Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 13

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Jane Smith C & I 210, Section 5 November 28, 2011

Observation 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Date 10/21/2011 10/21/2011 10/21/2011 10/27/2011 10/27/2011 11/10/2011 11/10/2011 11/10/2011 11/10/2011

Time 12:00pm -1:00pm 1:05pm - 1:40pm 2:20pm 2:56pm 12:25pm - 1:15pm 1:50pm 2:25pm 10:15am 11:15am 12:00pm 12:55pm 1:00pm 1:55pm 2:00pm 2:55pm

Grade Level K-1st 4th 3rd 6th 2nd 8th 11th 12th 10th

Teachers Name Ms. Zawatski Ms. Mohrman Ms. Thomley Ms. Kane Ms. Finnegan Mr. Basolo Ms. Gorski Mr. Thompson Ms. Biundo

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Jane Smith | 2

Observation Notes
Observation 1 10/21/2011 12:00pm -1:00pm Kindergarten -1st grade Ms. Zawatski Developmental domain: Physical and Socio-emotional Possible theory: Growth and Motor Development Examples of student development and/or behavior: I observed kindergartens for thirty
minutes and the first graders for thirty minutes. The class session was the same, but the students behaviors defiantly changed. Students entered the room in single file line. Some There werent any obese children. They all seemed thin and were relatively the same height. Everyones speech seemed to be developed; there wasnt any baby talk. Except an African American boy who was slightly deaf, speech was different. There were extreme levels of energy, they couldnt sit still! Students were able to walk to the beat that the teacher was playing. Students were confident enough to establish friendships; female students came in holding hands and made sure they set next to each other for all of the activities. They showed concern when a little girl got hurt and began to cry. A little boy went and hugged her and rubbed her back. There were a lot of questions and hands up. Can you tie my shoe? They remembered what colors meant and were able to identify the colors. I notice that they made certain colors actions. For example, yellow would be walk, blue would be freeze, green would be jogged etc.

Observation 2 10/21/2011 1:05pm - 1:40pm 4th grade Ms. Mohrman Developmental domain: Cognitive Possible theory: Social Constructivism, Scaffolding Examples of student development and/or behavior: This technology course was a bit wild.
Students were all over the place at first until the teacher established order. Students were working on blogs and personalizing their email home page. The teacher showed them what the proper fonts and sizes should be. She went over saving and printing. She effectively broke down each component. She asked a student what tying in all caps means; she replied shouting. Some students knew how to type, others did not. The teacher asked a student to show the class their blog and go over what they just discussed as far as formatting. The students monitor became everyones display. They were forced to pay attention and learn. They watched her navigate through her blog and after were able to fix theirs before turning theirs in. ____________________________________________________________________________

Jane Smith | 3
______________________________________________________________________ Observation 3 10/21/2011 2:20pm 2:56pm 3rd grade Ms. Thomley Developmental domain: Soc-emotional Possible theory: Personality Examples of student development and/or behavior: This drama course could not sit still.
They had very low attention spans. They entered the auditorium using the stage doors. They began the warm up right away. It was Rachels turn and she was all over the place. She went to get props, had her friends act out with her. They had very large imaginations. Other students watched, while whispering to their friends. After the warm up students gave feedback. They guys told the girls that they are always too wild and they couldnt follow her warm up. Bring it down. Feedback was constructive but they didnt like it. They were able to explain the story but couldnt show/act it out. They then begin storytelling. They received guided instructions and were to use real instead of fiction. One student began the story and had to pick someone to continue. There were gender battles going. Girls only picked girls to continue the story and boys picked boys.

Observation 4 10/27/2011 12:25pm - 1:15pm 6th grade Ms. Kane Developmental domain: Cognitive Possible theory: Piagets Theory of Cognitive Development and Math Examples of student development and/or behavior: Students were on time, prepared and
ready to learn. The Aid administered a bell ringer/warm up. Students entered and immediately began working out the problems, quietly. I notice the board wasnt a regular chalk board; its a nice new piece of technology. Triangles were the topic, acute, right and obtuse. They went over the steps and answers. Students with different answers were not afraid to share them; they even explained how they did the problems. Aid asked how the hands on a clock would look as an obtuse angle. Students opened their arms and demonstrated. They learned from each other. After the bell ringer, the regular teacher took over. The rest of the class period consisted of presentations. Students picked a number and discussed its relevance, history, prime factors and other rules/instructions. I was surprised to see a lot of hands up to present first. Everyone was eager to show their knowledge, not shy or afraid to share. The students had options to do poster boards, PowerPoints, videos or even pair up. Everyone clapped after presentations and encouraged each other. Great visual learning technique and presentations. ____________________________________________________________________________

Jane Smith | 4
______________________________________________________________________ Observation 5 10/27/2011 1:50pm 2:25pm 2nd grade Ms. Finnegan Developmental domain: Physical Possible theory: Motor Skills Examples of student development and/or behavior: The students in this Art class were eager to come in. They received instructions to not touch anything before entering the class. I was surprised that the students did not color, they had writing assignments. Students listened to the teacher read a story out of a chapter novel with out pictures. She told time to picture the story in their heads; they were all for it. They had an option to sit or stand; only the guys stood up. There was a lot of movement, very jittery. They were able to recall the class story from the other day. Students talked with out raising their hand until corrected. They were instructed to write for fifteen minutes a little girl told the teacher she could write for hours! Some students set and thought about what the wanted to write about for a while before starting. Students with blank journals asked the teacher to draw lines on the paper for them. The students knew how to hold their pencils and were able to write on the line. Students without lines started off writing straight but sentence ended up in a high angle. They wrote close together and erased a lot. Observation 6 11/10/2011 10:15am 11:15am 8th grade Mr. Basolo Developmental domain: Social Possible theory: Prosocial Behavior Examples of student development and/or behavior: Students were quiet and focused. It was a diverse group of students, all shapes, sizes and races. A student came in late with a note. They started class with a lab. Some students had questions about the review. Teacher said that theyll go over it towards the end of class. When it was time to go over the answers, students raised their hand. If they had the wrong answer they fixed it and seemed not to feel bad about it; content faces. I noticed it was the same group of students who raised their hands to participate. Student asked about doing another experiment. There was communication with the opposite sex with out arguments. Students helped one another when allowed. Students were on-task and seemed interested in their schoolwork. ______________________________________________________________________

Jane Smith | 5
______________________________________________________________________ Observation 7 11/10/2011 12:00pm 12:55pm 11th grade Ms. Gorski Developmental domain: Cognitive Possible theory: Information Processing Examples of student development and/or behavior: This was an AP European history course. There was a sub and limited interaction. It was a small course, about eleven students. There were no African American students. The chairs in this class only had two legs. Students were assigned to finish up their essays. Some were focused and completed the task. There was this one boy who read the textbook the entire class period. He got smart with the sub and told her he didnt want a quality education just want a check. Some students appeared to be thinking hard, looked frustrated. Other flipped through course materials to help them with their essays. Their cognitive skills well developed. Students in front of me wrote in cursive and in straight lines. The students packed up early and took their net books out until it was time to change classes. Observation 8 11/10/2011 1:00pm 1:55pm 12th grade Mr. Thompson Developmental domain: Cognitive Possible theory: Behaviorism and Math Examples of student development and/or behavior: This was my second male teacher out
of my nine observations. This college algebra class was well behaved. There was one African American female. A student told me where I could sit when I entered the class. This class also had nice technology, helps students who are visual learners. All eyes where on the board, students took notes and was interested in learning. The topic was slopes. Students interacted with one another to finish the problems in the bell ringer/warm up. The teacher got a debate going on the correct answer; there were two students against the entire class. Some students had their net books out and graphing calculators. A student asked about question fourty from the homework last night and other students had the same problem. The teacher went over it and everyone said Aw at the same time. Towards the end of class one table of girls attention was lost. They were whispering, blinking and trying to grasp the concepts. Other students were really into the lesson. They worked on the handout and called the teacher over to see if they did the problems correctly. A guy said, I want to make sure Im doing this right before the test next week. ________________________________________________________________________

Jane Smith | 6
______________________________________________________________________ Observation 9 11/10/2011 2:00pm 2:55pm 10th grade Ms. Biundo Developmental domain: Emotional Possible theory: Personality Examples of student development and/or behavior: This Spanish III course was out of hand. Students were not prepared to learn. Majority of them were on their net books the entire class period. A female student set in the front of class eating and apple with a knife. Teacher had to constantly remind them to speak Spanish only. Students focus was all over the place, they were acting like second graders. A boy wrote on the board with out permission that he was ready to go. Students were passing notes. I was able to see everyones personality. Felt like I was in a movie. When the students finally decided to participate they struggled pronouncing the words. They were given a hangout and were told to work in groups. They worked in groups well, they loudly completed the handout. I could tell that the students understood the material but they could not fluently speak it. That surprised me because the students should be in a introductory Spanish course.

__________________________________________________________________ Analysis and Application


Introduction I hear you can observe a lot by watching (Yogi Berra). I was assigned the task of completing nine hours of observations. I completed six hours at Thomas Metcalf School and three hours at University High School. At each institute, I observed students interactions with themselves, one another and their instructors. Each observation was at a different grade level ranging from Kindergarten to 12th grade. At Metcalf I observed Kindergarten music, 4th grade technology, 3rd grade drama, 6th grade math, 2nd grade art and 8th grade science. At U-High I observed 11th grade AP European History, 12th grade College Algebra and 10th grade Spanish III. I was able to see child and adolescent development in the classroom. In the analysis below, I will discuss the four developmental domains: physical, cognitive, social and emotional. In addition, I will tie each domain to a theory or concept that was discussed in class or covered in the readings. I gained a better understanding of the course material when I applied the theories to my observations. I will conclude my analysis by comparing each type of development with different grade levels. Elementary During my observations of the kindergarten and 1st grade music course, I saw the physical developmental domain of growth and motor skills. Students were able to walk, squat while playing, run and jump with both feet. For example, I observed students entering the room in single file line. Also, everyones speech seemed to be developed;

Jane Smith | 8

there wasnt any baby talk. There were extreme levels of energy, they couldnt sit still! The teacher played a beat and asked the students to walk to it. The students were able to walk to the beat that the teacher was playing. She then added a song to the beat; I can tell that the students were developing a sense of rhythm. They remembered what colors meant and were able to identify the colors. I notice that they made certain colors actions. For example, yellow would be walk, blue would be freeze, green would be jogged etc. The teacher held up a color card and the students were able to demonstrate each action depending on the color. They were eager to participate in all of the physical activities. During my observation of the fourth grade technology course, I noticed a concept from the sociocultural theory, scaffolding. Scaffolding is when a more competent person helps a child master new skills by breaking the task or subskills into small units and guiding performance to a higher level (Bergin 2012: 113). Ms. Mohrman walked around the class and took a look at the students monitors. She noticed that they were not completing the blog assignment correctly. She took control of everyones monitor and went step by step guiding the students through the process. Scaffolding was an excellent technique to utilize. I could tell that the students really got the hang of it because they were able to correct their blogs after she broke down the material. While observing the third grade drama course, I saw aspects of the socioemotional developmental domain of the concept personality. Personality is a constellation of traits that distinguishes one person from another (Bergin 2012: 239). Students were confident enough to establish friendships, Rachels and her friends called each other Bffs. Theory says that an individuals personality can change from

Jane Smith | 9

situation to situation. Maybe Rachels behavior/personality was appropriate because she was in drama class. My last elementary observation was second grade art. Within this classroom setting I saw the physical developmental domain and the concept of motor skills. Motor development refers to changes in control and proficiency in movement (Bergin 2012: 51). The teacher gave the students an option to sit or stand
while she read them a story; only the guys stood up. There was a lot of movement, very jittery group of children. The students also held their pencils and were able to write on the line. Everything that I observed correlates with the concept of motor development.

Middle School Out of my nine observations, I only observed two grade levels in middle school. The first observation was six grade math and within that setting I noticed Piagets theory of cognitive development and math. Piagets theory suggest, Children construct knowledge, they reinvent number concepts on their own, based on experience (Bergin 2012: 162). To be 6th graders, the students in this class were extremely proficient in math. Students were working on a bell ringer/warm up activity. It was time to go over the answers and a boy with a different answer was not afraid to share it; he even explained how he did the problems. By his response and puzzled looks on other students faces that he assimilated what he was taught with what he already knew just as the theory predicts. Other students could only relate to the parts that they were all taught but did not understand his previous acquired knowledge. Piaget suggests that errors give teachers a window into the childs thinking process. This allows teachers to correct and enhance the childs method of learning.

Jane Smith | 10

My last middle school observation was eighth grade science. Within this classroom I observed the social developmental domain with in the concept of prosocial behavior. Prosocial behavior is a voluntary behavior that benefits others or promotes harmonious relations with others (Bergin 2012: 377). The students in this class were social; they frequently interacted with their peers and the teacher. For example,
students raised their hands to answer questions or bring a new thought to the discussion. A young man asked about doing another experiment like they did the day before. There was communication with the opposite sex with out arguments. Students helped one another when allowed. They were on-task and seemed interested in their schoolwork which promoted learning for others as the concept suggest.

High School During my observation of the eleventh grade AP European history class, I saw the cognitive developmental domain and the concept of information processing. Information processing is a model of cognition that focuses on how children acquire, store, and use knowledge (Bergin 2012: 128). This class had the task of completing essays, writing requires a great deal of information processing. Some students appeared
to be thinking hard, looking frustrated. Other flipped through course materials to help them with their essays. Each student accessed information from a component of their memory to assist them in completing their essays.

I also observed a twelfth grade college algebra course. With in this classroom I saw, the cognitive developmental domain and the concept of behaviorism and math. Learning begins with simple stimulus-response connections and then progresses to the complex level of abstract reasoning. Students cannot solve advance problems if they

Jane Smith | 11

do not have the prerequisite low-level skills mastered (Bergin 2012: 161). Theses twelfth graders were learning slopes. In order to even be introduced to slopes one has to have previous knowledge on triangles, fractions, other algebra functions to ever approach the topic of slopes. There was direct instruction with drills and practice to create strong connections as the concepts suggest. They were able to show that they have learned. Students worked on the handouts and called the teacher over to see if they were doing the problems correctly. My last high school observation was tenth grade Spanish III. In this classroom, I saw the emotional developmental domain of the concept personality play out. Personality traits refer to individual differences in the tendency to behave, think, and feel in certain consistent ways (Bergin 2012: 240). I could associate the extraversion personality trait to majority of the students in the classroom. Students were energetic, talkative, sensation seeking, and full of life. I did not expect this out of an advance tenth grade Spanish course. I saw students constantly talking while the teacher was instructing, moving around from desk to desk and writing on the board with out permission. I felt like I were in a movie, students were full of life and not focused on the task at hand. The section on the emotional child in the text suggest that teachers who do not learn how to promote the emotional and social well-being of their students tend to have poorly behaved students, become cynical about teaching, and burn out. (Bergin 2012: 209). My observations supported each theory or concept that I discussed because there were direct correlations of what I observed and what the theory/concept had to say about what I observed.

Jane Smith | 12

Comparisons Across Grade Levels It was interesting to see the differences within each type of developmental domain across grade levels. Ill start with the physical developmental domain. In the elementary setting there werent many obese children. They all seemed thin and were relatively the same height. In middle school students were all shapes, sizes and hit puberty at different times/ages. High school students for their ages seemed small and looked young in the face but dressed like adults/college students. Females had on way to much make-up. The elementary students were more energetic, touchy and jittery than the middle and high school students. Socially each grade level interacted one way or another with their peers and teachers. They kept each other out of trouble and on task. When it was time to switch classes the line captain rushed to the front of the line. Kindergartens are eager to be trusted with responsibility. I saw some middle school students take on the task of passing out folders or supplies to their classmates. Also with in the social domain students were able to established friendships. In elementary setting, female students came in holding hands and made sure they set next to each other for all of the activities.

Displaying emotions decreased as the grade levels went up but there acceptance of it grew as they got older. The cognitive domains enhanced as the grade levels increased. From elementary school to high school, I saw how children leaned and what their cognitive abilities were from class room participation. There were several concepts and theories used to enhance learning, from shaping and direct instructions to scaffolding and ZPD.

Jane Smith | 13

References
Bergin, C. A., & Bergin, D. A. (2012). Child and Adolescent Development in Your Classroom. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning. Quote. Berra, Yogi. "Observation Quotes :: Finest Quotes." Source for Famous Quotes, Inspirational Quotes & Sayings :Web. 21 Nov. 2011. <http://www.finestquotes. com/select_quote-category Observation-page-0.htm>.