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www.smdailyjournal.com Thursday • Nov. 24, 2011 • Vol XII, Edition 85 Mixed bag for the

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www.smdailyjournal.com Thursday • Nov. 24, 2011 • Vol XII, Edition 85 Mixed bag for the economy

Thursday Nov. 24, 2011 Vol XII, Edition 85

Thursday • Nov. 24, 2011 • Vol XII, Edition 85 Mixed bag for the economy Projected

Mixed bag for the economy

Projected economic growth may be weaker than first thought

By Martin Crutsinger and Christopher S. Rugaber

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — At the start of the critical holiday shopping season, the economy received a dose of mixed news Wednesday. Consumers barely increased their spending in October, and businesses

pulled back on investment in long-last- ing manufactured goods. Still, Americans’ pay rose by the most in seven months, a sign they may spend more in coming weeks. Some economists were discouraged by the reports, especially after a separate report earlier this month showed Americans spent more on retail goods in October for the fifth straight month.

Paul Dales, a senior U.S. economist with Capital Economics, said the slower consumer spending growth and decline in business investment suggest econom- ic growth in the October-December quarter could be weaker than first thought. He now expects just 2.5 percent growth, instead of 3 percent.

See ECONOMY, Page 20

growth, instead of 3 percent. See ECONOMY , Page 20 HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL Above : Volunteers

HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL

Above: Volunteers make peanut butter and jelly sandwiches at Notre Dame de Namur University Tuesday evening in preparation for Thanksgiving. Below:Josh Aguirre and Giovanni Douresseau take meat off two of 21 turkeys.

Giving thanks for new friends

meat off two of 21 turkeys. Giving thanks for new friends By Heather Murtagh DAILY JOURNAL

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

With a glob of peanut butter on a but- ter knife-like utensil, Josh Aguirre picked up a piece of whole wheat bread and began to spread. Aguirre was one of a handful of vol- unteers around a table in the food servic- es preparation area at Notre Dame de Namur University in Belmont Tuesday night. Sandwiches are a picnic staple that students and staff came together this week to prepare. Peanut butter sand- wiches will be one of three types that will be shared with hundreds of home- less people Thanksgiving Day. This is the 19th annual “Thanksgiving in the

See GIVING, Page 16

Bigstakesforshoppingseason

By Anne D’innocenzio

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Retailers awaiting the arrival of Black Friday are on the edge. How well they do during the biggest shopping season of the year will have lasting consequences not just on them, but the still-fragile economic recovery.

See STAKES, Page 20

DA: Drunk mom took toddler to film,crashedcar

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

A woman who crashed her car three times after taking her

toddler to see The Smurfs movie in Daly City was so intoxi- cated the 4-year-old had to provide police officers with her mother’s name and the explanation that she was drunk, accord-

ing to prosecutors. While leaving the Century Theatre Aug. 19 with her daugh-

ter, Sarah Thomison Boushey, 42, of San Francisco, crashed her vehicle three times, sideswiped two cars and struck a cement median at the exit booth, according to the District Attorney’s Office.

A witness and responding police reportedly found her too

incoherent to speak but said the girl told them “Sarah” and that her mother was drunk. Daly City police reported finding a vodka bottle in her purse and a blood sample placed her blood alcohol level at .35. They were unable to immediately book her that evening because of her intoxication level and she was given a notice to appear. The child’s father picked her up at the scene.

See MOM, Page 20

South city man charged with trying to kill sister

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A South San Francisco man accused of shooting his sister in

the hand while she tried escaping the home where he was hold- ing their family hostage was angry about his deceased moth- er’s estate, according to prosecutors who charged him with attempted murder. Alvin Baja Luis, 55, of San Francisco, appeared in court Wednesday afternoon for arraignment on 24 felony charges, also including residential burglary and several counts each of felony assault with a firearm, false imprisonment and making criminal threats. The charge of premeditated attempted murder with a gun

See ATTACK, Page 20

imprisonment and making criminal threats. The charge of premeditated attempted murder with a gun See ATTACK
imprisonment and making criminal threats. The charge of premeditated attempted murder with a gun See ATTACK
imprisonment and making criminal threats. The charge of premeditated attempted murder with a gun See ATTACK
imprisonment and making criminal threats. The charge of premeditated attempted murder with a gun See ATTACK

2 Thursday Nov. 24, 2011

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“There is a great deal of difference in believing something still,and believing it again.”

 

— W.H.Auden,British poet (1907-1973).

This Day in History

1971

A hijacker calling himself “Dan Cooper” (but who became popularly known as “D.B. Cooper”) parachuted from a Northwest Orient Airlines 727 somewhere over the Pacific Northwest after receiving $200,000 dollars in ran- som — his fate remains unknown.

In 1784, Zachary Taylor, the 12th president of the United States, was born in Orange County, Va. In 1859, British naturalist Charles Darwin published “On the Origin of Species,” which explained his theory of evolution by means of natural selection. In 1863, the Civil War Battle of Lookout Mountain began in Tennessee; Union forces succeeded in taking the mountain from the Confederates. In 1939, British Overseas Airways Corp. (BOAC) was formal- ly established. In 1941, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Edwards v. California, unanimously struck down a California law prohibiting people from bringing impoverished non-residents into the state. In 1950, the musical “Guys and Dolls,” based on the writings of Damon Runyon and featuring songs by Frank Loesser, opened on Broadway. In 1963, Jack Ruby shot and mortally wounded Lee Harvey Oswald, the accused assassin of President John F. Kennedy, in

a

scene captured on live television.

 

In 1969, Apollo 12 splashed down safely in the Pacific. In 1987, the United States and the Soviet Union agreed on terms to scrap shorter- and medium-range missiles. In 1991, rock singer Freddie Mercury died in London at age 45 of AIDS-related pneumonia. Ten years ago: A Swiss Crossair airliner carrying 33 people crashed near Zurich, killing 24, including American pop singer Melanie Thornton. British actress Rachel Gurney, who’d played Lady Marjorie Bellamy on the popular television series “Upstairs Downstairs,” died at age 81.

 

Birthdays

“Upstairs Downstairs,” died at age 81.   Birthdays Actor-comedian Billy Connolly is 69. Actress Katherine
“Upstairs Downstairs,” died at age 81.   Birthdays Actor-comedian Billy Connolly is 69. Actress Katherine
“Upstairs Downstairs,” died at age 81.   Birthdays Actor-comedian Billy Connolly is 69. Actress Katherine

Actor-comedian Billy Connolly is 69.

Actress Katherine Heigl is 33.

Actress Sarah Hyland is 21.

Basketball Hall of Famer Oscar Robertson is 73. Country singer Johnny Carver is 71. Former NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue is 71. Rock-and-roll drummer Pete Best is 70. Rock musician Donald “Duck” Dunn (Booker T. & the MG’s) is 70. Former White House

news secretary Marlin Fitzwater is 69. Motion Picture Association

of

America Chairman Dan Glickman is 67. Singer Lee Michaels is

66. Actor Dwight Schultz is 64. Actor Stanley Livingston is 61. Rock musician Clem Burke (Blondie; The Romantics) is 57. Record producer Terry Lewis is 55. Actor Ruben Santiago-Hudson

is

55. Actress Denise Crosby is 54. Actress Shae D’Lyn is 49. Rock

musician John Squire (The Stone Roses) is 49.

 
musician John Squire (The Stone Roses) is 49.   REUTERS Andrew Cotton of Britain rides a

REUTERS

Andrew Cotton of Britain rides a wave during a tow-in surfing competition in Nazare,Portugal.

Farmers crack down on rash of pecan thieves

SAVANNAH, Ga. — Hired by farmers as a private security guard, Brooks Rucker patrols thousands of acres of Georgia farmland on the lookout for thieves toting 5-gallon buckets. He rarely comes up empty handed. Since the fall harvest began Oct. 1, Rucker says, he and two other guards have caught more than 160 culprits in the act. Some they let go. Others get handed over to police. Either way, he’s recovered thousands of dollars’ worth of stolen goods: mounds of pecans snatched from his employers’ trees. “It’s an all-day hassle trying to keep these folks out,” said Rucker. “You’ll pull into a pecan grove and they’ll have a 10-foot extension ladder trying to shake the pecans loose with poles. It’s bad.” At a time when farmers should be giv- ing thanks for pecans selling at record prices, they’re instead cracking down on thieves. One sheriff in pecan-growing country says his department gets several calls a week reporting pecan snatchers, while the prosecutor in the area antici- pates prosecuting dozens of pecan-theft cases. It’s not just pecan pies and other nutty goodies driving demand so close to the holidays. Prices have soared as China has developed an insatiable appetite for pecans, while withering drought in the southern U.S. has limited supplies.

In other news

In Georgia, the nation’s top pecan pro- ducer, farmers and authorities say crimi- nals can earn a tidy profit by stealing the nuts — worth $1.50 or more per pound in smaller quantities. Pecan grower Bucky Geer estimates a single 5-gallon bucketful is worth about $38. “Some of these pecans are approach- ing a nickel in value apiece,” said Geer, whose neighbor set up surveillance cam- eras after a theft. “It makes them too tempting to steal.” Geer and six other farmers in south- west Georgia’s Mitchell County hired Rucker and his friends to watch their combined 7,500 acres of pecan groves during the fall harvest, which runs through December. The farmers pay the men, all of them volunteer firefighters, about $2,100 a week total. Under Georgia law, it’s a felony to steal more than $500 worth of a crop from a farmer’s land. Joe Mulholland, district attorney for the five-county judi- cial circuit that includes Mitchell County, anticipates that he’ll prosecute dozens of pecan theft cases after the har- vest. “A significant number of them will be felonies,” he said. Duke Lane, chairman of the Georgia Pecan Growers Association, said the pre- cautions are worth it. Pecan groves can cover hundreds, even thousands, of rural acres where there often aren’t people around to spot thieves. And stolen nuts are easy to offload. Roadside stands are buying them to

sell to passing motorists, Lane said. Owners of rural businesses from gas sta- tions to hardware stores act as middle- men, buying smaller amounts until they accumulate enough to sell to food processors. “We’re losing a lot of money,” said Lane, who notes that pecan thieves have been a problem before, but seem more aggressive than ever this year. “You could easily steal $1,000 worth of nuts in one night.”

Students no longer need to give professor snacks

SACRAMENTO — A California uni- versity professor can no longer demand snacks from students taking his psychol- ogy classes. Sacramento State professor George Parrott has demanded snacks from his students for 39 years. Students were told of the snack demand on the first day of class. But two weeks ago he walked out of his Psychology 101 lab class because there were no snacks. University spokeswoman Kimberly Nava says members of the psychology department at California State University, Sacramento decided Parrott’s decision to walk out of class was unac- ceptable and the dean told him to stop. The Sacramento Bee reports Parrott’s requirement was his way of encouraging students to work collectively, among other things.

students to work collectively, among other things. THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

KTYCA

letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. KTYCA ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All
letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. KTYCA ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

 

AHTIB

 
 
   
   
 
   

SULSME

 
   
     
     
 

EINAGD

   
   
   
   
Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble
Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: Jumbles: (Answers tomorrow) FRONT BAGGY MINNOW PADDED Yesterday’s Answer: Even with one, the
Answer:
Jumbles:
(Answers tomorrow)
FRONT BAGGY MINNOW PADDED
Yesterday’s
Answer: Even with one, the thousand-dollar store was not

going to be a success — GRAND OPENING

Lotto

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Nov. 19 Super Lotto Plus
Daily three midday
4 18
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33 39
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Mega number
Daily three evening
Fantasy Five
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1
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three evening Fantasy Five 3 9 1 7 13 14 18 22 The DAily Derby race

The DAily Derby race winners are Lucky Charms, No.12,in first place;Eureka,No.7,in second place; and Lucky Star,No.2,in third place.The race time was clocked at 1:45.70.

Local Weather Forecast

Thanksgiving Day: Rain likely. Highs in the mid 50s. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph. Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming mostly cloudy. A slight chance of showers in the evening. Lows in the lower 40s. Northwest winds 5

to 15 mph. Friday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s. Northwest

winds around 5 mph.

Friday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the lower 40s. Northwest

winds around 5 mph in the evening

Saturday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the lower 60s. Saturday night through Sunday night: Mostly cloudy. Lows

in the lower 40s. Highs near 60. Monday: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of showers.

Becoming light.

The San Mateo Daily Journal

800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402

Publisher: Jerry Lee jerry@smdailyjournal.com

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twitter.com/smdailyjournal

Editor in Chief: Jon Mays jon@smdailyjournal.com

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Delivery:

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(650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290 ads@smdailyjournal.com calendar@smdailyjournal.com news@smdailyjournal.com circulation@smdailyjournal.com info@smdailyjournal.com

As a public service,the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries,email information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style,clarity,length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed more than once,longer than 250 words or without editing,please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Thursday Nov. 24, 2011

3

ATM thief withdraws not guilty plea

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

An ATM maintenance man accused of pocketing approximately $200,000 by filling the machines on Independence Day with pho- tocopied and counterfeit $20 bills could him- self be deposited in jail. Samuel Gregory Kioskli , 64, pleaded no contest yesterday to a reduced number of charges to avoid trial later this month on counts of burglary, embezzlement, possession of counterfeit bills and forging documents. Instead, Kioskli pleaded no contest to felony counts of embezzlement and possession of a fictitious check. He will be ordered to pay full restitution and will serve no more than 16 months prison when sentenced Jan. 10. Kioskli, of San Francisco, worked for Diebold, the company that services the auto- matic teller machines for Bank of America. On July 4, 2010 — a bank holiday — he allegedly visited six ATMs in San Francisco and another in Daly City to steal approxi- mately $200,000 by replacing the real cash

to steal approxi- mately $200,000 by replacing the real cash Samuel Kioskli with photocopies of bills.

Samuel Kioskli

with photocopies of bills. Each time, surveillance video reportedly caught Kioskli using his work card key to enter the machines. The next day, Kioskli’s wife filed a missing per- sons report and the ATM thefts were discovered

when customers com- plained about receiving the counterfeit money during transactions. Kioskli remained at large until May 11, 2011 when an Arizona officer turned up his Daly City arrest warrant during a traffic stop in Phoenix. San Francisco has yet to file its charges against Kioskli. Although that county has more charges pending against him, San Mateo County had first dibs on prosecution because its warrant is the one that caught

Kioskli. Kioskli remains in custody in lieu of $25,000 bail.

Police reports

Footloose

A woman wearing high heels was danc- ing around a store on the first block of Bovet Road in San Mateo before 6:32 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17.

FOSTER CITY

Petty theft. A catalytic converter valued at $300 was taken on Edgewater Boulevard before 9:08 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 22. Fraud. A woman reported that there were unauthorized online purchases to her check- ing account on Moonsail Lane before 9:44 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 22. ID theft. Identity theft was reported on Surfbird Isle before 2:33 p.m. Monday, Nov.

21.

Bike theft. Two bikes worth $1,700 were taken from a parking garage before 7:19 a.m. Monday, Nov. 21. Petty theft. Four men who were seen break- ing into vehicles were found in possession of two GPS units and an iPod and were arrested

on Rock Harbor Lane before 9:20 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 20. Bicycle theft. A locked bicycle worth $100 was stolen from a carport at Sand Cove Apartments on Bounty Drive before 8:38 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 19.

BELMONT

Illegal dumping. Someone reported seeing a

person dumping garbage into the trash bins of

a shopping center on Alameda de las Pulgas

before 1:13 p.m. Monday, Nov. 21. Theft. A front license plate was taken from a car on Middle Road before 4:07 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 19. Theft. The rear license plate was taken from a car on Elmer Street before 4:37 p.m. Friday, Nov. 18. Burglary. A home was ransacked on Chesterton Avenue before 12:17 p.m. Friday, Nov. 18.

MILLBRAE

Burglary. A car was broken into and a print-

er was taken from the trunk on the 1300 block of El Camino Real before 10:47 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 19.

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4

Thursday Nov. 24, 2011

THE DAILY JOURNAL

* Some exclusions apply * * Redeem mall receipts dated 11/25/11 at the redemption area

* Some exclusions apply

*

* Redeem mall receipts dated 11/25/11 at the redemption area by Dressbarn from 6am-noon. Limited

* Redeem mall receipts dated 11/25/11 at the redemption area by Dressbarn from 6am-noon. Limited to one gift check per person. Must be 18 or older with a valid I.D. Receipts from JCPenney, Sears and Target do not qualify. Mall gift checks and bags are avaialable while supplies last. Offer only available on 11/25/11.

and Target do not qualify. Mall gift checks and bags are avaialable while supplies last. Offer
and Target do not qualify. Mall gift checks and bags are avaialable while supplies last. Offer

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/STATE/NATION

Thursday Nov. 24, 2011

5

Protests cost nation’s cities $13M

By Meghan Barr and Ryan J. Foley

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — During the first two months of the nationwide Occupy protests, the movement that is demanding more out of the wealthiest Americans cost local tax- payers at least $13 million in police overtime and other municipal serv- ices, according to a survey by the Associated Press. The heaviest financial burden has fallen upon law enforcement agen- cies tasked with monitoring march- es and evicting protesters from out- door camps. And the steepest costs by far piled up in New York City and Oakland where police clashed with protesters on several occa- sions. The AP gathered figures from government agencies in 18 cities with active protests and focused on costs through Nov. 15, the day pro- testers were evicted from New York City’s Zuccotti Park, where the protests began Sept. 17 before spreading nationwide.

the protests began Sept. 17 before spreading nationwide. REUTERS Jessica O’Donnell holds a sign at an

REUTERS

Jessica O’Donnell holds a sign at an Occupy L.A.protest on the lawn in front of Los Angeles City Hall.

Internet memes sprouting around Occupy movement

By Jake Coyle

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Call it the Meme Movement. Whatever degree of success achieved by the Occupy protests, it’s largely been based on its old-fash- ioned, off-line demonstrations. They’ve been decidedly beyond vir- tual, staking out real ground in downtown Manhattan’s Zuccotti Park and forging signs-and-sit-in protests around the country. Some of its founding members even dis- dain online interaction.

But the protests — the country’s first large-scale demonstrations led largely by a generation raised on the Internet — were originally con- ceived of as “the Occupy Wall Street meme” and made its name by its website: OccupyWallStreet.org. The protests went viral, but they’ve also spawned all kinds of more playful Internet memes that highlight the dual nature of the Web to an American protest movement. Though the Internet is an essential tool for amplifying a message, it inevitably leads toward frivolity and parody.

UC chancellor under fire for pepper-spray incident

By Terence Chea and Judy Lin

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DAVIS — Linda Katehi was a col- lege student in her native Greece in 1973 when the government used guns and tanks to crack down on campus demonstrations against mili- tary rule. Thirty-eight years later, the chan- cellor of the University of California, Davis is under intense pressure fol- lowing a crackdown last week on stu- dent protesters who set up an Occupy camp on campus. Anger has mounted since online videos showed police officers dous-

mounted since online videos showed police officers dous- Linda Katehi ing a row of pro- testers

Linda Katehi

ing a row of pro- testers with pep- per spray as they sat passively on the ground with their arms linked. Youtube videos of Friday’s inci- dent have been watched millions

of times. Katehi, 57, is now fighting calls for her resignation from students and fac- ulty, condemnations from state law- makers, and mass protests on her 32,000-student campus, the third largest in the prestigious UC system.

Around the state

Bills to target child abuse reporting laws

SACRAMENTO — Two California state lawmakers said Wednesday they plan to introduce bills designed to prevent the type of sexual molestation scandal that has rocked Penn State University. State Sen. Juan Vargas wants to hold coaches at all public and pri- vate colleges accountable for report- ing instances of sexual abuse, while legislation planned by Assemblyman Ricardo Lara would strip nonprofits of their tax-exempt status if they are caught concealing, fostering or failing to report the sex- ual abuse of children.

GOP sues in fed court over congressional map

SACRAMENTO — A Republican group led by former congressman George Radanovich has filed a fed- eral lawsuit over California’s newly drawn congressional maps, after the state Supreme Court previously declined to take up a challenge.

Local brief

Rollover crash blocks traffic on 101

A rollover crash on Highway 101

Wednesday morning blocked traffic

in both directions for a couple of hours near San Francisco International Airport. The crash was reported at 6:12 a.m. just south of Interstate 380, California Highway Patrol Officer Kevin Bartlett said.

A northbound vehicle overturned

and landed in southbound lanes. No other vehicles appear to have been involved. The driver suffered cuts and bruis- es and possibly a broken jaw, Bartlett said. The crash initially shut down lanes on both sides of the highway. Northbound lanes reopened at about 7:20 a.m., and southbound lanes reopened at about 7:40 a.m.

sides of the highway. Northbound lanes reopened at about 7:20 a.m., and southbound lanes reopened at
sides of the highway. Northbound lanes reopened at about 7:20 a.m., and southbound lanes reopened at
sides of the highway. Northbound lanes reopened at about 7:20 a.m., and southbound lanes reopened at
sides of the highway. Northbound lanes reopened at about 7:20 a.m., and southbound lanes reopened at

6 Thursday Nov. 24, 2011

LOCAL/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Obituary

Zacharia Paul Pineda

Zacharia Paul Pineda, born Aug. 30, 1968, died suddenly Nov. 20, 2011. A native Californian, he loved the Bay Area and found much happiness in settling in Burlingame. Zac loved sports, especially his beloved Raiders, Giants and mixed martial arts. An avid wrestler at Capuchino High School and San Francisco State University, love of this sport continued with his volunteer coaching at Burlingame High School. Regular trips to Sturgis on his beloved Harley combined friend- ships and honored his dad, Louie Pineda. “Always there to help, his devotion to friends stretched a network of survivors far and wide but his biggest pride was his wife and children. There could not have been a more loving hus- band or devoted father. He loved the weekends, his son’s soccer games, a run with his wife and pitbull or father-son wrestling; these were the pleasures that brought a deep joy to Zac. Always the loving father, husband and friend, his life touched many and his passing will leave a deep void in many that were fortu- nate to have him in their life.” Family survivors include his wife Lisa and sons Calvin and Jameson, his mother Patti Pineda and brother Gabriel, his aunts Theresa, Gloria, Lydia, Lolly and uncles Mark, Te, Brian and Paul and his cousins Amanda, Thomas, Jake, Cecilia, Paul, Lana, Julia and Alex. His life celebration will be held 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Nov. 2 6 at the El k s Lodge, 9 38 Wilmington Ave., Emerald Hills. In lieu of owers, a trust has been set up for Zac’s sons and donations will be received at the celebra- tion.

As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing. To submit obituaries, email informa- tion along with a jpeg photo to news@smdai- lyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com. HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL Penny enjoys a delicious

HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL

Penny enjoys a delicious Thanksgiving-themed meal created by Peninsula Humane Services volunteer Jeff Bratu on Wednesday.The frozen ‘pupkin’pies include turkey broth, sweet po- tatoes,pumpkin,peanut butter and broccoli.

Shelter puppies get Thanksgiving treats

BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

Dogs at the Peninsula Humane Society in B urlingame were served a special canine ver - sion of pumpk in pie Wednesday afternoon. At 1 :3 0 p.m., staff and volunteers at the PHS’ new Tom and Annette Lantos Center For Compassion served up Thank sgiving pump k in treats for dogs who are without a home this

holiday season, PHS spo k esman Scott Delucchi said. The doggie pies, invented by PHS volunteer

J eff B ratu, are made up of turkey broth, water,

canned pumpk in, peanut butter and broccoli froz en into a dog- biscuit pie crust. The “pupsicle” pies were specially created as a healthy pre- Than k sgiving treat for all the dogs at the shelter looking for homes.

Supercommittee failure not good for election year

By Jim Kuhnhenn

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON The failure of Congress’ decit-reduction supercommittee adds a new

dimension to the 2012 political contests, drawing political battle lines around broad ta x increases and massive spending cuts that now are scheduled to begin automatically in 2013. President Barack Obama and his Republican chal- lenger will be forced to

debate alternatives for reducing decits, made all the more urgent by the looming consequences of congressional inaction. The dividing lines already are sharply drawn, with Obama supporting decit reduc- tion that includes a mix of spending cuts and ta x increases on the wealthy, while Republicans have declared themselves averse to tax hikes. An election that has been shaping up as a ref- erendum on Obama’s stewardship of the econ- omy now will require the candidates to offer competing forward-looking decit-reduction plans to avoid cuts and tax hikes that neither side wants to see materialize. For Obama, that is a more favorable place to be, drawing contrasts with his opponent and arguing for higher taxes on the rich rather than defending his oversight of an economy that could still be suffering from high unemploy- ment and slow growth next November. Beginning in 2013, the federal government faces two oncoming trains. When the super- committee was unable to nd agreement by Wednesday, it triggered spending cuts of $1.2 trillion starting in January 2013 and extending over 10 years.

starting in J anuary 201 3 and e x tending over 10 years. Barack Obama Attn:

Barack Obama

J anuary 201 3 and e x tending over 10 years. Barack Obama Attn: MEDICARE Enrollees
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PUBLIC AUCTION

CONFISCATED ASSETS FOR VIOLATION OF LAWS

This seized and confiscated merchandise obtained from gov’t held auctions will be offered at this one day auction with other fine jewelry items which constitutes the majority of items.

ALL JEWELRY IS G.I.A., E.G.L. OR A.I.G. CERTIFIED

DIAMOND SOLITAIRES ROLEX WATCHES
DIAMOND
SOLITAIRES
ROLEX
WATCHES
OR A.I.G. CERTIFIED DIAMOND SOLITAIRES ROLEX WATCHES DIAMOND STUD EARRINGS PEARLS OVER 400 ITEMS •LOT 2:

DIAMOND STUD

EARRINGS

DIAMOND SOLITAIRES ROLEX WATCHES DIAMOND STUD EARRINGS PEARLS OVER 400 ITEMS •LOT 2: •LOT11:

PEARLS

SOLITAIRES ROLEX WATCHES DIAMOND STUD EARRINGS PEARLS OVER 400 ITEMS •LOT 2: •LOT11: •LOT54:
OVER 400 ITEMS

OVER 400 ITEMS

•LOT 2:

•LOT11:

•LOT54:

•LOT125:

•LOT214:

•LOT391:

Auctioneer’s Note 19.17ct Diamond Bracelet 4.02ct Diamond Solitaire 30.54ct Emerald Necklace 26.40ct Oval ShapedSapphire 4.01ct Alexandrite Ring 6.78ct Diamond Earrings

Diamond Solitaire 30.54ct Emerald Necklace 26.40ct Oval ShapedSapphire 4.01ct Alexandrite Ring 6.78ct Diamond Earrings
Diamond Solitaire 30.54ct Emerald Necklace 26.40ct Oval ShapedSapphire 4.01ct Alexandrite Ring 6.78ct Diamond Earrings
Diamond Solitaire 30.54ct Emerald Necklace 26.40ct Oval ShapedSapphire 4.01ct Alexandrite Ring 6.78ct Diamond Earrings
Diamond Solitaire 30.54ct Emerald Necklace 26.40ct Oval ShapedSapphire 4.01ct Alexandrite Ring 6.78ct Diamond Earrings
Diamond Solitaire 30.54ct Emerald Necklace 26.40ct Oval ShapedSapphire 4.01ct Alexandrite Ring 6.78ct Diamond Earrings

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HANDBAGS GUARANTEED GENUINE P R A D A BALENCIAGA CHANEL MARC JACOBS EMERALDS TANZANITES SAPPHIRES RUBIES

MARC JACOBS

EMERALDS TANZANITES SAPPHIRES RUBIES LOUIS VUITTON DIAMOND BRACELETS
EMERALDS
TANZANITES
SAPPHIRES
RUBIES
LOUIS VUITTON
DIAMOND
BRACELETS
SAPPHIRES RUBIES LOUIS VUITTON DIAMOND BRACELETS G U C C I Sunday, November 27th Auction 1:00

GUCCI

Sunday, November 27th

Auction 1:00 PM • Preview 12:00 Noon

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101 South exit Burlingame / Broadway. Follow 101 overpass, turn right on Old Bayshore, turn left on Airport Blvd, turn left on Anza Blvd. Or, from 101 North, exit Anza Blvd.

Terms: Cash, All Major Credit Cards. Auction conducted by Flawless, Inc. For more info call 1-818-348-2812. Auction not affiliated with any government agencies.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/NATION

Thursday Nov. 24, 2011

7

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/NATION Thursday • Nov. 24, 2011 7 E xactly 1,111 items of food

E xactly 1,111 items of food were deliv- ered to Second Harvest or set aside for Samaritan House’s holiday food

drive by the Congregational Church of Belmont this week as the church celebrated the United Church of Christ’s Mission:1 project. The project, which culminated on 11-11-11, focused on hunger issues worldwide. Besides gathering non-perishable food — more than 700 pounds of it — the Belmont congregation also wrote 111 letters to its members of Congress, urging support for a variety of hunger-related programs, and raised $1,111 for hunger-action purposes with agencies of justice and compassion throughout the United

States and East African famine relief ministries. All the United Church of Christ congregations in the U.S. gathered 1,111,111 food items, wrote 11,111

letters and raised $111,111 for hunger-focused social welfare agencies. Last week, members of the Belmont church took a more personal approach to hunger action by sorting food at Second Harvest, an activity they plan to make a regu- lar occurrence.

an activity they plan to make a regu- lar occurrence. COUNTY GOVERNMENT • The San Mateo
COUNTY GOVERNMENT • The San Mateo County Board of Supervisors will hold a spe- cial

COUNTY GOVERNMENT

• The San Mateo County Board of Supervisors will hold a spe- cial meeting to authorize an agreement with former county manager John Maltbie who was named acting county manager until a per- manent replacement is found. Current County Manager David Boesch is leaving at the end of the year but Maltbie will assume the interim position the beginning of next month. At the same meeting, the board will authorize a property tax exchange with Daly City for two dozen parcels which are being annexed. The Board of Supervisors meets 9 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 29 in Board Chambers, 400 County Government Center, Redwood City.

Board Chambers, 400 County Government Center, Redwood City. Medicare chief stepping aside in political impasse By

Medicare chief stepping aside in political impasse

By Ricardo ALonso-Zaldivar

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The point man for car- rying out President Barack Obama’s health care law will be stepping down after Republicans succeeded in blocking his confir- mation by the Senate, the White House announced Wednesday. Medicare chief Don Berwick, a Harvard professor widely respected for his ideas on how to improve the health care system, became the most prominent casualty of the political wars over a health care overhaul whose constitutionality will be now decided by the Supreme Court. Praising Berwick for “outstanding work,” White House deputy press secretary Jamie Smith criticized Republicans for “putting political interests above the best interests of the American people.” Berwick will be replaced by his principal

people.” Berwick will be replaced by his principal Don Berwick deputy, Marilyn Tavenner, formerly Virginia’s

Don Berwick

deputy, Marilyn Tavenner, formerly Virginia’s top health care official. The White House said Obama will submit Tavenner’s nomination to the Senate. Tavenner has been at Medicare since early last year, earning a reputation as a problem solver with

years of real-world experi- ence and an extensive network of industry contacts. A nurse by training, the 60-year-old Tavenner worked her way up to the senior executive ranks of a major hospital chain. She ran Virginia’s health department under former Democratic Gov. Tim Kaine. Berwick’s fate was sealed early this year when 42 GOP senators — more than enough to derail his confirmation — asked Obama to withdraw his nomination. He remained as a temporary appointee, and his resignation takes effect Dec. 2.

THE DAILY JOURNAL Raymond’s Sourdough and The Van’s Restaurant Present The Seventh Annual PIGSKIN Pick
THE DAILY JOURNAL
Raymond’s Sourdough and The Van’s Restaurant
Present The Seventh Annual
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
Week Twelve
PICK THE MOST NFL WINNERS AND WIN! DEADLINE IS 11/25/11
ROAD TEAM
HOME TEAM
ROAD TEAM
HOME TEAM
Minnesota
Atlanta
Chicago
Oakland
Cleveland
Cincinnati
Washington
Seattle
Tampa Bay
Tennessee
New England
Philadelphia
Carolina
Indianapolis
Denver
San Diego
St Louis
Arizona
Pittsburgh
Kansas City
Buffalo
NY Jets
NY Giants
New Orleans
Houston
Jacksonville
TIEBREAKER: NY Giants @ New Orleans
How does it work?
Each Monday thru Friday we will list the upcoming weeks’ games. Pick the winners of each game
along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point
total on the Monday night game of the week. If there’s a tie on that total, then a random drawing
will determine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward gift certificates to Raymond’s
Sourdough and The Van’s Restaurant. The Daily Journal Pigskin Pick’em Contest is free to play.
Must be 18 or over. Winners will be announced in the Daily Journal.
What is the deadline?
All mailed entries must be postmarked by the Friday prior to the weekend of games, you may
also drop off your entries to our office by Friday at 5 p.m. sharp.
Send entry form to: 800 S. Claremont Street, #210, San Mateo, CA 94402. You may enter as many
times as you like using photocopied entry forms. Multiple original entry forms will be discarded.
You may also access entry entry forms at www.scribd.com/smdailyjournal
NAME
Mail or drop off by 11/25/11 to:
AGE
CITY
PHONE
Pigskin Pick’em, Daily Journal,
800 S. Claremont Street, #210,
San Mateo, CA 94402
The Daily Journal will not use
your personal information for
marketing purposes. We respect
your privacy.
151 Spruce Ave., So. San Francisco
815 Belmont Avenue, Belmont
650-588-5868
650-591-6525
We are not responsible for late, damaged, illegible or lost entries. Multiple entries are accepted. One prize per household. All applicable Federal, State & Local taxes associated
with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The Daily
Journal reserves the right in its sole discretion to disqualify any individual it finds to be tampering with the entry process or the operation of the promotion; to be acting in
violation of the rules; or to be acting in an unsportsmanlike manner. Entry constitutes agreement for use of name & photo for publicity purposes. Employees of the Daily
Journal, Raymond’s Sourdough and the Van’s are not eligible to win. Must be at least 18 years of age. Call with questions or for clarification (650) 344-5200.
Each winner, by acceptance of the prize, agrees to release the Daily Journal, Raymond’s Sourdough and the Van’s from all liability, claims, or actions of any kind whatsoever for
injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, or use of the prize.

8 Thursday Nov. 24, 2011

LOCAL/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Reporters’ notebook

I n conjunction with the SFO Museum exhibition Revolutions per Minute:

The Evolution of the Record, turntable

legend DJ Qbert will make a special guest appearance 7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 2 at San Francisco International Airport’s Mezzanine Level in Terminal 2 with an exclusive musical set for airport visitors. Bay Area native DJ Qbert is often referred to as the “Jimi Hendrix of the turntables.” He has invented more scratching techniques than any other DJ in the history of turntablism — the art of using a turntable as a musical instrument. ***

Lots of people spend time on Facebook — more than 800 million of them — but until now, no one has ever become a millionaire simply by clicking “like” on a Facebook page. Chase Freedom decided to change that by offering a $1 million grand prize in its “Get Your Cash Back Sweepstakes.” By simply by “liking” Chase Freedom on Facebook, 22-year-old college student, Steven Haryono, became San Mateo’s latest millionaire. Chase spokesman Ben Grant recently pre- sented Haryono with his check for $1 million at a local Chase branch in San Mateo. This represents the culmination of the sweepstakes in which Chase Freedom gave 504 lucky peo- ple $500 each between Oct. 3 and Oct. 23. The sweepstakes was live on the Chase Freedom Facebook page for four weeks, and allowed fans to enter once a day for a chance to win the $1 million grand prize or one of the hourly $500 prizes. *** Congratulations are in order for Grace Kallis, former Daily Journal intern extraordi- naire and award-winning columnist, who recently passed the California Bar Exam. Kallis launched the Daily Journal internship program in 2000 and was well known for her popular column “Graceland.” Way to go! *** More than 300 San Carlos residents — par- ents, kids and ages in between — dropped by the San Carlos Fire Department’s main sta-

tion on Laurel Street Saturday to check out equipment and ask questions at its open house. Some even climbed in to the driver’s seat of the engine for a photo or two. *** The Mystery Writers of America honored M is for Mystery with one of its 2012 Raven Awards. Established in 1953, the award recognizes outstanding achievement in the mystery field outside the realm of creative writing. “Owner and founder Ed Kaufman, along with his wife Jeannie, are devoted champions of the mystery genre. With the closing of the San Francisco Mystery Bookstore, M is for Mystery remains the only mystery bookstore between Los Angeles and Portland,” accord- ing to the announcement of the award. *** Foster City resident Sam Runco was recently inducted into the prestigious Consumer Electronics Association Hall of Fame. Runco is the founder of Runco International (formerly of the Bay Area), the company that was first to introduce a line doubler with a multi-frequency projector in 1990, providing more detailed image than previous projectors as well as the first multi- ple-aspect-ratio controller, the ARC-IV, to the high-end home theater market, which added widescreen and did high-definition tel- evision seven and a half years in advance of the regulation.

*** Nominations are still being accepted for the 13th annual Sustainability and Green Building Awards — an opportunity to honor those who have made outstanding contribu- tions to sustainability in San Mateo County. Nominations close Wednesday, Dec. 1. Winners will be recognized March 15, 2012 at the South San Francisco Conference Center. For more information visit www.sus- tainablesanmateo.org.

The reporters’ notebook is a weekly collection of facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily Journal staff. It appears in the Thursday edition.

Advertisement

How Trees Benefit Our Health

While Absorbing Air Pollutants

By Paul Larson

MILLBRAE – As a Past President of the Millbrae Lions Club I was recently asked to take on the position of “Tree Planting Chairman”. It is a goal of the current “Lions Clubs International” President for all Lions Clubs across the world to plant one million trees during the 2011-2012 term. This new responsibility reminded me of a plan I had in the back of my mind to donate a number of trees on behalf of the CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS for planting on several sparsely landscaped strips at Saint Dunstan’s Church in Millbrae. I’ve always been a fan of planting trees, and my new task as “Tree Planting Chair” gave me an excuse to follow through with this previous goal. I immediately put my plan into action, so as of this writing 17 good sized Redwood Trees have already been planted at Saint Dunstan’s which will grow up tall and lush (see the picture to the right of me with one of the trees on the day they were planted). Trees are a major life sustaining feature of our planet. They not only help secure the ground they are planted in, but are the home to countless numbers of species. Trees absorb carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in addition to other harmful pollutants from the atmosphere, and during photosynthesis they release the oxygen we breathe. An acre of trees absorbs enough CO 2 over one year to equal the amount produced by driving a car 26,000 miles. If everyone reading this article planted one new tree at their home it would not only create a noticeable improvement in everyone’s quality of life but also would benefit future generations.

quality of life but also would benefit future generations. Historically San Mateo County had a vast

Historically San Mateo County had a vast population of healthy old growth Redwood Trees. In the 1800’s a large portion of these tall majestic trees were cut down to feed the quickly growing need for lumber in the up and coming city of San Francisco. During this “gold rush” period little was known of the benefits in keeping these trees alive and healthy. Realistically we still need lumber today, and now the lumber industry regularly replaces the trees they harvest with new young trees. Trees are a good renewable resource if used in a responsible manner, and many more trees have to be planted than harvested to support society’s needs. We all have a chance to help by planting our own new trees and replacing those which may be unhealthy or have died.

Tying this topic into our role at the CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS is easy. Wood is used in caskets, urns, paper and other items needed for funerals. The CO 2 absorbed by trees is permanently locked into the wood used to craft these items therefore

keeping it out of the atmosphere. My goal is to keep planting trees where ever I find the need as to help replenish this vitally essential and health-nourishing resource. If you ever wish to discuss cremation, funeral matters or want to make pre- planning arrangements please feel free to call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650) 588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you in a fair and helpful manner. For more info you may also visit us on the internet at:

www.chapelofthehighlands.com.

visit us on the internet at: www.chapelofthehighlands.com . Teachers, district at impasse Contract negotiations between

Teachers, district at impasse

Contract negotiations between the San Mateo Union High School District and the teachers union came to a halt the week of Nov. 18, 2006 when the teachers declared an impasse. Both sides signed off to go to mediation. Negotiations began months prior — with a slight delay because of budget woes — with no success. The San Mateo High School District Teachers Association planned to file one to five unfair labor practice charges with the Federal Labor Regulations Authority because of negotiation tactics used by the district negotiation team.

Brothel ring busted

Two men were arrested in Colorado on suspicion of running multiple brothels in Pacifica, Foster City, Cupertino and as far away as Colorado, Pacifica police announced the week of Nov. 18, 2006. Kwor Chou, 29, of Colorado and Ri Luo, 41, of Oakland, were arrested on four felony counts each of pimping and pandering. The two were served with $20,000 arrest warrants out of Pacifica by the Rocky Mountain Safe Streets Task Force, which was already running a separate investigation of brothels in the Denver area, authorities said.

Teacher fired for blood draw

A substitute science teacher at Redwood City’s Kennedy Middle School was fired the week prior to Nov. 18, 2006 after allowing several seventh-grade students to share the same instrument to draw blood during an experiment, potentially putting them at risk for blood-borne illnesses, the school’s princi- pal Warren Sedar said.

The teacher was conduct- ing a science experiment to study cells, and had about 20 students volun- teer to have their fingers pricked to test their blood, using lancets similar to those a dia- betic would use to test blood sugar.

Belmont meth lab under probe

State authorities were investigating a small methamphetamine lab discovered in Belmont the week of Nov. 18, 2006. Belmont police and the Belmont-San Carlos Fire Department responded to a resi- dence at 926 South Road on a possible haz- ardous materials incident around 9:25 p.m. on Sunday of that week. An employee at the nearby Walgreens called 911 after spotting smoke coming from the garage, according to the initial 911 call.

From the archives highlights stories originally printed five years ago this week. It appears in the Thursday edition of the Daily Journal.

It appears in the Thursday edition of the Daily Journal. FBI arrests seven in Amish haircut

FBI arrests seven in Amish haircut attacks in Ohio

MILLERSBURG, Ohio — The leader of a breakaway Amish group allowed the beatings of those who disobeyed him, made some members sleep in a chicken coop and had sex- ual relations with married women to “cleanse them,” federal authorities said Wednesday as they charged him and six others with hate crimes in hair-cutting attacks against other Amish. Authorities raided the group’s compound in eastern Ohio earlier in the day and arrested

Around the nation

seven men, including group leader Sam Mullet and three of his sons. Several members of the group carried out the attacks in September, October and November by forcefully cutting the beards and hair of Amish men and women and then taking photos of them, authorities said. Cutting the hair is a highly offensive act to the Amish, who believe the Bible instructs women to let their hair grow long and men to grow beards and stop shaving once they marry.

and men to grow beards and stop shaving once they marry. HELP WANTED SALES The Daily
HELP WANTED SALES The Daily Journal seeks two sales professionals for the following positions: EVENT
HELP WANTED
SALES
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
EVENT MARKETING SALES
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WORLD

Thursday Nov. 24, 2011

9

Yemen president of 33 years to quit

By Jamal Al-Jashini Hubbard

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANAA, Yemen — Yemen’s autocratic leader agreed Wednesday to step down after months of demonstrations against his 33-year rule, pleasing the U.S. and its Gulf allies who feared that collapsing security in the impover- ished nation was allowing an active al-Qaida franchise to step up operations. President Ali Abdullah Saleh is the fourth leader to lose power in the wave of Arab Spring uprisings this year, following longtime dictators in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya. But the deal ushering Saleh from power grants him immunity from prosecution and doesn’t explicitly ban him from the country’s political life — raising doubts that it will address Yemen’s many problems. The deal opens the way to what will likely be a messy power struggle. Among those possibly vying for power are Saleh’s son and nephew, who command the country’s best-equipped military units; powerful tribal leaders; and the

commander of a renegade battalion. Saleh had stubbornly clung to power despite nearly 10 months of huge street protests in which hundreds of people were killed by his security forces. At one point, Saleh’s palace mosque was bombed and he was treated in Saudi Arabia for severe burns. When he finally signed the agreement to step down, he did so in the Saudi capital of Riyadh after most of his allies had abandoned him and joined the opposition. Seated beside Saudi King Abdullah and dressed smartly in a dark business suit with a matching striped tie and handkerchief, Saleh smiled as he signed the U.S.-backed deal hammered out by his powerful Gulf Arab neighbors to transfer power within 30 days to his vice president, Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi. He then clapped his hands a few times. “The signature is not what is important,” Saleh said after signing the agreement. “What is important is good intentions and dedication to serious, loyal work at true participation to rebuild what has been destroyed by the crisis during the last 10 months.”

been destroyed by the crisis during the last 10 months.” REUTERS Anti-government protesters react as they

REUTERS

Anti-government protesters react as they celebrate the signing by Yemen’s President Ali Abdullah Saleh of a deal to step down in Sanaa.

Medvedev: Russia may target U.S.missile shield

By Vladmir Isachenkov

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MOSCOW — Russia threatened on Wednesday to deploy missiles to target the U.S. missile shield in Europe if Washington fails to assuage Moscow’s concerns about its

plans, a harsh warning that reflected deep cracks in U.S.-Russian ties despite President Barack Obama’s efforts to “reset” relations with the Kremlin. President Dmitry Medvedev said he still hopes for a deal with the U.S. on missile defense, but he strongly accused Washington and its NATO allies of ignor- ing Russia’s worries. He said Russia will have to take military countermeasures if the U.S. continues to build the shield with-

out legal guarantees that it will not be aimed against Russia. The U.S. has repeatedly assured Russia that its proposed missile defense system wouldn’t be directed against Russia’s nuclear forces, and it did that again Wednesday. “I do think it’s worth reiterating that the European missile defense system that we’ve been working very hard on with our allies and with Russia over the last few years is not aimed at Russia,” said Capt. John Kirby, a Pentagon spokesman. “It is designed to help deter and defeat the ballistic missile threat to Europe and to our allies from Iran.” White House spokesman Tommy Vietor said the United States will continue to seek Moscow’s cooperation, but it must realize “that the missile defense systems planned for deploy- ment in Europe do not and cannot threaten Russia’s strategic deterrent.” But Medvedev said Moscow will not be satisfied by simple declarations and wants a binding agreement. He said, “When we propose to put in on paper in the form of precise and clear legal obligations, we hear a strong refusal.” Medvedev warned that Russia will station missiles in its westernmost Kaliningrad region and other areas, if the U.S. continues its plans without offering firm and specific pledges that the shield isn’t directed at its nuclear forces. He didn’t say whether the missiles would carry conventional or nuclear war- heads.

the missiles would carry conventional or nuclear war- heads. Dmitry Medvedev Around the world Pakistan names

Dmitry

Medvedev

Around the world

Pakistan names new envoy to U.S. in wake of scandal

ISLAMABAD — The government appointed a liberal law- maker and rights activist as its U.S. ambassador Wednesday, swiftly replacing an envoy who was forced out amid allega- tions he sought Washington’s help in trying to rein in Pakistan’s powerful military. Sherry Rehman, who has faced militant death threats for speaking out against Pakistan’s anti-blasphemy laws often used to persecute Christians, appeared to be a candidate acceptable both to the army and the weak civilian govern- ment. The appointment of a vocal proponent of civilian rule sug- gested that the government still had some fight in it after the bruising standoff with the military that led to the ouster of Ambassador Husain Haqqani. Rehman will face a difficult task because of the frequently troubled relationship between the U.S. and Pakistan.

Your Local Newspaper Supporting TheTheThe CommunityCommunityCommunity As your local San Mateo County newspaper, it is
Your Local Newspaper Supporting
TheTheThe CommunityCommunityCommunity
As your local San Mateo County newspaper, it is important to be involved in the community
and to support local charitable organizations, fundraising events and local events.
Events supported by the Daily Journal in 2011
January 22
January 22
January 29
February 12& 19
February 19
March 5
March 5
March 7
March 10
March 18
March 20
April 2
April 2
April 2
April 3
April 8
April 8
April 12
April 23
April 28
E-Waste
Millbrae
E-Waste
Chinese
Collection Day, San Mateo
Health & Wellness Faire, Millbrae
Collection Day, San Mateo
New Year Events, San Mateo
June 26
June-July
July 16 & 17
July 22 & 23
July 23
July 30
August 1
August 7
August 20
August 27
August 29
September
Ryan’s
Central
Ride, Burlingame
Park Music Series, San Mateo
Connoisseur’s Marketplace, Menlo Park
Blues Festival, Redwood City
Family Resources Fair, San Mateo
Ombudsman Services of San Mateo Fundraiser, San Mateo
Bike
For Breath, Foster City
Cars in the Park, Burlingame
Burlingame
Community for Education Foundation
Art in Action, Menlo Park
San Mateo County Health Foundation Golf Tournament, PA
Tour de Peninsula Bike Ride, San Mateo
Sustainable San Mateo County Awards, So. San Francisco
SSF Senior Health Fair, So San Francisco
NAACP Fundraiser, San Mateo
Peninsula
Humane Society Mutt Strutt, San Mateo
Senior
Showcase Information Fair, Menlo Park
Community
Gatepath Golf Tournament, Palo Alto
San
Bruno Business Showcase, San Bruno
3 & 4
Millbrae
Art & Wine Fair, Millbrae
San
Mateo County Youth Conference, San Mateo
September 16-18
San
Mateo Library Book Sale, San Mateo
Plant
Sale, Master Gardeners, San Mateo
September
17& 18
Filipino
American Festival, Daly City
Peninsula
Humane Society Fashion for Compassion, B’game
September 22
Job
Boot Camp, San Mateo
Anti-Bullying Program Fundraiser, Foster City
Gary Yates PAL Golf Tournament, San Mateo
Nueva
School Benefit Auction, Hillsborough
Peninsula Conflict Resolution Center Fundraiser Breakfast, FC
City of San Mateo Eggstravaganza, San Mateo
College of San Mateo Athletic Hall of Fame, San Mateo
Burlingame Pet Parade, Burlingame
San Mateo County Business Expo, San Mateo
Celebrity
Roast, Assemblymember Jerry Hill, Belmont
September 23
September 23 & 24
September 24
September 28
October 1
October 4
CRUSH
Supports Education, San Carlos
May
1
Pacific
Coast Dream Machines, Half Moon Bay
Taste of San Bruno, San Bruno
May 2
May 6
May 7
May 10
May 11
May 17
May 19
May 20
May 23
June 4& 5
June 5
June 7
June 10
June 11
June 11-19
June 11& 12
June 14
June 18 & 19
Mills
Peninsula Women’s Luncheon, Burlingame
October
7 & 8
ChocolateFest,
Belmont
Golf
Tournament benefitting Hiller Aviation Museum, HMB
San
Carlos Art & Wine Faire, San Carlos
Samaritan
House Gala, Redwood Shores
One Book One Community Kick-Off event, Redwood City
Spring
Victory
Job Fair, San Mateo
Over Stroke, Millbrae
Taste of San Mateo, San Mateo
Tributes
& Tastings, Burlingame
Senior
Showcase Information Fair, Burlingame
October 8 & 9
October 14
October 14
October 15
October 15
October 15
October 16
October 20
Oct 21 & 22
November 11-13
November 18
November 19
Nov. 26-27 & Dec. 3-4
December 2
League of Women Voters Luncheon, San Mateo
Family Resources Fair, San Bruno
Mission Hospice “Jewels & Jeans” Gala, Burlingame
Peninsula Oktoberfest, Redwood City
San Mateo Rotary Fun Run, San Mateo
Peninsula
Humane Society Golf Tournament, Menlo Park
Foster City Art & Wine Festival, Foster City
Power of Possibilities Recognition Breakfast, Burlingame
McKinley School Harvest Festival, Burlingame
Posy
Parade, San Bruno
Harvest
Festival, San Mateo
Job
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10 Thursday Nov. 24, 2011

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Dow 11,257.55 -2.05% 10-Yr Bond 1.8790 -3.09 Nasdaq 2,460.08 -2.43% Oil (per barrel) 95.779999 S&P
Dow
11,257.55
-2.05%
10-Yr Bond 1.8790 -3.09
Nasdaq 2,460.08
-2.43%
Oil (per barrel)
95.779999
S&P 500 1.3347
-2.21%
Gold
1696.10

Dow continues to decline

By Matthew Craft and Daniel Wagner

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Fear that Europe’s debt crisis is infect- ing Germany, the strongest economy in the region, sent stocks reeling Wednesday. The Dow Jones industrial average dropped 236 points, leaving it down 4.6 percent over the past three days. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell for the sixth day in a row, its worst losing streak since August. Traders were spooked by the poor results at an auction of German debt, which drew too few bids to sell all of the 10-year notes being offered. Germany has Europe’s strongest economy, and traders have bought its debt as a safe place to store value during turbulent times. The weak buying suggests that Europe’s crisis might be infecting strong nations that are crucial to keeping the euro currency afloat. Germany bears much of the burden of bailing out weaker neighbors such as Greece and Portugal. Borrowing costs for Italy and Spain rose from levels that already were consid- ered dangerously high. Europe lacks the resources to bail out those countries, which have its third- and fourth-biggest economies. The Dow fell 236.17 points, or 2.1 per-

Wall Street

cent, to close at 11,257.55. It has slumped this week as Congress neared a deadlock on cutting the budget deficit and as Europe’s debt woes appeared to worsen. The Dow has now given back more than

half of its big October rally. It jumped 9.5 percent last month, the biggest gain since

2002.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 26.25, or 2.2 percent, to 1,161.79. All 10 industry groups fell sharply, led by ener- gy companies, materials makers and banks. The index is headed for its sixth

straight decline, the longest losing streak since August. The Nasdaq fell 61.20, or 2.4 percent,

to 2,460.08.

The dollar rose sharply against the euro as investors moved money into assets considered to be relatively safe. The euro fell near $1.33, from $1.35 late Tuesday. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 1.89 percent from 1.94 percent late Tuesday, signaling higher demand for Treasurys. Fears about Europe also dragged U.S. bank stocks lower. Investors were unnerved by the Federal Reserve’s announcement late Tuesday of a fresh round of stress tests of the biggest banks, said Peter Tchir, who runs the hedge fund TF Market Advisors.

Big movers

Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:

NYSE Deere & Co.,up $2.80 at $74.72 Strong sales of the company’s farm equipment

boosted its fourth-quarter profit. It also said it expects better results next year. Yingli Green Energy Holding Co.Ltd.,up 42 cents at $3.96 The Chinese solar energy company increased its estimates for photovoltaic module shipments

for the year on increased demand.

Suntech Power Holdings Co.Ltd.,down 19 cents at $2.43 The solar panel maker posted a third-quarter

loss of $116.4 million amid falling prices.It also warned of increasing competition. Nokia Corp.,down 9 cents at $5.47 The mobile phone maker’s joint venture,Nokia Siemens Networks,will slash 17,000 jobs to cut $1.3 billion in costs by 2013. Diana Shipping Inc.,down 23 cents at $7.38 The Greek shipping company said its third- quarter net income fell 22 percent as the company made less money chartering its fleet. Boston Scientific Corp.,up 1 cent at $5.32 The medical device maker said it received U.S. approval to launch its latest drug-coated stent

for patients with clogged arteries.

Nasdaq TiVo Inc.,down 19 cents at $9.38 The company, which sells set-top boxes that

record,rewind and fast-forward liveTV,said that

its third-quarter loss widened.

Diamond Foods Inc.,down $7.17 at $27.80

A member of the snack maker’s audit

committee reportedly committed suicide.The company is in the midst of an accounting probe.

Travel rush is under way

By Nomaan Merchant

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — Undeterred by costlier gas and airfare, millions of Americans set out Wednesday to see friends and family in what is expected to be the nation’s busiest Thanksgiving weekend since the financial meltdown more than three years ago. Many people economized rather than stay home. “We wouldn’t think of missing it,” said Bill Curtis, a retiree from Los Angeles who was with his wife at Bob Hope Airport in Burbank, Calif. “Family is important and we love the holiday. So we cut corners other places so we can afford to travel.” About 42.5 million people are expect- ed to hit the road or take to the skies for Thanksgiving this year, according to

travel tracker AAA. That’s the highest number since the start of the recession at the end of 2007. Heavy rain slowed down early travel- ers along the East Coast. Snow across parts of New England and upstate New York made for treacherous driving and thousands of power outages. And a mud- slide covered train tracks in the Pacific Northwest. But most of the country is expected to have clear weather Thursday. As afternoon traffic picked up, flight delays were reported in Boston, San Francisco, Newark, N.J., and New York. The average round-trip airfare for the top 40 U.S. routes is $212, up 20 percent from last year. Tickets on most Amtrak one-way routes have climbed slightly, and drivers are paying an average $3.33

a gallon, or 16 percent more than last year, according to AAA.

Jake Pagel, a waiter from Denver, was flying to see his girlfriend’s family in

San Jose, Calif. He said he had to give

up working during one of the restaurant

industry’s busiest and most profitable times. “I think it’s something you can’t quan-

tify in terms of monetary cost,” he said.

“I mean, being able to spend quality

time with your family is fairly signifi- cant.” Most travelers — about 90 percent, according to AAA — are expected to hit the road. John Mahoney acknowledged the economy has changed the way he trav- els, which is why he and his girlfriend slept in their car instead of getting a motel room when a heavy, wet snow- storm flared up along the New York State

Thruway during their 20-hour drive from New Hampshire to St. Louis.

Microsoft signs agreement to scrutinize Yahoo

By Michael Liedtke

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — It looks as if Microsoft wants a seat at the negotiating table if Yahoo decides to sell part or all of its business. To gain better access, Microsoft Corp. has signed a nondisclosure agreement with Yahoo Inc., according to a person familiar with the situation. The person spoke to the Associated Press on Wednesday on the condition of anonymity because the agreement hasn’t been formally announced. The DealReporter and The New York

Times earlier reported the arrangement between Microsoft and Yahoo. Yahoo’s board has been mulling the company’s options since firing CEO Carol Bartz in early September. The alternatives include selling Yahoo’s Asian assets, such as the Alibaba Group in China, and auctioning off the compa- ny in its entirety instead of hiring a new CEO. Tim Morse, Yahoo’s chief finan- cial officer, has been interim CEO since Bartz’s ouster. The DealReporter said that Yahoo’s board is scheduled to meet next week to discuss its next step. Microsoft unsuccessfully tried to buy

Yahoo in 2008 for as much as $47.5 bil- lion before walking away in frustration. Yahoo’s stock is worth less than half of Microsoft’s last offer of $33 per share. Yahoo shares fell 3 cents Wednesday to close at $14.94. Microsoft’s stock

price dropped 32 cents to close at $24.47. The New York Times reported that Microsoft is primarily interested in pro- tecting its Internet search advertising alliance with Yahoo if its partner pursues

a sale or a dramatic reorganization.

Microsoft currently provides most of the search technology on Yahoo’s website in

return for 12 percent of the ad revenue generated from the results.

This holiday season, the tablet goes mainstream

By Rachel Metz

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — ‘Tis the season of the tablet. Despite the gloomy econo- my, shoppers are expected to shell out for tablet computers this December, making them about as popular as candy canes and twinkling lights. The glossy-screened gadgets are the most-desired electronic devices this hol- iday season. And, of all the gifts people

are craving, tablets are second only to clothing, according to the Consumer Electronics Association. The industry group expects U.S. consumers to spend an average of $246 on electronic gifts, including tablets. With help from his three siblings, Bob Cardina, 26, plans to purchase an iPad for his parents for Christmas. Cardina and his sister live in Washington. His parents live in Tampa, Florida. So he’s excited to be able to video chat with his

parents — them on the new iPad, him on his iPhone. He thinks his mother will be especially happy with the gift. One of her friends has an iPad and she’s “defi- nitely taken a liking to it,” he said. To be sure, tablets were on some wish lists last year, but they were mostly prized by gadget geeks. In the past year, they have become more mainstream. Consumers have become comfortable using touch screens, especially as smart- phones continue to proliferate.

FOR THE LOVE OF A FATHER: USF BASEBALL MANAGER DONATES KIDNEY TO AILING DAD >>>
FOR THE LOVE OF A FATHER: USF BASEBALL MANAGER DONATES KIDNEY TO AILING DAD >>> PAGE 13
Thursday, Nov. 24, 2011
<< Lions-Packers, Cowboys-Dolphins go Thursday, page 12
• American Samoa soccer snaps 30-game slide, page 15
12 • American Samoa soccer snaps 30-game slide, page 15 REUTERS Baltimore coach John Harbaugh,left,takes on
12 • American Samoa soccer snaps 30-game slide, page 15 REUTERS Baltimore coach John Harbaugh,left,takes on

REUTERS

Baltimore coach John Harbaugh,left,takes on younger brother Jim Harbaugh,coach of the 49ers,Thursday night.It is the first time in NFL history two brothers face each other as head coaches.

Harbaughs reflect their teams

By David Ginsburg

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BALTIMORE — The Baltimore Ravens and San Francisco 49ers have thrived this sea- son because they are physical, relentless and combative. Just like their coaches. The no-holds barred sibling rivalry between John and Jim Harbaugh moves to the national stage on Thanksgiving night, when they make NFL history by becoming the first brothers to compete on opposite sidelines as head coach- es. John Harbaugh is seeking to take the Ravens (7-3) to the playoffs for the fourth time in as many years at the helm. Jim Harbaugh has turned the 49ers (9-1) into Super Bowl contenders in his rookie year as an NFL coach by instilling his unyielding work ethic into a workmanlike offense and the

“It goes back to how hard both of them worked to get to where they’re at today.“Nobody said,‘Oh,you’re Jack Harbaugh’s son,why don’t you come do this job?’ They both started out in their professions at the bottom rung,so to speak.They both worked their way up.”

— Joani Crean,the Harbaughs’sister

league’s stingiest defense (14.5 points per game). The brothers received much of their football knowledge from their father, Jack, a longtime college coach. Their competitive spirit was honed during endless duels in almost every game imaginable — including a few they invented just so they could butt heads for boasting purposes. “We would play tennis-ball basketball on a

coat hanger rim,” big brother John recalled. “We were throwing balls between tree branch- es, I guess, throwing snowballs against trees. It was whatever we could think of.” Sometimes, things got a bit out of hand. “We have never had a fight as adults, maybe since we were 25 or something,” John said. “But we had some knock-down drag-outs when we were younger. I can remember my mom screaming, wailing and crying, ‘You’re

brothers! You are not supposed to act like this!’ There are probably a lot of mothers out there that can relate to that.” John, 49, and Jim, 47, aren’t the only pair of brothers who have dueled while growing up. They are, however, poised to become the only ones to take that competition into an NFL game as head coaches. “It goes back to how hard both of them worked to get to where they’re at today,” said Joani Crean, their younger sister. “Nobody said, ‘Oh, you’re Jack Harbaugh’s son, why don’t you come do this job?’ They both start- ed out in their professions at the bottom rung, so to speak. They both worked their way up.” Their players know how important this game is to each brother. “They’re both competitive. We’re competi- tive as a team,” 49ers running back Frank

See HARBAUGHS, Page 14

Bay Cities reaches bowl game

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

There is plenty to be thankful for this Thanksgiving day. If you’re the Bay Cities Bulldogs, a pee wee Pop Warner football team that calls San Mateo home, you’re probably very thankful that no one can play defense quite like you. And that defense has the Bulldogs slated to play next week in San Diego at the “Best of the West” Bowl. Bay Cities will play Dec. 3 against the Murrieta Silverhawks. “We are blessed with 19 kids that are coachable, that play as a team,” said Bay Cities head coach Sione Tongamoa, who is now in his fifth year with the program. “We don’t have any All-stars.” The Bay Cities Youth Football and Cheerleading Program has served more than 4,000 scholar-ath- letes since it began in 1991. The program focuses on the “whole child,” not just on winning football games or cheerleading competi- tions. The organization works close- ly with schools and parents to sup-

works close- ly with schools and parents to sup- JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL STAFF Members of the

JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Members of the Bay Cities Bulldogs practice Wednesday night in San Mateo.The Bulldogs were 13-1 this season.

port and encourage academic achievement and positive personal qualities that help young people grow into responsible adults. In the Bulldogs, Bay Cities has a group of 9-12 year olds that have gone 13-1 this season, behind a defense that hasn’t allowed 30 points cumulative in that stretch.

Their last victory was a 30-0 shutout in the Pacific Northwest regional. “All season long, these kids have been showing up and doing what they got to do,” Tongamoa said. “We have a great mixture of kids. It’s a very diverse community we

See BULLDOGS, Page 14

Giving thanks

T oday is a day of family, food and football. Thanksgiving is probably

still one of the most “pure” holi- days that has yet to be taken over by corporations or retailers. It’s

tough to incorporate a “thanksgiv- ing” column into a sports context, so I’m not going to even try. Here is what I’m thankful for on this day:

First and foremost, not only am I thankful I have a job given today’s economy, but I’m especial- ly blessed to have a job working for a newspaper. Given the amount of consolidation and shuttering of newspapers around the country, to have a job with the Daily Journal is a godsend. I’m thankful to have a job that I love. After graduating college, I spent nearly a decade trying to find a full-time job in this indus- try. There were many years I spent working a menial day job, 9 to 5, then heading to a newspaper office for another four or five hours of work there, just trying to get my foot in the door and hopefully be

just trying to get my foot in the door and hopefully be on some- one’s radar

on some- one’s radar when a full- time spot opened up. Sports reporting is what I want- ed to do for quite a while and I was begin- ning to think it would never come. I have been with the Daily Journal for over a decade now and can honestly say I’ve never had a bet- ter job. People often ask if I have aspirations to move on. Nope. It would be tough to find anything better than what I have here. I’m thankful to all the coaches, players and athletic directors with whom I’ve developed relationships over the years. The coaches and ADs, especially, since they are usually my go-to people whenever

See LOUNGE, Page 14

12 Thursday Nov. 24, 2011

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Bears QB to make first career start vs.Oakland

By Rick Gano

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAKE FOREST, Ill. — Caleb Hanie had little time to be jittery when he found himself thrust into the NFC Championship game last January. Jay Cutler was hurt, backup Todd Collins was ineffective and suddenly third- stringer Hanie was facing the Green Bay Packers.

A trip to the Super Bowl rest- ed on the out- come. How’s that for pressure? Hanie did OK. He led the Bears to a pair of fourth-quarter touchdowns but

also threw two interceptions as Green Bay emerged with 21-14 victory. “Sometimes it’s better to be there and be shocked and then ‘boom’ you’re in the game because you don’t even have to think about,” Hanie said Wednesday. Now he’s in the spotlight again and he has a little more time to prepare. Cutler suffered a broken thumb last Sunday against San Diego while try- ing to make a tackle on an intercep-

San Diego while try- ing to make a tackle on an intercep- Caleb Hanie tion. He

Caleb Hanie

tion. He had surgery Wednesday and

is out indefinitely with the Bears hop-

ing he can return before the regular season ends in six weeks. The job right now is Hanie’s, and he will make his first NFL start Sunday at Oakland as the Bears go for their sixth straight victory. “You have the whole week to think about it so you get a little more nerv- ous, but at the same time if you pre- pare the right way you’ll be confident going into the game,” Hanie said. Hanie has appeared in two games this season without throwing a pass. He’s attempted only 14 regular-sea- son passes in his career that began when he was signed by the Bears as an undrafted free agent in 2008. In that championship game against the Packers at Soldier Field 10 months ago, he completed 13 of 20 passes for 153 yards with a TD and the two picks, one of which was returned for a touchdown. “Just try to be myself,” Hanie said, looking ahead to Sunday. “I feel like I take control of the huddle and I’m a vocal guy when I need to be. And so that’s my approach to it. Jay is a strong leader and he’s grown into the role more this season, as well. We expect him back, so I’m just filling his shoes.”

Lions look to test Packers

By Noah Trister

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DETROIT — The last time Aaron Rodgers and the Packers came to Detroit, they looked like anything but Super Bowl contenders. Of course, the Green Bay quarter- back has a perfectly valid explana- tion for why the Lions slowed him down. “They gave me a concussion,” Rodgers said. Rodgers recovered from that jar- ring December loss, leading the Packers to a Super Bowl title, but the way the Lions shut down their NFC North rivals still resonates. This trip to Detroit to face Ndamukong Suh on Thanksgiving could be the toughest remaining test of the regular season for the unbeat- en Packers. “Another game, another opportu- nity to get after another great team,” said Suh, Detroit’s imposing defen- sive tackle. “They’re a great offense, and one that’s very potent.” It’s hard to imagine now, but the Packers were actually in danger of missing the playoffs after they lost 7-3 in Detroit last season. Rodgers left with a concussion toward the end of the second quarter, but Green Bay was sputtering even while he was in the game.

but Green Bay was sputtering even while he was in the game. Aaron Rodgers Ndamukong Suh

Aaron Rodgers

was sputtering even while he was in the game. Aaron Rodgers Ndamukong Suh Rodgers missed the

Ndamukong

Suh

Rodgers missed the fol- lowing week’s game, a loss to New England, but the Packers have won 16 straight since. Green Bay (10- 0) hasn’t been held under 21 points this sea- and

Rodgers has thrown 31 touchdown pass- es with only four interceptions. The Lions (7- 3) face a daunt- ing task if

they’re going to

end their seven- game Thanksgiving losing streak. The last time they won their tradi- tional holiday game was in 2003, when they intercepted Brett Favre three times in a 22-14 victory over Green Bay. “We want to make sure that the players understand the tradition of this game, its importance to the city, its place in the history of the National Football League,” Detroit coach Jim Schwartz said. “When you wake up downtown and they’re

son,

setting up for the parade, I mean, it’s not just a normal day. Thanksgiving in Detroit is different than other cities.” This entire year has been different so far for the Lions. Their resur- gence actually began with that vic- tory over Green Bay, the start of a four-game winning streak to end last season. Detroit also won its first five games this season. The Lions beat the Packers last year with third-string quarterback Drew Stanton. Now, starter Matthew Stafford is healthy. He’s started every game this season, throwing 25 touchdowns and 10 interceptions. Detroit had lost three of four and trailed 24-7 in the first half last weekend against Carolina, but Stafford rallied the Lions with five touchdown passes, and they won 49-35. Because of injuries, Stafford has faced Green Bay only once in his career, throwing four intercep- tions against the Packers in a 34-12 loss on Thanksgiving of 2009 — his rookie season. “It’s special,” Stafford said. “It’s a challenge for us. It’s a challenge for Green Bay, everybody playing on Thanksgiving that played last It’s a special one for us. We’ve got the 10-0 Packers coming in.”

Cowboys, Dolphins try to continue winning streaks

By Jaime Aron

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ARLINGTON, Texas — The Cowboys and Dolphins playing on Thanksgiving will forever conjure memories of the 1993 game. Dallas defensive lineman Leon Lett adding to his blunderful reputation by sliding across ice and snow to bring alive a dead ball, setting up Miami for the winning kick as time ran out. With Lett now part of the Cowboys’

coaching staff, and Snickers pushing a lighthearted “Forgive Leon” cam- paign, that tale seemed likely to be the most exciting storyline for another holiday meeting between the clubs. Nope. Nostalgia has been shoved to the sideline because the game itself is shaping up as a good one. Both teams go in having won three straight. For the Cowboys, it’s meant

a rise into a tie for first place in the NFC East, and a chance to take over sole possession at least until the

Giants play Monday night. For the Dolphins, it’s flushed away the dread from an 0-7 start and replaced it with the invaluable commodity of hope. Matt Moore has shown he could be the club’s long-sought solution at quarterback and the defense has gone 12 straight quarters without giving up a touchdown. No wonder there’s so much dancing

on the Miami sideline. “I’ll tell you what,” said Dolphins linebacker Jason Taylor, who was the

runner-up on “Dancing With The Stars” in 2008, “you keep winning, you keep making plays, you can do anything you want.” Dallas and Miami have played four times since Lett’s unthinkable gaffe, which came 10 months after an equal- ly stunning, though nowhere near as punitive, mistake in the Super Bowl. The Dolphins and Cowboys have even met on Thanksgiving twice since then. Yet this is their first meeting since

the Dolphins have turned into Cowboys East, with their general manager, coach, quarterback and five more players having been with Dallas first, most going directly from one club to the other. “We know there are a lot of guys who have Dallas ties — ‘the Cowboy club,”’ Miami safety Yeremiah Bell said. “But they’re Dolphins now. We want to make sure we go there and give them a good showing on Thanksgiving.”

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SPORTS

Thursday Nov. 24, 2011

13

USF coach gives up kidney to ailing dad

By Janie McCauley

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Mickey Giarratano never would have asked one of his children for

a kidney. That’s not his nature, and Nino

Giarratano knew it. That’s why the son stepped in and made the decision for his ailing father, offering up one of

his healthy kidneys so his 80-year-old dad could live a longer, more normal life. Giarratano makes tough calls all the time as

a college baseball coach at the University of

San Francisco. When it involved putting his own life on the line, his wife and grown daugh- ter initially couldn’t understand making such a sacrifice. Especially doing so for someone who already had lived a full life, even if it was his father. Still, it’s a something Giarratano would do all over again. “If it didn’t work out health-wise for me, I

could live with that,” Giarratano said. “It’s kind

of

that athletic

I’ve just been lucky

to

be around sports my whole life. I’ve been

lucky with the decisions I’ve made to do what I do. I was healthy. So, I always knew if any- one could recover, I would be the quickest recovery in the family — based on age, based on my lifestyle. So it worked out pretty good.” He is doing great relying on one kidney. Giarratano returned to running on the treadmill six weeks post-op to make sure he was “healthy for fall practice and ready to go” at the start of his 14th season at USF.

“I was healthy.So,I always knew if anyone could recover, I would be the quickest recovery in the family — based on age,based on my lifestyle.So it worked out pretty good.”

— Nino Giarratano,USF baseball manager who donated a kidney to his father

“I’m up to about 15 miles per week, and feel- ing great,” Giarratano, the reigning West Coast Conference coach of the year, said this week. “I am so lucky to have this opportunity to give back to my dad.” The 49-year-old Giarratano decided he want- ed to provide this gift not only to his father but also to his mother, Josephine, who had handled the bulk of the care for her ill husband. They had given up so much for Giarratano and his three older siblings along the way. “I wasn’t surprised at all. That’s just the type of person he is,” said former USF outfielder Jonnie Knoble. “His dad had given him so much, he felt he owed it to him. Not a lot of kids would do that.” While Giarratano didn’t know everything the donation would entail, he understood the trans- plant would improve his father’s life. At the time he made the decision a year ago, Mickey needed dialysis for five hours a day three times a week. “We’re still kind of angry at him,” joked Giarratano’s wife, Brenda. “I’m kidding. We’re happy. We’re all doing much better now that everybody’s healthy. It was scary.”

Mickey Giarratano had gone in for what was expected to be a routine gallbladder surgery last year and ended up staying in the hospital for 45 days because of kidney failure. In October 2010, Giarratano first mentioned to his mother the idea of donating his kidney. “It was a matter of two months, you take this man who has lived his life and all of a sudden it has changed considerably. It was different to see that,” Giarratano said. “That’s when I start- ed stepping in. I just started thinking, if he needs my help, I’m the guy.” Everything aligned to make it a go, starting with their matching blood types. Giarratano began researching the entire pro- cedure and process, educating himself on kid- ney disease and what his life might look like 30 years down the road with only one kidney. He learned that his lifestyle wouldn’t necessarily be altered at all. He went through a battery of tests to first make sure father and son were a match. Eventually it came time to discuss when they could actually make it happen, which was after the WCC champion Dons’ sea- son finished in a loss to UCLA in the NCAA Regionals.

The exact day ended up being picked for them. The transplant center had a cancellation and an open date on July 11. “There are steps along the way where you just kind of have your fingers crossed and say, ‘Boy, I hope it works, I hope I’m the person,”’ said Giarratano, who soon will become USF’s all-time winningest baseball coach. He stayed for about a week after the surgery at Denver’s Porter Adventist Hospital, while his father was in for three weeks before return- ing home to Pueblo, Colo. “He’s the first 80-year-old man to have an organ transplant in Colorado at their facility. It was pretty neat,” Giarratano said. “In the beginning, he said, ‘I need a transplant.’ I said, Dad: ‘80 years old, how are they going to accept that? I’m all for helping.’ He had to go through psychological testing, he had to go through all the physical testing — EKG stuff, the running tests to make sure he was healthy enough to sustain that. He passed all of that. Little by little, he tenaciously stayed up until they said, ‘OK, if you find a donor, you can do it.’ He knew going into that he had a donor.” Paul Meyer, one of Giarratano’s close friends and a longtime USF supporter, has known the coach for 15 years and was moved to hear about the kidney donation. “There’s no greater gesture of love than when you give a kidney to your 80-year-old father so he can live 10 more years and see his grandkids and great-grandkids,” Meyer said. “That’s the amazing part.”

NASCAR opens and closes 2011 season with a bang

By Jenna Fryer

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — NASCAR opened its season with a fresh-faced Daytona 500 winner and ended it with one of the most thrilling championship races in series history. In between, there was conflict, controversy and, most impor- tant, compelling competition — none more so than Sunday’s season finale. Tony Stewart grabbed his third NASCAR cham- pionship with a determined drive at Homestead, where he passed an unbeliev- able 118 cars to win for the fifth time in the 10-race Chase for the Sprint Cup champi- onship. The victory left him tied with Carl Edwards in the final points standings — a

NASCAR first — and Stewart got the title on the tie-breaker of season wins.

“If you didn’t think this was one of the most exciting Chases

to watch from a fan standpoint, you’ve got to go to a doctor

immediately and get checked out,” Stewart said. The television ratings backed it up, as NASCAR saw an

said. The television ratings backed it up, as NASCAR saw an Tony Stewart upswing for the

Tony Stewart

ratings backed it up, as NASCAR saw an Tony Stewart upswing for the first time in

upswing for the first time in years. ESPN had its largest audi- ence ever for a NASCAR race, as the 4.0 rating was up 18 per- cent from last year’s finale. More important, ratings for the entire Chase were up 14.8 percent from last year. “Obviously, we think the season has gone very well,” NASCAR chairman Brian France said two days before the race. It was a good season, beginning with Trevor Bayne’s improb- able Daytona 500 victory. Nobody gave the 20-year-old a chance in NASCAR’s version of the Super Bowl, not in his first Daytona 500 start and driving for a team that hadn’t been to Victory Lane in a decade. But with a slew of veterans lined up behind him on the final restart — Stewart included — Bayne kept his foot on the gas and drove the famed No. 21 Wood Brothers Ford to a stunning upset. It was a tremendous kickoff to the season and made many people forget about the two-car tandem racing style that had taken over at Daytona. As the months wore on, 18 different drivers won Sprint Cup races, including six first-time winners. Among them was Regan Smith, driving for underfunded, single-car team Furniture Row Racing, and Marcos Ambrose, who proved Richard Petty Motorsports could still compete

who proved Richard Petty Motorsports could still compete after staving off a 2010 collapse. And then

after staving off a 2010 collapse. And then there was Brad Keselowski, a brash and outspoken driver who just two years ago was a thorn in most everyone’s side. That seems so long ago now. Keselowski has grown into a media darling and backed it up with a sensational summer run — while driving with a broken ankle — that got him into his first Chase and earned him a surprising fifth place in the final points standings. His emergence helped soften things at Penske Racing, which all year was forced to clean up behind driver Kurt Busch. Busch sparred with his team, the media, and his meltdowns on his in-car radio became legendary. Just this week, Busch’s crew chief formally quit the team and Penske officials took the unusual step of issuing a public apology when a fan posted video to YouTube of Busch being verbally abusive Sunday to an

unusual step of issuing a public apology when a fan posted video to YouTube of Busch
unusual step of issuing a public apology when a fan posted video to YouTube of Busch

14 Thursday Nov. 24, 2011

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOUNGE

Continued from page 11

I need help with a story. I feel blessed to

have developed relationships with enough of them that they recognize my office number when I call their cellphones and am on a first-name basis with dozens of them. I’m thankful for the kind words and emails

I receive from the public. There’s not a lot of

positive response you get in this industry. Most of the feedback reporters get is nega- tive — whether it’s a mistake in reporting or someone claiming we’re biased or believe we’re simply a hack. When we do receive positive feedback, it makes us feel good. No different than any other line of work, I sup- pose. I’m thankful for Daily Journal publisher Jerry Lee. He has somehow kept the Daily Journal afloat during these trying times for the newspaper industry. He’s not just my boss, but also a friend. I’m especially thank- ful that he allows me to cruise around in shorts and a T-shirt as my office “uniform” most of the time. I’m thankful for the newsroom staff at the Daily Journal. Editor in Chief Jon Mays, police reporter Bill Silverfarb, copy editor/layout guru Erik Oeverndiek, court reporter Michelle Durand, education reporter Heather Murtagh, along with my right-hand man Julio Lara, make coming to work truly a pleasure. We are like a family, having get- togethers for weddings, parties, birthdays and other events. You never know where the con- versation will go during a day in the office, and stories and comments that would have ordinary folks (and human resources depart- ments) shudder in horror, are merely laugh riots with our crew. There is no tighter, yet looser office group around. We have a good time in the office.

I’m thankful to have an immediate supervi- sor like Mays. He’s a laid-back guy who knows the business. Not at all like what you might see on television or in the movies. Not the type of guy to yell and scream to get something done. He knows how to motivate his staff and pull the best out of us without intimidation or fear. He also understands that people have lives outside of their job and is lenient and understanding when people need time to recharge their batteries. I’m thankful I have an understanding wife and daughter, who deal with the crazy hours I work. It’s tough when I get home at a time my wife is heading off to bed. A typical con- version goes like this:

Wife: “You’re home!” Me: “Yep.” Wife: “I’m going to bed.” It’s even tougher on my daughter. I some- times wonder if she realizes I’m her dad or if I’m just a guy she sees in the morning before going to school. I kid, she knows I’m daddy, but it can’t be easy on either of them with me gone during prime “parenthood” hours. But my wife knew the deal when we first got together and she supports me. Trust me, there have been periods of doubt and fear, but she has always reassured me and she supports my “swingshift” lifestyle. During my time at the Daily Journal, my father often asks me if I ever thought about getting out of the industry, citing the less- than-stellar pay that goes along with being a reporter at a small newspaper. I always told him that doing something you love is the trade-off for better pay. I’ve had other jobs that paid more, but I was miserable. Doing what I love is priceless. I’m thankful I get to say that.

Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:

nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344- 5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter @CheckkThissOutt.

117. He can also be followed on Twitter @CheckkThissOutt. HARBAUGHS Continued from page 1 Gore said.
117. He can also be followed on Twitter @CheckkThissOutt. HARBAUGHS Continued from page 1 Gore said.
117. He can also be followed on Twitter @CheckkThissOutt. HARBAUGHS Continued from page 1 Gore said.
117. He can also be followed on Twitter @CheckkThissOutt. HARBAUGHS Continued from page 1 Gore said.

HARBAUGHS

Continued from page 1

Gore said. “Baltimore has a great team — they’ve been playing great ball for a while. Now we’re doing our thing, so it should be a great game.” Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs said, “We really want to win it bad for (John). We’ve (heard) they were going to kind of get after each other like they did when they were little. It’s going to be fun to be a part of a sibling rivalry.” The last time John and Jim Harbaugh com- peted against each other in a sporting event was during an American Legion baseball game when both were teenagers. John was part of the an elite team and Jim wasn’t, so lit- tle brother created a team of his own. Jim can remember virtually all of his teammates and the final score: Jim lost 1-0. John’s recollection of the game is not quite as precise, or so it would seem. “We won. That’s what I remember about it,” he said. “I think I had the game-winning home run, too, if I remember correctly. At least as far as everyone here knows, right?” The stakes will be much higher on Thanksgiving night, although to the Harbaugh brothers, it’s just another chapter in a compe- tition that will almost certainly continue for

the rest of their lives.

“I’m really looking forward to it, and I think Jim is, too,” John said. “Yeah, it’s going to be very competitive, it’s going to be very emo- tional. We’re going to have a lot of family in town. It’s one of those things in life where you don’t get these moments back, you don’t get these chances to live back. And this is a chance to live. Not just for Jim and I, but for the family, even the players and fans. If noth- ing else, it’s something to remember. It’s an event. It’s cool.” The Harbaughs’ parents will be at the stadi- um early, but will watch the game at John’s house to “allow the stage to be John and Jim’s.

I want to rephrase that. Let the stage be the

49ers and the Ravens. I stand corrected,” Jack Harbaugh said. Some have dubbed this the Harbaugh Bowl, but it’s also a very important game for both teams. The 49ers have won eight straight and are chasing unbeaten Green Bay for the top seed in the NFC. San Francisco can clinch the NFC West with a win and a Seattle loss on Sunday against Washington. The Ravens are locked in a first-place tie with the Pittsburgh Steelers, one game ahead of surprising Cincinnati. Jim Harbaugh loves the idea of squaring off against John again, although he’d have pre- ferred a more neutral scenario. “It’s the first time in history that two broth- ers have coached against each other,” he said.

BULLDOGS

Continued from page 11

have out here.” The Bulldogs have players representing Burlingame, Hillsborough, San Mateo and Foster City. Their team is small, with 19 play- ers instead of the usual 35 or so. But Tongamoa said there is something about his boys that is special and unique. “The key to success is motivation, determi- nation and lots of heart,” Tongamoa said. “We don’t have the most explosive offense out there, that’ll blow people’s minds, but we have a defense that is very, very, greedy in giving up points. If you want to gain a yard, you’re going to have to earn that yard. Our defense has been doing a tremendous job all year long.” It’s the Bulldogs defense that has kept them in all 14 of their games. Their only loss came by two points. In their best performance of the season, Tongamoa said the Bulldogs won 6-0 thanks to a defense that stopped the opposing team from getting into the end zone despite having 12 plays on the 1-yard line. Oh, and those six points came on a defensive touch- down. “Our team is very coachable,” Tongamoa said. “They’re open to what we have to offer,

open to learning new techniques, not just kids that know it all.” With this being the first time Bay Cities has qualified for a bowl game, fundraising efforts are already under way to cover some of the costs. “As a nonprofit organization, we operate on

a shoestring, just like many of our team mem-

bers’ families,” said Bay Cities President Bill Morris, via press release. “We need to do some pretty fast local fundraising to help with travel costs.” Morris said a travel fund has been started to help defray travel costs for the pee wee team. “It’s the first year that we’ve gone this far and it’s great opportunity for the kids to go down to San Diego and show what the Bay can do,” Tongamoa said. “We have a great group of kids that are talented and really love to play football.”

Service organizations, businesses, or indi- viduals interested in contributing to the Bay Cities Bulldogs Travel Fund should make their checks payable to the Bay Cities Bulldogs (note Travel Fund on the memo line) and mail them to Bill Morris – President, Bay Cities Bulldogs, P.O. Box 1026, San Mateo, CA 94403-0626. Bay Cities Bulldogs is a 501-C-3 nonprofit organization and financial contributions are tax deductible.

CA 94403-0626. Bay Cities Bulldogs is a 501-C-3 nonprofit organization and financial contributions are tax deductible.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Thursday Nov. 24, 2011

15

NHL in a good place right now,could be even better

By Dan Gelston

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHILADELPHIA — Gary Bettman understands the risks of a work stoppage as well as any sports commissioner. He oversaw the 1994-95 NHL lockout that delayed the start of the season and forced a 48-game regular- season schedule. When labor prob- lems lingered in 2004-05, Bettman shut down the league. Bettman knows the pain that NBA players, owners and fans feel and the financial and career gambles they’re taking as the messy lockout contin- ues. Everyone from the parking atten- dants and restaurant owners to the peanut vendors and ushers suffers with no games. He just hopes the NHL doesn’t make that sport stoppages list again. The NHL’s collective bargaining agreement is set to expire Sept. 15, 2012, and discussions are scheduled to begin shortly after the NHL All- Star break at the end of January. Donald Fehr, the executive director of the NHL Players’ Association, has said he does not expect acrimonious negotiations. Bettman has declined to discuss specifics of what he expects

out of the negoti- ations — just know that he wants the NHL business to con- tinue to grow. “We’ve been spending time together,” Bettman said.

“I’ve known Don for 30 years. He’s quite smart and capable. I’m sure he’ll do a very workman-like job in representing his constituents.” Before labor negotiations begin, Bettman hopes to have a better handle on realignment. Vancouver businessman Tom Gaglardi just bought the Dallas Stars, and he’s already lobbied Bettman to get the team out of the Western Conference. The Winnipeg Jets are still stuck in the Southeast Division with Washington, Florida, Carolina and Tampa Bay for this season. Bettman wants the Jets in the Western Conference. “We’re going to have to address it, and that’s something we’ll do with the board (of governors) in December,” Bettman said.

with the board (of governors) in December,” Bettman said. Gary Bettman Bettman was in Philadelphia this

Gary Bettman

Bettman was in Philadelphia this week for the ribbon cutting on a ren-

ovated rink that’s part of Flyers chair- man Ed Snider’s youth hockey pro- gram. Three neglected, open-air rinks in Philadelphia have been trans- formed as part of a $13 million restoration project into reconstructed, closed rinks worthy of an NHL prac- tice facility. Bettman was all smiles during the presentation of the feel-good project. He’ll be back in Philly in January for the Winter Classic game between the Flyers and New York Rangers at Citizens Bank Park — a game that has developed into the NHL’s signa- ture event behind the Stanley Cup finals.

He takes pride in the overwhelming

success of the Winter Classic. Teams

are enthusiastic about hosting or play- ing the game, set this season for Jan. 2, 2012, and the behind-the-scenes “24/7” show on HBO has bolstered the league’s visibility in the U.S. sports scene, where interest can lag.

A look around the league at the

quarter-mark of the season shows why Bettman is pleased with the early returns — and how devastating anoth- er work stoppage could be to a league that has rebuilt itself.

Samoa snaps losing skid

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

American Samoa’s players raised their arms and fell to the ground, as if they had won a major champi- onship. It was only a 2-1 victory over Tonga in the start of Oceania World Cup qualifying Tuesday night, but for soccer’s worst national team it was a triumph like no other. Led by former U.S. Under-20 coach Thomas Rongen, American Samoa won its first international soccer match after 30 consecutive losses over 17 years. American Samoa is a U.S. protectorate in the South Pacific with a population of about 55,000.

“This is going to be part of soccer history, like the 31-0 against Australia was part of history,” Rongen said. American Samoa, tied for 204th and last in the FIFA world rankings, had been outscored 229-12 since starting international play in 1994, including a world record 31-0 defeat to Australia in a World Cup qualifier in 2001. Twelve of the losses had been in World Cup qual- ifying in which they had been outscored 129-2. Goalkeeper Nicky Salapu was the only holdover in the starting lineup from that game against Australia. Ramin Ott scored on a 40-yard shot in the 44th minute. The ball

bounced off the hands of goalkeep- er Shalom Luanio and into the goal. Kaneti Falela lobbed the ball over

the onrushing goalkeeper from just inside the penalty area to make it 2- 0 in the 74th. Unaloto Faeo scored on a header in the 87th minute for Tonga, 202nd in the rankings.

“I can’t explain it right now,” Ott

said. “I’m elated. I’m above every- thing right now.”

Rongen, born in the Netherlands, was fired as coach of the U.S. Under-20 team in May, and he was hired by American Samoa in October. He is a former coach of Major League Soccer teams Tampa Bay, New England, D.C. United and Chivas USA.

11/24 12/4 12/11 12/19 12/24 1/1 1/8 @ Ravens vs.St. Louis @ Arizona vs.Steelers @
11/24
12/4
12/11
12/19
12/24
1/1
1/8
@ Ravens
vs.St. Louis
@
Arizona
vs.Steelers
@ Seattle
@ St.Louis
Playoffs
5:20 p.m.
1
p.m.
1:05 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
1:15 p.m.
10 a.m.
TBD
NFLN
FOX
FOX
ESPN
FOX
FOX
11/27
12/4
12/11
12/18
12/24
1/1
1/8
vs.San
vs. Chicago
@ Miami
@
Packers
vs. Detroit
@ K.C.
Diego
Playoffs
1:05 p.m.
10
a.m.
10 a.m.
1 p.m.
10 a.m.
1:15 p.m.
TBD
FOX
CBS
CBS
FOX
CBS
CBS
11/26
11/28
12/1
12/3
12/6
12/8
12/10
vs.Canucks
@L.A.Kings
vs.Montreal
vs.Panthers
vs.Wild
vs.Stars
@St.Louis
7p.m.
7:30p.m.
7:30p.m.
7:30p.m.
7:30p.m.
7:30p.m.
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL

NHL STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Atlantic Division

 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Pittsburgh

12

6

4

28

67

53

Philadelphia

12

6

3

27

77

65

N.Y.Rangers

10

5

3

23

48

40

New Jersey

11

8

1

23

54

55

N.Y.Islanders

5

10

4

14

38

65

Northeast Division

 
 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Boston

13

7

0

26

69

42

Toronto

12

8

2

26

70

70

Buffalo

12

8

1

25

61

55

Montreal

10

9

3

23

57

53

Ottawa

10

9

2

22

62

70

Southeast Division

 
 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Florida

12

6

3

27

62

52

Washington

12

7

1

25

66

62

Tampa Bay

9

9

2

20

55

67

Winnipeg

8

9

4

20

61

69

Carolina

8

11

4

20

56

76

WESTERN CONFERENCE

 

Central Division

 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Chicago

12

7

3

27

71

68

Detroit

12

7

1

25

58

46

St.Louis

11

8

2

24

53

48

Nashville

10

7

4

24

57

57

Columbus

5

13

3

13

48

72

Northwest Division

 
 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Minnesota

13

5

3

29

50

42

Edmonton

11

8

2

24

57

51

Vancouver

11

9

1

23

61

57

Colorado

9

12

1

19

56

68

Calgary

8

11

1

17

45

56

Pacific Division

 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

San Jose

13

5

1

27

58

43

Dallas

13

8

0

26

56

57

Los Angeles

11

7

4

26

54

53

Phoenix

11

6

3

25

58

51

Anaheim

6

11

4

16

43

65

Two points for a win,one point for overtime loss or shootout loss. Wednesday’s Games Minnesota 3,Nashville 2 Dallas 3,Los Angeles 2,OT Phoenix 4,Anaheim 2 Vancouver 3,Colorado 0 San Jose 1,Chicago 0

NFL STANDINGS

AMERICAN CONFERENCE

East

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

New England

7

3

0

.700

293

203

N.Y.Jets

5

5

0

.500

228

217

Buffalo

5

5

0

.500

237

253

Miami

3

7

0

.300

193

186

South

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Houston

7

3

0

.700

273

166

Tennessee

5

5

0

.500

203

195

Jacksonville

3

7

0

.300

125

180

Indianapolis

0

10

0

.000

131

300

North

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Baltimore

7

3

0

.700

256

176

Pittsburgh

7

3

0

.700

220

179

Cincinnati

6

4

0

.600

236

195

Cleveland

4

6

0

.400

145

193

West

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Oakland

6

4

0

.600

235

254

Denver

5

5

0

.500

205

247

Kansas City

4

6

0

.400

144

252

San Diego

4

6

0

.400

236

259

NATIONAL CONFERENCE

East

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Dallas

6

4

0

.600

250

206

N.Y.Giants

6

4

0

.600

228

228

Philadelphia

4

6

0

.400

237

213

Washington

3

7

0

.300

160

205

South

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

New Orleans

7

3

0

.700

313

228

Atlanta

6

4

0

.600

235

213

Tampa Bay

4

6

0

.400

182

268

Carolina

2

8

0

.200

225

286

North

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Green Bay

10

0

0

1.000

355

212

Detroit

7

3

0

.700

301

219

Chicago

7

3

0

.700

268

207

Minnesota

2

8

0

.200

200

271

West

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

San Francisco

9

1

0

.900

256

145

Seattle