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A A i i r r c c r r a a f f t

AAiirrccrraafftt MMoovveemmeenntt AArreeaa ((AAMMAA)) TTrraaiinniinngg PPrrooggrraamm

Study Guide & Program Informational Booklet

Presented by the Airside Operations Admin Team Created by Geoffrey Gaskin, ACE

Guide & Program Informational Booklet Presented by the Airside Operations Admin Team Created by Geoffrey Gaskin,

Contents

Introduction Requirements & Eligibility222222222222222222222 1 FAQ8s 22222222222222222222222222222 2

Objectives22222222222222222222222222223

Definitions & Acronyms222.2222222222222222222 4

Section 1 0 Runway Incursions

Definition2222.2222222222222222222222225

Section 2 0 Airfield Familiarization Airfield Complexes222222222222222222222222.6 Runways22 222222222222222222222222227 Runway Safety Area (RSA)222222222222222222222.8 Taxiways2222222222222222222222222222 9 Areas of Concern2222222222222222222222222.9 Twy C/D Intersection22222222222222222222222.10 Twy V Loop222222222222222222222222 2211 Airfield Markings222222222222222222222 22211 Runway Hold Bar22222222222222222222 22212 Red/White Zipper Marking22222222222222222222 12 Airfield Signage2222222222222222222222222.13 ILS Critical Area222222222222222222222222214 LAHSO222222222222222222222222222 14 SMGCS2222222222222222222222222222 14 FOD22222222222222222222222222222 15 Aircraft Repositioning and Disabled Aircraft2222222222222215 City Codes222222222222222222222222222.16

Section 3 0 Communications Primary Frequency222222222222222222222222.17 Initial Call222222222222222222222222222 17 Phonetic Alphabet222222222222222222222222.18 ATC Frequencies22222222222222222222222.2 18

Ramp Frequencies22222222222222222222222.2.19

19

Aviation Terminology2222222222222222222222220 Radio Communications Failure2222222222222222222.21 Light Gun Signals222222222222222222222222 21

General Rules and Guidelines2222222222222222222

Airport Operations and Contact Information22222222222 2 222

Figures Figure 1 ` Airfield Complexes222222222222222222226

Figure 2 ` Airfield Layout (Jepp Chart)2222222222222222.7 Figure 3 ` Runway Safety Area2222222222222222222 8

Figure 4 ` Areas of Concern22222222222222222222

9

Figure 5 ` Twy D, Southbound2222222222222222222.10

Figure 6 ` Twy D, Southbound2222222222222222222 10 Figure 7 ` Twy V222222222222222222222222 11 Figure 8 ` Airfield Markings22222222222222222222.11 Figure 9 ` Runway Markings2222222222222222222211 Figure 10 ` Surface Painted Signs222222222222222222.12

Figure 11 ` Runway Hold Bar2222222222222222222

12

Figure 12 ` Red/White Zipper Marking222222222222222212 Figure 13 ` Airfield Signage22222222222222222222.13 Figure 14 ` ILS Holding Position Rwy 8L22222222222222214

Figure 15 ` Phonetic Alphabet2222222222222222222 18

Charts 0 Charts can be found at the end of the guide and are intended for educational use only. All are current as of the date this guide was published, but may become outdated. ALWAYS obtain a new, updated chart, prior to entering the movement area

KATL Jepp Chart Runway Incursion Awareness Chart ILS Critical Area Chart East Operation ILS Critical Area Chart West Operation FAA Signage Test Blank ATL Aerial Overview

Introduction

This training guide has been provided to you by the Airport Operations Division of the Department of Aviation, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Our goal is to operate a safe and efficient airport, and to reduce the number of runway incursions. The procedures, guidelines and airport specific information contained within this guide, when combined with proper training from your company or the FAA, will provide you with the basic knowledge needed to meet these goals.

This guide provides a general overview of safe operating procedures for driving on the movement area at ATL. It is not intended to cover specific conditions at all airports. Some local procedures are unique. If there are questions about differences between this guide and local procedures, they can be resolved by your supervisor or by contacting the Airport Operations Office at (404) 530-6620. By its nature, it is necessary for this guide to be generic.

The Movement Area Driver Training course is intended for airfield familiarization training and should be a review only. Proper training from your company is required prior to completing this course. This class is not for beginners.

Why do we require this training? The FAA requires all Operating Certificate holders to limit access to the movement areas only to those ground vehicles with a daily operational need. We are also required by the FAA to ensure that vehicle operators with access to the movement area are familiar with our procedures for the operation of ground vehicles and the consequences of non-compliance.

Consequences of non-compliance are:

Suspension of airfield and/or movement area driving privileges Permanent revocation of airfield and/or movement area driving privileges Criminal penalties as defined in the Atlanta City Code of Ordinances

Who is eligible for an AMA license? Only those with a daily operational need. Authorized personnel include: Airport operations, airport maintenance, ARFF, engineers and certain airline personnel, including airline mechanics and specially trained tug and tow teams.

Students that successfully complete the course, with a passing grade of 80% or better, will be issued an AMA badge as shown below. If the student is not a taxi qualified mechanic, and will be acting in a limited capacity during relocation of an aircraft (such as driving a pushback tug/tractor), a restricted license will be issued. Restricted license holders are not authorized to cross runways.

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How long is the license valid? Airport Ops, ARFF, Airport Maintenance, Engineers and FAA personnel will have to renew their license every 12 months

Airline tow teams and Mechanics repositioning aircraft will have to renew every 24 months, with the exception of Delta Air Lines, which must renew when their ATL SIDA badge expires.

Who is required to have an AMA license during an aircraft reposition? Any person that operates the aircraft, brakes, radios or tug is required to have a valid AMA license. In order to keep a sterile cockpit, anyone not integral to the reposition, or not in a training capacity, should not be allowed to ride in the cockpit or tug unless they have a valid AMA license.

What is the difference in Movement Area Training and Airport Driver Safety Training (ADST)? Movement Area Training is for those individuals that have a daily operational need to enter the AMA, for instance, airline maintenance teams that need to relocate an aircraft from a maintenance facility to the ramp.

ADST training only allows you to access the NLVR and ramp areas. Entering the AMA is strictly prohibited.

Are there any prerequisites for AMA training? Anyone attending the class, whether initial or recurrent, should be able to pass the exam prior to viewing the presentation. It is expected that you have a level of knowledge that would make you a safe operator on the movement area, as our presentation will be more of a review of what you already know, and introduction to ATL specific information.

Airline personnel are required to have completed the Taxi 101 course presented by the FAA. Airport Operations may provide the CD for this training if needed.

DOA employees need to make arrangements with your immediate supervisor for on the job training. DOA contractors and engineers can expect to be required to complete a checklist and up to 20 ride-alongs with Airside Operations during the daily airfield inspection, to better familiarize you with the AMA, during initial training.

to better familiarize you with the AMA, during initial training. ATL Airside Operations - 2 -

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Objectives

Upon completion of the AMA training course, you should be able to:

Define runway incursion and understand the importance in preventing them. Identify runways and hold positions on the movement area. Identify what side of the runway hold bar you stop on. Define what the red/white zipper marking means here at ATL and know what steps are needed to cross it. Label all 10 runways and 23 major taxiways on a blank airport diagram. Understand why aircraft always have the right of way. Identify a runway and know the color of the lights and markings, understand why they are designated with numbers and letters. Identify a taxiway and know the color of the lights and markings. Understand what a runway safety area is and why itas important to remain clear of them. Understand what the different types of signs mean and why itas important to be able to read them. Understand LAHSO and how it applies to you. Know your limitations during a SMGCS operation. Understand the Atlanta City Code of Ordinances that refer to Aviation and how to comply with them. Know the phonetic alphabet and basic aviation terminology. Discern between an east and west operation.

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Definitions

Movement Area c the runways, taxiways, and other areas of an airport that are used for taxiing, takeoff, and landing of aircraft, exclusive of loading ramps and aircraft parking areas.

Safety Area c a defined area comprised of either a runway or taxiway and the surrounding surfaces that is prepared or suitable for reducing the risk of damage to aircraft in the event of an undershoot, overshoot, or excursion from a runway or the unintentional departure from a taxiway. Figure 3 illustrates the runway safety area.

Runway (Rwy) c a rectangular paved surface on an airport designed for the take-off or landing of aircraft.

Taxiway (Twy) c a paved surface designed for the movement of aircraft from one part of an airport to another.

Acronyms

ADST - Airport Driver Safety Training AOA H Aircraft Operating Area AMA H Aircraft Movement Area ATC or ATCT H Air Traffic Control Tower ATL c three letter identifier for the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport ATIS c Automated Terminal Information Services CPTC c Central Terminal Passenger Complex. Commonly called dthe rampe. DOA c Department of Aviation for the City of Atlanta FAA c Federal Aviation Administration FBO c Fixed Base Operator (handles GA Aircraft) FOD c Foreign Object Debris/Damage GA c General Aviation H-JAIA - Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport ICAO c International Civil Aviation Organization ILS c Instrument Landing System RSA c Runway Safety Area RVR H Runway Visual Range RWY c abbreviation for Runway SMGCS H Surface Movement Guidance and Control System TOC c Delta Air Linesa Technical Operations Center (maintenance facility) TWY c abbreviation for Taxiway

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Section 1

Runway Incursions

On October 1, 2007, the FAA adopted the ICAO definition of a runway incursion. It states:

Any occurrence at an aerodrome involving the incorrect presence of an aircraft, vehicle or person on the protected area of a surface designated for the landing and take off of aircraft

Runway incursions are broken down into three categories.

1. Operational Error (OE): An error is made by an air traffic controller.

2. Pilot Deviation (PD): When a pilot enters the runway without permission.

3. Vehicle/Pedestrian Deviation (V/PD): When a person or vehicle enters the runway without permission.

Some common causes for runway incursions are miscommunications, unfamiliarity with surroundings, poor weather conditions or complacency.

Runway Incursions are a major concern at ATL. Safety is the primary goal when entering the AMA. We must always stay alert and be aware of other aircraft around us. There should be no distractions, such as listening to music, talking on a cell phone or company radio, or conversing with someone else in the cockpit/vehicle while operating on the AMA.

When operating on the AMA, itas important to listen to radio calls from ATC closely. The frequency can become very congested during the peak arrival/departure times. Itas important to make sure the call you heard was for you. If you are unsure, or did not hear your call sign, ask ATC to repeat the instructions or verify whom they are for.

In order to keep from becoming lost on the AMA, you should always carry an updated Jeppesen Chart. If you are unsure on the route given to you by ATC, you may request dprogressive taxie instructions. This will alert ATC to the fact that you are unfamiliar with the route given and will need turn-by-turn instructions.

ATL is a constantly evolving airport. We are always looking to expand, add new taxiways to improve our capacity, or to repair older components. Because of this, itas important to not become complacent while operating on the AMA. Just because youave always taken the same route to reach your location, doesnat mean the same route will be available forever. Itas important to be aware of what areas are under construction or what areas may be closed for routine maintenance. Prior to entering the AMA, you should always listen to ATIS frequency to get up-to-date airfield information.

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Section 2

Airfield Familiarization

The ATL airfield is broken up into three distinct complexes.

North Complex: includes all taxiways and runways north of the CPTC, including taxiway Golf. The north complex is depicted in red on Figure 1. Center Complex: includes all taxiways and runways south of the CPTC, and from taxiway romeo north. The center complex is depicted in green on Figure 1. South Complex: includes all taxiways and runways south of taxiway romeo. The south complex is depicted in blue on Figure 1.

Figure 1

taxiway romeo. The south complex is depicted in blue on Figure 1. Figure 1 ATL Airside

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Runways

ATL currently has five 150a wide runways. All runways are configured in an east/west direction and are depicted in black on Figure 2. Each runway has a parallel taxiway and numerous high speed taxiway turnoffs.

All runways at ATL have:

White painted markings that include edge lines and centerlines, precision approach, and runway designator markings (see Figure 2). White centerline lights that change to alternating red/white at 3,000a remaining and solid red with 1,000a remaining. White edge lights that change to amber with 2,000a remaining.

Figure 2

lights that change to amber with 2,000a remaining. Figure 2 A runway designator is determined by

A runway designator is determined by the runways magnetic heading. Think of an aircraft sitting on a runway, and visualize where its nose would be pointing on a compass. For example, if an aircraft was sitting on Rwy 9L, awaiting departure, its nose would be pointing to the east, or 090 degrees. The zeros are then dropped from the heading giving you your runway designator of Rwy 9.

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Due to the fact that we have parallel runways, our runways are paired up via complex (as depicted in Figure 1 earlier). An dLe or dRe following the runway designator is determined by the pilotas point of view. For example, if a pilot is approaching from the west towards two Rwy 9as, the left runway would be Rwy 9L and the right would be Rwy

9R.

During normal operations at ATL, each complex will have one landing and one departing runway, with the exception of the south complex. The runway that is closest to the CPTC is considered the dinboarde, and is used for departures. The runway further away, is considered the doutboarde, and is used for landings.

While working at ATL, you may hear the term deast operatione or dwest operatione. This is in reference to the flow of air traffic in and out of the airport. Aircraft always flow in the same direction. For instance, you should never see an aircraft departing Rwy 8R while another is landing Rwy 26R.

Runway Safety Area (RSA)

All runways have a 1000ax 500a safety area that surrounds them. This area must not be occupied by any objects or structures that could damage an aircraft in the event that the aircraft was to leave the runway. Figure 3 depicts the RSA dimension for ATL.

Figure 3

leave the runway. Figure 3 depicts th e RSA dimension for ATL. Figure 3 ATL Airside

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Taxiways

ATL has 22 taxiways and numerous connectors. Taxiway widths vary from 75a to 150a, with a typical width of 100a. Taxiways are shown as grey on Figure 2.

All taxiways have:

Yellow pavement markings Blue edge lights Green centerline lights

***Areas of Concern***

Twy C and D on the north complex are the main routes to the north side maintenance facilities. These taxiways cross both north complex runways. It is advised to use caution when operating in this area. As depicted in Figure 4, there is only 383a between the runways where Twy C and D intersect with Twy B. Often, ATC will give clearance to cross Rwy 8L/26R and hold short of Rwy 8R/26L, and at the same time, may advise you to dexpeditee and change frequencies. Itas important to keep your eyes scanning out of the vehicle/cockpit and to be aware of where the hold short bar is. Several runway incursions have occurred here simply because the operator wasnat ready to stop. Figure 4 gives examples of distance traveled at an average taxi speed and expedited speed.

Again, use caution while moving aircraft through this intersection - be prepared to stop

Figure 4

moving aircraft thro ugh this intersection - be prepared to stop Figure 4 ATL Airside Operations

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Whereas the runway? Figures 5 and 6 illustrate what you will see when traveling southbound on Twy D, just after exiting Rwy 8L/26R. As you can see, itas very difficult to identify runway in this intersection. Twy D is a designated SMGCS route, which means it has a 12e (wider then normal) centerline that overlaps all other markings, including runway markings. Because of the markings, the elevation differences, there appears to be no runway. Runway guard lights, both in-pavement and elevated, are located in this intersection. Be aware of where you are!

Figure 5

in this intersection. Be aware of where you are! Figure 5 Figure 6 ATL Airside Operations

Figure 6

in this intersection. Be aware of where you are! Figure 5 Figure 6 ATL Airside Operations

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Twy V is commonly referred to as dthe victor end arounde or dthe victor loope. Caution should be used while operating on this taxiway, as it slopes down and has a large turn at the bottom. It should also be noted that aircraft with a wingspan greater then 171a are restricted from using Twy V.

Figure 7

greater then 171a are restricted from using Twy V. Figure 7 Airfield Markings Pavement markings on

Airfield Markings

Pavement markings on taxiways consist of taxiway edge and center lines, holding points, critical area markings and the runway hold bar. All taxiway pavement markings are yellow. Pavement markings are reflective and can be seen at night time. Some examples can be seen in Figure 8.

Figure 8

night time. Some examples can be seen in Figure 8. Figure 8 Pavement markings on runways
night time. Some examples can be seen in Figure 8. Figure 8 Pavement markings on runways

Pavement markings on runways consist of, but arenat limited to, a runway identifier, edge lines, center lines, aiming point and precision runway markings. All runway pavement markings are white and are reflective so that they can be seen at night time.

Figure 9

white and are reflective so that they can be seen at night time. Figure 9 ATL

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Some taxiways have surface painted signs. These are painted markings that look just like the actual signs off to the side of the taxiway. They are used in areas where there may not be enough room to have a standard sign. An example is shown in Figure 8 and 10.

Figure 10

sign. An example is shown in Figure 8 and 10. Figure 10 The holding position (or

The holding position (or hold bar) marking is the most important marking on the airfield. The hold bar is made up of a double solid yellow line and a double dashed yellow line. This marking holds you short of the runway. You will always stop on the solid side of the marking. You must always remember; you can not cross a runway hold bar with out permission from ATC. All hold bars at ATL have in-pavement runway guard lights in front of them. Runway guard lights are alternating yellow flashing lights.

Figure 11

lights are alternating yellow flashing lights. Figure 11 The red and white zipper marking is a

The red and white zipper marking is a marking thatas unique to ATL. This marking is used in lieu of the movement area boundary marking. The red and white zipper marking indicates:

Beginning/ending of a taxiway Edge of the NLVR ATC clearance is required to go further

Figure 12

Edge of the NLVR ATC clearance is required to go further Figure 12 ATL Airside Operations

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Airfield Signage

There are several different types of signs located on the airfield. They include, but arenat limited to, the following:

Mandatory Instruction: Red background with white letters

o

Holds you short of a runway or critical area.

o

Also called 5runway holding position8 sign

Directional Sign: Yellow background with black letters

o Indicates directions of other taxiways leading out of an intersection

Inbound Destination: Yellow background with black letters

o Indicates direction to a major destination

black letters o Indicates direction to a major destination Location Sign : Black background with yellow
black letters o Indicates direction to a major destination Location Sign : Black background with yellow
black letters o Indicates direction to a major destination Location Sign : Black background with yellow
black letters o Indicates direction to a major destination Location Sign : Black background with yellow

Location Sign: Black background with yellow letters and border

o Identifies the taxiway or runway you are located on

o Identifies the taxiway or runway you are located on Figure 13 below illustrates some of

Figure 13 below illustrates some of the different signs you may see on the airfield. You will always see a runway holding position sign where a taxiway intersects a runway. Runway holding position signs normally have a drunway boundarye sign on the back of them. This helps you identify whether or not you are on or off of the runway.

Figure 13

you identify whether or not you are on or off of the runway. Figure 13 ATL

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ILS Critical Area

ILS Critical Areas must be dprotectede when the ceiling is less than 800a and/or the visibility is less than 2 miles. It is our responsibility, while on the AMA, to know when we should or shouldnat stop at the ILS critical area marking. Figure 11 illustrates the Rwy 8L glide slope critical area. It is important to remain clear of this so that we donat interrupt the glide slop signal that an inbound aircraft may be using to land.

When in doubt, ask ATC if the critical area is being protected.

Figure 14

ask ATC if the critical area is being protected. Figure 14 LAHSO LAHSO, which stands for

LAHSO

LAHSO, which stands for land and hold short operations, is an ATC procedure intended to increase airport capacity without compromising safety. LAHSO will be explained in more detail during the AMA Training Course.

Surface Movement Guidance Control System (SMGCS)

During periods of low visibility due to fog or snow, ATL will implement its SMGCS plan. Once the RVR readings drop below 600a, landing traffic will be sent to Rwy 9R (Category IIIB) and a Follow Me truck will be deployed to escort aircraft into the gate areas. Itas important to know that when the SMGCS plan is initiated, ground vehicle operations on the movement area will not be authorized. This includes aircraft repositioning.

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FOD

FOD, which stands for Foreign Object Debris or Foreign Object Damage, is a major concern at ATL. While it is the responsibility of all airport personnel to reduce FOD, FOD on the movement area is the responsibility of Airport Operations. While operating in the movement area, if FOD is spotted, do not attempt to maneuver or chase the debris. Report all FOD to the ATCT or Airport Operations.

debris. Report all FOD to the ATCT or Airport Operations. Aircraft Repositioning and Disabled Aircraft For

Aircraft Repositioning and Disabled Aircraft

For Airline personnel, an ATL AMA license grants you permission to relocate aircraft ONLY. You may not use your license to enter the movement area for any other reason. Tugs, baggage carts and ground servicing equipment are strictly prohibited from enter the movement area.

Consequently, airline mechanics or other personnel are not authorized to respond to a disabled aircraft on the movement area. You must first coordinate with Airport Operations for an escort. We are here 24/7/365 and can be reached via the numbers on your AMA badge.

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City Codes

The City of Atlanta has several codes listed in Section 22 pertaining directly to the airport. Atlanta Police Department has the authority to enforce the codes as they see fit. Listed below are codes that may directly affect you.

Section 22-168. Taxiing and ground rules.

(a) No aircraft engine shall be started or run at the airport unless a pilot or a certified airframe and powerplant mechanic qualified to run the engines of that particular type of aircraft is attending the controls. (b) Aircraft at the airport shall perform warm-up or prolonged engine test operations only in approved areas. (City Blast Fence/Delta TOC/Northwest hangar) (m) All aircraft being taxied, towed or otherwise moved at the airport shall proceed with navigation lights on during the hours between sunset and sunrise. (n) Aircraft engines shall be started or operated only in the places designated for such purposes by the aviation general manager. Engine run-ups for test or maintenance purposes between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. shall be permitted only in specific locations approved by the aviation general manager for such purposes during such period. Note: City Blast Fence is closed between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. (t) No person or individual shall push back or power back any aircraft from gate areas unless at least two wing walkers are deployed. The wing walkers shall position themselves on each side of the aircraft to exercise pedestrian and vehicle control. No person or individual shall put into motion or cause to be put into motion any aircraft in such a manner that the movement of such aircraft presents an endangerment to persons or property (l) All vehicles operating on or across taxiways or runways shall be equipped with a two-way radio and must be in continuous communication with the control tower, except when under escort by a vehicle properly authorized and equipped. (m) Aircraft shall at all times have the right-of-way over other vehicular traffic. All vehicles shall pass to the rear of taxiing aircraft

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Section 3

Communications

It is essential to use proper aviation terminology when talking with ATC while accessing the movement areas. As always, safety is the main concern. Use of CB jargon or 10- codes is strictly prohibited. It is imperative that all personnel responsible for aircraft movements be thoroughly familiar with ATC procedures and radio phraseology, especially those terms that are specific to ATL. Use of correct radio techniques will reduce frequency congestion, allow for a more efficient flow of aircraft movements, reduce miscommunications, and reduce the risk of a runway incursion.

Talking to ethe Towerf

The primary frequency for communications on the movement area is called ground control. There are several positions in the tower that you may talk to, including dgrounde, dtowere, and dmeteringe. Although you are talking to controllers in the tower, you wonat always be talking to the person working the dtowere position (known to controllers as dlocal controle). When entering the movement area, your first and primary contact will be ground control. Each subsequent frequency will be provided by the controller you are talking to, via a frequency change advisory.

When communicating on the FAA frequencies, itas important to keep your transmissions short and to the point. Being the worldas busiest airport means we can have well over 100 aircraft on the AOA at one time. This equates to congested frequencies which can in turn lead to many pilots trying to key their radios at once. Always listen before you speak. Never speak until you know what you want to say. Never take more time transmitting then necessary, you never know when ATC may need to stop someone from crossing a runway.

Initial Call to ATC

When making your initial call to ATC, you should always use the who/who/where format. Even though FAA Taxi 101 teaches you who/who/where/what format, as stated earlier, the frequencies at ATL are extremely congested, so we must not convey too much information to ATC until we have their full attention.

Who you are calling

o 5Atlanta ground8

Who you are

o 5Tug 18 5Airport 5 Alpha8

Where you are

o 5Ramp 4 north8 5Delta North8

Example: 5Atlanta ground, Airport 5 Alpha, at ramp 4 north8 from ATC before stating your intentions.

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Phonetic Alphabet

The use of the ICAO standard phonetic alphabet is required at ATL, with the exception of one letter; D. Due to ATL being the home base of Delta Air Lines, itas been agreed upon with ATC to not use the phonetic ddeltae when referring to D, instead, we use ddixiee. Refrain from using police terms, such as dadame and dbakere, proper use would be dalphae and dbravoe. Figure 15 provides a listing of the phonetic alphabet and is a guide to proper pronunciation of letters and numbers.

Figure 15

Character

Word

Pronunciation

A

Alpha

ALFAH

B

Bravo

BRAHVOH

C

Charlie

CHARLEE

D

Dixie

DIKSEE

E

Echo

ECKOH

F

Foxtrot

FOKSTROT

G

Golf

GOLF

H

Hotel

HOHTELL

I

India

INDEE AH

J

Juliett

JEWLEE ETT

K

Kilo

KEYLOH

L

Lima

LEEMAH

M

Mike

MIKE

N

November

NOVEMBER

O

Oscar

OSSCAH

P

Papa

PAHPAH

Q

Quebec

KEHBECK

R

Romeo

ROWME OH

S

Sierra

SEEAIRAH

ATC Frequencies

Character

Word

Pronunciation

T

Tango

TANGGO

U

Uniform

YOUNEE FORM

V

Victor

VIKTAH

W

Whiskey

WISSKEY

X

X-ray

ECKSRAY

Y

Yankee

YANGKEY

Z

Zulu

ZOOLOO

0

Zero

ZE-RO

1

One

WUN

2

Two

TOO

3

Three

TREE

4

Four

FOW-ER

5

Five

FIFE

6

Six

SIX

7

Seven

SEV-EN

8

Eight

AIT

9

Nine

NIN-ER

There are 10 main frequencies that you may communicate on while operating on the movement area. Below, you will find the listings for those frequencies.

North Complex

Center Complex

South Complex

 

Ground

121.90

Ground

121.75

Ground

_

121.65

Tower 8L/26R

119.1

Tower 9R/27L

119.3

Tower 10/28

119.5

Tower 8R/26L

125.32

Tower 9L/27R

123.85

Metering

121.0

Metering

118.65

ATIS Dep.

125.55

ATIS Arr.

119.65

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Ramp Tower

If repositioning an aircraft via a Terminal Ramp, it will be necessary to contact Ramp Control on the corresponding frequency:

Ramp 1

131.45

Ramp 4

130.07

Ramp 2

131.85

Ramp 5

129.37

Ramp 3

129.27

Ramp 6

131.37

All ramp and ATC frequencies can be found on your Jeppesen Chart, a copy of which will be provided during the AMA Training Course.

General Rules and Guidelines to Follow While Moving Aircraft

Ensure that you have the latest airport information, obtained from the ATIS frequency. It is important to know what areas are closed, to be aware of any possible frequency changes and to know the current weather conditions (ceiling and visibility). Itas important to have a route planned out ahead of time, but ATC may have to reroute you due to construction activity of congestion on taxiways.

Always read back holding instructions, including your call sign and runway designator. This is mandatory. Use the correct phraseology, including the phonetic alphabet. Remember, no 10- codes, slang or CB jargon. Speak clearly. Maintain a sterile cockpit. Do not allow other people that may be with you to distract you. Refrain from conversations unless they apply to the task at hand. Ensure that you are on the correct frequency, and continuously monitor. If you are unsure of your location, or get lost, stop and advise ATC. Give way to aircraft and emergency vehicles. Advise ATC or DOA Ops of FOD or any other abnormalities on the movement area. If an instruction wasnat understood, ask ATC to dsay againe. If your taxi route takes you to an unfamiliar location on the airfield, ask for a dprogressivee. ATC will then provide you with turn by turn instructions.

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AMA Training Guide

Aviation Terminology

Listed below are some of the common terms you may here while accessing the movement area, along with an explanation.

Acknowledge: Let me know that you have received and understood my message Affirmative: Yes Clear: Avoid using this phrase, use dexitinge or doffe instead Expedite: Used by ATC when prompt compliance is required to avoid an imminent situation. Go Ahead: Proceed with your message c does not mean approved Hold Short: Stop at the location assigned until given further instructions Immediately: Compliance with instruction is required to avoid an imminent situation Negative: No Proceed: Authorization to begin/continue on authorized routes Read Back: Repeat my message back to me Roger: I have received all of your last transmission c does not mean dyese Say Again: Used to request a repeat of the last transmission Stand By: Means the controller or pilot must pause for a few seconds, usually to attend to other duties of a higher priority. Unable: Indicates inability to comply with a specific instruction, request or clearance. Request is denied. Verify: Request confirmation of information Wilco: Will comply. I have received your message, understand it, and will comply with it. Without Delay: With a sense of urgency, proceed with approved instructions in a rapid manner

ATL Airside Operations

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AMA Training Guide

Radio Communications Failure

If your radio was to fail while operating on the movement area:

Turn your vehicle toward the tower Flash your lights on and off repeatedly Wait for the controller to signal you with the light gun DO NOT proceed until cleared by the tower

OR

Call Airport Ops for an escort at 404-530-6620

the tower OR Call Airport Ops for an escort at 404-530-6620 Light Gun Signals Steady Green

Light Gun Signals

Steady Green

 

Go, proceed, cross the Rwy or Twy

Steady Red

 

Stop

Flashing Red

Rwy or Twy Steady Red   Stop Flashing Red Clear the Rwy or Twy Alternating Red/Green

Clear the Rwy or TwyRwy or Twy Steady Red   Stop Flashing Red Alternating Red/Green Exercise extreme caution Flashing

Alternating Red/Green

Exercise extreme caution
Exercise extreme caution
Exercise extreme caution

Exercise extreme cautionFlashing White Return to starting point on airport

Exercise extreme caution

Flashing White

Return to starting point on airport
Return to starting point on airport
Return to starting point on airport

Return to starting point on airportExercise extreme caution Flashing White

Return to starting point on airport

ATL Airside Operations

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AMA Training Guide

The City of Atlanta, Department of Aviation, is the owner and operator of Hartsfield H Jackson Atlanta International Airport. The Airport Operations Division is tasked with the responsibility for the safe and efficient operations of the airport. The division operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. Any request for the City Blast Fence, airfield debris or any other assistance, contact Airport Operations at 404-530-6620 or via the Police Dispatch at 404-530-6666.

To schedule a class, contact the Airside Ops office at 404-530-6620. For electronic copies of the schedule, or to inquire about on-site training, email geoffrey.gaskin@atlanta-airport.com

This document was created on 5 June 2008 and last updated on 10 June 2008

was created on 5 June 2008 and last updated on 10 June 2008 The information contained
was created on 5 June 2008 and last updated on 10 June 2008 The information contained

The information contained herein is for the sole purpose of information and education. All information published by Airport Operations is subject to change without notice. Airport Operations is not responsible for errors or damages of any kind resulting from the use of the information contained therein. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of information presented as factual; however, errors may exist. Students are directed to countercheck facts when using this guide to study for the AMA Test. Use of this guide does not guarantee a passing score on the AMA Test.

Questions or comments on any information listed in this guide can be addressed by contacting Airport Operations at 404-530-6620 or by contacting the author at geoffrey.gaskin@atlanta-airport.com.

ATL Airside Operations

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AMA Training Guide

02^W CONCOURSE E RAMP 5 CONCOURSE D RAMP 4 CONCOURSE C RAMP 3 CONCOURSE B
02^W
CONCOURSE E
RAMP 5
CONCOURSE D
RAMP 4
CONCOURSE C
RAMP 3
CONCOURSE B
RAMP 2
CONCOURSE A
RAMP 1
CONCOURSE T
KATL/ATL
JEPPESEN
ATLANTA, GA
1026'
4 MAY 07
Apt Elev
10-9
.Eff.10.May.
HARTSFIELD-JACKSON ATLANTA INTL
N33 38.2 W084 25.7
D-ATIS
ACARS:
ATLANTA Clearance
Ground
D-ATIS
125.55
(North)
Rwys 8L/R, 26L/R
(South)
Rwys 9L/R, 27L/R
84-25
84-24
Rwys 10/28
PDC
TWIP
118.1
121.9
121.75
121.65
VOT 111.0
Tower
ATLANTA Departure (R)
Rwys 8L/26R
Rwys
Rwys8R/26L
9L/27R
Rwys 9R/27L
Rwys 10/28
Rwys 8L/R, 26L/R
Rwys 9L/R, 27L/R
Rwys 10/28
119.1
125.32
123.85
119.3
119.5
125.7
135.7
135.37
84-27
84-26
Below RVR 1200 down to
and including RVR 600,
1157'
all
taxiways
available
DAL
CARGO
except
taxiways
B2, B4,
1124'
NORTH
BLDG
RWY APPROACH
AREA HOLDING POINT
1172'
B6, B10, N5, and S South
City
1082'
GENERAL
ILS
of Rwy 9L-27R
Blast Fence
1238'
NORTH
AVIATION
HOLDING
CARGO
1128'
ILS
RAMP
1113'
1062'
HOLDING
Tanks
Tanks1123'
1117'
A13
ILS
1050'
1124'
A
A11
HOLDING
A7
A3
A5
A
8L
A
093^
1099'
Elev
9000'
26R
Elev 990'
A
1123'
DIXIE
33-39
1015'
A4
2743m
C
A6
273^
33-39
1112'
B1
B3
Aircraft
with 171'(52m)
wingspan
B5
B11B7
B13
B15
ILS
C
B
greater
than
HOLDING
B
Elev
are restricted
from
B
B
Elev 995'
H
1024'
B2
1057'
C
B4
B6
DIXIE
B
B10
using Taxiway V.
V
8R
093^
E5
10,000'
H
E1
E3
E
C
DIXIE
3048m
E13
E11
1107'
1099'
E7
E
E
E
26L
E
273^
1074'
E
F2
E10F3
C
F4
F5
RAMP 7
F
FFF
DIXIE
G
1N
2N
RAMP 6
4N
5N
3N
1357'
6N
North Deicing Pads
Control
Tower
1357'
6E
1037'
Aircraft
greater
than
214' with
(65m) wingspan
are restricted
from using Twy L east of Ramp 5
1S
2S
3S
4S
5S
6S
1014'
to the west side of Ramp
ILS
South Deicing Pads
Elev 1019'
L
6 South
South.
L
L
ARP
HOLDING
DIXIE
1056'
L1
T
L3
L6L4
L5
L7
L10
M
M
M
M
9L
27R
273^
L093^
M2
T
M4
M6
M10
SM12
M14
DIXIE
J
M16
M18
MM20
T
3624m11,889'
J
N13
N
DIXIE
K
N5
S
N
ILS
ILS
33-38
HOLDING
33-38
HOLDING
Elev 978'
J
N2
N4
N10
P
9000'
N6
N12
K
2743m
Feet
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
R3
R7
R11
27L
273^
1030'
9R
RR
R
Meters
0
200
400
600
800
0001
R6
R10
093^
R12Elev
1026'
SC
SJ
Elev 985'
VOR
1059'
84-24
1120'
SOUTH
SJ2
CARGO
CAUTION:
Pilots are
not to mist akecautioned
RAMP
the
concrete on RWY 10/ 28marked
LAND
HOLD SHORT OPERATIO NSand
SC
SJ
and taxiway SG for taxiway at
FROM
Thld Rwy 8L
Thld Rwy 9R
Thld Rwy 26R
TO
LDA
the I-285 overpass.
Twy B13
8490'2588m
SJ1
Twy J
8627'2630m
SEE TWY
INSET DETAIL
FOR RWY/
Fire
Twy H
8600'2621m
Station
SJ
SC
Thld Rwy 27L
Twy P
8600'2621m
Fire
Station
SG
SG
SG
Elev 998'
SG SG2
SG SG14
Elev 1000'
SG
SG14SG12
SG4
SG12SG6
SG16
9000'
2743m
Rwy 10-28
10
28
84-27
84-25
092^
272^
CHANGES:
Obstructions.
|
, INC.,JEPPESEN
2001,SANDERSON
2007.
RIG HTS RESERVED.ALL

KATL/ATL

KATL/ATL JEPPESEN ATLANTA, GA 20 APR 07 .Eff.26.Apr. 10-9B HARTSFIELD-JACKSON ATLANTA INTL INTERNATIONAL CONCOURSE E

JEPPESEN

KATL/ATL JEPPESEN ATLANTA, GA 20 APR 07 .Eff.26.Apr. 10-9B HARTSFIELD-JACKSON ATLANTA INTL INTERNATIONAL CONCOURSE E

ATLANTA, GA

20 APR 07

.Eff.26.Apr.

10-9B

HARTSFIELD-JACKSON ATLANTA INTL

INTERNATIONAL CONCOURSE E CONCOURSE D CONCOURSE C CONCOURSE B CONCOURSE A CONCOURSE T H E1
INTERNATIONAL CONCOURSE E
CONCOURSE D
CONCOURSE C
CONCOURSE B
CONCOURSE A
CONCOURSE T
H
E1
E3
E5
E7
V
W084-26.0
W084-25.8
W084-25.6
C
Aircraft with wingspan greater than 171'
TAXIWAY E
TAXIWAY E
D
(52m) are
from using Taxiway V .restricted
F3
F2
C
TAXIWAY F
TAXIWAY F
EYAWIXAT
N33-38.6
F4
F5
N33-38.6
T15
FAYWIXAT
1
A34
2
N
N
3
4
NN
E36
T14
A33
B36
5
N
A32
C36
B33
E34
E35
B34
T13
C34
C35
D38
A30
A31
E33
Ramp 6
B31
B32
D35
C33
D36
C32
E32
Ramp Control
A28
A29
B30
B29
D34
D33
E31
C31
131.37
T12
D
B28
C30
D32
A27
B27
D31
A26
C29
E30
E29
N33-38.5
B26
D30
B25
D29
N6
C28
C27
A24
A25
T11
B24
B23
D28
D27
E27
DIXIE
C26
C25
E28
B22
T10
B21
D26
D25
C24
C23
B20
A20
A21
B19
D23
E26
T9
Ramp 1
Ramp
Ramp2
Ramp 3
C21
Ramp 4
A19
D22
5
E14
D21
E16 E18
Ramp Control
Ramp Control
Ramp Control
Ramp Control
Ramp Control
131.45
131.85
129.37129.27
130.07
A18
T8
A16
A17
B18
B17
C20
E15 E17
E11
T7
D16
D15
A15
B15
C18
C17
B16
E12
C17A
C16
D14
D13
A12
A13
B14
T6
B13
C15
C14
D12
D11
E10
E9
6
E
A11
T5
A10
B12
B11
C12
C11
D10
D9
A9
B10
C12A
E7
A8
E8
B9
C9
N33-38.3
T4
C10
D8
D7
B8
C7A
A6
A7
B7
C7
T3
C8
D6
D5
E6
E5
B6
A5A4
B5
C5
C6
T2
D4
D3
E3
B4
E4
A2
A3
C3
B3
C1
T1
B2
A1
C4
D2
D1
B1
C1A
E1E2
21
S6
S
S
3
S
54
SS
N33-38.2
N33-38.2
TAXIWAY L
Aircraft with wingspan greater than
214' (65m) are restricted from using
Twy L east of Ramp 5 South to the
west side of Ramp 6 South.
L3
L4
L5
L10
L7
L6
T
W084-26.4
W084-26.2
W084-26.0
W084-25.8
W084-25.6
W084-25.4
M4
M6 TAXIWAY M
M12M10
S
M14

CHANGES:

Taxiway V added with restriction, notes.

| JEPPESEN SANDERSON, INC., 2001, 2007. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

RunwayRunway IncursionsIncursions JulJul 0707 22 FebFeb 0808

Incursions Incursions Jul Jul 07 07 2 2 Feb Feb 08 08 1 Sep 07 -
Incursions Incursions Jul Jul 07 07 2 2 Feb Feb 08 08 1 Sep 07 -

1 Sep 07 - A vehicle appeared from the Delta

North Area and entered Taxiway Alpha at Alpha-3 and proceeded westbound. The vehicle then crossed Runway 8L and proceeded to Taxiway Victor. Once the vehicle reached Taxiway Victor, it turned around and proceeded to cross the approach end of Runway 8L again. The vehicle then proceeded on Taxiway Alpha back to Alpha-3 where the vehicle was stopped by Airport Operations.

6 Sep 07 ) During the midnight shift, an airport

vehicle was observed by ATCT entering Runway 8L from the ARFF access road. The operator was tasked with placing the lighted X on Runway 8R, which had just been closed by Airport Ops. The driver entered the incorrect runway.

12 Aug 07 ) ASA reported a pedestrian, walking across the touchdown zone of Rwy 10, that had come within 50A of their wingtip. The individual entered the SIDA area while being pursued by local authorities. ATL Ops closed the runway while APD apprehended the individual.

Ops closed the runway while APD apprehended the individual. KEY KEY   Surface Incident (prior to

KEYKEY

 

Surface Incident (prior to Oct 07)

Vehicle/Pedestrian Deviation (V/PD)

12 Oct 07 ) An airport vehicle was observed by ATCT across

the hold bar near Taxiway A6 and Runway 26R. The operator had been given instructions to remain clear of all runways while performing routine maintenance on the Nbird cannonsP that were located outside of the RSA. After a brief exchange

with ATCT, the vehicle exited the RSA.

a brief exchange with ATCT, the vehicle exited the RSA. 19 Dec 07 ) Three ARFF
a brief exchange with ATCT, the vehicle exited the RSA. 19 Dec 07 ) Three ARFF

19 Dec 07 ) Three ARFF Strikers were responding to Taxiway Bravo 10 for a response drill. The 2 nd and 3 rd Strikers to arrive proceeded to spray agent near the hold bar. While doing so, both trucks crossed over the hold bar and into the RSA of Runway 26L. Operations were not impacted.

25

clearance to Ncross Runway 8L without delay and hold short of Runway 8RP. The operator read back Ncross Runway 8L

and hold short of Runway 8RP. The aircraft proceeded across Runway 8L and then failed to stop short of the hold short line for Runway 8R.

Oct 07 ) A CRJ operated by a non-pilot was given

20

clearance to Ncross Rwy 26L and hold short of Rwy 26RP. The operator read back the hold short instructions. After

crossing Rwy 26L, the operator continued across Rwy 26R without authorization from ATC. An ASA on final was sent around.

Jan 08 ) A CRJ operated by a non-pilot was given

The FAA defines a runway incursion as:

N Any occurrence at an aerodrome involving the incorrect presence of an aircraft, vehicle, or person on the protected area of a surface designated for the landing and take-off of aircraft.P

ForFor moremore information,information, contactcontact AirsideAirside OperationsOperations atat 404404--530530--66206620 geoffrey.gaskin@atlantageoffrey.gaskin@atlanta--airport.comairport.com