Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 17

UNLOCK YOUR POTENTIAL

DISCOVER YOUR DESTINY

Dr. Mary & Ron Askew

Table of Contents
Keys to Career and College Major Planning Awareness, Knowledge, and Assessment 3 4 10 7

Three Guideposts in the Career Planning Process Overview of Personality Trait Clusters or Factors

Activity Sheet for Personality Types and Trait Clusters 15

To read about the rest of the Destiny Development Diary, click here.
Overview of the Transferable Skills Career Abilities and Skills Inventory 17 22 23

Activity Sheet for Transferable Skills Inventory 21 Holland Personality Types and Abilities Holland Career Personalities Overview of Values 36 39 40 41 32

Activity Sheet for Interest Career Assessments 31

Activity Sheet for Values Assessment 37 Activity Sheet for Career Decision Making Activity Sheet for Career Decision Matrix Transferable Skills Summary 42 Interest Summary Values Summary Final Summary 43 44 45 47

MBTI Type or Personality Trait Clusters Summary

Educational and Occupational Exploration Activity Sheet for Career Exploration 49 College Major Exploration 50 Activity Sheet for Exploring College Majors

51

Keys to Career and College Major Planning


Three factors influence planning for career or selecting a college major

Knowing yourself Knowing occupations Knowing the college majors

Know the College Majors

Know About Self

Know About Occupations

Dr. Mary & Ron Askew, Holland Codes Resource Center 2011 - 2012. http://www.hollandcodes.com

Three Guideposts in the Career Planning Process

Career Planning Map I. Career Planning a. Keys to Career Planning b. Steps Within Career Planning Process Career planning is so important. We are each significant, different, and special. We are a product of many intricate things Vocational interests Personality types or trait clusters Skills/Abilities Values

Dr. Mary & Ron Askew, Holland Codes Resource Center 2011 - 2012. http://www.hollandcodes.com 4

Career planning includes Assessing our vocational interests, abilities, skills, beliefs, and values Discovering potential careers that are linked to identified interests Choosing the right post-secondary education and training Understanding the relationship between education, training, and specific occupations Presenting information on the current and future labor market Introducing problem-solving and decision-making strategies Solving career issues, conflicts, and concerns

The basis for most of career planning resources is the National Career Development Guidelines. In 1987, the National Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (NOICC) developed the National Career Development Guidelines. The guidelines competencies were organized into three areas Self-Knowledge Educational and Occupational Exploration Career Planning

Self-knowledge deals with our self-concept, interpersonal skills, growth, and development. Educational and occupational exploration reveals the relationships between learning, work, career information skills, job seeking, skill development, and the labor market. Career planning includes self-assessment, career exploration, decision making, life role formation, goal setting, and the implementation of career choices II. Self Assessment The preliminary assessment is the first step in the career planning process. From the assessments, we will gain knowledge and understanding of Abilities Callings Destinies Educational plans Interests Personality trait clusters/ types Priorities Skills Talents Visions/ Dreams Vocational plans

Dr. Mary & Ron Askew, Holland Codes Resource Center 2011 - 2012. http://www.hollandcodes.com

III.

Educational Exploration Exploring educational options involves Making educational choices Choosing right choices Researching a variety of factors Benefits of educational achievement Specific programs of study or training opportunities

IV.

Occupational Exploration Informational Interview Internet Career Exploration Resources

Occupational knowledge encompasses awareness of V. Advancement opportunities Duties and responsibilities Informational interview Informational search Knowledge required Occupational research Salary range Training and skills needed Working conditions Economy or labor market A typical working day in specific occupations

Problem Solving, Goal Setting, and Decision Making Problem solving is decision making and goal setting. The problem solving processes include Identifying educational and career planning obstacles Setting, formulating, prioritizing and ranking achievable goals Clearly stating vocational interests, abilities, and values Deriving plans or strategies to implement the solutions Creating solutions or courses of action Evaluating the primary choice Considering a secondary choice, if necessary Making a commitment to complete the plans and to reach God-given potential

Dr. Mary & Ron Askew, Holland Codes Resource Center 2011 - 2012. http://www.hollandcodes.com

Awareness, Knowledge, and Assessment


You become aware of, know, and identify

Holland vocational interests Abilities Skills Values Personality types or trait clusters Occupations College Majors

Students complete one or more of the following assessments


Interest inventory Value assessment Skill assessment Personality type or trait cluster inventory

There are a variety of factors that influence your career decisions. Here is a model.

Dr. Mary & Ron Askew, Holland Codes Resource Center 2011 - 2012. http://www.hollandcodes.com

When you are looking for a career test, you look at 3 things

Format Printed, CD-ROM, or on-line

Cost $10, $12, $15, $20 or $50

Information provided Personalities, interests, skills, values, careers, and colleges

When you are looking for a career test, you should look for a test that has a lot of tools and resources. Tools and resources help to identify your personality, interests, skills, and values. The tools and resources also provide information about careers and colleges.

Dr. Mary & Ron Askew, Holland Codes Resource Center 2011 - 2012. http://www.hollandcodes.com

Career Test Checklist


Instructions: Use the Career Test Checklist to gather the information from career test web sites. Format: (Place an "X" to the right of the format of the test.) Format answers the question how do you take the career test?

Cost: Resources:

What is the cost of the career test? $ What resources are available? What sub-tests are included in the career test? (Place an "X" to the right of the type of the sub-test that is included.) Personality Skills Values Interests Abilities

(Place an "X" to the right of the information that is included.) Overview Skills Outlook Working Conditions Training or Educational Levels Job Duties Values Earnings Areas of Study

(Place an "X" to the right of the information that is included.) Location: State Type of School: Certificate Religious Affiliate 2 Year 4 Year Public Private Do you want to go to a school with a specific belief system? Enrollment: Total Enrollment Total Annual Cost Major Areas of Study: Region Urbanization

Dr. Mary & Ron Askew, Holland Codes Resource Center 2011 - 2012. http://www.hollandcodes.com

Overview of Personality Trait Clusters or Factors


Personality trait clusters describe how people with similar personality types share occupational interests and preferences for specific work environments. Examples of the personality inventory are Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and the Career Personality Inventory. Myers Briggs Type Indicator The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is the most widely used personality assessment in the world more than 2 million assessments worldwide each year.

Reliable, valid, versatile, and dependable - Used for more than 50 years Guide to understand individual differences Source of understanding on how people think, communicate, and interact

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is a career assessment test and a personality test. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) types are in four groups

Extraversion / Introversion Sensing / Intuition Thinking / Feeling Judging / Perceiving

The type indicates a preference.


The Extrovert prefers to focus on other people and things. The Introvert prefers to focus on internal thoughts and ideas. The Sensing person prefers to use the five senses to receive information. The Intuitive person receives input from internal thinking processes. The Thinking person judges using logic. The Feeling person uses affective measures to judge. The Judging aspect of the type results in sequential step-by-step mental processing. The Perceiving responds in a spontaneous and flexible way.

The results from the MBTI produce the 16 types 1. ISTJ 3. INFJ 5. ISTP 7. INFP 9. ESTP 11. ENFP 13. ESTJ 15. ENFJ 2. ISFJ 4. INTJ 6. ISFP 8. INTP 10. ESFP 12. ENTP 14. ESFJ 16. ENTJ

Dr. Mary & Ron Askew, Holland Codes Resource Center 2011 - 2012. http://www.hollandcodes.com

10

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Career Report The MBTI Career Report is a career exploration tool that helps you

Identify strengths and weakness that may influence the career exploration process Identify job families Choose a potential career Select a college or other form of training Provide information necessary to evaluate a possible career transition or job shift Develop a career plan

The MBTI Career Report has information on


MBTI Results Reported Type and Clarity of Reported Preferences MBTI Types and Career Choice preferred work environments, and action steps MBTI Types and Career Exploration Strengths, challenges, strategies, and action steps MBTI Types and Career Development Strengths, challenges, strategies, and action steps MBTI Types and Job Families Job family ranking, Most attractive job families, Moderately attractive job families, Least attractive job families, Most popular occupations, Least popular occupations, and Tips for succeeding in atypical occupation.

Career Personality Inventory Figure 3: Similarities between Jung/ Personality Patterns and Scales The following chart highlights the similarities between the scales on the Career Personality Inventory and the four primary patterns of Jungs research. Theories Based on Four Personality Types Jung/ Theme SP People who are motivated by a need for freedom and action and who value and enjoy living in the here and now. NT People motivated by a need to understand the world around them, who value competency and the powers of the mind. SJ People who are motivated by a need to be useful and of service, who like administering and being in charge. NF People motivated by a need to understand themselves and others, who value authenticity and autonomy and strive for an ideal world. Scale Optimist

Analyst

Realist

Idealist

Dr. Mary & Ron Askew, Holland Codes Resource Center 2011 - 2012. http://www.hollandcodes.com

11

The next table highlights the similarities between the scales on the and the 16 personality types measured on the . Similarities Between Personality Types ESTP, ESFP, ISTP, ISFP ENTJ, ENTP, INTJ, INTP ESTJ, ESFJ, ISTJ, ISFJ ENFJ, ENFP, INFJ, INFP Personality Types and Scale Optimist Analyst Realist Idealist Scales

The third figure highlights the similarities between Keirseys four Temperament Types and scales on the . Similarities Between Keirsey Temperament Types and Keirsey Temperament Type Artisans Highly skilled in implementing goals. They are strong in promoting and operating, or displaying and composing. Rationals Highly skilled in strategic analysis. They are strong in marshaling and planning, or inventing and configuring. Guardians Highly skilled in logistics. They are strong in administering, protecting, and providing for others. Idealists Highly skilled in communicating and cooperating to get things done. They are strong in diplomacy, teaching, counseling, and tutoring. The CPI Inventory personality types are: Optimist: Optimist personality types are generous, fun-loving, and adventurous. They enjoy living their life here-and-now and rarely think about what will happen in the future. They value freedom and hate to feel controlled or obligated. They are spontaneous and trust their own impulses to help them make decisions. They live for a variety of experiences and recover easily from setbacks. They like to see the tangible results of their work and will take any risks necessary to meet the challenges in their lives. They respond well to challenges and crises, but take immediate action and then quickly lose interest. They do not like rules, routines, or structured work environments. They like working with practical, action-oriented people. Analyst: Analyst personality types are innovative, inquisitive, and logical. They highly value competency and intellectual knowledge. They strive to be able to understand and explain how the natural world works. To do so, they use their insight and intellect to create theories and models to develop better understanding of the world around them. They are adept at Scale Optimist Scales

Analyst

Realist

Idealist

Dr. Mary & Ron Askew, Holland Codes Resource Center 2011 - 2012. http://www.hollandcodes.com

12

understanding and synthesizing complex information, and they develop and focus on long range goals. They are not very interested in the day-to-day details, but are more interested in making a unique contribution in their area of specialization. They value independence and autonomy and can be argumentative and opinionated. They enjoy work environments that have objective standards and where they can attain recognition from peers. Realist: Realist personality types are realistic, practical, and responsible. They like to be fully in charge of their duties. They want to be valuable parts of any organization and will take on additional assignments to make a contribution. They have a strong work ethic and believe that hard work is the most important factor in being successful. They bring tremendous stability to any organization. They want their supervisors to judge their performance based on a specific set of job responsibilities. They do not like change, especially if they do not understand the reason for it. They value common sense, not theories, vague information, or abstract thinking. Idealist: Idealist personality types are warm and compassionate. They are optimistic and enjoy work that allows them to use their creativity and individuality and to use their insight and helpful nature to benefit other people. They are sensitive to the needs of others and are skilled at bringing out the best in others. They like to be mentally stimulated and often come with new and interesting ideas and solutions to problems. They enjoy working in friendly, conflict-free environments where personal growth and development are encouraged by supervisors. They put a great deal of energy into projects and are easily disappointed when projects do not turn out as expected. They genuinely want to learn about and better understand themselves. Source: Liptak, John J. 2010. Career Personality Inventory Adminstrators Guide, Jist Publishing, Indianapolis, IN. The Career Personality Inventory is

Self- scoring, self-interpreting, consumable, no other components needed Comparable results to the MBTI Match personality types to careers, work styles, skills, work environments, and work preferences with this easy-to-use assessment Is based on the MBTI personality types

The CPI uses a simple and innovative testing method requiring test takers to

Simply circle words that describe them Total the number of descriptors circled

The CPI then helps users consider how their personality relates to their careers by focusing on their top two traits. Users can match their personality types to careers and work preferences. Clients then use the career planning guide and worksheet to set goals and start their career research.
Dr. Mary & Ron Askew, Holland Codes Resource Center 2011 - 2012. http://www.hollandcodes.com 13

Valid and reliable, the CPI provides a powerful and cost-effective alternative to any organization using similar but more expensive personality inventories. Product type: Printed booklet Interest level: Middle School-High School Pages Opens to 8-panel foldout Size: 8.5 x 11

Dr. Mary & Ron Askew, Holland Codes Resource Center 2011 - 2012. http://www.hollandcodes.com

14

Activity Sheet for Personality Types and Trait Clusters


Complete the following Personality Types and Trait Clusters Inventories Myers Briggs Type Indicator Career Personality Inventory Date Started Date Completed

Complete the following table using the information provided in your Myers Briggs Type Indicator and Career Personality Inventory. 1. Place words that represent the MBTI Type or Personality trait clusters . MBTI Type Personality Trait Clusters

2. Write words that describe the MBTI Type or Personality Trait Clusters.

3. Write occupations related to MBTI Type or Personality Trait Clusters.

Enter the MBTI Type or Personality Trait Clusters on page 41.

Dr. Mary & Ron Askew, Holland Codes Resource Center 2011 - 2012. http://www.hollandcodes.com 15

After this activity, write down five (5) statements explain the following statement After completing the myself. 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) activity, I have learned the following about

Build Your Destiny Development Kit


Here are some popular combinations! Or build your own Destiny Development Kit!

Dr. Mary & Ron Askew, Holland Codes Resource Center 2011 - 2012. http://www.hollandcodes.com 16

To read about the rest of the Destiny Development Diary, click here.
Dr. Mary & Ron Askew, Holland Codes Resource Center 2011 - 2012. http://www.hollandcodes.com 17