13,950
*
06 CHE V Y M ON TE CA RL O L T
#Z2342,36K M iles........................................
$
12,999
*
03 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 1500 RE G CA B
#11348A ,Low M iles......................................
$
12,999
*
93 CHE V Y CA M A RO Z28
#11983A A ,O nly 23K M iles..................................
$
8,999
*
04 CHE V Y A V E O 5DR
#Z2501..........................................................
$
5,995
*
07 CHE V Y COBA L T 2DR L S
#Z2518...................................................
$
12,999
*
08 HON DA CIV IC E X CP E
#12143A ,Sunroof......................................
$
14,995
* 10 HYUN DA I S ON A TA GL S
#Z2536A ....................................................
$
12,900
*
08 HUM M E R H3
#Z2422,O nly 36K M iles....................S ta rtin g A t
$
25,987
* 07 FORD RA N GE R XL T E XT CA B
#11992A ,O nly 45K M iles.............................
$
15,987
*
06 GM C CA N YON S L RE G CA B 4X4
#Z2582 .....................................................
$
15,950
*
2011 CHE V Y A V E O
L T
$
12,985
* $
12,985
*
SA L E
P R ICE
L OW
M IL E S
S ta rtin g A t
CHE V Y TRA IL BL A ZE RS
L S •L T
$
14,999
* $
14,999
*
SA L E
P R ICE
L OW
M IL E S
S ta rtin g A t
$
19,999
* $
19,999
*
2007 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO
1500 RE G CA B
#11552A
SA L E
P R ICE
ON L Y
3 1K
M IL E S
L OW A P R
A V A IL A BL E
2006 P ON TIA C TORRE N T
A W D
#12048A
$
14,999
* $
14,999
*
SA L E
P R ICE
L OW
M IL E S
S ta rtin g A t
M ORE
S IL V E RA DOS
A V A IL A BL E
L OW
M IL E S
2011 CHE V Y HHR
L S
#Z2540
SA L E
P R ICE
$
14,975
* $
14,975
*
2007 CHE V Y IM P A L A L S
#Z2402,37K M iles........................................
$
13,999
*
2010 CHE V Y COBA L T L T
#Z2476,31K M iles........................................
$
14,999
*
2008 CHE V Y E XP RE S S P A S S V A N
#Z2480,Low M iles........................................
$
19,900
*
2009 P ON TIA C G6 4DR
#11785A ,33K M iles......................................
$
16,499
*
06 CHE V Y E QUIN OX L S
#11892A ,Low M iles......................................
$
16,389
*
*Tax & Tags additional. LowAPR to qualified customers. See dealer for details. Select vehicles may not be GM Certified. Photos may not represent actual vehicle. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Not responsible for typographical errors.
EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.
821- 2772 •1- 800- 444- 7172
601 KIDDER STREET, W ILKES-BA RRE, PA
MONDAY-FRIDAY 8:30-7:00pm; SATURDAY 8:30-5:00pm
V AL L EY CH EV R OL ET
www.v alleyc hev ro let.c o m K EN W AL L ACE’S
THE BEST COVERAGE IN AMERICA.
100,000-M IL E
5 Y EA R P O W ER TR A IN LIM ITED W A R R A NTY
100,000-M IL E S
5 Y EA R S O F C O U R TESY TR A NSP O R TA TIO N
100,000-M IL E S
5 Y EA R S O F R O A DSIDE A SSISTA NC E
W hichever com es first.See dealer for lim ited w arranty details.
S E RV ICE HOURS
OPEN SATURDAY
8AM - 12 NOON
MON. - FRI. 8AM - 4:30PM
221 ConynghamAve., Wilkes-Barre
570.821.2778
F in d th e v eh ic le
you w a n tto bu y
from you r
m obile d ev ic e!
SCA N H E R E >
w w w .va lleych evro let.co m
A V A ILA BLE O N SELEC T
C ERTIFIED PRE-O W NED
1
.9%
A P R
2012
C HE V Y C RUZE
Stk. #12250 L S • LT • LT Z • E C O
M S R P
$1 7 ,450
42
M P G
h wy
(ECO)
$
1 6,995
*
O
R
L EAS EF OR
P er
M o .
$
1 99
Stk. #11721
L S • LT • LT Z • 4 C yl. • 6 C yl.
3 2
M P G
h wy
$
22,999
*
P er
M o .
$
299
S TAR TIN G AT
O
R
L EAS EF OR S TAR TIN G AT
2011-2012 C HE V Y
E Q UIN O X AW D a n d FW D
35 35 35
AVAILABLE AVAILABLE AVAILABLE
IN-STOCK & IN-STOCK & IN-STOCK &
IN-BOUND IN-BOUND IN-BOUND
SAVINGS SAVINGS
H elp Yo u rself to a Gen ero u s
L o w AP R a n d D ea lerD isco u n ts!
P R E-OW NED SAV INGS
F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
AP R AP R AP R
F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
AP R AP R AP R
F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
AP R AP R AP R
M S R P
$42,900
2011 C HE V Y TAHO E
L S 4W D
Stk. #11940,5.3L V 8 A utom atic,A ir,Front
B uckets,PW ,PD L ,B luetooth,R ad io,17” A lum .
W heels,C ruise C ontrol,T hird R ow Seat,O nStar,
X M Satellite
$
3
6
,9
9
9
*
S TAR TIN G AT
F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
AP R AP R AP R
07 GM C S IE RRA 1500 S L E
#Z2517,41K M iles........................................
$
25,999
*
06 GM C E N V OY S L E
#Z2515......................................................
$
17,999
*
08 S A TURN A URA XR
#Z2432,O nly 32K M iles..................................
$
14,900
*
07-08 S A TURN A URA
XE 4DR
#Z2436
$
13,999
* $
13,999
*
SA L E
P R ICE
L OW
M IL E S
S ta rtin g A t
#Z2570
1 OW N E R
08 JE E P S A HA RA W RA N GL E R 4W D
#Z2531,LTD,33K M iles...............................
$
24,999
*
0% AP R
for u p to 72 m os .
or
120 D a y P a ym en t
D eferra l.
O n M os t C h ev y M od els

AL L N E W 2012
C HE V Y S O N IC
IN S TO C K !
Tes t
D riv e 2012
V olt Tod a y
#Z2521A
PAGE 10G SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
The Vi deo
Game St or e
28 S. Main W.B.
Open Mon- Sat,
12pm – 6pm
570-822-9929 /
570-941-9908
$$ CASH PAID $$
VI DE O GAME S &
S YS TE MS
Highest $$ Paid
Guaranteed
Buying all video
games &
systems. PS1 & 2,
Xbox, Nintendo,
Atari, Coleco,
Sega, Mattel,
Gameboy,
Vectrex etc.
DVD’s, VHS & CDs
& Pre 90’s toys,
The Video
Game Store
1150 S. Main
Scranton
Mon - Sat,
12pm – 6pm
570-822-9929
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay
Outs Guaranteed
Mon- Sat
10am - 6pm
Cl osed Sundays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd
( Pl aza 315)
315N . 3 mi l es af t er
Mot orworl d
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
Visit us at
WilkesBarreGold.com
Or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
Nov. 18: $1,719.00
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
KITTENS, FREE, 8
weeks old, gray
stripped twins and 1
gray/white spotted.
570-740-1392
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
DOG, FREE, Female
Blue Fawn Pit Bull, 1
1/2 years old has all
shots.
570-287-5493
POMERANIAN PUPPIES
Parents on premises
Shots Current. $450
570-401-1838
815 Dogs
LAB RETRIEVER PUPS!
8 weeks old. Ready
to go. 2 females, 1
yellow, 1 black. $300
570-357-2719 (c)
570-655-8342 (h)
ROTTWEILER PUPS
German lines.
2 females. Ready to
go. $450.
570-592-5515
570-654-0678
SHIH TZU PUPPIES
2 females. First
shots & Vet
checked.
570-654-6730
570-881-3117
St. Bernard, Poms,
Yorkies, Maltese,
Husky, Rotties,
Doberman, Golden,
Dachshund, Poodle,
570-453-6900
570-389-7877
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
835 Pets-
Miscellaneous
HURRICANE IRENE
SURVEY: University
of Pennsylvania sur-
vey on Hurricane
Irene and its effect
on people with pets.
If interested visit
surveymonkey.com/
upennpetstudy or
email Evacuation-
Study@psych.upenn.
edu.
It’s there
when
you wake up.
Get convenient home delivery.
Call 829-5000.
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL LL NNNNL LYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LLE LE LE LEE LLE LEEE DER.
timesleader.com
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL L NNNNL LYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LEE LE LE LEE LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 11G
PAGE 12G SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
EASY... AFFORDABLE...
REPUTATION
INTELLIGENCE
FOR YOUR SMALL BUSINESS!
CALL US TODAY
TO GET STARTED!
970.7201
OR VISIT REPINTELL.COM
• MONITOR YOUR
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BLOGS AND
SOCIAL MEDIA
• CORRECT INACCURACIES ABOUT
YOUR BUSINESS FLOATING AROUND
THE WEB
• COMPARE AGAINST YOUR
COMPETITION
$
30
00
JUST A MONTH!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 13G
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
7
2
3
9
6
4
KEN
POLLOCK
SUPER CENTER
PRE-OWNED
Ken Pollock k AT
339 HWY 315, PITTSTON, PA
Hours
M-F 9-8pm
Sat 9-5pm
1-800-223-1111
www.kenpollocksuzuki.com
CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE
WE’RE EASY TO FIND
JUST OFF EXIT 175
RTE I-81 • PITTSTON
* 2.49% Based on 60 months. Must be approved under program guidelines. Tax & Tags Additional. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors. ** See Salesperson for complete details. ***Based on 3 Month District Avg from Suzuki Survey Statistics.
CARS
2008 HONDA CIVIC
SI COUPE
#P14420, Hard to Find! Power
Windows/Locks, CD, Sunroof, Alloys
$
16,499
*
2010 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE
#P14408, Leather, Automatic, CD,
Power Windows/Locks
$
13,790
*
2010 CHEVY
COBALT LT SEDAN
#S1691A, Power Windows/Locks, CD,
Automatic, Keyless Entry
$
11,999
*
2010 VOLKSWAGEN
JETTA
#P14511, Automatic, CD, Power
Windows/Locks, Gas Saver!
$
14,993
*
2008 HONDA
ACCORD SEDAN
#S1625A, EX-L Package, Sunroof,
Leather, Automatic, CD
$
13,999
*
2009 VOLKSWAGEN
CC LUXURY
#S1719A, Leather, Sunroof, Automatic,
Power Seat, Clean!
$
22,799
*
2010 FORD FOCUS
#S1759A, Power Windows/Locks,
Automatic, Low Miles, 1 Owner!
$
13,998
*
2010 KIA RIO
SEDAN
#P14478, Automatic,
Dual Airbags, CD, A/C
$
10,950
*
2010 HYUNDAI
SONATA SEDAN
#P14495, GLS Pkg, Automatic, CD,
Power Windows/Locks
$
13,677
*
2009 JEEP
WRANGLER 4X4
#P14440, 2 Dr, Upgraded Wheel Pkg,
Push Bar with Lights
$
18,475
*
2008 HUMMER
H3 4X4
#P14483, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels,
Automatic, Power Windows/Locks
$
20,630
*
2008 DODGE
CALIBER AWD
#P14500, Leather, Sunroof, Chrome
Wheels, Power Windows/Locks, CD
$
14,488
*
2011 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT 4X4
#P14505, Chrome Pkg, Automatic,
Power Windows/Locks
$
18,690
*
2010 HYUNDAI
SANTA FE 4WD
#P14513, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Power
Windows/Locks, CD, Dual Airbags
$
19,353
*
• 3 Day or 150 Mile Money Back Guarantee**
• 30 Day/1000 Mile Limited Warranty**
• All Value Vehicle Outlet Cars Pass
PA State Inspection**
CHECK OUT
OUR VALUE
VEHICLE OUTLET
2007 CHEVROLET
COBALT SEDAN
$
7,999
*
#S1665A, Automatic,
Tinted Windows, AM/FM/CD
2007 CHRYSLER
PT CRUISER
$
7,999
*
#P14503A, Automatic, PW, PL, CD,
Dual Airbags
2005 KIA
RIO SEDAN
$
4,990
*
#P14390A, Automatic, A/C,
Great Gas Mileage!
2006 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT 4X4
$
9,995
*
#P14462, Rare Manual Trans!
Power Windows/Locks, CD
2004 ACURA
RSX COUPE
$
9,998
*
#P14497, Automatic, Sunroof, Alloy
Wheels, Low Low Miles!
2008 HYUNDAI
SONATA SEDAN
$
9,959
*
#P14496, GLS Pkg, Automatic, CD,
Power Windows/Locks
2008 CHEVROLET
COLORADO REG CAB 4X4
#S1816A, Automatic, CD,
4 Cylinder, 1-Owner!
$
13,850
*
2010 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO EXT CAB 4X4
#P14526, Automatic, CD,
Dual Airbags, 4 Doors
$
21,880
*
2007 JEEP
COMMANDER 4X4
#P14457A, 3rd Row, Alloy Wheels,
Auto, Power Windows/Locks
$
14,999
*
2010 CHRYSLER
TOWN & COUNTRY
#P14514, Power Doors,
3rd Row, PW, PL, CD
$
18,799
*
SUVS/TRUCKS
PRE-OWNED SUZUKI BLOWOUT
2010 SUZUKI SX4
CROSSOVER AWD
#S1675A, Automatic, Power Windows/
Locks, CD, Dual Airbags
$
13,999
*
2009 SUZUKI SX4
CROSSOVER AWD
#S1790A, Alloy Wheels, Manual Trans,
Power Windows/Locks, CD
$
12,729
*
2011 SUZUKI
GRAND VITARA 4X4
#S1810A, Alloy Wheels, Automatic,
Navigation, PW, PL, Low Miles! 1-Owner!
$
17,914
*
2010 SUZUKI
KIZASHI SLS
#S1191, Heated Leather, Sunroof, Power
Memory Seats, Dual Climate Control
$
17,993
*
2010 SUZUKI
KIZASHI GTS
Sunroof, Power Seat, Alloys, Dual
Climate Control, Only 1 Left!
$
17,499
*
2011 SUZUKI EQUATOR
CREW CAB 4X4
#S1600A, Sport Pkg, Alloy Wheels, Auto,
Power Windows/Locks, Only 700 Miles!
$
23,888
*
2011 SUZUKI
GRAND VITARA 4X4
#P14524/P14525, Navigation, Power Windows/
Locks, CD, Auto, Snow Ready! 2 To Choose From
$
16,895
*
2003 SUZUKI
GRAND VITARA 4X4
#S1761A, Power Windows/Locks,
Automatic, Alloy Wheels, Only 52K Miles
$
8,779
*
2010 SUZUKI SX4
CROSSOVER AWD
#S1683A, Tech Pkg, Alloy Wheels,
Navigation, Sunroof!!
$
15,750
*
KEN POLLOCK
PAGE 14G SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
7
2
3
9
6
0
Ken Pollock
SAVE
NOW!
DRIVE
NOW!
A TOP 10 IN THE NATION SUZUKI SALES VOLUME DEALER.**
INTERSTATE
ROUTE 315
KEN
POLLOCK
SUZUKI
81
ROUTE 315
EXIT 175
CLOSE TOEVERYWHERE!
WE’RE EASY TOFIND!
JUST OFF EXIT 175
RTE I-81 • PITTSTON
* ALL PRICES +TAX & REGISTRATION. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ALL REBATES AND DISCOUNTS INCLUDED. **BASED ON SUZUKI NATIONAL SALES VOLUME REPORTS FOR 2010. THIS IS A
COMBINED OFFER. MAKE YOUR BEST DEAL ONA PACKAGE PRICE. ***OWNER LOYALTY REBATE, MUST HAVE OR OWN SUZUKI VEHICLE IN HOUSEHOLD. +2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI JD POWERS
HIGHEST RANKD MIDSIZE VEHICLE (APPEAL) STUDY JULY 2011. OFFERS END NOV 30, 2011.
Automatic, AM/FM/CD,
Power Windows/Locks, Keyless Entry
MSRP w/ Add Ons
$
23,519*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
21,795*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
500*
Suzuki Owner Loyalty -
$
500***
$
20,795* SALE PRICE
Stk# S1718
2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI
S AWD
AJ Detrick Manny Lopez
Rick Edwards Joe Kosloski Murad Elbattah Chet Miles Paul Mazzetilli
MEET OUR SALES DEPARTMENT
Ed Falkowski John Kuna
OFTHE
ARE
YOUA
MEMBER...
What Are You Waiting For?
I
l
o
v
e
m
y
s
u
z
u
k
i
c
a
r
c
l
u
b
!
2011
JD POWER
MOST APPEALING
MIDSIZE CAR
1ST PLACE
AWARD
Suzuki
Kizashi
Power Windows/Locks, Keyless Entry, CD, A/C
MSRP
$
18,019*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
16,795*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
500*
Suzuki Owner Loyalty -
$
500***
$
15,795*
SALE PRICE
2012 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER
ALL WHEEL DRIVE
Stk#S1747
MSRP
$
18,289*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
16,995*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Suzuki Owner Loyalty -
$
500***
$
15,495*
SALE PRICE
LE Popular Package, Power Windows/
Locks, Keyless Entry, CD
2012 SUZUKI
SX4 SEDAN
Stk#S1766
2012 SUZUKI
GRAND VITARA 4WD
MSRP
$
24,284*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
22,545*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
750*
Suzuki Owner Loyalty -
$
500***
$
21,295*
SALE PRICE
Navigation, Automatic, Power Windows/Locks, CD
Stk# S1852
2” Leveling Kit with Wheel Package, Power
Windows/Locks, Keyless Entry, CD, Alloy
Wheels, 6 Ft Box, Running Boards
MSRP w/ add ons
$
32,637*
$
29,595*
SALE PRICE
Stk#S1799
2012 SUZUKI EQUATOR
CREW CAB 4X4
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 15G
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1006 A/C &
Refrigeration
Services
STRISH HVAC
Installation, Service & Repair
Hot air furnaces,
steam/hot water
boilers and hot
water heaters.
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-299-7241
570-606-8438
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / repair,
Interior remodel
& additions
Call the
Building
Industry
Association of
NEPA to find a
qualified mem-
ber for your
next project.
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
ROOFING, SIDING,
DECKS, WINDOWS
For All of Your
Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates
570-899-4713
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CAVUTO
CHIMNEY
SERVICE
& Gutter Cleaning
Free Estimates
Insured
570-709-2479
1039 Chimney
Service
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
COZY HEARTH
CHIMNEY
Chimney Cleaning,
Rebuilding, Repair,
Stainless Steel Lin-
ing, Parging, Stuc-
co, Caps, Etc.
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
1-888-680-7990
570-840-0873
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
MC GERARD & SONS
10% OFF
All Inside Work!
Basement water
proofing, concrete
floors, parging
foundation walls,
foundation repair
& rebuild, finish
basements.
PROMPT SERVICE
FREE ESTIMATES
QUALITY WORKMANSHIP
www.mcgerard.com
Licensed & Insured
570-941-9122
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-606-7489
570-735-8551
PRICE CONSTRUCTION
Full Service
General Contractor
BASEMENT > ROOFING
> KITCHENS > REMOD-
ELING > BATHROOMS
LJPconstructioninc.com
570-840-3349
1078 Dry Wall
DAUGHERTY’S
DRYWALL INC.
Remodeling, New
Construction, Water
& Flood Repairs
570-579-3755
PA043609
MIKE SCIBEK DRYWALL
Hanging & finishing,
design ceilings and
painting. Free esti-
mates. Licensed &
Insured. 328-1230
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
(570) 675-3378
1084 Electrical
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
1105 Floor Covering
Installation
FALCONE’S CITY
CARPET CENTER
35 N. Main St, Pittston
Flood damage– free
estimates! All your
flooring needs &
window treatments
570-498-0977, 570-
822-3494, or 570-
592-4060.
KING GLASS & PAINT
1079 Main St, Swoyersville
Over 50 years experience!
Š Paints & supplies
for residential &
commercial.
Š Flooring: Carpet,
Vinyl, Ceramic tile,
Laminate, Hard-
wood and more.
Š Certified Installa-
tion Crews.
Specials:
Š Carpet starting at
82¢/sf
Š Ceramic &
Laminate starting
at $1.20/sf
Š Material only
Installation
available
Š Pittsburgh Interior
Paints: 14-110 Flat
$9.69/gal. 14-510
Semi Gloss
$12.99/gal.
14-310 Eggshell
$12.05/gal.
All materials plus tax
and freight when
applicable.
FREE ESTIMATES.
Store Hours
MONDAY-FRIDAY 7-5
SATURDAY 8-12:30
CLOSED SUNDAY
EVENING APPOINT-
MENTS AVAILABLE
UPON REQUEST.
570-288-4639
10% off our
everyday low
prices with
this ad!
We offer additional
discounts to all
Flood Victims.
Excludes specials.
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning.
Regulars, storms,
etc. Pressure
washing, decks,
docks, houses,Free
estimates. Insured.
(570) 288-6794
Professional
Window & Gutter
Cleaning
Gutters, carpet,
pressure washing.
Residential/com-
mercial. Ins./bond-
ed. Free est.
570-283-9840
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
1132 Handyman
Services
ALL
MAINTENANCE
WE FIX IT
Electrical,
Plumbing,
Handymen,
Painting
Carpet Repair
& Installation
All Types
Of Repairs
570-814-9365
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
Electrical, Plumbing,
Carpentry, Painting
Attic & Basement
Cleanup. Call Rick
570-287-0919
FLOOD VICTIMS
FOR
CONSTRUCTION
& DEMOLITION
CALL
LICENSED GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Plumbing, heating
electrical, painting,
roofs, siding, rough
& finished carpentry
- no job too big or
small. Free Esti-
mates. Call anytime.
570-852-9281
RUSSELL’S
Property Maintenance
LICENSED & INSURED
30+ years experi-
ence. Carpentry,
painting & gener-
al home repairs.
FREE ESTIMATES
570-406-3339
SOME ASSEMBLY
REQUIRED
Bought something
or thinking about
buying something
that needs assem-
bly or installation
but don’t feel com-
fortable doing it?
Call 570-675-1839
or 570-855-2806.
Pick up & delivery
of item available.
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A A C L E A N I N G
A1 Always hauling,
cleaning attics, cellar,
garage, one piece or
whole Estate, also
available 10 &20 yard
dumpsters.655-0695
592-1813or287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, we’re
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-822-4582
AAA Bob & Ray’s
Hauling: Friendly &
Courteous. We take
anything & every-
thing. Attic to base-
ment. Garage, yard,
free estimates. Call
570-655-7458 or
570-905-4820
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
CASTAWAY
HAULING JUNK
REMOVAL
823-3788 / 817-0395
M&S HAULING
Clean outs. Metal &
appliances for free.
We do it all - no job
too small! FREE ESTI-
MATES. 570-239-5593
570-592-0504
Mike’s $5 & Up
We do cleanups -
basements,
garages, etc. Yard
waste removal &
small deliveries
from Thrift shops,
homes & small
businesses.
SAME DAY SERVICE.
793- 8057 826- 1883
1147 Home
Restoration
A-1 REMODELING
ROOFING & SIDING
Garages, Additions,
Windows, Cement
work & Drywall
570-233-7788 or
570-455-5581
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
  JOHN’S  
Landscaping/Hauling
Bobcat:Grading/
Stone. Snow Clearing
Shrub / Tree Trimming
Handyman - All types
7Holiday Lighting 7
& more! 735-1883
RESIDENTIAL & COM-
MERCIAL. BRUSH UP TO
4’ HIGH, MOWING, EDG-
ING, MULCHING, TRIM-
MING SHRUBS, HEDGES,
TREES, LAWN CARE,
LEAF REMOVAL, FALL
CLEAN UP. FULLY
INSURED. FREE ESTI-
MATES 829-3261
TOLL FREE
1-855-829-3261
Tree Removal,
Stump Grinding, Haz-
ard Tree Removal,
Grading, drainage,
lot clearing, snow
plowing, stone / soil
delivery. Insured.
Reasonable Rates
570-574-1862
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BDMhel pers. com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A QUALITY PAINTING
Interior specialist,
residential/commer-
cial. $0 money
down! Pictures &
references avail-
able! 570-328-2072
570-714-2202
House in Shambles?
We can fix it!
Cover All Painting & Cover All Painting &
General Contracting General Contracting
PA068287. Serving
Northeast PA &
North Jersey since
1989. All phases of
interior & exterior
repair & rebuilding.
Call 570-226-1944 Call 570-226-1944
or 570-470-5716 or 570-470-5716
Free Estimates
And yes, I am a
lead paint removal
certified contractor
JASON SIMMS PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Free Estimates
21 Yrs. Experience
Insured
(570) 947-2777
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
JOHN’S
PAINTING
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
RELIABLE, NEAT, HONEST
WORKING WITH PRIDE
INSURED,FREEESTIMATES
570-735-8101
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
1213 Paving &
Excavating
EDWARD’S ALL COUNTY
PAVING & SEAL COATING
Modified stone,
laid & compacted.
Hot tar and chips,
dust and erosion
control. Licensed
and
Insured.
Call Today
For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
1228 Plumbing &
Heating
EXPERT PLUMBING,
HEATING & ELECTRICAL
30 years experience
Free Estimates
570-824-1559
NEED FLOOD REPAIRS?
Boilers, Furnaces,
Air. 0% Interest 6
months.
570-736-HVAC
(4822)
1249 Remodeling &
Repairs
HOSIE HOSIE
CONSTRUCTION CONSTRUCTION
Free estimates,
interior and exterior
design. Licensed
and ins. No job too
big or small. Dry-
wall, siding & more
570-540-6597
1252 Roofing &
Siding
FALL
ROOFING
Special $1.29 s/f
Licensed, insured,
fast service
570-735-0846
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
ŠFREE EstimatesŠ
*24 Hour Emer-
gency Calls*
1324 Water
Purification
WET BASEMENT?
800-511-6579 Free
inspection/estimate.
Call today, don’t
delay. No costly
excavation, finished
& unfinished. Life-
time transferrable
warranty. Financing
available, PA Base-
ment Waterproof-
ing, Inc. PA 001027
Get the ultimate
Football Package
All the high school, college and NFL coverage delivered to your door at a super great price.
Call 829-5000
Ask for code: FOOTBALL
*Offer valid for new subscribers only or past subscribers who have been inactive for more than 30 days.
Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday home delivery for only $1.50 per week.
PLACE
YOUR
OWN
CLASSIFIED
AD
ONLINE!
IT’S FAST AND EASY!
PLUS, YOUR AD WILL
RUN FREE FOR ITEMS
PRICED UNDER $1000.
GO TO “CLASSIFIED ADS”
AND CLICK ON
“PLACE YOUR AD.”
Our online system will let you place
Announcements, Automotive Listings,
Merchandise, Pets & Animals, Real
Estate and Garage Sales.
Customize the way your ad looks
and then find it in the next day’s
edition of The Times Leader, in our
weekly newspapers and online at
timesleader.com.
NUMBER
ONE
AUDITED
NEWSPAPER
IN LUZERNE COUNTY
– AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC)
*Your ad will appear in the next day’s paper if placed online
before 4 p.m. Mon. through Thurs. Place on Friday before
1 p.m. for Saturday’s paper and before 4 p.m.
Our online system will let you place
Announcements, Automotive Listings, gg
PAGE 16G SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
$
37,991
$
37,991
**G M B uy B ack.
$
54,990
$
54,990
$
28,998
$
28,998
2012 CTS A W D
2012 CTS A W D
$
359
$
359
$0Down P a ym e n t $0Down P a ym e n t
$01s tP a ym e n t $01s tP a ym e n t
$0S e c urity De pos it $0S e c urity De pos it
By C a dilla c
Lease price based on a 2012 CTS Sdn with AllW heelDrive $40,340 M SRP.$359 permonth plus9% salestaxtotal$391 per
month.39 M onth lease 10,000 milesperyear.38 M onthly paymentstotal$14,858 $.25/mile penalty over32,500 miles.$0 down
paymentplus$0 firstpaymentplustags,LESSEE M UST Q UALIFY FOR G M TAR G ETED PR IV ATE OFFER OR IFYOU HAV E A
CUR R EN T LEASE ON A 19 9 9 OR N EW ER N ON G M V EHICLE. Leasee responsible forexcessive wearand tear.M usttake
delivery by 1/3/2012.RequiresALLY BankTierS orA creditapproval.Please see salesperson forcomplete details.
2012 S RX L UXURY
2012 S RX L UXURY
$
439
$
439
$0Down P a ym e n t $0Down P a ym e n t
$01s tP a ym e n t $01s tP a ym e n t
$0S e c urity De pos it $0S e c urity De pos it
Lease price based on a 2012 SRX Fwd Luxury Edition $40,590 M SRP.$439 permonth plus9% salestaxtotal$479 permonth.
39 M onth lease 10,000 milesperyear.38 M onthly paymentstotal$18,681 $.25/mile penalty over32,500 miles.$0 down payment
plus$0 firstpaymentplustags,LESSEEM UST Q UALIFY FOR G M TAR G ETED PR IV ATE OFFER OR IFYOU HAV E A
CUR R EN T LEASE ON A 19 9 9 OR N EW ER N ON G M V EHICLE. Leasee responsible forexcessive wearand tear.M usttake
delivery by 1/3/2012.RequiresALLY BankTierS orA creditapproval.Please see salesperson forcomplete details.
By C a dilla c
s
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
BONNERCHEVROLET.COM
694 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON 287-2117
Chevy Runs Deep
2012 CHEVY
TRAVERSE
LS AWD
39 month lease
12k miles per year
+ tax $
349
*
/Mo.
STARTING
AT
*Prices plus tax & tags, Lease payment is plus tax. Not responsible for typographical errors.
$0 1st Month Payment, $0 Security Deposit, $0 Down Payment, $0 Due at Delivery.
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
WVON¡MO VALLEV
415 Kidder Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570.822.8870
steve@yourcarbank.com
www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com
*For qualified Buyers. Bi-weekly payments greater than 17
1/2% of monthly net income, additional
down-payment may be required. Costs to be paid by Buyer at delivery: registration, taxes, title, doc fee.
0
$
DOWN*
ÐUV MEME º PAV MEME º ÐUV MEME
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
7
2
5
0
6
5
MOTORTWINS
2010 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming
718-4050
CALL STEVE MORENKO
NEW LOW PRICES!
$
6,990
*
2002 Hyundai
Elantra
$
5,590
*
4 Cyl., 88K, Loaded
2000 Ford
Ranger 4x4
$
7,990
*
73K, Great Condition
2000 Ford Taurus
$
2,990
*
*All Prices Plus Tax & Tags.
2003 Kia Spectra
$
5,990
*
2000 GMC
Jimmy 4x4
2003 Ford
Taurus
$
4,990
*
6 Cyl., Station Wagon,
151K, Runs Great
4 Cyl., 73K, Extra Clean! 6 Cyl., 98K
88K, Like New
LOOK-
ING
FOR
MORE
AUTO
ADS?
PLEASE
TURN
TO
PAGES
29
30
&
32G
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 17G
Lewith&Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
Kingston: 288.9371
Hazleton: 788.1999
Wilkes-Barre: 822.1160
Clarks Summit: 585.0600
Shavertown: 696.3801
Mountain Top: 474.9801
www.lewith-freeman.com
Happy Thanksgiving
Give Thanks For All of
Life’s Blessings this Holiday.
ONE
SOURCE
REALTY
ERA1.com
Mountaintop Office
12 N Mountain Blvd.
(570) 403-3000
WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE
OR ERA WILL BUY IT! *
17 DONALD CT., WILKESBARRE
DIR: Take Carey Ave to Simpson St., turn right onto Plymouth
St., turn left onto Willow St., then turn left onto Donald Ct.
MLS#11-2969 $194,900
Donna Clarke 570-262-0608
158 CENTER ST. E., SHAVERTOWN
DIR: 309 North (Cross valley Expressway) to light at Burger
King. Make right on E. Center Street. Home on left at top of
hill. MLS#11-944 $115,400
Anne Marie Janus : (570) 899-0704
61 MARKET ST., LAFLIN
DIR: Route 315 to Laflin Road. Right onto Market. Continue
all of the way to end of road.( cul-de-sac)
MLS#11-3557 $159,000
Anne Marie Janus : (570) 899-0704
OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-2:30
OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 12:00-1:30
OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 2:00-3:30
2
6
3
4
9
0
11-4053
Very well
m a i n t a i n e d
4 bedroom home
on level lot, in
Walden Park. Eat-
in Kitchen, living
room withwood
burning brick
fireplace. Move
in condition! Plaster walls and much more....a
Mountain Top gem and a must see!
CALL CHARLES 430-8487 NEW PRICE $169,900
Price Reduced!
M
o
u
n
tain
T
o
p
11-4109
Live a gracious
lifestyle on the 9th
hole of the Blue
Ridge golf coarse
in this picture-
perfect 3BR/2+BA
two-story on a
peaceful cul-de-
sac. Features
master bedroom w/FP & WIC, heated garage, security
system & finished basement on 2 acres w/attractive
in-ground pool and large deck. Lush golf course view!
CALL PAT 793-4055 $379,000
New Listing!
M
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tain
T
o
p
11-3695
Very nice
all brick ranch set
on 3.75 acres.
An updated
kitchen, living
room with
beamed ceilings
& a 2 car garage
are just a few of
the amenities this home has to offer. Home is
extremely fuel efficient. Sellers are extremely
motivated! CALL SUSAN 417-9904 $160,000
New Listing!
B
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k
SELL YOUR HOME
Ed and Diane McCabe
Four Star
McCabe Realty
(570) 674-9950
(570) 824-1499
(570) 654-4428
If you are considering selling your home we are
offering a “FREE EVALUATION” with no
obligation. We list and sell homes at a 4%
commission so call today for details. We
“GUARANTEE” that when you list your home
with our service “YOU CAN FIRE US.”
No REALTOR in their right mind would give you
the PLEDGE unless they are committed to
selling your property and WE ARE!
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Atlas Realty, Inc.
829-6200 • www.atlasrealtyinc.com
1610 WESTMINSTER RD, PLAINS
Paradise found! Your own personal retreat, small pond in front of yard, private setting only minutes from everything. Log
cabin chalet with 3 bedrooms, loft, stone freplace, hardwood foors. Detached garage with bonus room. Lots to see.
Watch the snow fall in your own “cabin in the woods”. MLS #11-319. Call Charlie 829-6200 $279,900
For more information and photos visit www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
DRASTIC PRICE REDUCTION!
Proudly serving our community for 23 years.
GERALD L. BUSCH
REAL ESTATE,
INC.
288-2514 EMAIL: JERRYBUSCHJR@AOL.COM
Pat Is Ready
To Work For “You!”
Call Pat Today 885-4165
Jerry Busch, Jr. Is Ready
To Work For “You!”
Call Jerry Today 709-7798
Each Office is Independently Owned And Operated.
FOR PROMPT REAL ESTATE APPRAISALS, CALL GERALD L. BUSCH APPRAISAL SERVICE 288-2514
405 PLYMOUTH AVE., HANOVER
This Home Says Come In! You will
feel right at home the moment you
step into this quality built home with
3 nice size bedrooms, 2.5 modern
baths, modern kitchen, living room,
dining room with hardwood foors,
offce, laundry, comfortable gas
heat, cool central air and two car
garage. You have to see the patio!
MLS#11-2487 $224,900
HANOVER
FORTY FORT
BRICK RANCH
Rambling Ranch! Spa-
cious dining room, large
living room with brick fre-
place, modern kitchen, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths, huge
family room, deck and
hardwood foors.
Call Jerry Busch Jr.
$149,900
NEW LISTING
LUZERNE
This home features a
nice modern eat in kitch-
en, living room, den, good
size bath, 3 bedooms,
comfortable gas heat
and yard.
Call Jerry Busch Jr
$59,900
KINGSTON
VICTORIOUS VICTORIAN!
Genuine character is expressed
throughout every inch of this classic
home situated on a lovely residential
street. It features 9 rooms, 5 bed-
rooms, 2 1/2 baths, modern kitchen
with granite counter tops and stain-
less steel appliances, lots of wood-
work - huge newel post. Wrap around
porch , screened porch, deck and a
two car garage. And Yes.... It does
have a Turret! $259,000
Call Pat Busch 885-4165
N
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R
I
C
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Call Marcie Petrucelli 570.714.9267 or Marie Montante 570.714.9279
Lewith&FreemanReal Estate, Inc.
570.288.9371 www.lewith-freeman.com
LUXURY CONDOMINIUMS
2-3 Bedrooms with 1st Floor Master
Distinctive Design &Architecture
Unit pricing starts at $269,000
Project now
owned and under development by
Audi Management IV LLC
4 WELLES STREET
FORTY FORT, PA 18704
(570) 714-HART (4278)
AUGUST BEDNAR
CELL 760-6402
37 E. LUZERNE AVE.,
LARKSVILLE
Custom ranch home!!! Walk in
closets, pantry closet, laundry room,
generously sized nook, and a kitchen
that can only be described as WOW!
Composite deck, oversized one car
garage, and central air!!!
MLS#11-54 $159,900
DIR: Main St Luzerne, turn left on
Courtdale, 1.5 miles on right, corner
lot.
OPEN HOUSE • SUNDAY, NOV. 20TH • 12:00-2:00PM
http://www.youtube.com/user/RealtyWorldTomHart
lot.
lt WW lldd
Check it out on
Story and photos
by Marianne Tucker Puhalla
Advertising Projects Writer
Striking architecture and an amazing
layout are just a few of the highlights
at this two-story contemporary in the
Amber Woods development in Lehman
Twp. Just off Jackson Rd. and near to
the Huntsville Dam, this approximately
4,700-square-foot beauty has five bed-
rooms, five baths and elegant details
such as an ultra-modern granite kitchen
and two-story great room with fireplace.
Listed by Margy Simms of Lewith and
Freeman Real Estate for $445,000, this
stellar home was built in 2007 and also
has a beautifully finished lower level
that offers an exceptional family room
loaded with custom cabinetry. Among
the features you will fall in love with at
this home are the unique floor plan that
offers angled rooms, unique rooflines,
and the dramatic two-story portico that
frames the front entry.
A beautiful inlaid marble tile floor
welcomes guests into the dramatic foyer
where an angled staircase leads to the
second floor. To the left, you have the
21-by-16 vaulted living room, with a two-
story chimney that hosts a wood-burning
fireplace and cayenne colored walls. To
the right of the foyer, the 16-by-13 dining
room has hardwood flooring, green walls
and large windows.
The adjacent kitchen is a cook’s dream
with an amazing number of cherry cabi-
nets and a large island topped by black
speckled granite designed to accent a
tan ceramic tile floor. The cabinets are
oversized, making good use of the height
provided by a nine-foot ceiling. There
are two windows set on an angle facing
rear. Top-of-the-line appliances include a
trash compactor, dishwasher, refrigera-
tor, stove and a second bar refrigerator
for storing drinks. A door opens to the
rear deck.
A nearby study also has a door to the
deck and more of the beautiful hardwood
flooring. At 12-by-12, this bright and
sunny room has two large windows rear
and a double closet. A laundry has a tile
floor, blue walls, storage cabinets and a
utility sink. Next door, the powder room
offers a black and white tile floor, strik-
ing red walls and a white pedestal sink,
with a single side-facing window.
The first floor master bedroom suite
offers a spacious 23-by-23 bedroom with
tan walls and more of the beautiful hard-
wood flooring. Two is a popular number
here with two large walk-in closets, two
windows front and two windows facing
Unique floor plan highlights Amber Woods contemporary
Continued
SUNDAYREAL ESTATE
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011
Smith Hourigan Group
SMARTER. BOLDER.
FASTER.
Century21SHGroup.com
Two Ofces To Serve You Better:
1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600
Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com
!
TedPoggi 283-9100x25
MLS#11-4243 $329,000
Meticulously maintained
ranchhome inconvenient Mt.
Toplocation. Newsunroom
addition, large &openfamily
room, beautiful landscape.
DIR: Rt. 309So., 1/4mile
past ChurchRoad, home on
right, signonproperty.
Chris Jones 696-6558
MLS#11-3607 $165,000
All original 2.5 story Center
Hall Colonial. Beautiful
woodwork and hardwood
floors. Living &dining rooms
offer beamed ceilings and a
real fireplace. Over 2700SF,
modern kitchen, 4 bedrooms,
and finished 3rd floor.
Farmhouse andformer Inn
completely remodeledinside and
out. 8 rooms with4 bedrooms,
and3 full baths. Beautifully
appointed, large moderneat-in
kitchen, numerous porches and
decks, in-groundpool, all ona
manicured1.17 acre lot.
TedPoggi 283-9100 x25
MLS 11-2114 $359,750
MaryEllenBelchick696-6566
MLS#11-4260 $139,900
Very nice ranchhome on1.13
acres withstreamat the back of
the property. Hardwoodfloors,
modernkitchen,1.5modern
baths and2 bedrooms. Large
detachedgarage. Locatedinthe
Tunkhannock Sch. District.
© 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Afliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.
Harveys Lake-Beautiful! Forty Fort-Colonial
If you are ready for the step up....call US today!
453 So. Mt. Blvd. Mt. Top Harveys Lake-Nice Ranch!
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PAGE 18G SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
rear.
A French door opens to the adjacent master bath.
Measuring 11-by-10, this well-appointed bathroom has a
jetted tub set on an angle in a corner with a rear-facing
window above. It also features a dramatic triple vanity
with black granite countertop and two white sinks, and
an oversized walk-in shower.
A second full bath is located on the second floor and
offers gray ceramic tile floor and a one-piece tub and
shower surround. This bath has blue walls and a tan
and white granite-topped vanity.
Bedrooms two and three share a third full bath. This
bath has a tiled shower and floor and a white vanity
with gray and tan granite countertop.
Bedrooms two through five range in size from 12-by-
8 through 15-by-14. All have tan wall-to-wall carpeting
and substantial closet space.
The finished basement offers plenty of fun spaces
to rest and relax. A 31-by-20 family room has terra
cotta tile flooring, a number of separate sitting areas
and features two walls full of beautiful cherry built-ins.
A separate recreation area has a built-in bar with bar
refrigerator and more striking cherry cabinets.
Lastly, a den on this level measures 14-by-14 and has
a hardwood floor and tan walls. A nearby three-quarter
bath provides a cherry vanity and a large walk-in
shower with built-in seat and glass block window.
There is a series of built-in lockers for the storage of
coats and boots in the mudroom, with an adjacent door
to the attached two-car garage.
This home has a private well, on-site septic system
and gas forced air heat supplemented by baseboard
electric heat in portions of the lower level.
To make an appointment to see this stunning home,
contact Margy Simms at Lewith & Freeman Real Estate
at (570) 696-3801; or msimms@lewith-freeman.com.
SPECIFICATIONS:
Two-story
4,700 square feet
BEDROOMS: 5
BATHS: 5
PRICE: $445,000
LOCATION: 77 Yolanda Dr., Lehman Twp.
AGENT: Margy Simms
REALTOR: Lewith & Freeman Real Estate,
(570) 696-3801; msimms@lewith-freeman.com
Amber Woods
Continued from front page
The Attorney To Call
When Buying A Home
• Complete Real Estate Legal
Services
• Title Insurance
• Rapid Title Search & Closing
• Evening & Weekend
Appointments
Angelo C. Terrana Jr.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Suite 117 Park Building,
400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA
(570) 283-9500
7
1
4
0
7
8
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
ALDEN
1100 Walnut Street
Great starter or
investment home.
Nice neighborhood.
Property sold in as
is condition.
MLS#11-215
$23,000
(570) 885-6731
(570) 288-0770
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
ASHLEY
3 bedroom, 1 bath 2
story in good loca-
tion. Fenced yard
with 2 car detached
garage. Large attic
for storage. Gas
heat. $79,900
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
ASHLEY
Delightfully pleas-
ant. This home has
been totally remod-
eled, a great buy
for your money.
New modern
kitchen with all
appliances, living
room and dining
room have new
hardwood floors.
Nice size 3 bed-
rooms. 1 car
garage. Be sure to
see these values.
MLS 11-2890
$68,000
Call Theresa
Eileen R. Melone
Real estate
570-821-7022
906 Homes for Sale
ASHLEY
Not in Flood Zone
77 Cook Street
2 or 3 bedroom Sin-
gle Home for Sale.
Off street parking.
Large yard.
$82,000
Negotiable
(570) 814-4730
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
AVOCA
314 Packer St.
Remodeled 3 bed-
room with 2 baths,
master bedroom
and laundry on 1st
floor. New siding
and shingles. New
kitchen. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3174
$99,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
AVOCA
FOR SALE BY OWNER.
Very nice split level
home. 3 bedrooms,
2 full baths with
over-sized jacuzzi.
Living room with
fireplace. Kitchen
with dining area,
family room, rec
room with pool
table. Garage with
opener. Central air.
3 season sun room,
deck, large fenced
lot with shed. In
great neighborhood.
$189,900
(570) 540-0157
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
906 Homes for Sale
AVOCA
Renovated 3 bed-
room, 2 story on
corner lot. New roof
& windows. New
kitchen, carpeting &
paint. Hardwood
floors, gas fireplace
& garage. All appli-
ances included. A
MUST SEE. $119,000.
570-457-1538
Leave Message
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
BACK MOUNTAIN
133 Frangorma Dr
Bright & open floor
plan. 5 year old 2
story. 9' ceiling 1st
floor. Custom
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances. Family room
with 14' ceiling &
fireplace. Conve-
nient location.
MLS# 11-2572
$349,000
Call Geri
570-696-0888
BACK MOUNTAIN
Enjoy this gracious
4 bedroom Tudor
home on 5+ acre lot
with mature land-
scaping. Hardwood
floors throughout, 4
fireplaces, built in
bookcases & Ameri-
can Chestnut doors
enhance this archi-
tecturally designed
home. The master
bedroom and bath
located on the first
floor with 3 addition-
al bedrooms, a sun-
room and 2 baths
on the second floor.
Lovely views over
look stone patio and
yard. MLS#10-3053
$549,000
Call Rhea
570-696-6677
906 Homes for Sale
BEAR CREEK
6650 Bear Creek Blvd
Well maintained
custom built 2 story
nestled on 2 private
acres with circular
driveway - Large
kitchen with center
island, master
bedroom with 2
walk-in closets,
family room with
fireplace, custom
built wine cellar - A
Must See property!
$299,900
MLS# 10-4312
Call Geri
570-696-0888
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
BEAR CREEK
Meadow Run Road
Enjoy the exclusive
privacy of this 61
acre, 3 bedroom, 2
bath home with
vaulted ceilings and
open floor plan. Ele-
gant formal living
room, large airy
family room and
dining room and
gorgeous 3 season
room opening to
large deck with hot
tub. Modern eat in
kitchen with island,
gas fireplace,
upstairs and wood
burning stove
downstairs. This
stunning property
boasts a relaxing
pond and walking
trail. Sit back
and savor
the view
MLS 11-3462
$443,900
Sandy Rovinski
Ext. 26
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
BEAR CREEK
VILLAGE
333 Beaupland
10-1770
Living room has
awesome woodland
views and you will
enjoy the steam/
sauna. Lake and
tennis rights avail-
able with Associa-
tion membership.
(membership
optional). Minutes
from the Pocono's
and 2 hours to
Philadelphia or New
York. $259,000
Maria Huggler
CLASSIC PROPERTIES
570-587-7000
906 Homes for Sale
BEAR CREEK VILLAGE
470 Lewis Drive
Great house in
great condition!
Unique 1 1/2 story
with 4 bedrooms &
2 1/2 baths on 2
acre wooded lot.
Fireplaces in living
room, dining room
& family room.
Modern kitchen
with stainless appli-
ances & breakfast
bar. Hardwood
floors. Flexible floor
plan. MLS#11-2408
$349,9000
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
BLAKESLEE
Quiet Country
Living
Impressive, well-
cared for, 4 Bed
Colonial on a beau-
tiful 2 Acre home
site, just 20 minutes
to W-B. Lots of
storage with a huge
basement and 3 Car
Garage. Enjoy
country living at it’s
best. $268,627
Call Betty
570-643-4842
570-643-2100
DALLAS
$199,000 - 2 Story
3 Bedroom, 3 Bath
Home with 30x60
Commercial Garage
on 9 acres in
Franklin Township.
Call Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-4400
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Proposed new
construction
“Ranch Condo”
in Green Briar with
a 1 car garage,
community pool &
tennis in a great
adult community.
$229,900
MLS# 10-1105
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
DALLAS
Nice 3 bedroom
home on a deep lot
with large eat in
kitchen.
MLS#11-3387
$118,800
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
DALLAS
20 Fox Hollow Drive
Well maintained
two story with
fully finished lower
level awaits its
new family. 4-6
bedroom, 3.5 bath,
2 fireplaces. One
year home warranty
included. Wonderful
neighborhood.
$270,000
MLS #11-3504
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
210 42nd St. E
Beautiful 3300 sq.ft.
custom built Tudor
home on 3.7 +/-
acres with stream,
pond & gorgeous
landscaping in a
great country like
setting. A home
you'll be proud to
own. MLS#10-4516
$ 399,900
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
3 Crestview Dr.
Well-constructed
and maintained
sprawling multi-
level with 5,428
square feet of living
space. Living room
& dining room with
hardwood floors
& gas fireplace;
eat-in kitchen with
island; florida room.
5 bedrooms, 4
baths; 2 half-baths.
Lower level rec
room with wet bar
& fireplace. leads
to heated in-ground
pool. Beautifully
landscaped 2
acre lot.
$575,000
MLS# 11-1798
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
DALLAS
56 Wyoming Ave
Well maintained 4
bed, 2 bath home
located on large .85
acre lot. Features
open floor plan,
heated 3 season
room with hot tub,
1st floor laundry, 2
car garage and
much more. 11-3641
Call Jim Banos
COLDWELL
BANKER RUNDLE
REAL ESTATE
570-991-1883
DALLAS
PRICE REDUCED!
314 Loyalville Rd
Very Nice 3 bed-
room, 2 bath dou-
blewide on 2 acres
with detached 2 car
garage and well
maintained yard.
Home has Anderson
Thermopane win-
dows, wood burning
fireplace in TV room,
walk-in closet, wall
heater in full base-
ment, 16x23.6 &
9.6x8.4 rear deck,
9.6x8.4 front deck,
glass sliding door in
kitchen, central air,
black walnut trees,
peach tree, paved
driveway etc.
MLS# 11-2679
$159,900
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS SCHOOL
DISTRICT
100% Financing
Wooded and private
Bi-Level in Dallas
School District. This
home features 1 Car
Garage, 3
Bedrooms, 1 3/4
Bath and nice
updates. Plenty of
room on your pri-
vate 2 acre lot.100%
USDA Financing
Eligible. Call for
details.
REDUCED PRICE
$166,000
Call Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-4400
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
DALLAS
** OPEN HOUSE **
SUNDAY, NOV-13
12NOON-2PM
148 E Center Hill Rd.
Conveniently locat-
ed, roomy & com-
fortable 2 story
awaits your family.
3 bedrooms 1.5
bath, hardwood
floors, new deck,
pool & new win-
dows MLS#11-3815
$149,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
** OPEN HOUSE **
SUNDAY, NOV-6
12NOON-2PM
DRUMS
Sand Springs
12 Sand Hollow Rd.
Nearly new 3 bed-
room, 2.5 bath
town home. Huge
Master with 2 clos-
ets full bath. 1 car
attached garage,
wooded lot, end
unit. Cul-de-sac.
Great golf
community.
MLS 11-2411
$172,000
Call Connie
Eileen R. Melone
Real Estate
570-821-7022
906 Homes for Sale
DUPONT
167 Center St.
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath
2 story home with
garage and drive-
way. Newer kitchen
and bath. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3561
Price reduced
$64,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
DUPONT
INVESTMENT
OPPORTUNITY
Single family
home with a
separate build-
ing containing a
1 bedroom
apartment and 5
car garage all
on 1 lot.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2828
Price reduced
$82,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
DUPONT
Main Street
Commercial
Excellent corner
location. Approxi-
mate 200’ road
frontage. 1st floor
offices. Large 2nd
floor apartment.
Detached 3 bay
garage. $225,000
Call Kathie
570-288-6654
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
548 Green St.
Are you renting??
The monthly mort-
gage on this house
could be under
$500 for qualified
buyers. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, 1st
floor laundry. Off
street parking,
deep lot, low taxes.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3983
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
DURYEA
619 Foote Ave.
Don’t judge a book
by its cover! This is
a must see Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 baths,
1 car garage, large
yard, finished lower
level. New kitchen
with heated tile
floors, granite
counter, stainless
appliances. Split
system A/C, gas
hot water base-
board. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4079
$159,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 19G
Discover Buyers Top Choice for Homes Searches
Lewith&Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
Lewith & Freeman homes appear on all major real estate websites, 600 & Growing...
Kingston 570.288.9371
Shavertown 570.696.3801
Mountain Top 570.474.9801
Hazleton/Drums 570.788.1999
Wilkes-Barre 570.822.1160
Clarks Summit 570.585.0600
Did you Know? More sellers choose L&F to display their homes for sale.
www.lewith-freeman.com
LF Homefinder – Search and save your
favorite homes right on our website
Call the experts!
HARVEY’S LAKE REDUCED! Breath-
taking beauty - 88 feet of lake front-
age. 5BR home w/new Master Suite
& gourmet kitchen, exceptional boat-
house w/dream view. MLS# 11-605
VIRGINIA ROSE 714-9253 $950,000
DALLAS Lovely 2BR, 2 bath, Ranch style
condo at “The Greens” in Newberry Es-
tate. LR w/cath ceiling, gas FP w/built-
ins. Gas heat C/A, mod kit w/Island,
open to den, 2 car gar. MLS# 11-3797
SALLY 714-9233 $349,000
HARVEYS LAKE Inviting home - 100ft of
prime lakefront-spacious rms, breathtaking
views, exceptional 2stry boathouse w/stone
FP, kitchen, bar, 1/2 bath & upper & lower
decks. MLS# 10-2957
MARGY 696-0891 $1,500,000
SHAVERTOWN Wonderful home in conve-
nient location features spacious formal
rms, beautiful HW frs, & grand stone FP. Kit
opens to bright sunroom/brkfst area. 4 lg
BRs, offce & 2 baths on 2nd fr. Charming
wrap around porch offers views of lg prop-
erty w/mature oak & pines. MLS#11-528
RHEA 696-6674 $545,000
SHAVERTOWN Spacious home. Wonder-
ful fr plan & elegant detail throughout.
Fantastic 2 story great rm w/gas FP, great
kitchen, MSTR on 1st fr, 5BRs, 5 baths
& great fnished LL w/custom cabinetry.
MLS# 11-3697
MARGY 696-0891 $445,000
NORTH LAKE GREAT HOUSE w/ 90ft of
lakefront! 3BR, 2.5 bath Cape Cod w/
Open f plan has extensive views, 1 f
Master opens to screened porch & large
deck. MLS# 11-2958
RHEA 570-696-6677 $328,500
KINGSTON Airy & elegant defne the interior of
this 3 story 5BR, 4 bath home. The elegant entry
opens to the formal LR & den, both w/FPs. Kit w/
breakfast area is bright & inviting. A formal DR
w/beamed ceiling & built-in cabinets. An added
feature to this splendid home is a lg indoor - in-
ground swimming pool w/adjacent 3 season
room. MLS# 11-2791
RHEA 696-6677 $495,000
SHAVERTOWN Bulford Farms custom built brick 2sty,
5BR, 4 full & 2 1/2 baths home on 4acres w/open fr
plan. Quality thru-out includes mod kitchen w/island
& granite open to FR w/FP & bar. Walls of windows
overlook grounds, 2stry fyr, sunken LR w/FP, 1st fr of-
fce. Finished LL w/2nd kitchen, rec rm & wine cellar.
Amazing storage, 4 car garage, tennis court & large
patio. MLS# 09-4567
TINA 714-9277 or VIRGINIA 714-9253 $750,000
GLEN SUMMIT Glen Summit Community -
Beautiful Victorian home renovated w/new
open foor plan, 6BRs, 4.5 elegant baths &
stunning new kitchen - HW frs, spacious rms,
handsome FP’s, front & back staircases, de-
lightful Gazebo & huge wrap around porch.
MLS# 10-2874 MARGY 696-0891
or RHEA 696-6677 $650,000
SHAVERTOWN Magnifcent views from
this inviting contemporary. Open foor
plan, ultra kitchen, HW, spa-like MBTH,
5BRs, 3 baths. MLS# 11-952
TRACY Z. 696-0723 $532,000
MOUNTAINTOP Spectacular 2 story in ex-
cellent condition with upgrades galore! A
true beauty & great value!
MLS# 11-3758
LISA 715-9335 $359,900
WHITE HAVEN Lovely & affordable is this
3BR, 2 story in a splendid lake commu-
nity! Many nice features. Call today!
MLS# 10-2856
LISA 715-9335 $174,900
BEAR CREEK TWP. Beautiful 4BR, 3 bath
Ranch home. HW foors, freplace, large
LR & FR. Large yard. MLS# 11-3344
JILL 696-0875 $159,900
KINGSTON TWP. NEW LISTING! Well
maintained all brick Ranch set on a large
lot. New roof & windows, 2 FPs, 2 baths,
breezeway, 2 car garage. MLS# 11-4226
GERI 696-0888 $179,900
KINGSTON Beautifully maintained 4BR, 3 bath,
2 story in a desireable location. Cozy up next
to the large brick FP in LR w/double French
doors & beamed ceilings. Private backyard w/
inground pool & 1 car garage. Seller offering a
1yr home warranty! MLS# 11-2916
CHRISTINA 714-9235 $210,000
253 PARRISH ST., WILKES-BARRE
Charming, well kept 3 BR, 2 story. Tastefully deco-
rated, w/lg eat-in kit., beautiful woodwork, 1 car gar,
fenced yard & more. MLS# 11-3154
MIKE D. 714-9236 $74,900
Dir: S. on S. Main, L. on Parrish
4 MYSTIC DRIVE, MOUNTAINTOP
Newly remodeled 4BR, 2.5 baths in great neighbor-
hood. New siding, windows, kitchen w/granite & tile,
HW & new carpet throughout. Wont last! MLS# 11-1233
PATTY A. 715-9332 $199,900
Dir: 309 to Walden Park - straight on Walden to Mys-
tic 2nd home on L.
OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 11/20 • 2:00-3:30PM OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 11/20 • 1:00-2:30PM
DALLAS Roomy & comfortable 2 story
awaits your family. 3BRs, 1.5 baths, HW
foors, new deck & pool. MLS# 11-3815
TRACY 696-0723 $149,000
TRUCKSVILLE Happy days in this beauti-
ful 3 BR, 3 bath, Traditional in one of Back
Mt’s quietest downhome subdivisions.
MLS# 11-3235
DEANNA 696-0894 $242,000
OLD FORGE Beautiful Ranch home with
3BRs, eat-in kitchen, large LR & fnished
lower level that walkouts to a covered pa-
tio. MLS# 11-3627
PEG 714-9247 $135,000
WILKES-BARRE
Elevations is a new Con-
dominium Living that fea-
tures: 1 & 2BR lofts &
fats w/high ceilings, open
fr plans, quality fnishes,
secured indoor parking
w/direct elevator access.
PEG 714-9247,
VIRGINIA 714-9253
or RHEA 696-6677
$188,900, $201,900,
$259,900, $263,900
MOUNTAINTOP An opportunity to make
it your own! This 3BR, 1.5 bath on large
lot w/detached garage, lower level FR &
more! MLS# 11-3596
JUDY 714-9230 $149,900
PLAINS 4BR, 2 bath home in beautiful condi-
tion! Move right in! Private neighborhood just
minutes away from the city. Ductless A/C 1st
fr. Fenced yard, double deck, LL workshop can
be BR. Plus many extras! Extra parking.
MLS# 11-3446
PEG 714-9247 $195,000
HAZLE TWP. Stop searching your dream home
awaits! 4BR, 3.5 bath custom built Colonial.
Open & spacious! Kitchen w/granite, s/s ap-
pls, imported tile foor. Beautiful HW foors, gas
FP, fnished walkout LL, professional landscap-
ing! MLS# 11-3234
PAT G. 788-7514 $297,900
PINE RIDGE ESTATES Close to work & shopping!!
Almost new traditional home in a gorgeous neigbor-
hood. All mod conveniences, 2stry foyer, granite Kit
w/ss appls, open fr plan, gas FP w/stone hearth &
2nd fr lndry. Lg MSTR Ste w/sitting area, whirlpool
tub w/shower, walk-in closet, walk-out LL. A must see
gem! MLS# 11-138
JOAN 696-0887 $249,900
SWEET VALLEY PRICE REDUCED! Coun-
try setting Ranch home set on 1 acre lot.
Modern kitchen, 3BRs, large deck w/above
ground pool, lower level fnished, 2 car ga-
rage. MLS# 11-2627
GERI 696-0888 $164,000
KINGSTON PRICE REDUCED! Old World Charm at
its best! Beautiful 5BR, 2.5 bath home w/mod kit.
HW frs, 2 mantels & 1 wood burning FP, 2.5 car gar,
library w/built-ins & FP, DR w/beam ceiling & stain
glass windows. Great landscaping! Could make
wonderful bed & breakfast! MLS# 11-2878
MATT 714-9229 $259,900
DALLAS NEW LISTING! Very nice 4BR,
2.5 bath home on private lot. Needs
some updating but nice open foor plan.
MLS# 11-4181
JILL 696-0875 $219,900
TWINS AT
WOODBERRY MANOR,
MOUNTAINTOP
Spectacular 3br 2 1/2 bath twin on great
lot offers beautiful hardwood foors on
1st fr and stunning kitchen with granite
counter tops and stainless steel appl.
Large master suite with wonderful bath
& closet. All modern amenities, stately
entry and staircase, composite deck,
central air, gas heat, 1 car garage.
MLS# 11-2000
$219,900
Call Lisa Joseph at 715-9335
8 WATSON ST., WEST WYOMING
Huge inside! Cathedral ceilings enhance this 4BR, 3
bath w/family room, A/C, garage, in-ground pool &
more! MLS# 11-3871
JUDY 714-9230 $178,500
Dir: Wyoming Avenue to Dennison St, R on N. Lack-
awanna, L on Washington Ave, R on Watson, house
on R.
OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 11/20 • 1:30-2:30PM
WYOMING Traditional meets modern! 4BR
authentic Tudor w/every amenity overlooking
gorgeous private grounds w/in-ground pool,
mature trees & gardens. A must see!
MLS# 11-3957
MARCIE 714-9267 $474,000
PAGE 20G SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
RIVER SHORES… We still have two
great properties in West Pittston’s River
Shores….. We have a ranch with first
floor master and master bath suite,
fabulous stainless kitchen with separate
pantry room, Three full baths, huge
home theater, loft, high ceilings and
two Fps. We also have a building lot for
a custom home of any size in this great
neighborhood. No flood.
EAGLE VIEW….. Great buys …VERY HIGH AND VERY DRY !!!!
The Views at Eagle View in Jenkins Township are outstanding. All rear
yards offer breathtaking views of the river and valley. You’ll never find
a better time to buy your lot. Put a deposit on any lot and build now
or when you are ready. We are a custom builder and will build to your
plan or modify one of ours to be your “Dream Home”. We have started
our landscaping, utilities and pave at Eagle View…. making these
spectacular lots even more outstanding.
From South Main turn toward the river on Brady Street then left.
Heritage Homes Promise:
Competitive Pricing • No Hidden Costs • No Hidden Upgrades
Herriittaaggee HHommeess PPrroommise: Heerritagge Hoommees Prommiise:
etit tiv ivee PPr Pric ic iciin in nggggg ••• NNo No No No No HHHH H d id id id idddde de dennnn CCo Co Co Co t st st stssss •• No NNo No N H HHid d idde de d nn U
Te Willowbrook - 2,340 sq. ft.
2898 Scranton/Carbondale Highway
Blakely, PA 18447
570-383-2981 • www.heritagehomesltd.com
Featuring:
You’ve Got Dreams. We’ve Got Plans.
Scan Code and
Visit Our Website:
MODEL HOURS
Weekdays 12-7
Sat & Sun 12-5
Closed Fridays
HERITAGE HOMES INCLUDE:
• Gas Warm Air Heat
• Site Work Package
• Central Air Conditioning
• Concrete Front Porch
• Andersen Windows
• 1st Floor Laundry
• Master Bath Whirlpool
• Two Story Foyer
• 2 1/2 Tile Baths
• Two Car Garage with Openers
•˙Hardwood, Kitchen, Foyer, Eating
• Poured Concrete Foundation
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
805-807 Main
St.
Multi-Family.
Large side by
side double with
separate utili-
ties. 3 bed-
rooms each side
with newer car-
pet, replace-
ment windows
and newer roof.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3054
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
DURYEA
Blueberry Hill.
3 bedroom ranch.
Large lot with pool.
$339,500
No Realtors
For more details
call 570-406-1128
DURYEA
BLUEBERRY HILLS
108 Blackberry Ln.
Newer construc-
tion, 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family
room with gas fire-
place. Formal dining
room. 2 car garage,
gas heat, large
deck, above ground
pool. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3858
$289,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
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DURYEA
NOT IN FLOOD ZONE
319 Bennett Street
For Sale by Owner
Two story, 2-unit
home. Live in one
unit rent the other
to pay mortgage or
great investment
property. Small
fenced-in yard and
detached garage.
$65,000 Negotiable
Call Tara
570-430-1962
DURYEA
Not in Flood Zone
Single family house,
2 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, oil heat,
unfinished base-
ment, small yard,
$35,000
Call 570-457-3340
DURYEA
PRICE REDUCED!
314 Bennett Street
Refashioned 3 or 4
bedroom, two full
modern baths. Two
story, 2300sf, with
level yard with love-
ly new landscaping
and 1 car garage.
New EVERYTHING
in this charming
must see property.
Custom blinds
throughout the
home. Great neigh-
borhood with Park
beyond the back-
yard. MLS# 11-3776
$164,900
Call Patti
570-328-1752
Liberty Realty
& Appraisal
Services LLC
DURYEA
REDUCED
1140 SPRING ST.
Large 3 bedroom
home with new
roof, replacement
windows, hardwood
floors. Great loca-
tion! For more infor-
mation and photos
visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2636
$99,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
REDUCED
411 JONES ST.
Beautiful 2 story
English Tudor
with exquisite
gardens, sur-
rounding beauti-
ful in ground
pool, private
fenced yard
with a home
with too many
amenities to list.
Enjoy the sum-
mer here!
Screened in
porch and foyer
that just adds to
the great living
space
of the home
For more info
and photos:
visit:www.
atlasrealtyinc.co
m
MLS 11-2720
$229,900
Call Phil
570-313-1229
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Looking for that
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Your needs.
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DURYEA
REDUCED!
38 Huckleberry
Lane
Blueberry Hills
4 BEDROOMS, 2.5
baths, family room
with fireplace, 2 car
garage, large yard.
Master bath with
separate jetted tub,
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances and island,
lighted deck. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3071
$319,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
EDWARDSVILLE
274 Hillside Ave.
PRICED TO SELL.
THIS HOME IS A
MUST SEE. Great
starter home in
move in condition.
Newer 1/2 bath off
kitchen and
replacement win-
dows installed.
MLS 11-560
$52,000
Roger Nenni
EXT. 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
EDWARDSVILLE
32 Atlantic Ave
3 bedroom. Great
starter home.
Almost completely
remodeled. 11-2108
$87,000
Darcy J. Gollhardt,
Realtor
570-262-0226
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-718-4959
Ext. 1352
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
EDWARDSVILLE
66 East Grove St.,
Looking for a bar-
gain? This half dou-
ble will meet your
needs! It will make
a great starter
home, nice size
rooms, eat-in
kitchen, some
replacement win-
dows, pull down
attic for storage.
Plus a fenced rear
yard. The owners
want this SOLD so
make your offer
today!
MLS#10-3582
$22,500
Jill Jones 696-6550
906 Homes for Sale
EDWARDSVILLE
9 Williams St.
Large 4 bedroom
home with nice rear
deck, replacement
windows, off street
parking. Possible
apartment in sepa-
rate entrance.
Loads of potential.
For more info and
pictures visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2091
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
906 Homes for Sale
EDWARDSVILLE
New Listing!
122-124 SHORT ST.,
OUT OF THE FLOOD
ZONE! Very nice
double-block on a
quiet street. Good
income property for
an investor or live in
one side and rent
the other to help
with a mortgage.
#122 has living
room, dining room,
kitchen, 2 bed-
rooms and a full
bath. #124 has living
room, dining room,
kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths
and a family room
with free-standing
fireplace. Off-street
parking on one
side. Taxes are cur-
rently $1516 on
Assessed value of
$68,700. Motivated
Seller! Call today for
an appointment.
MLS#11-3694
$62,000
Mary Ellen &
Walter Belchick
570-696-6566
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
EXETER
105 Cedar Street
Price Reduced!
$50,000
Great starter home
in a great neighbor-
hood, off street
parking, upgraded
electric, newer roof,
replacement win-
dows & 2nd floor
laundry. MLS 10-4130
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday 12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms and 1.5
baths, new rear
deck, full front
porch, tiled baths
and kitchen, granite
countertops, all
Cherry hardwood
floors throughout,
all new stainless
steel appliances
and lighting, new oil
furnace, washer
dryer in first floor
bath. Great neigh-
borhood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
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906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
REDUCED
128 JEAN ST.
Nice bi-level home
on quiet street.
Updated exterior.
Large family room,
extra deep lot. 2
car garage,
enclosed rear
porch and covered
patio. For more
information and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-2850
$184,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
EXETER TWP.
311 Lockville Rd
Stately brick 2 story.
In-ground pool, cov-
ered patio, finished
basement, fireplace
& wood stove, 3 car
attached garage, 5
car detached
garage with apart-
ment above.
MLS# 11-1242
$719,000
Call Joe or Donna
570-613-9080
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
FORTY FORT
4 Sunset Court
Must see! Located
in a private cul-de-
sac. Large enclosed
front porch, 4 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, 2 car
garage. REDUCED!
$139,000
MLS 11-2824
Call Kathie
570-288-6654
906 Homes for Sale
FORTY FORT
70 Wesley Street
Very nice, move-in
condition or good
rental property. 1.5
double, 3 bedroom,
living room, kitchen,
dining room, base-
ment & full attic.
Great deal, must
sell, only $30,000.
Call (570) 762-5119
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
FORTY FORT
REDUCED!
1301 Murray St.
Very nice duplex,
fully rented with
good return in great
neighborhood. For
more information
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2149
$124,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
FORY FORT
Great Walnut street
location. 8 rooms, 4
bedrooms. wall to
wall carpet. Gas
heat. 2 car garage.
Deck & enclosed
porch. MLS 11-2833
$99,500
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
FRANKLIN TWP.
FOR SALE BY OWNER
Chalet style split
level in country set-
ting. 3 bedrooms,
den with wood
burning fireplace,
living room, dining
room, kitchen &
family room. Fin-
ished basement. 1
car attached
garage. Must see!
$189,900
Call (570) 333-4987
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
10 Lyndwood Ave
3 Bedroom 1.5 bath
ranch with new win-
dows hardwood
floors finished base-
ment 2 car garage
and a finished base-
ment. MLS 11-3610
$154,900
Call Pat Guesto
570-793-4055
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
20 Dexter St. ,
Nice starter home
with shed - MOVE-IN
READY! Fenced yard.
Security system.
Roof 2006. Hanover
Area School
District. This home
would be eligible for
the Luzerne County
Growing Home-
owners Initiative.
MLS #11-3023
$ 39,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
5 Raymond Drive
Practically new 8
year old Bi-level
with 4 bedrooms, 1
and 3/4 baths,
garage, fenced
yard, private dead
end street. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3422
$179,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
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Town & Country
Properties
19 REAR ELM ST,
WEST PITTSTON
Very cute starter home with nice
carport, deck and in-ground
pool. Don’t miss out on this
one! Winter and summer pool
covers, pool vacuum included.
MLS#11-2931
$89,500
Tis property was not involved in the
recent flooding in the area (Sept. 11).
Directions: From Exeter Ave,
Elm St, right at white wall (side
of second warehouse), left at
yellow pole, sign
OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-3:00PM
Patrick Deats Contractor
Back Mountain Lots Now Available!
Integrity • Quality • Value
Custom Home Builder
with over 25 years
experience in Luzerne
and Lackawanna Counties
570-696-1041
www.patrickdeats.com
Lot/Home Packages or Custom Homes on Your Lot
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
577 Nanticoke St.
Well maintained 3
bedroom, 2 story
home in quiet
neighborhood. This
home features an
enclosed patio with
hot tub, enclosed
front porch, walk up
floored attic with
electric. 2 coal
stoves and much
more. All measure-
ments approximate.
MLS 10-4645
$80,900
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
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HANOVER TWP.
8 Diamond Ave.
Don’t worry
about winter in
this fully insulat-
ed home with
new windows. 3
floors of living
space lets you
spread out and
enjoy this
house. Large
family room
addition plus 4
bedrooms, 1 1/2
baths, 1st floor
laundry, large
corner lot. Mod-
ern kitchen with
granite coun-
ters. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #11-622
$119,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
94 Ferry Road
Nice vinyl sided 2
story situated on a
great corner fenced
lot in Hanover Twp.
2 bedrooms, 2
modern baths,
additional finished
space in basement
for 2 more bed-
rooms or office/
playrooms.Attached
2 car garage con-
nected by a 9x20
breezeway which
could be a great
entertaining area!
Above ground pool,
gas fireplace, gas
heat, newer roof
and “All Dri” system
installed in base-
ment. MLS #11-626
$119,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
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.HANOVER TWP.
2 story in good con-
dition with 3 bed-
rooms, 1 full bath,
eat-in kitchen, 2 car
garage, fenced yard
& new gas heat.
$44,000
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
HARVEYS LAKE
New Listing. Unique
Contemporary Log
home with full fin-
ished lower level
family room, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
beautiful stone fire-
place, heated In
ground pool & a
great view of the
lake! Very private
setting nestled up
against the woods,
high on the hill.
Loads of charm &
character, “One of a
kind” home. *Agent
owned. MLS11-3754
$247,000
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
143B GROVE ST.,
Like to entertain?
This floor plan lends
itself to that with a
large kitchen, formal
dining and living
rooms. A car enthu-
siast? This garage
will hold 4 cars
comfortable. Enjoy a
hot tub, this workout
room has one and
French doors open-
ing to the rear yard.
Spacious bed-
rooms, wood burn-
ing fireplace. The list
goes on and on! Did
I mention you are
just ¼ of a mile from
the lake?!
MLS#11-1994
$249,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
HARVEYS LAKE
Completely remod-
eled interior & exte-
rior. All furnishings
included. Price
reduced. $49,500.
MLS 11-2895
Call Jim Banos
570-991-1883
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
HARVEYS LAKE
6 Hemlock Gardens
Great neighborhood
only ¼ mile to War-
den Place at Harvey
Lake, access to
Harveys Lake
through the Beach
Club at Warden
Place. 8 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
garage, 18 x 36 in-
ground heated pool,
12x27 screened
porch, landscaped,
workshop, office in
lower level, 100x150
lot neat and clean
ready to move-in.
MLS#11-2357
$146,000
Bob Cook
570-696-6555
906 Homes for Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
POLE 265
LAKESIDE DRIVE
44’ of lakefront!
This home offers
recently remodeled
kitchen with Cherry
cabinetry, granite
counters. Hard-
wood floors through
the kitchen and din-
ing area. Stone fire-
place, enclosed
porch to enjoy the
lake view! The
boathouse has a
second level patio,
storage area, plus
dock space. A must
see! MLS#11-2018
$369,900
Bob Cook
570-262-2665
HOMES FOR SALE
CHEAP Multi-unit
homes for sale.
Nanticoke & Wilkes-
Barre locations. 2 &
3 units. Wholesale
pricing. Some ready
to rent out. Call
570-237-0124
HUGHESTOWN
304 Division St
Fix & make $$$! 1/2
double. 3 bed-
rooms. 11-2407
$22,900
Darcy J. Gollhardt,
Realtor
570-262-0226
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-718-4959
Ext. 1352
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
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Shopping for a
new apartment?
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you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
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with classified!
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
189 Rock St.
Spacious home with
4 bedrooms and
large rooms. Nice
old woodwork,
staircase, etc. Extra
lot for parking off
Kenley St.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3404
$99,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
HUNLOCK CREEK
12 Oakdale Drive
Completely remod-
eled 3 bedroom, 1.5
bath home with
detached garage &
carport on approx
1.5 acres in a nice
private setting.
MLS# 11-1776
$129,900
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
JENKINS TWP
2 Owen Street
This 2 story, 3 bed-
room, 1 1/2 bath
home is in the
desired location of
Jenkins Township.
Sellers were in
process of updating
the home so a little
TLC can go a long
way. Nice yard.
Motivated sellers.
MLS 11-2191
$89,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
JENKINS TWP.
297 Susquehannock
Drive
A HOME FOR A HOME FOR
THE HOLIDA THE HOLIDAYS! YS!
Classic 2 story
home with 4 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths, 2
car garage. Master
bedroom with walk-
in closet, private
yard with above
ground pool,
kitchen overlooks
large family room.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2432
$259,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
475 S. Main St.
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
2 story home with
vinyl replacement
windows, vinyl sid-
ing, large yard and
off street parking.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3545
Price reduced
$69,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
JENKINS TWP.
475 S. Main St.
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
2 story home with
vinyl replacement
windows, vinyl sid-
ing, large yard and
off street parking.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3545
Price reduced
$64,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
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KINGSTON
Awesome Kingston
Cape on a great
street! Close to
schools, library,
shopping, etc.
Newer gas furnace
and water heater.
Replacement win-
dows, hardwood
flooring, recently
remodeled kitchen
with subway tiled
backsplash. Alarm
system for your
protection and
much more. MLS
#11-1577
$154,900.
Call Pat Busch
(570) 885-4165
KINGSTON
111 Church St.
Large 3 bedroom
completely updat-
ed. Big family room.
Detached garage.
Home warranty
included. Walk-up
attic. Replacement
windows.
$149,900
MLS #11-3598
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
128 Vaughn St.
Beautifully main-
tained home shows
pride of ownership
for last 40 years.
Upgrades include
new kitchen with
Kraftmaid cabinets
and Corian counter,
new hardwood
floors, brand new
gas furnace, central
air and replacement
windows. 3 bed-
rooms, with 2 addi-
tional rooms (bed-
rooms) on finished
3rd floor. 1.5 baths
and bonus family
room in basement.
Fenced yard, deck,
garage and off
street parking.
MLS 11-3864
$149,900
Call Mark Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
KINGSTON
129 S. Dawes
Ave.
4 bedroom, 1
bath, large
enclosed porch
with brick fire-
place. Full con-
crete basement
with 9ft ceiling.
Lots of storage, 2
car garage on
double lot in a
very desirable
neighborhood.
Close to schools
and park and
recreation. Walk-
ing distance to
downtown Wilkes-
Barre. Great fami-
ly neighborhood.
Carpet allowance
will be consid-
ered. For mor info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realty.inc.com
$129,900
MLS #11-1434
Call Tom
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
171 Third Ave
So close to so
much, traditionally
appointed 3 bed-
room, 3 bath town-
home with warm
tones & wall to wall
cleanliness. Modern
kitchen with lots of
cabinets & plenty of
closet space
throughout, enjoy
the privacy of deck
& patio with fenced
yard. MLS 11-2841
$123,000
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
KINGSTON
29 Landon Ave N
Striking curb appeal
with charm to
spare! Hardwood
floors throughout
the first floor, beau-
tiful arched door-
ways, gas fireplace,
lots of closet
space, modern
kitchen and a large
updated main bath.
MLS#11-3075
$144,900
Call Mary Price
570-696-5418
570-472-1395
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
549 Charles Ave.
A quality home in a
superior location!
Features: large
living room; formal
dining room with
parquet flooring;
oak kitchen with
breakfast area; 1st
floor master
bedroom & bath
suite; bedroom/
sitting room; knotty
pine den; half-bath.
2nd floor: 2
bedrooms & bath.
Finished room in
lower level with
new carpeting &
wetbar. Central air.
2-car garage. In-
ground concrete
pool with jacuzzi.
$324,900
MLS# 10-1633
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
KINGSTON
58 S. Welles Ave
Large charmer had
been extensively
renovated in the last
few years. Tons of
closets, walk-up
attic and a lower
level bonus recre-
ation room. Great
location, just a short
walk to Kirby Park.
MLS 11-3386
$129,000
Call Betty at
Century 21
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
ext 3559
or 570-714-6127
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
76 N. Dawes Ave.
DO THE MATH!
Qualified FHA buy-
ers could possibly
be paying less than
$900 per month for
mortgage, taxes
and insurance.
NOW is the time to
buy. Stop throwing
your money away
renting. Well cared
for 2 bedroom
home with private
yard, garage and
driveway. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2278
$129,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
KINGSTON
806 Nandy Drive
Unique 3 bedroom
home perfect for
entertaining! Living
room with fireplace
and skylights. Din-
ing room with built-
in china cabinets.
Lower level family
room with fireplace
and wetbar. Private
rear yard within-
ground pool and
multiple decks.
MLS#11-3064
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
Find A NewFriend
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570-829-7130
PAGE 22G SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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570-829-7130
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
83 E. Vaughn St
Yes, it’s really true,
$109,900. From the
Room size entrance
foyer to every room
in the house, you
find PERFECTION.
Living Room, Dining
Room/Family Room,
Large Kitchen, But-
ler-style work area,
3 bedrooms, 1 1/2
bath, lovely
enclosed screened-
in porch. Off street
parking. Choice
location. 11-2155
MUST SELL
$109,900
Open to Negotiation
Joan Evans
Real Estate
570-824-5763
KINGSTON
Completely remod-
eled, mint, turn key
condition, 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
large closets, with
hardwoods, carpet
& tile floors, new
kitchen and baths,
gas heat, shed,
large yard.
$134,900, seller will
pay closing costs,
$5000 down and
monthly payments
are $995/month.
Financing available.
WALSH
REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
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KINGSTON
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday 12pm-5pm
46 Zerby Ave
Lease with option
to buy, completely
remodeled, mint,
turn key condition,
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, large
closets, with
hardwoods, carpet
& tile floors, new
kitchen and baths,
gas heat, shed,
large yard.
$134,900 (30 year
loan @ 4.5% with
5% down; $6,750
down, $684/month)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
KINGSTON
Spacious 4 bed-
room, 2 bath Brick
“Cape Cod” with
oversized 2 car
garage with loft for
storage.
MLS#11-4162
$179,900
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
SALE BY OWNER!
Charming, well
maintained. Front
porch, foyer,
hardwood floors,
granite kitchen, 4
bedrooms, living
room/large dining
room, 2 fire-
places, 2.5 baths,
sun room, base-
ment with plenty
of storage. Pri-
vate English style
back yard.
$195,000
570-472-1110
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
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LAFLIN
Spacious ranch with
4 bedrooms, 1 3/4
baths, 18x22 Family
room with fireplace
on a 102x150 lot.
Fantastic view from
the rear deck!
MLS# 11-2609
$147,500
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sale
LAFLIN
210 Beechwood Dr
Rare brick & vinyl
tri-level featuring 8
rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
family room with
fireplace, rear
patio, sprinkler
system, alarm sys-
tem & central air.
MLS#11-2819
$199,000
CALL DONNA
570-613-9080
LAFLIN
24 Fordham Road
Lovely cedar shingle
sided home on large
corner lot in a great
development. 4 bed-
room, 2 1/2 baths, 1st
floor family room, fin-
ished lower level.
Hardwood floors
throughout, huge liv-
ing room & family
room. 1st floor laun-
dry room & office,
gas heat, nice deck,
above ground pool, 2
car garage. 11-3497
$295,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
LAFLIN
TOWNHOUSE FOR
SALE BY OWNER
105 Haverford Drive
Move right into this
3 bedroom 1.5 bath
townhouse with
many recent
updates including
new bath room
/kitchen and finished
basement. $131,900
Call 570-903-6308
LAKE HARMONY
3A Ridgewood
Neat, clean and
updated! Spacious
rooms throughout.
Sunken living area
with accent wall for
fireplace. Large loft
with entertainment
area. Jacuzzi in
master bath/show-
er. New carpet.
Freshly painted. No
outside mainte-
nance. MLS 10-7583
$144,900
570-643-2100
C21poconos.com
LAKE NUANGOLA
Lance Street
Very comfortable
2 bedroom home in
move in condition.
Great sun room,
large yard, 1 car
garage. Deeded
lake access.
Reduced $119,000
Call Kathie
MLS # 11-2899
(570) 288-6654
906 Homes for Sale
LAKE SILKWORTH
Brand new Ranch,
approximately 50
yards from lake. 3
bedroom, 2 baths,
laundry room, full
basement. Deeded
lake access.
MLS 11-2346
$135,000
Barbara Strong
570-762-7561
ANTONIK &
ASSOCIATES
570-735-7494
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
LILY LAKE
Year-round beauty
featuring cedar and
stone siding, central
aid conditioning,
hardwood floors.
Modern kitchen with
granite island, 4
bedrooms, fireplace
in master, 2 baths.
Sunroom with glass
walls for great lake
views. Low taxes.
MLS#11-1753
$299,000 or
rent for $1,250/mos
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
906 Homes for Sale
LUZERNE
330 Charles St.
Very nice 2 bed-
room home in move
in condition with
updated kitchen
and baths. Nice
yard with shed and
potential off street
parking. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3525
$59,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LUZERNE
459 Bennett St.
Very nice 5 bed-
room, 2 story home
in nice area of
Luzerne. Off street
parking for 4 cars.
1st floor master
bedroom and laun-
dry. Replacement
windows on 2nd
floor. 5 year young
full bath. Modern
kitchen w/breakfast
bar and oak cabi-
nets. Basement
always DRY! All
measurements
approximate
MLS11-3745
$122,900
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LUZERNE
807 North Street
NEW LISTING
Lovely modern
large ranch with 4
or 5 bedrooms
including a master
suite with walk in
closet.Full finished
basement with a
separate room
presently used as a
functioning beauty
shop and 1/2 bath.
Beautiful back yard
with 2 covered
patios, one with hot
tub. Gas heat, all
hardwood floors on
first level, profes-
sional landscaping,
neutral decor, over-
sized 1 car garage,
lots of closets and
storage & much
more. MLS#11-3139
$172,000
(570) 237-1032
(570) 288-1444
MOUNTAIN TOP
130 CHURCH RD
Enjoy the fall foliage
right from your own
home! This colonial
style home offers
double entry doors
leading into the for-
mal living and dining
rooms. Spacious
kitchen - breakfast
area, family room
opening to the
fenced rear yard.
Large 3-season
room with cathedral
ceiling. Hardwood
floors, fireplace,
recently remodeled
full and ½ bath plus
2-car garage.
Located on 3+
acres.
MLS# 11-2600
$183,900
Call Jill Jones
570-696-6550
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
15 Albert Road
Home in good con-
dition! Nice rear
yard! Basement is
heated & semi fin-
ished! Hardwood
floors under carpet!
MLS#11-3703
$134,000
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
16 Hazlenut Drive
New granite count-
er tops/island! 3
zone heat, nice
lower level finished
with walkout, huge
inground pool,
fenced yard! Large
bedroom sizes.
Large family room
with fireplace & new
carpet. New garage
door! Hardwood in
living room & dining
room. MLS #11-2270
$389,000
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
MOUNTAIN TOP
3 story, 5 bedroom
home completely
remodeled in & out.
$245k with owner
financing with
20% down or will
lease with option
to purchase.
tj2isok@gmail.com
MOUNTAIN TOP
803 Aspen Drive
Brand new carpet in
lower level family
room! Hardwood on
1st floor dining
room, living room,
bedrooms & hall!
Large rear deck.
Master bedroom
opens to deck! Pri-
vate rear yard!
Basement door
opens to garage.
MLS #11-2282
$199,000
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
MOUNTAIN TOP
NEW LISTING –
Nestled on just
under an acre just
minutes from 81S
this colonial offers
2194 sq. ft. of living
area plus a finished
basement. Enjoy
your summer
evenings on the
wrap around porch
or take a quick dip in
the above ground
pool with tier deck.
The covered pavil-
ion is ideal for pic-
nics or gatherings
And when the winter
winds blow cuddle
in front of the gas
fireplace and enjoy
a quiet night. Price
to sell, $185,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
(570) 288-6654
Doyouneedmorespace?
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in classified
is the best way
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MOUNTAINTOP
NewListing
For Sale By Owner
2+ acre lot. 4 bed-
room, 1 1/2 bath, 2
story home. Hard-
wood floors. New
roof. Large detached
garage. Crestwood
area school district.
$69,000. Needs
some TLC. Call
570-868-8223
MOUNTAIN TOP
130 CHURCH ROAD
The feel of a true
colonial home with
double entry doors
off the foyer into the
living room and din-
ing room. Spacious
kitchen breakfast
area, family room
leading to a fenced
rear yard. 3-season
room with cathedral
ceiling. Hardwood
floors, fireplace,
recently remodeled
2.5 bath and 2-car
garage. Located on
3.77 acres, all the
privacy of country
living yet conve-
niently located.
MLS#11-2600
PRICE REDUCED
$183,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
HEIGHTS SECTION
ENORMOUS 4+ bay
garage!! Plus 1
more garage for
gadgets! Pretty 4
bedroom Cape with
a supplemental coal
unit and a beautiful
view from the
back yard.
NEW PRICE!!
$85,900
MLS# 11-2088
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
NANTICOKE
This very nice family
home, as it has
been for many
years, with a
detached garage,
1 3/4 baths, 4 bed-
rooms & so much
more is waiting for
your private tour.
MLS #11-2654
$78,600
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
NANTICOKE
414 E. Grove Street
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
2 story with off
street parking,
backyard, new oil
furnace, windows,
wiring, kitchen,
bath, flooring &
paint. Excellent
condition. $89,500.
Seller Assist of $5,000
Call Bill Remey @
570-714-6123
NANTICOKE
Reduced - $89,000
25 Shea St
CAPE ANN: Large
& Bright, 3 bed-
rooms, eat-in
kitchen, Carrara
Glass Bathroom,
Finished Lower
Level, Family Room
(knotty pine) with
BAR. Oil heat, very
large lot. Estate.
View the mountains
from the front
porch. #11-2970
BIG REDUCTION!
NEW PRICE
$89,000
Go To The Top... Call
JANE KOPP
REAL ESTATE
570-288-7481
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
REDUCED!
Motivated Seller!
$116,900.
619 S. Hanover St
Nicely appointed
brick 2-family. 2nd
unit on 2nd and 3rd
floors has 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths -
currently at
$400/mos below
market value of at
least $600/mos.
Most windows
replaced through-
out. Heated 2-car
detached garage,
rear covered patio,
fenced-in side yard.
MLS#11-2538
Call Steve Shemo
(570) 288-1401
(570) 793-9449
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
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the directions!
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
10 Garfield St.
Looking for a
Ranch???
Check out this
double wide
with attached 2
car garage on a
permanent foun-
dation. Large
master bedroom
suite with large
living room, fam-
ily room with
fireplace, 2 full
baths, laundry
room, formal
dining room,
vaulted ceilings
throughout and
MORE!
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-2463
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
PITTSTON
Privacy abounds
this beauty on
almost 3 acres of
“Pure Privacy”
tucked away from
the hustle & bustle
of everyday stress.
4 bedrooms, 1 3/4
baths with a 2 car
detached garage &
workshop. This
19x30 master bed-
room will knock
your socks off!
MLS #11-2705
$252,000
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
PITTSTON
168 Mill St.
Large 3 bedroom
home with 2 full
baths. 7 rooms on
nice lot with above
ground pool. 1 car
garage. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3894
$89,900
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
PITTSTON
31 Tedrick St.
Very nice 3 bed-
room with 1 bath.
This house was
loved and you can
tell. Come see for
yourself, super
clean home with
nice curb appeal.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3544
Reduced to
$84,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
44 Lambert Street
For Sal e or Rent!
Beautiful cozy
home! Upstairs
laundry, lots of clos-
et space. Tastefully
renovated. Extra
large driveway. Low
maintenance. Ther-
mostats in each
room. MLS#11-2210
$89,900
or $800/month
(570) 885-6731
(570) 288-0770
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
PITTSTON
82 Parsonage St
MOVE-IN CONDI-
TION! Good starter
home. 2 bedrooms,
2 1/2 baths.
Replacement win-
dows. Newer roof.
Freshly painted.
New carpet. Base-
ment with two lev-
els. Parking in front
of home. Priced to
sell! MLS 11-2508
$29,900
Joan Evans
Real Estate
570-824-5763
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
99 1/2 Pine St.
The owner of
this house took
pride in its
upkeep. It is
meticulous.
Home has 3
bedrooms, 1
bath, eat in
kitchen, living
room and dining
room. Walkout
basement with
paneled walls
and heat. Large
yard with newer
one car
detached
garage,
accessed from
rear alley. MLS
11-3555
$48,000
Call Terry
570-885-3041
Angie
570-885-4896
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
PITTSTON
NEW PRICE!!
92 Tompkins Street
Totally remodeled
2-story; 7 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
2-car garage, deck,
rear fence.
MLS# 11-2770
$99,900
CALL JOE OR DONNA
570-613-9080
PITTSTON
REDUCED!
95 William St.
1/2 double home
with more square
footage than most
single family
homes. 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen and remod-
eled baths. Super
clean. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc. com
MLS 11-2120
$59,000
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
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in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PITTSTON
Sunday, Nov-20
12 Noon - 2 PM
168 Elizabeth Street
Sturdy ranch in Ore-
gon Section. 3/4
bedrooms, 2 baths.
Price $92,500.
Call Stephen
570-814-4183
PITTSTON TOWNSHIP
SUSCON AREA
New Listing. Won-
derful home on a
huge country size
lot, in a private set-
ting, just off the
beaten path. Eco-
nomical Dual heat
system, central A/C
plus ductless unit,
Lower Level family
room, detached 2
car garage, fire-
place & a great
view from the front
porch! MLS 11-3733
$229,900
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON TWP.
38 Frothingham St.
Four square home
with loads of poten-
tial and needs
updating but is
priced to reflect its
condition. Nice
neighborhood.
Check it out. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3403
$69,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
PITTSTON TWP.
754 Laurel St.
Absolutely beau-
tiful move in
condition. This 2
bedroom Ranch
home with fully
finished base-
ment is in excel-
lent condition.
Come and see
for yourself. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3796
$129,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
PITTSTON TWP.
993 Sunrise Dr.
Horizon Estates
Fabulous end unit
townhome provides
luxurious, carefree
living. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths with 1st
floor master suite.
Ultra kitchen with
granite and stain-
less appliances.
Dining room with
built in cabinet. 2
story living room
with gas fireplace
and hardwood. 2
car garage, mainte-
nance free deck,
nice yard that can
be fenced. Low
HOA fee for snow
removal and grass
cutting. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3488
$289,900
Call Terry
570-885-3041
Angie
570-885-4896
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
10 Norman St.
Brick 2 story home
with 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large family
room with fireplace.
Lower level rec
room, large drive-
way for plenty of
parking. Just off the
by-pass with easy
access to all major
highways. For more
info and photos
visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2887
$169,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
122 PARNELL ST.
Beautiful bi-level
home on corner lot.
7 rooms, 3 bed-
rooms, newer roof
and windows.
Fenced in yardFor
more info and phtos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.om
MLS 11-2749
$189,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON TWP.
STAUFFER POINT
42 Grandview
Drive
NEW PRICE
better than new
end unit condo,
with 1st floor
master bedroom
and bath, Living
room with gas
fireplace, hard-
wood floors in
living, dining
room & kitchen,
granite counter-
tops and crown
molding in
kitchen, with
separate eating
area, lst floor
laundry, heated
sunroom with
spectacular
view, 2 addition-
al bedrooms, full
bath and loft on
the 2nd floor, 2
car garage, gas
heat and central
air, priced to sell
$274,500 MLS
11-2324
call Lu-Ann
602-9280
additional pho-
tos and informa-
tion can be
found on our
web site, www.
atlasrealtyinc.co
m
S
O
L
D
PLAINS
NEW LISTING
3 bedroom Town-
house in “Rivermist”
with 2.5 bath, 1 car
garage & all new
carpeting & painted
interior throughout!
MLS#11-3153
$184,500
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
PLAINS
1610 Westminster
Road.
DRASTIC PRICE
REDUCTION
Paradise found!
Your own personal
retreat, small pond
in front of yard, pri-
vate setting only
minutes from every-
thing. Log cabin
chalet with 3 bed-
rooms, loft, stone
fireplace, hardwood
floors. Detached
garage with bonus
room. Lots to see.
Watch the snow fall
in your own “cabin
in the woods.”
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-319
$279,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLAINS
2 bedroom, 2.5
bath. Luxury 1,950
sq ft end unit
Townhome in
sought after River
Ridge. Gas heat,
CAC, Hardwood &
wall to wall.
Marble tile master
bath with jetted
tub & seperate
shower. $199,500
Call 570-285-5119
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
PLAINS
3 bedroom, 2 bath
bi-level in good con-
dition with 2 car
garage, eat-in
kitchen and living
room/dining room
combo. Lower level
has framed out fam-
ily room with brick
fireplace. Very nice
lot. Electric base
board heat.
$139,900
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
74 W. Carey St.
Affordable home
with 1 bedroom,
large living room,
stackable washer
& dryer, eat in
kitchen. Yard
with shed.
Low taxes.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-4068
$37,500
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS
KEYSTONE SECTION
9 Ridgewood Road
TOTAL BEAUTY
1 ACRE- PRIVACY
Beautiful ranch 2
bedrooms, huge
modern kitchen, big
TV room and living
room, 1 bath, attic
for storage, wash-
er, dryer & 2 air
conditioners includ-
ed. New Roof &
Furnace Furnished
or unfurnished.
Low Taxes! New
price $118,500
570-885-1512
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
74 Mack Street
Modern 3 bedroom,
1 1/2 baths with a 1
car garage and
fenced yard. Combi-
nation living room/
dinning room with
hardwood floors.
Modern kitchen with
Corian counter tops
and tiled back-
splash. Modern tiled
bath. First floor
bonus family rooms.
New carpeting
throughout. Finished
lower level with 1/2
bath. Shed included.
MLS 11-4241
$119,900
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
PLAINS
Updated 2-story, 3
bedroom, 2 bath
home has 1 car
garage & carport,
fenced rear yard
with tiered deck and
more. MLS#11-3655
$152,000
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
PLAINS
48 Woodcrest Drive
Great end unit
townhouse in
Woodcrest Estates!
Located within
walking distance to
Mohegan Sun and a
few minutes drive to
the Wyoming Valley
Mall and I-81. Low
HOA fees. New roof!
Don’t miss an
opportunity to live
carefree & have
someone else shov-
el your snow & mow
your lawn! A great
price! MLS#10-4416
$119,900
Karen Bernardi
570-371-8347
Ray Bernardi
570-283-9100 x34
PLYMOUTH
1 Willow St.
Attractive bi-level
on corner lot with
private fenced in
yard. 3-4 bedrooms
and 1.5 baths. Fin-
ished lower level,
office and
laundry room
MLS 11-2674
$104,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
PLYMOUTH
401 W. Shawnee Ave
OUT OF FLOOD AREA
Beautifully redone
3-4 bedroom, 2
bath bi-level with
garage on cozy cor-
ner lot near Valley
West High School.
New Paint, Carpet-
ing, Appliances &
more. $125,000.
570-706-5496
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classified
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E DER DDD .
timesleader.com
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 PAGE 23G
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
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with classified!
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car go fast? Place
an ad in Classified!
570-829-7130.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
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Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
906 Homes for Sale
PLYMOUTH
Don’t miss this spa-
cious 2 story, with a
17 x 11 Living room,
formal dining room,
eat in kitchen plus ½
bath on the first
floor & 2 bedrooms
& bath on 2nd floor.
Extras include an
enclosed patio and
a detached garage.
Reasonably priced
at REDUCED!
$34,900.
MLS 11-2653
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
PLYMOUTH
OUT OF FLOOD ZONE
North Street
Large raised ranch
with 2 car garage.
Modern kitchen, 3
bedrooms, living
room, family room,
3 season porch, fin-
ished lower level
with 1½ bath & laun-
dry. $139,900
570-779-2424
PRINGLE
372 Hoyt Street
This two story home
has 4 bedrooms
with space to grow.
First floor has gas
heat and second
floor has electric
heat. Off street
parking for one in
back of home.
MLS 11-640
$59,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
SHAVERTOWN
Well maintained
raised ranch in
Midway Manor.
Good size level yard
with shed. Large
sunr oom/ l aundr y
addition. Lower
level family room
with wood stove.
MLS #11-4178
$163,700 Call
Christrine Kutz
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
SHAVERTOWN
1195 Sutton Road
Attractive, well-
maintained saltbox
on 2 private acres
boasts fireplaces in
living room, family
room & master
bedroom. Formal
dining room. Large
Florida room with
skylights & wet bar.
Oak kitchen opens
to family room. 4
bedrooms & 3 1/2
baths. Finished
lower level.
Carriage barn
$449,000
MLS# 10-3394
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
SHAVERTOWN
12 Windy Drive
New construction in
the exclusive
Slocum Estates.
Stone & Stucco
exterior. All the
finest appoint-
ments: office or 5th
bedroom, hard-
wood floors, crown
moldings, 9' ceil-
ings 1st & 2nd floor.
Buy now select
cabinetry & flooring.
MLS #11-1987
$499,000
Call Geri
570-696-0888
906 Homes for Sale
SHAVERTOWN
4 Genoa Lane
There is much
attention to detail in
this magnificent 2
story, 4 bedroom, 2
full bath all brick
home on double
corner lot. Large
family room with
brick fireplace, all
oak kitchen with
breakfast area,
master suite, solid
oak staircase to
name a few.
MLS #11-3268
$525,000
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-07770
SHAVERTOWN
Exquisite 4 bed-
room. Formal living
room, floor to ceiling
brick fireplace.
Formal dining room.
Beautiful eat in
kitchen, cherry cab-
inetry, granite coun-
ters, stainless steel
appliances. Master
suite, ash hardwood
floors, his/her clos-
ets and balcony.
Master bath, cherry
vanity and granite
counters. Spacious
24x28 family room,
entertainment unit &
bar. Office, built-ins.
Sunroom. Three car
garage. Completely
updated and well
maintained. This
home is convenient-
ly located on 2.5
park like acres just
minutes from Cross
Valley. MLS#11-2008
$519,000.
Call Ruthie
570-714-6110
Smith Hourigan Group
570-287-1196
SHAVERTOWN
Lovely 3 bedroom
2400 sf Cape Cod
with modern eat-in
kitchen, large sun-
room & family room.
Master bedroom
with master bath.
Central air, gas heat
& 2 car garage.
Very well land-
scaped with beauti-
ful paver sidewalks.
Quiet neighborhood.
Possible 6 month
rental for the right
tenant. $229,000
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
SHICKSHINNY
17 Main Road
REDUCED
Lovely Country set-
ting for the cute Bi-
Level on 5.34 acres.
Property features 4
bedrooms, 1.75
baths, living room,
kitchen, family room
& laundry room.
Plus 2 car attached
garage, 30' X 35'
detached garage
and 14' X 28' shed.
MLS 11-1335
$210,000
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
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in classified
is the best way
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with classified!
SHICKSHINNY
178 SWEET VALLEY RD
NEW Brick Ranch
on 1 acre. (11-4576)
$274,000
O’BOYLE
REAL ESTATE LLC
570-586-2911
906 Homes for Sale
SHICKSHINNY
Completely remod-
eled 3 bedroom,
1.75 bath brick &
aluminum ranch on
over 4 acres with
Pond. New stainless
steel appliances, 2
car attached and 1
car built-in garage,
paved driveway,
open front porch, 3
season room, rear
patio, brick fireplace
& property goes to
a stream in the
back.
PRICE REDUCED
$179,900
MLS# 10-4716
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
SPRINGVILLE
“NEW LISTING”
Year round cottage
on Schooley Pond
only 15 minutes from
Tunkhannock. Very
private area. Water
front property.
MLS# 11-4111
$125,000
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
SWEET VALLEY
570 Grassy Pond Rd
Nice Country Bi-
Level on 40 acres
with 3 bedrooms,
1.5 baths, kitchen,
living room, family
room, office & laun-
dry room. Plus
attached oversized
2 car garage with
workshop, rear
deck & 3 sheds.
MLS 11-1094
$319,900
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
SWOYERSVILLE
2 Unit Duplex &
Double Block
with a
4 Bay Garage.
Family owned for
many years.
BIG REDUCTION
$100,000
MLS# 09-1643
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
SWOYERSVILLE
10AM-12PM
SUNDAY 11/20/11
67 Watkins St
Large 4 bedroom
with many attractive
details emanating
from the French
door entrance foyer.
MLS#11-3962
$135,000
Call Al Clemont
570-371-9381
Smith Hourigan Group
570-714-6119
SWOYERSVILLE
120 Barber St.
Nice Ranch home,
great neighbor-
hood.
MLS 11-3365
$109,000
Call David
Krolikowski
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
SWOYERSVILLE
120 Barber Street
Nice ranch home!
Great neighbor-
hood. MLS#11-3365
$109,000
(570) 885-6731
(570) 288-0770
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
33 Oliver St.
FOR FOR SALE SALE
BY BY OWNER OWNER
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
nice level yard,
wonderful neighbor-
hood completely
out of flood plane.
$66,900
570-472-3334
570-239-1557
SWOYERSVILLE
610 Church St.
Attractive cape cod
on a large, open lot
in a great neighbor-
hood. Bright, eat-in
kitchen, finished
lower level rec
room, updated gas
furnace and electri-
cal. MLS# 11-3562
PRICE REDUCED
$139,900.
Call Steve Shemo
(570) 288-1401
(570) 793-9449
SWOYERSVILLE
Beautiful 2 story, 3
bedroom home.
Modern kitchen &
bath. Nice yard. Gas
heat. $69,900. Call
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
SWOYERSVILLE
PRICE REDUCED!!
Enjoy this charming
2 bedroom home
with recently updat-
ed tile kitchen and
bath, laminate floors
in bedrooms, large
yard, deck and stor-
age shed. MLS#11-
3231. $89,000
Call Matt
570-714-9229 or
Darlene
570-696-6678
There are many
great reasons to
consider
Team Belchick!
Mary Ellen & Walter
work together in a
unique approach
that guarantees
your real estate
needs are handled
immediately &
professionally.
Mary Ellen
696-6566
Walter 696-2600
ext 301
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
TRUCKSVILLE
Well maintained 3
bedroom, 2 bath
double wide in nice
neighborhood.
Many updates.
Landscaped &
fenced yard with
pool, large deck &
koi pond!
$99,700
MLS#11-2253
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sa