Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 199

%.

^.'VJ

-'^^

-vV

iV^

.V

vis

IMAGE EVALUATION
TEST TARGET (MT-3)

il

|||||2.8

1.0
^

2.5
Il

2.2

2.0
l.l

18

1.25

1.4

'-^

W
"o^ .*

^1

#^V

Photographie Sciences Corporation

23 WEST MAIN STREET

WEBSTER, N. Y. 14580 (716) 872-4503

?.

Vi

CIHM/ICMH
Microfiche

CmM/ICIVIH
Collection de microfiches.

o'
Canadien
Insiitute for Historicai

Microreproductions

Institut

canadien de microreproductions historiques

1980

Technical and Bibliographie Notes/Notes techniques et bibliographiques

The

institute has attempted to obtain the best original copy available for filming. Features of this

copy which may be bibliugraphically unique, which may alter any of the images in the reproduction, or which may significantly change the usual method of filming, are checked below.

microfilm le meilleur exemplaire t possible de se procurer. Les dtails de cet exemplaire qui sont peut-tre uniques du point de vue bibliographique, qui peuvent modifier une image reproduite, ou qui peuvent exiger une modification dans la mthode normale de filmage sont indiqus ci-dessous.
L'Institut a
qu'il lui a

n
I I

Coloured covers/ Couverture de couleur

Coloured pages/ Pages de couleur

Covers damaged/ Couverture endommage

Pages damaged/ Pages endommages

Covers rejtored and/or laminatvid/ Couverture restaure et/ou pellicule

r~/ Pages restored and/oi laminated/ and/or Pages restaures et/ou pellicules

Cover
Le

title

titre

missing/ de couverture manqua

I I

Pages discoloured, stained or foxei oi foxed/ Pages dcolores, tachetes ou piques


Pages detached/ Pages dtaches

Coloured maps/
Cartes gographiques en couleur

I I

Coloured ink (i.e. other than blue or black)/ Encre de couleur (i.e. autre que bleue ou noire)
Coloured plates and/or illustrations/ Planches et/ou illustrations en couleur

I I

Showthroughy Showthrough/ Transparence


Quality of prir varies/ print Qualit ingale de l'impression

I I

Bound with other matriel/ Reli avec d'autres documents


Tight binding may cause shadovvs or distortion along interior margin/ La reliure serre peut causer de l'ombre ou de la distortion le long de la marge intrieure

Comprend du

Includes supplementary materii matriel/ matriel supplmentaire

Q n
V
10X

Blank leaves added during restoration may appear within the text. Whenever possible, thse hve been omitted from filming/ Il se peut que certaines pages blanches ajoutes lors d'une restauration apparaissent dans le texte, mais, lorsque cela tait possible, ces pages n'ont pas t filmes.

n n

Only dition available/ Seu!e dition disponible

obscured by errata hve been refilmed to ensure the best possible image/ Les pages totalement ou partiellement obscurcies par un feuillet d'errata, une pelure, etc., ont t filmes nouveau de faon obtenir la meilleure image possible.
partially
slips, tissues, etc.,

Pages wholly or

comments:/ Commentaires supplmentaires:


Additional

This item

is

Ce document

filmed at the rduction ratio checked below/ est film au taux de rduction indiqu ci-dessous.

14X

18X
v/

22X

26X

30X

12X

16X

20X

24X

28X

32X

The copy filmed hre has been reproduced thanks


to the generosity of
:

L'exemplaire film fut reproduit grce gnrosit de:

la

Library of the Public Archives of Canada

La bibliothque des Archives publiques du Canada


Les images suivantes ont t reproduites avec le plus grand soin, compte tenu de la condition et de la nettet de l'exemplaire film, et en

The images appearing hre are the best quality possible considering the condition and legibility of the original copy and in keeping with the
filming contract spcifications.

conformit avec
filmage.

les conditions

du contrat de

Original copies in printed paper covers are filmed beginning with the front cover and ending on the lest page with a printed or illustrated impression, or the back cover when appropriate. AI! other original copies are filmed beginning on the first page with a printed or illustrated impression, and ending on the last page with a printed or illustrated impression.

Les exemplaires originaux dont la couverture en papier est imprime sont films an commenant par le premier plat et en terminant soit par la dernire page qui comporte une empreinte d'impression ou d'illustration, soit par le second plat, selon le cas. Tous les autres exemplaires originaux so-' *"r*s en commenant par la premire pag^ oiiporte une empreinte d'impression ou d i.;u. tration et en terminant par la dernire page qui comporte une telle
>;

empreinte.

The

last

recorded frame on each microfiche

shall contain the sym^^ol

^ (meaning

"CON-

TINUED"), or the symbol whichever applies.

(meaning "END"),

Un des symboles suivants apparatra sur la dernire image de chaque microfiche, selon le cas: le symbole signifie "A SUIVRE ", le symbole signifie "FIN".

Maps, plates, charts, etc., may be filmed at diffrent rduction ratios. Those too large to entirely included in one exposure are filmed
beginning
in

be

Les cartes, planches, tableaux, etc., peuvent tre films des taux de rduction diffrents.

hand corner, left to right and top to bottom, as many frames as required. The following diagrams illustrate the method:
the upper
left

Lorsque ie document est trop grand pour tre reproduit en un seul clich, il est film partir de l'angle suprieur gauche, de gauche droite, et de haut en bas, en prenant le nombre d'images ncessaire. Les diagrammes suivants
illustrent la

mthode.

3 6

4
*

32X

|. (Sage i: (o'b cSbiicaliomil Sencfi.

CHRISTOPHE GOLOJIB
PAK

A.

DE LAMAIITINE.

WIT/I

EXPLANATORY NOTES AND VOCABULARY


BY

JOHN SQUAIR,

JB.A.

Lecturcr on French in L'nipertity Colley., Toronto.

W.

J.

GAGE & C0MPA:NY,


TORONTO.

Enttred accordinjr to the Act of Parliament of Canada, in the year one thousand cight hundred and eitfhty-six, by W. J. Gaok & Co., in
the office of
tlie

Minister of Ajfriculture.

A^^^o^

PREFACE.
f
rri -L

HE notes on
of

the prsent dition of Christophe Colon.b hve been prparer! to moet the need of thoae stiuleuta whoso

Knowledge

French

is

he holp of a teacher, but for those

ted into the study of


superfluous.
texts before they

who may be studying without who havo boi,n propcjrly iuitiaFrench inuch of what is in thom will be
nica^re, or

It is to be regretted

that so r^iany atten.pt to read

hve spent a long enough time at prepitratory work in exercises on the principles of grammar. If stu'^.tnts did as they oiight to do, the occupation of the " note-maker would be gone. StilJ in the prsent text there woidd even then be sonie
'

5ieed of explanation, for the author bas at titnes paid

to rhetorio

than to sens.

It

is

not claiuied that

mure attention ail har and

obscure passages bave been co.rectly and adequately explained, but there bas been no conacious shirking of difliculties. AU attempt at imparting mre historical and geographical information bas been studiou8lyavoided,foritisof thogreatestiniportancetoimpresauponstudentsthe idea that they rend this bonk aoJely for the purpose of learning French.
If any one wishes to learn history and geography, or even to improve hia English, he had better hve recnurse to other

meaiis. It is to be hoped that the translations found in tlie notes will be used in a proper manner they are not intended to be final, but merely helps to the hoiiest student in hia endeavors to understatid the
;

gross in soundscholarship.

Meuiorizing cf translafions alwaya proves ruinoua to proThe notes on i^rainmatiea! p(.int8, na well as the paragraphs referred to in Do Fiva' Grammar, shoald be

French.

pondered, fur a thorough oomprehensioti of the grammatical is the only sure foundation for subsquent work. The vocabulary ha been prepared with care, though it will
\:<l

principles of a language

doubtlesB hve
ies.

may

some of the faults common to ail spcial vocabularrespect to the etymological notes forraing part of it, it be urged by aomo that the students who will read this book

With

hve not yet arrived

at that stage

where the discussion

of driva-

*^

PRBPAC,
It

pend time wh.ch ought to be employed in Jearning Prench. do anyth.ng more than remember the merest outl """^' mentioned hre coneerning the author of" our tex? The best text avaiable has been used in this dition, and as far as possible ail mistakes hve been corrected in the notes.
wtll

itwashopedthatbyseeing them ofteu he wcMd remember some of the. v.thout effort. Surely no teacher or examiner will expect Btudents to know thse drivations because he happens to find them wit un the hds of a te.t-book. Similar remarks might be made with rfrence to the "Life of Lamartine," published with th dation It wasprepared for the curions, and no wiso person

would certainly be on to learn Jl or any of them, but it was thought their prsence would be a constant remmder to the st^udent that every word has a history, and besidea
called

tion can be made interesting and profitable. a reat calanuty if any person felt hirnself

m attemptmg to

jrbe
Il

or

tant idea orne pect


find
t

LIFE OF LAMARTINE.
Alphonse Marie Louis de Prat de Lamartine, was born at Maon, October 2l8t, 1791. Hia t'ather was imprisoned during the Reign of Terror, and escaped only by the reaction of 9 Thermidor, The after whioh he withdrew with hia faniily to the country.
boy's earlier ducation was got from his mother.

be

vith
son
ich,

3Ut-

;hor

Ho was
much

sent to

school at Lyons in 1805, but he disliked


far

it

so

that he was

removed to a religious school at BoUey, whero he remained till For Bome time after that date ho lived at home till in 1811 1809. he set OUI on his travels through Italy, which occupied two years. Being of a royaliat famU/, he entered the Gardes du Corps, when the Bourbons regained power, but the events of the " Hundred Days," forced him to fly. After the battle of Waterloo he returned.
In 1820 appeared his
of poetry tliat
first

book, " Les Mditations," a collection

brought him at once into popularity.

Soon

after

he

entered the diplomatie service and was sent

officially to

Naples.

On- his way to his post he raarried at Geneva in 1823, a beautif ul and wealthy young Englishwonian, Marianne Birch. In the same year appeared his "Nouvelles Mditations." In 1824 he was transferred to Floreroe, where he stayed five years. In 1829 he publiahed his "Harmonies Politiques et Religieuses," and in 1830 was elected a member of the famous French Academy. Two yeara later he went with his wife and daughter to visit Palestine and while away was elected to the Chamber of Deputies. He retomed and made his first speech in 1834. Under the reign of

Louis Philippe his loyalist principles becanie strongly tinged with dmocratie sympathies, and in 1847, his "''Histoire dos Girondins"

was finally issued as a whole.


ing February

When

the rvolution of the foUow-

came he sprang at once into prominence. He was oneof the first to dclare for a provisional governmont, and he became Minister of Foreign Aflairs under it. Ue had the extraordinary distinction of being elected for the new Asaembly in teu diffrent departmeuts, and was on of the tive members of tio Executivf

^
Oommittee.

liiPK

op Lamartinb.

men
:|,

m Europe;

For a few weoks ho was one of the moat important


but his inoxporience together with the peculiar brought about his politircplaced by Cavaignac.
H'^ no^r
life,

difficulty of administration at eiuch a tiiao cal ruin, and in Juno 1818 he was

retlredfrom public

and

sot

to

work

to rid hiinself,

by literary

{,

labor, of the heavy debts he had incurred. His first work was a senos of " Condences," in which he told the secrets of his own life, and later he wrote a kind of romantio autobiography, called "Raphal. " Theu he took to history, and producod Historis of the Rvolution of 1&48, of the Rostoration, of Turkoy and of Russia beaides a very large number of stnall biographical and miscellan' eous Works. In 18G3, the year in which lue wife died, he published Uio sries of sketchos to which the text of the prosent volume belongs. It contaiued biogr.ii.'iies of Bossuet, Cicero, llomer, Socrates and Nelson, as well as c f Chriatopher Coluuibus. But he had no

groat success in discharging his debts, and in 18G7 the Government Toted him the yearly incon.e of a capital of 500,000 francs. He lived two yoars longer in ill-health and died March Ist, 1809, two years before the fall of the Empire.

ClfRISTOriIR COLOMB.

Dieu

ae osiche dans lo dt^tail ma chcmos humaines,

ofc

il

se
los

d.oile dans l'ensomble.

Aucun sens
la vie

n'a janniis ni

que

grands ve'nenionts qui composent

historique de l'hunianitrf
fil

ne fusBont relis et coordoiuu^s sectotoniont par un

invisible,

main toute-puisaante du souvoiain ordonnateur des mondes pour concourir un dessein et un plan. Comment celui qui a donnd la lumire l'il serait-il aveugle? Comment celui qui a donnd la pense'e sa crature serait-il luisuapendu
la

mme

sans ponso?

L'

ancieiis

appelaient ce plan

ccculte,

absolu et irrsistible do
Destin, la Fatalit
;

les

Dieu dans les choses humaines, le ^0 modernes l'appellent la Providence,

nom plus intelligent, plus religieux et plus paternel. En tudiant l'histoire de l'humanit, il est ijnpossible de ne
pas reconraltre,

par-dessus et par-dessous l'action


la

libre

do

l'homme, l'action souveraine et transparente de

Providence. 15

Cette action d'ensemble et de masses n'exclut on rien la libert

de nos
peuples

actes,
;

qui

fait

seule la moralit des individus et des

elle

semble

les laisser se

mouvoir, agir, s'garer avec

une latitude complte d'intention, de choix du bien et du mal, dans une certaine sphre d'action et avec une certaine cons- 20 quence logique de peines encourues ou de rmunrations mrites, selon que leur intention a t plus droite ou plus vicie ; mais les grands rsultats gnraux de ces actes des individus ou
des peuples lui appartiennent, et elle seule.
les rserver,

Elle semble se
lins

indpendamment de noua, pour des

divines 25

que nous ne connaiss'jns pas et qu'elle noua laisse seulement Le bien et le mal entrevoir quand elles sont presciue atteintes. Bont de nous et sont \\< un ; mais la Providence se joue de nos perversits comme de nos vertus, et de ce bien et de ce mal elle tire avec une gale infaillibilit de sagesse l'accomplissement de 80 on dessein sur l'humanit. L'instrument cach, mais divin, de

OnRISTOPnE CoLOMfi.
cette Providence,

quand

ollo

daigne so servir de
')e

hommes pour

le pr^parer ou pour
l'inspiration.

accomplir u

partie de sos plans, c'est

L'inspiration est vtritaMemcnt


est uifficile du trouver la source

main dont
mmt3.

il

un mystre hudans l'homme


Voilit

Elle semble venir de plus haut ot de plus loin.


lui

pourquoi on
dfinit
n>ktro

donne un nom mystrieux aussi, et qui no se bien dans aucune langue i^nie. La Providence fait un homme de gt5nie. Le gnie est un don il ne
a
:

s'acquiert pas par lo travail,


vertu,
il

il

ne s'obtient pas

mme

par la

que celui-l mmo qui le possjde 10 puisse rendre compte dt sa nature et de sa possession. A ce gnie la l'rovidence envoie une inspiration. L'inspiration est au gnie ce que l'aimant est au mtal. Elle l'attire, indpendamment de toute c<macience et de toute volont, vers quelque chose de fatal et d'inconnu, comme le ple. Le gnie suit cette 15 inspiration qui l'entrane, et un monde moral ou un monde
est

ou

il

n'est pas, sans

physique

est trouv.
I

Voil Christophe Colomb et la dcouverte de l'Amrique

n.
Colomb, dans sa pense, aspirait h complter le globe, qui lui manquer d'une de ses moitis. C'tait le besoin do 20 Ce besoin l'unit gographique terrestre dont il tait travaill. Il y a des ides tait galement une inspiration de son poque. qui flottent dans l'air comme des miasmes intellectuels et que
paraissait

des milliers

d'hommes semblent
que
la

respirer
le

en

mme

temps.
insu, 2?

Chaque

fois

Providence prpare

monde, son

quehjue transformation religieuse, morale ou politique, on peut observer presque rgulijreraent ce mme phnomne une
:

aspiration et

une tendance plus ou moins complte


le

l'unit

du

globe par la conqute, par la langue, par

proslytisme ivligieux,

par la navigation, par les dcouvertes gographiques ou par la 30


multiplication des relations des peuples entre eux, au

moyen du

rapprochement et du contact de ces peuples que des voies de communication, des besoins et des changes resserrent en un seul peuple. Cette tendance l'unit du globe, certaines
poques, est un des faits providentiels les plus visibles dans les 35
rsultats do l'histoire.

Ainsi, lorsque la grande civilisation orientale des Indes et de

iiniiiiKi>*i

CuuiSTOi'UB Colomb.

rgypte semble
et plus active,

rfpuHrfe

de

vieillesse et

l'Asie et l'Occident h

une

civilisation plus jeune,

que Dieu veut appeler [)lii8 mouvante

de

Alexandre part, sans savoir pourquoi, dos valWos Macdoine, entranant les regards et les auxiliaires de lu Orce, et le inonde connu devient un sous la terreur et sous la gloire de son nom, depuis l'Indus jusqu' l'extrmit de l'Europe.
la

Quand
IQ

il

veut prtparer un auditoire

immense au Verbe

trans-

formateur du christianisme en Orient et en Occident, il re'pand la langue, la domination, les armes de Rome et de Csar des
bords du golfe Persique aux montagnes de l'Ecosse, unissant 10 sous un seul esprit et sous une seule servitude l'Italie, les
Gaules, la Grande-Bretagne, la Sicile, la Grce,
l'Asie.

l'Afrique et

15

Quand

il

veut, quelques sicles aprs, arracher l'Arabie, la

Perse et leurs dpendances la barbarie, et faire prvaloir le 15 dogme irrsistible de l'unit de Dieu sur les idoltries et sur los
indiffrences de ces parties reculoes ou corrompues du monde, il arme Mahomet du Coran et du glaive il permet l'islamisuie de conqurir en deux sicles tout l'espace compris entre l'Oxua
;

efc

le

Tage, entre le Thibet et le Liban, entre l'Atlas et

le

Taurus. 20

20

Une immense
unit d'ide.

unit d'empire rpond d'avance une

immense

Ainsi de Charlemagne en Occident, quand sa monarchie uni-

2?

des deux cts des Alpes, prpare, depuis la Soyihio et le vaste Ut o la civilisation chrtienne va recevoir 2 et baptiser les Barbares.
verselle, la

Germanie,

Ainsi de la rvolution franaise, cette rforme

du monde
le

occi-

dental par le raisonnement, quand Napolon, aussi entreprenant

qu'Alexandre, promne ses armes victorieuses sur


asservi, constitue

continent

30

grande unit de la Franco, et, 30 croyant y fonder son empire, n'y jette en effet que les semences de la langue, des ides et des instituticus de la Rvolution.
le

un moment

Ainsi de nos jours, non plus sous la forme de conqutes, mais

sous

la

forme de communications

intellectuelles, commerciales,

pacitiquas, entre tous les continent et tous les peuples

du globe, 35

36

qui devient la conqurant universel au profit et La Providence semble avoir charg cette fuis la gloire de tcms.
c'est la science
le gnie de l'industrie et des dcouvertes de lui prparer la plui. complte unit du globe terrestre qui ait jamais resserr le

CnRisTOPrK Colomb.
temps, l'espace et les

hommes en une masse


La

plus rapproch(?e,

plus compacte et plus assimile.


la

navigation, l'imprimerie,

dcouvert

de

la vapeur, cette force

conomique et

irrsistible

d'impulsion, qui lance l'houimo et ses armes, et ses marchandises, aussi loin et aussi vite

chemins de
triques, qui

fer qui aplanissent les


to'^.te la

que sa pense la construction des montagnes en les perant, et


;

qui nivellent

terre

la

dcouverte des tlgraphes lecla

donnent aux communications entre


;

sphres l'instantanit de la foudre

les deux hmidcouverte dos arostats,


([ui

qui cherchent encore leur gouvernail, mais


navijable

rendront bientt 10

un lment plus universel


{:;nie

et plus simi)le

que l'Ocan

toutes ces rvlations pres<iue contenqjoraines do la Providence

par l'inspiration du

industriel, sont des

moyens do resserre,
;

ment, de concentration, de contraction du globe sur lui-mme des instruments de rapprochement, d'honiognit des hommes 15 Ces moyens sont si actifs et si vidents, qu'il est entre eux.
impossible do ne pas y voir un dernier plan de la Provi'^?uce, un
dernier effort vers l'inconnu, et de ne pas en conclure que Dieu

prmdite pour nous et pour no. descendants quolijue dessein, cach enc<)re notre courte vue, dessein pour lecjuel il prend ses 20 mesures en faisaiit avancer le monde vers la plus puissante des
units,
l'unit

de pense, qui annonce quelque grande unit

d'action dans l'avenir.

Ainsi tait prpar l'esprit du xve sice quelque trange


manifestation humaine ou divine, quand naquit le grand

homme
vagues

25

dont nous allons raconter


chose
:

l'histoire.

Ou

attendait quelque

l'esprit

humain

a ses pressentiments.

Ce sont

les

prophties des ralits qui s'approchent.


III.

Au
soleil

printemps de l'annje 1471, au milieu du jour, par un

brlant qui calcinait les chemins de l'Aiidalousie, sur une 30 colline, a environ une demi-lieue du petit p'.rt de mer de P.ilos,

deux trangers voyagcint i\ pie'', leurs chaussures uses par la marche, leurs habits, o l'on oyait les vestiges d'une certaine
',

aisance, souills de poussire, le front baijn de sueur, s'arrtr-

ent et s'assirent l'ombre d'un portique extrieur d'un petit 35 monastre appel Sainte-Marie de Rabida, Leur aspect et leur
iassitudu iuiploruieut

d'eux-mmes

l'hospitalit.

Lus cuuveuta

Christophe Colomb.
de franciscains
asiles.

taient,

cette poque,

les htelleries

des voja-

geura pdestres qui la misre interdisait d'aboider d'autres

Ce groupe de deux trangers

attira

l'attention

des 5

moines.

L'on tait un homme peine parvenu au milieu de la vie, grand de taille, robuste de formes, majestueux de pose, noble

de

front, ouvert
lvres.

de physionomie, pensif de regard, gracieux et


Ses cheveux, d'un blond lgrement brun dans
se

doux de
10

ft preniire

jeunesse,

teignaient

tempes de ces mches blanches que htent


travail d'esprit.

prmaturment sur les le malheur et le 10


;

Son front

tait lev

son teint, primitivele soleil et la

ment
mer.
15

color, tait pli

par l'tude et bronz par

Le son de

sa voix tait mle, sonore et pntrant

comme

l'accent d'un

homme
;

habitu profrer des pen.ses profondes.

Rien de lger ou

d'irrtlchi

ne se rvlait dans ses moindres 16

mouvements
ou

il

semblait se respecter modestement lai-)Qarae

n'agir qu'avec la rserve d'un


s'il

homme

pieux dans un temple,


Ses
traita,

comme
.'0

et t en prsence de Dieu. plus

L'autre tait un enfant de huit dix ans.

fminine, mais dj mris par les fatigues de la vie, avaient une 20


toile

ressemblance avec ceux du premier tranger, qu'il tait

impi.>ssible

de no pa? reconnatre eu

lui

ou un

fils

ou un frre de

l'homme mr.
25

IV.

fils.

Ces deux trangers taient Chri-stophe Colomb et Diego son Les moines, curieux et attendris l'aspect de cette 25 noblesse de visage du pre et de cette grce de l'enfant, qui contrastaient avec l'indigence de leur quipage, les. firent entrer

dans l'intrieur du monastre pour leur


le
50
I

offrir

'ombre, le pain et

Pendant que Colomb et son enfant se rafrachissaient et se fortifiaient de l'eau, du pain et des 30 olives de la table des htes, les moines allrent informer le prieur de l'arrive des deux voyageurs, et de l'intrt trange qui
epos dus aux plerins.
s'attachait

leur

noble

apparence en contraste

avec

leur

misre.

Le

prie\ir d<'scendit {K)ur

converser avec eux.

Ce suprieur du couvent de la Kabida tait Juan Prs de 35 Marohenna, ancien confesseur de la reine Isabelle, qui rgnait Houune de saintet de alora avec Ferdinand sur riCpague.

Christophe Colom&
science et de recueillement, il avait prf^r^ l'abri de son clotre aux honneurs, et aux intrigues de la cour mais il avait conserv, par cette retraite mme, un grand respect dans le palais La Providence et un grand crdit sur l'esprit de la reine. n'avait pas moins dirig les pas do Colomb que le hasard, si elle avait eu pour intention do lui ouvrir par une main afBdo, quoique invisible, les portes du conseil, l'oreille et le cur des
;

souverains.

Y.

Le prieur
travers

salua l'tranger, caressa Tenfant, et s'informa avec

bienveillance des circonstances qui les foraient voyager pied 10


les routes

dtournes de l'Espagne

et

emprunter
sa

l'humble toit d'un monastre pauvre et isol.


vie obscure et droula ses penses

Oolomb raconta

immenses au moine attentif. Cette vie et ces penses n'taient qu'une attente et un pressentimeut. Voici ce qu'on en a su depuis. 15

vt
Christophe Colomb tait
laines de Gnes,
librale et presque noble.
le
fils

premier n d'un cardeur de


profession alors

mtier aujourd'hui intime,

Dans
les

ces rpubliques industrielles et


tiers

conunerciales de

l'Italie,

artisans,

de retrouver ou
n on 1436.
Il

d'inventer des industries, formaient des corporations er.iioblies 20

par leur art et importantes dans


avait

Etat.

Il tait

deux

frres, Bartlilemy et Diego, qu'il

appela plus tard


;

partager ses tr<>vaux, sa gloire et ses malheurs

il

avait aussi

une sur plus jeune que wes frres. Elle se maria de Gnes. Son obscurit la prserva longtemps de
infortunes de ses frres.

un ouvrier
25

l'clat et tles

Nos
oii're
h,

instincts naissent des premiers spectacles

que

la

nature
surtout
les

nos sens dans les lieux


ces spectacles
le ciel et la

oii

nous voyons

le jour,

quand

sont majestueux et
mer.

infinis,

comme

montagnes,

Notre imagination

est la contre-

30

preuve
frapps.
le

et le miroir

des premires scnes dont nous

sommes

firmament

Les premiers regards de Colomb enfant contemplrent L'astronomie et la navigation et la mer de (nes.
Il les

entranrent de bonne heure ses penses dans ces deux espaces

ouverts sous ses yeux.

remplissait de ses rveries avant 35

Christophk Colomb.
repeupler de leurs continents et de leurs les. Oontemsilencieux, pieux d'inclination ds ses plus tendres annes, il tait, encoro enfant, emport par son gnie,
les
platif,

de

dans

les

non pas seulement pour dcouvrir plus, mais p(jur adorer davantage. Dans l'uvre divine, ce qu'il cherchait an
espaces,

fond de tout,

c'tait

Dieu.

vn.
Son pre, homme clair et ais dans sa profession, ne rsista pas la nature qui se manifestait par do si studieux penchants dans son fils. Il l'envoya tudier Favie la gomtrie, la gographie, l'astronomie, l'astrologie, science imaginaire du temps, 10 et la navigation. Son esprit dpassa promptement les limites
do ces sciences alors incompltes. Il tait de ces mes qui vont toujours au del du but oii le vulgaire s'arrte et dit : assez. quatorze ans, il savait tout ce -"'on enseignait dans ces
coles
;

il

revint Gnes, dans sa famille.

La

profession sdentaire et 15

inintellectuelle de son pre


Il

ne pouvait emprisonner ses facults. navigua plusieurs annes sur les navires de commerce, de

gueiTo, d'expditions aventureuses, que les maisons de armaient sur la Mditerrane pour disputer ses flots et

Gnes

ses ports

aux Espagnols, aux Arabes, aux mahomtans, sortes de croisades 20 perptuelles o le trafic, la guerre et la religion faisaient, do
ces

marines des rpubliques italiennes, une cole de commerce de lucre, d'hrosme et de saintet. Soldat, savant et matelot'
i^
fois,
il

monta sur des vaisseaux que

sa patrie prta au duc

d'Anjou pour conqurir Naples, sur la flotte que le roi de Naples 25 envoya attaquer Tunis, sur les escadres dont Gnes combattait
l'Espagne. Il s'leva, dit-on, des commandements d'obscures expditions navales dans la marine militaire de son pays. Mais

perd de vue dans ces commencements de sa vie. Sa il se sentait l'troit dans ; cas petites 30 mers et dans ces petites choses. Sa pense tait plus grande que ea patrie. Il mditait une conqute pour l'espce humaine, et non pour une troite rpublique de la Ligurie.
l'histoire le

destine n'tait pas l

VIII.

Dans

les intervalles

de ces expditions, Christophe Colomb


art,
la satisfaction

Jrouvwk

la fois,

dans l'tude de son

de sa 35

Ohristophh Colomb.
humble
;

passion ponr la gographie et pour la navigation, et son


fortune.
petit

H dessinait,

gravait et vendait des cartes marines

ce

commeroe

suffisait

cherchait moins le
et ses sens,

pniblement son existence. Il y lucre que le progrs de la science. Son esprit


les astres et les

continuellement fixs sur

mers,

poursuivaient par la pense un but entrevu par lui seul.


I

Un

naufrage, & la suite d'un combat naval et do l'incendie


la

d'une galre qu'il montait, dans


Portugal.
Il

rade de Lisbonne,

le fixa

eu

se prcipita dans la

mer pour chapper aux


et,

flammes, se

saisit,

d'une main, d'une rame,


il

nageant de l'autre 10

main vers

la cte,

de passion pour
et des

les

Le Portugal, pris alors dcouvertes maritimes, tait un sjour qui


atteignit le rivage,

convenait ses inclinabions.

esprait y trouver dos occasions


;

moyens de

s'lancer son gr sur l'Ocan

il

n'y trouva

que
i

le travail

ingrat

amour. En allant dans l'glise d'un couvent de Lisbonne, il s'prit d'attachement ponr une jeune recluse dont la beaut l'avait frapp. C'tait la Son pre fille d'un noble Italien attach au service de Portugal. l'avait confie aux religieuses de ce couvent en partant pour une 20 Sduite elle-mme par la beaut expdition navale lointaine. pensive et majestueuse du jeune tranger qu'elle voyait chaque
jour assidu aux

du gographe sdentaire, l'obscurit et 15 chaque jour assister aux offices religieux

de l'glise, elle ressentit l'amour qu'elle Tous deux tant sans parents et sans fortune sur une terre trangre, rien ne pouvait contrarier l'attrait qu'ils 25 prouvaient l'un pour l'autre ; ils s'unirent par un mariage sur la foi de la Providence et du travail, seule dot de Felippa et de son amant. B continuait, pour nourrir sa belle-mre, sa femme
offices

lui avait inspir.-

et lui,

faire des cartes et des globes recherchs,

cause de leur
f

Les papiers de son 30 beau-p: J, qui lui furent remis par sa femme, et ses correspondances avec Toscanelli, fameux gographe de Florence, lui fournirent, dit-on, des notions prcises sur les mers lointaines de l'Inde et les moyens de rectifier les lments alors confus ou fabuleux de la navigation. Entirement absorb dans sa flicit 36
perfection, par les navigateurs portugais.

domestique et dans ses contemplations gographiques, il eut un premier fils,, oiu'il appela Diego, du nom de sou frre. Sa e composait que de marins revenant des expsocit int,^ .^es ou rvant des terres inconnues et dos routes ditions loi)

H'

OhBISTOPHB COLOU&
Aon frayes sur TOc^an. Son atelier de cartes et de globes tait un foyer d'ides de conjectures, de projeta, qui entretenait aans
cesse son imagination de quelque ^'rand inconnu sur le globe.

Sa femme,

fille

et

sur de marins, partageait elle-mmo


il

ces

enthousiasmes.
avait frapp les

Comme

contournait sous ses doigts ses globes

et pointait ses cartes d'Iles et

de continents, un vide immense

La

terre semblait

yeux de Colomb au milieu de l'ocan Atlantique. manquer, l, du contre-poids d'un continent.


terri blos^parlaient^Jt l'imagi-

Des rumeurs vagues, merveilleuses,


nation des navigateurs,
Aores, d'les

de ctes entrevues du sommet des 10 immobiles ou flottantes, qui se montraient par des

ou qui s'loignaient quand des Un voyageur vnitien, Marco Polo, qu'on regardait alors comme un inventeur de fables et dont le temps a reconnu depuis la vracit, racontait IP
temps
Sereins, qui disparaissaient
pilotes

tmraires cherchaient an ap>proclier.

l'Occident les merveilles des continents, des Etats et des civi*


liaations
ait se

de

la Tartarie,

de

l'Inde,

de

la

Chine, que l'on suppos*

prolonger l o s'tendent en ralit les deux Amriques.


se flattait de trouver l'extrmit de l'Atlanl'or,

Colomb lui-mme
"i

tique,

ces contres de

des perles, de

la

myrrhe,

dont 20

Salomon

tirait ses richesses, cet

depuis des nuage du lointain et

Ophyr de la Bible, recouvert du merveilleux. Ce n'tait pas


qu'il cherchait.

L'a*/trait
II

un continent mouveau, mais un continent perdu du faux le menait la vrit.

supposait dans ses calculs, d'aprs Ptolme et d'aprs les 2b

gographes arabes, que la terre tait un globe dont on pouvait Il croyait ce globe moins vaate qu'il ne l'est de faire le tour.
quelques milliers de lieues.
l'tendue de
Il s'imaginfiifc,

en consquence, que

de l'Inde
pensaient.
les

mer parcourir pour arriver h ces terres inconnues tait moins immense que les navigateurs no le 30
L'existence de ces terres lui semblait confirme par
le plus

tmoignages tranges des pilotes qui s'taient avancs

loin

au eh\ des Aores. Les uns avaient vu flotter sur les vagues des branches d'arbres inconnus en Occident ; les autres,
(5t

des morceaux de bois sculpts, mais qui n'avaient pas


ls

travail-

35

l'aide

d'outils

de fer

ceux-lA,

des sapins monstrueux

creuss en canots d'un seul tronc, qui pouvaient porter quatre,

vingts rameurs

ceux-ci,

deo roseaux gigantesques

d'autres,
les traits

enfin, des cadavres

d'hommea blancs oc cuivrs dont

10
ne rappelaient en rien
caines.

Christophe CoLOMa
lea races occidentales, asiatiques

ou

afri-

temps en temps la suite des quel instinct vague qui prt^cde toujours les ralits comme l'ombre prcde le corps quand on a 5 le soleil derrire soi, annonaient au vulgiire des merveilles, attestaient Colomb des terres existantes au del des plages crites par la main des gographes sur les mappemondes. Seulement il tait convaincu que ces terres n'taient qu'un prolongement de l'Asie, remplissant plus d'un tiers de la circonfrence 10
iSottants de

Tous ces indices

temptes sur l'Ocun et je ne

sais

du

globe.

Cette circonfrence, ignore alors des philosophes et

des gomtres, laissait aux conjectures l'tendue de cet Ocan

pour atteindre cette Asie imaginaire. incommensurable les autres se la figuraient comme une espce d'ther profond et sans bornes, dans lequel 15
qu'il fallait traverser

Les uns

la croyaient

les navigateurs

s'garent,

comme
Le

aujourd'hui les aronautes


plus grand nombre, ignorant
les

dans

les dserts

du firmament.

do au centre,
les lois

la

pesanteur et de l'attraction qui rippelle

corps

nanmoins admettant dj la rotondit du globe, croyaient que des navires ou des hommes poj-ts par le hasard 20 aux antipodes s'en dtacheraient pour tomber dans les abmes de Les lois qui gouvernent les niveaux et les mouvel'espace. ments de l'Ocan leur taient galement inconnues. Ils se reprsentaient la mer, au del d'un certain horizon, borne par les iles cMj dcouvertes comme une sorte de cliaos liquide, dont 25 les vagues dmesures s'levaient en montagnes inaccessibles, se
et

creusaient en gouffres sans fond, se prcipitaient du ciel en


cataractes infranchissables qui entraneraient et engloutiraient
les

voiles

assez

tmraires

pour
de

en
la

rapprocher.

Les plus
I

instruits,

en admettant

lea lois

pesanteur et un certain 80
antipodes, qui

niveau dans
emporterait

les espaces liquides,

pensaient que la forme arrondie


les

du globe donnait l'Ocan une pente vers


les

vaisseaux vers des rivages sans nom, mais qui ne

leur permettrait jamais de remonter cette pente pour revenir en

Europe.

De

ces prjugs divers sur la nature, la forme, l'ten- 35

q a
b:

due, les montes et les descentes do l'Ocan, se composait une

teneur gnrale et mystrieuse qu'un gnie investigateur pouvait


seul aborder par la pense et qu'une audace surhumaine pouvait

sole affironter de ses voiles.

C'tait la lutte
il

de

l'esprit

humain

contre

un lment

pour

la tenter,

fallait

plus qu'un

homme

40
ft

CuuisTOPijK Colomb.
IX.
L'attrait invincible
tait le vritable lion

11

du pauvre gographe vers

cette entreprise

Colomb Liabonne comme dans la patrie de ses penses. C'tait le moment o le Portugal, ajouvern par Jean II, prince clair et entreurennant, se livrait, dans un esprit de colonisation de commerce et
qui retenait tant d'annes
d'aventures, des tentatives
1

navales incessantes pour relier


le

Europe

l'Asie,

et

o Vasco de Gama,
la

colon portugais,

10

n'tait pas loin

de dcouvrir

route maritime des Indes par le

15

Colomb, convaincu qu'il trouverait une route plus large et plus directe en s'lanant droit devant 10 lui vers l'ouest, obtint, aprs de longues sollicitations, une audience du roi, pour lui rvler ses plans de dcouverte et pour lui demander les moyens de les accomplir au px'ofit de la fortune et de la gloire de ses tats, Le roi l'couta avec intrt, La foi de cet inconnu dans ses esprances ne lui parut pas assez 15 dnue de fondement pour la relguer au rang des chimres.
cap do Bonne-Esprance.
1

20

26

indpendamment de son loquence naturelle, avait 11 mut assez le roi pour que ce prince charget un conseil, compos de savants et de politiques, d'examiner les propositions du navigateur gnois et de lui faire 20 un rapport sur les probabilits de son entreprise. Ce conseil, compos du confesseur du roi et de quelques gographes d'autant
Colojnb,
l'loquence de sa conviction.

plus accrdits dans sa cour qu'ils s'cartaient moins des pr-

jugs vulgaires, dclara les ides de

Colomb chimriques

et

contraires toutes les lois de la physique. et de la religion.

25

second conseil d'examen, auquel Colonxb en appela avec la permission du roi, aggrava encore cette premire dcision.

Un

30

Toutefois, par une perfidie ignore du roi, sea conseillera communiqurent les plans de Colomb un pilote et firent partir secrtement un navire pour tenter son insu la route qu'il indi- 30

quait vers l'Asie,

Ce

navire, qui avait cingl

au dfhl des

les

Aores, revint pouvant


qu'il avait entrevu, et

du vide

35
sit

quelques jours et de l'immeule

de l'espace

confirma le conseil dans

mpris des conjectures de Colomb.

40

fortun

Pendant ces inutiles sollicitations la cour de Portugal, l'in- 36 Coluub avait perdu sa feuuue, l'amour, la consolation et

It

CHRi.=iTOPnE
peii8<5oB.

Colomb
n*^':'l;6o

rencouragement do sos
naient sur
cartes,
et
les fruits

Sa fortune,
;

pour les
et ses

perspectives de d^*couverte, dtait ruine

os cranciers n'achar-

de ses travaux, saisnissaiont ses ^lobos


libert.
;

menaaient mnio sa
les

Beaucoup d'annes

avaient t perdues ainsi dans l'attente

son ^e

mr s'avanait

son enfant grandissait

extrmits de la nuHre taient le

seul patrimciine qu'il envisage&t,

au

lieu

d'un nxmde

qu'il avait
il

entrevu pour hu. son

Il

s'vada nuitamment de Lisbonne,

pied,

sans autre ressource que l'hospitalit sur sa route, tantt


fils

menant
,

Diego par
;

la main,

tantt le portant sur ses robustes 10

paules

il

entra en Espagne, dcid otTrir Ferdinand et

Isabelle, qui

y rgnaient

alors, cet

empire ou ce continent refus

par

le

Portugal.

O'ost en poursuivant ce long pl.rinage vers le sjour mobile

de la cour d"Eapat(ne, qu'il tait arriv la porte du moniistve 1& de la Rabida, prs de Palos. Il se proposait de se rendre d'abord la petite ville do Huorta, dans l'Andalousie, habite
par un frre do sa femme, de dposer son fils Diego entre leJ mains do ce beau-frre, et d'aller seul subir les lenteurs, les hagards, et peut-tre les incrdulits a la cour d'Isabelle et de Feri<0

dinand.
il avait cru d'abord sa uocouverte Gnes, sa patrie, et au snat de Venise, mais que ces deux rpubliques, occupes d'ambitions plus rapproches et de 25 rivalits plus urgentes, avaient rpondu ses Bollicitations par des

On

assure qu'avant de se rendre en Espagne,

devoir, oonmie Italien et

comme

Gnois,

ollVir

froideurs et des refus.

XI
Le
prieur

du monastre de

la

Rabida

tait plus vera

dans

les

sciences relatives la navigation qu'il n'appartenait un

homme

de sa profession.

du avait mis
voisin
les

petit port
le

Son monastre, d'o l'on voyait la mer, et 30 de Faloa, un des plus actifs do l'Andalousie,
socit habituelle avec les navigateurs et

moine en

armateurs de cette petite ville, uniquement adonne la marine. Ses tudes, pendant qu'il avait habit la capitale et la cour, avaient t tournes vers les sciences naturelles et vers les 35 problmes qui s'agitaient dans les esprits. Il s'mut d'abord de
piti, et

bieut6t aprs d'enthousiasme et de convictiou dans sea

Christopub Colomb.
ntretien

IS

10

du jour avec Colomb, pour un homme qui lui parut si Hti fortune. Il vit en lui un dea envoys de Dieu, qui sont ropousstt du suuil de cets princes ou des cits, o ils apportent dans des mains indigentes des trsors invisibles de vrits. La religion comprit la gnie, une rvl;ition qui veut D comme l'autre ses fidles. Il se st^ntit porte tre un de ces fidles qui participent & ces rvlations du gnie, non par la dcouverte, mais par la foi. La Providence envoie presque toujours un de ces croyants aux hommes suprieurs pour les empcher de se dcourager devant l'incrdulit, hi duret ou les 10 perscutions du vulgaire ils ont la plus sublime forme de l'amiti, les amis de la vrit mconnue, les conddonts de l'aveBup<^riour ^
:

nir impossible.

Jua!i Prs se sentit prdestin par le ciel devenir,

du fond

16

do sa solitude, l'introducteur de Colomb, dans


belle, l'aptre

la

faveur d'Isa- 15

de son grand dessein dans le monde. Ce qu'il aima dans Colomb, ce ne fut pas seulement son dessein, ce fut lui-mme, ce fut la beauttJ, le caractre, le courage,
la

modestiu,

la

gravit, l'loquence, la pit, la vertu, la douceur,

20

la grce,

la patience,

l'infortune

noblement portes, rvlant 20

dans cet tranger une de ces natures marques par mille perfections

admirer un

25

de ce sceau divin qui dfend d'oublier et qui force homme unique. Aprs le premier entretien, le moine ne donna pas seulement sa conviction h son hte, il lui donna son cur, et, chose plus rare, il ne le lui retira jamais. 25 Colomb eut un ami.

XXL
Juan Prs engagea Colomb & accepter pour quelques jours asile, ou du moins uu lieu de repos, dans l'humble monastre, Pendant ce court sjour, le prieur pour lui et pour son enfant. communiqua A ses amis de la ville, voisins de Palos, l'arrive et 30
un
aventures de l'hte par qui il tait visit. Il les pria de venir au couvent s'entretenir avec 1 tranger de ses conjectures, de ses intentions et de ses plans, afin d'apprcier \ ses thories concordaient avec les ides exprimentales des marins de Palos. Un homme minent, ami du prieur, le mdecin Fernandez, et 35 un pilote consomm de Palos, Pierre de Velasco, vinrent passer,
les

30

ib

sur l'invitation

du moine, plusieurs

soires au couvent, couter-

14

Christophe Oolou&

ont Oolutnb, eentirent louri ynux dessilMs par ses entrutieni, untrrent aveo la ohaU ir d'esprits droits et de curs siinplei dans sea id^os, furiuront oe premier onaole o toute foi nouvelle se

oouve dans

la

contidenco do quelques proslytes,

la solitude et du mystre. Toute grande vrit commence par un seorut entre des amis, avant d'clater haute voix dans le monde. Oes premiers amis oon<

l'ombre de

l'intimiti^,

de

quia ses convictions par

Colomb dans

la cellule

d'un pauvre

moine

lui furent

peut-tro plus chers que l'enthousiasme et

l'applaudissement

consacr ses prvisions.


paroles, les duriers

de l'Eapa^ine entire, quand le aucca eut 10 Les premiers croyaient sur la foi doses ne devaient croire que sur
la foi

de ses

dcouvertes accomplies.

xni.
Le moine, oonHrm dans
ides sur la science
pilote

ses impressions par l'preuve

de ses

du mdecin Fernandez et sur l'exprience du l Velasfo, se passionna aveo eux pour son hte. Il

l'engagea laisser son enfant ^ses soins dans le monastre de

Rabida, se rendre

la
ft

cour pour
solliciter

offrir

sa dcouverte Ferdi

nand
lu

et

Isabelle, et

ncessaire l'accomplisseniont de ses penses.

de ces souverains l'assistance Le hasard rendit 20

d'Espagne.
la

pauvre moine un introducteur naturel et puissant la cour Il l'avait habite longtemps, il avait eu l'oreille et
et,
il

conscience d'Isabelle,

depuis que son got pour la retraita


avait conserv des rapports d'amiti

l'avait loign

du

palais,

avec le confesseur nouveau qu'il avait donn la reine.

Ce 25

confesseur, ministre de la conscience des rois cette poque,


tait

Fernando de Talavera, suprieur du monastre du Prado,


de mrite, de crdit et de vertu, devant qui toutes les Juan Pera remit Colomb de chaude recommandation pour Fernando de Tala- 30 fournit l'quipage convenable pour se prsenter
la cour,

homme
une

portes s'ouvraient dans le palais.


lettre

vera.

Il lui

dcemment
et,

et

une mule, un guide, une bourse desequins, il le recommanda, lui son dessoin, au Dieu qui inspire les grandes penses.
l'embrassant sur le seuil du monastre,

XIV.
Colomb, pntr de reconnaissance pour ce premier et gn- 35 reux ami qui ne l'abandonna jamais Ha v*>nx et du cur et

Obbistopbb CoLOMa
qui
il

15

renvoya toujours depuis


:

l'ori^fine

de sa fortune, s'achemina de
la cour.
Il

vers

Cordoue

c'tait alors la rtsidonco

marchait

avec sette contianco dans le succs qui est l'illusion, mais aussi
l'toile

du

gdnie.

Cette illusion ne devait pas tarder se dissi,

per et cette toile


gnois venait offrir

se voiler.
la

un monde

Le montunt o l'aventurier couronne d'Espagne semblait


de songer conqurir

mal choisi
itaient

Ferdinand et

Tsabulle, loin

des possessions problmatii{ues au del des murs inconnues,

occups reconqurir leur propre royaume sur les Maures d'Eapagne. Ces musulmans conqurants de la Pnin- 10 suie, aprs une longue et prospre possession, se voyaient enlever une une les villes et les provinces dont ils n'occupaient plus que les montagnes et les valles qui entouraient Grenade, Ferdinand et Isabelle capitale et merveille le leur empire.

employaient toute leur puissance, tous leurs efforts et toutes


ressources de leurs
cette citadelle

les

15

deux royaumes unis arracher aux Maures Unis par un mariage politique que des Espagnes.

l'amour avait ciment et qu'une gloire


avait apport en dot le

commune

illustrait, l'un

de

Castille,

cette

royaume d'Aragon, l'autre le royaume communaut de couronnes. Mais, bien que 20

le roi et !a reine

eussent confondu ainsi leurs provinces spares

en une seule patrie,


distincte et

ils conservaient nanmoins une domination indpendante sur leur royaume hrditaire. Ils

avaient leur conseil et leurs ministres part pour les intrts


rservs de leurs anciens sujets personnels.

Ces conseils ne se 25

confondaient eu un seul gouvernement que dans des intrts


patriotiques

communs aux deux empires et aux deux poux. La

nature semblait avoir dou ces deux souverains de formes, de qualits et d") perfections du corps et de Vme, diverses, mais

presque gales,

comme pour

complter l'un par l'autre

le

rgne 30

de prestige, de conqute, de civilisation et de prosprit qu'elle Ferdinand, un peu plus g qu'Isabelle, tait un leur destinait.
guerrier accompli et un politique consomm. Avant l'ge o l'homme apprend par la triste exprience connatre les hommes, Son seul dfaut tait une certaine incrdulit et 35 il les devinait. une certaine froideur qui viennent de la dfiance et qui ferment le cur l'enthousiasme et la magnanimit. Mais ces deux vertus qui lui manquaient un certain degr taient compenses dans ses conseils par la tendresse d'&me et par l'abondance de

16

Chbstophk CoLoma
d'Isabelle.

cur et de gnie
adure de
lui,

Jeune,

belle,

admire do

totia,

instruite,

pieuse sans superstition,

loquente,

pleine de feu pour ies grandes choses, d'attrait pour les grands

hommes, de confiance dans les grandes penses, elle imprimait a J cur et la politique de Ferdinand, l'hrosme qui vient du cur et le merveilleux qui vient de l'imagination. Elle inspirait, il

excutait, l'une trouvait sa

rcompense dans

la

renomme

de son poux, l'autre sa gloire dans l'admiration et dans l'amour de sa femme. Ce rgne deux, qui devait devenir presque fabuleux pour l'Espagne, n'i'ttendait, pour s'immortaliser 10 jamais entre tous les rgnes, que l'arrive de ce pauvre tranger qui venait implorer l'entre du palata de Cordoue, la lettre d'uu pauvre moine
la

main.

':

-''-...

^v

Cette lettre, lue avec prvention et incrdulit par le confesseur de la reine, n'ouvrit
d'attente, de refus d'audience et de dcouragement.

Colomb qu'une longue perspective 16 Les homaifaires et des cours,


,

et

mes n'ont dans le

d'oreilles
loisir.

pour

les

penses hardies que dans la solitude


ils

Dans

le

tumulte des

n'ont ni bienveillance ni temps.

';^

V:

Colomb
tranger,

fut repouss
dit

de toutes
Oviedo,

les portes,

parce qu'il tait 20

l'historien
qu'il tait

homme, parce
portait
-^'

contemporain de ce grand pauvrement vtu, et parce qu'il n'ap-

aux courtisans et aux ministres d'autres recommandations que la lettre d'un moine franciscain solitaire, depuis long-

temps oubli des cours.

2b

Le

roi et la reine n'entendirent

mme

pas parler de lui

le

compltement
obstin

confesseur d'Isabelle, par indiffrence ou par ddain, tronqua l'espoir que Juan Prs avait mis en lui. Colomb,

comme

la certitude

qui attend l'heure, ne s'loigna pas

de Cordoue, afin d'pier de plus prs un moment plus propice. 30 Aprs avoir puis dans l'attente la bourse modique de son ami, le prieur de la Ribida, il gagna misrablement sa vie dans son
petit tralc

d'un
)
;,-

monde

de globes et de cartes, jouant ainsi avec les images Sa vie rude et patiente qu'il devait conqurir.
laisse entrevoir,

- -

pendant ces nombreuses annes ne

au fond de 35

son obscurit, que la misre, le travail et les esprances tromJeune et tendre de cur, il aima cependant et il fut pe.

Christophb CoLOMa
aim pendant ces aniKea d'preuve cai' un. second fils, Fernando, naquit vers ce temps d'un amour mystrieux, que le mariage ne consacra jamais, et dont il rappelle la mmoire et le remords en paroles touchantes dans son testament. Il leva ce
;

17

ls naturel avec autant

de tendresse que son autre

fils

Diego.

XVL
et sa dignit extrieure transpiraient cependant humble profession. Les personnages distingus do qui son commerce scientitique le rapprochait quelquefois, recevaient de sa personne et de ses entretiens cette impression

Sa grce

travers son

d'tonnement et d'attraction, prophe'tie lectrique d'une grande 10 destine dans une mdiocre condition. Ce trafic et ces entretiens lui firent insensiblement des
les

amis dont

l'histoire a

conserv
futur,

noms pour
cite

les associer la

reconnaissance du

monde
;

Alonzo de Quintanilla, contrleur des finances d'Iaabolle ; Antonio Ger- 16 Getaldini, prcepteur des jeunes princes ses fils aldini, nonce du pape la cour de Ferdinand ; enfin Mendoza, archevque de Tolde et cardinal, homme d'uu tel crdit qu'il

on

tait appel troisime roi

d'Espagne.

XVIL
L'archevque de Toldo, d'abord effray de ces nouveauts
gographiques qui semblaient,
le

tort,

contredire les notions sur 20

dans la Bible, fut biontt rassur par la pit sincre et suprieure de Colomb. Il cessa de craindre un blaR[tlime dans des ides qui aggrandissent l'uvre et la

mcanisme

cleste contenues

sagesse de Dieu.
il

Sduit par

le

systme, charm par l'homme,

obtint une audience de ses souverains

pour son protg. 25

Colomb, aprs deux annes d'attente, parut cette audience avec la modestie d'un humble tranger, mais avec la confiance
d'uu ti.butaire qui apporte ses m<vitres plus qu'ils ne peuvent
lui

donner.

"

En pensant
je

ce que j'tais, crivit-il lui-mme plus tard, 30


;

j'tais
ais,

confondu d'humilit

mais, en songeant ce que j'apport-

me

sentais l'gal des

couronnes

je n'tais plus moi,

j'tais

l'instrument de Dieu, choisi et marqu pour accomplir un


. ,

grand dessein.**

r;

18

Christophe Colomb.

XVIIL
Ferdinand
enthousiasme.
entendit

Colomb avec
et

gravit,

Isabelle

avec
elle

Au

premier regard

aux premiers accent,

conut pour cet envoy do Dieu une admiration qui


nature avait donn
la

allait jus-

qu'au fanatisme, un attrait qui ressemblait la tendresse.


h,

La
5

personne de Colomb la sduction qui


l'esprit.

enlve les yeur., autant que l'loquence qui persuade

On

et dit qu'elle

le destinait

avoir pour premier aptre une


allait

reine, et

que

la vrit

dont

il

doter son sicle devait tre


Isabelle fut cette

reue et couve dans le cur d'une femme.

S constance en faveur de Colomb ne se dmentit ni 10 les indiffrents de sa cour, ni devant ses ennemis, ni Elle crut en lui ds le premier jour, elle fut devant ses revers. sa proslyte ur le trne et son amie jusqu'au tombeau. femme. devant
Ferdinand, aprs avoir entendu Colomb, nomma :n conseil d'examen Salamanque, sous la prsidence de Fernando de 15 Talavera, prieur du Prado. Ce conseil tait compos des hommes les plus verss dans les sciences divines et humaines des deux royaumes. Il se runit dans cotte capitale littraire de Colrmb y reut l'hospil'Espagne, au couvent des dominicains. talit. Les prtres et les religieux dcidaient alors de tout en 20 Espagne. La civilisation tait dans le sanctuaire. Les rois ne rgnaient que sur leurs actes, les ides appartenaient aux pontifes.

L'inquisition,

police

sacerdotale,

surveillait,

atteignait,

frappiit

jusqu'autour du trne tout ce qui encourait la tache

d'h-'sie.

Le

roi

avait adjoint ce conseil des professeurs 25

d'astronomie, de gographie, de mathmatiques et de toutes les


sciences professes Salamanque.

Cet auditoire n'intimidait


il

pas Colomb

il

se flattait d'y tre jug par ses pairs,

n'y fut

jug que par ses contempteurs.

La premire
les

fois qu'il

comparut
30

dans

la

grande

salle

du monastre,

moines

et les prtendus

savants, convaincus d'avance que toute thorie qui dpassait leur

ignorance ou leur routine n'tait que

le rve d'un esprit malade ou superbe, ne virent dans cet obscur tranger qu'un aventurier Personne ne daigna l'coucherchant tortane de ses chimres. ter, l'exception de deux ou trois religieux du couvent de 35 Saint Etienne de Salamanque, religieux obscurs et sans autorit,

qui se Uvrftient dans leur clotre des tudes mprises du drg

Christophe Colomb.
suprieur.

19
le

Les autres examinateurs de Colomb


des prophtes,

confondirent

par des citations de la Bible,

des psaumes, de

l'vangile et des pres de l'glfae, qui pulvrisaient d'avance,

par des textes indiscutables, la thorie du globe et l'existence

chimrique et impie des antipodes.


s'tait

Lactance, entre autres,

expliqu formellement cet gard dans un passage que

l'on opposait
* '

Colomb.
de

si absurde, avait dit Lactance, que de croire y a des antipodes ayant leur pieds opposs aux ntres, des hommes qui marchent les talons en l'air et la tte en bas, une 10 partie du monde o tout est l'envers, o les arbres poussent " avec les racines en l'air et les branches en bas.

Est-il rien

qu'il

Saint Augustin avait t plus loin,


seule foi dan les antipodes
'
:

il

avait tax d'iniquit la

Car, disait-il, ce serait supposer des nations qui ne descend- 15

ent pas

d'Adam

or, la

Bible dit que tous

les

hommes

descend-

ent d'un seul et

mme

pre."

D'autres docteurs, prenant une mtaphore potique pour un systme du mcmde, citaient au gographe ce verset du psaume

il

dit
il

que Dieu tendit

le ciel

sur la terre

comme une

tente,

20

d'o

rsultait, selon eux,

que

la terre devait tre plate.

Colomb rpondait en vain


qui n'excluait pas la nature
;

ses interlocuteurs avec

une pit

en vain,
il

les suivant respectueuse-

ment sur

le terrain

thologique,

se montrait plus religieux et

plus orthodoxe qu'eux,

l'uvre de Dieu.

parce qu'il tait plus enthousiaste de 25 Son loquence, que passionnait la vrit, per-

dans les tnbres volonde ces esprits obstins. Quelques religieux parurent seuls mus de doute ou branls de conviction i la voix de Colomb. Diego de Deza, moine de l'ordre de Saint-Dominique, homme 30 suprieur son sicle, et qui devint plus tard archevque de Tolde, osa combattre gnreusement les prjugs du conseil et Ce secours inattendu prter sa parole et son autorit il Colomb. ne put surmonter l'indiflrence ou l'obstination des examinaLes confrences se multiplirent, sans amener de con- 35 teurs.
dit tous ses foudres et tous ses clairs taires

clusion.

Elles languirent enfin et lassrent la vrit par des

de l'erreur. Elles furent interrompues par une nouvelle guerre de Ferdinand et d'Isabelle Colomb, ajourn, attrist, contre les Maures de Grenade.
dlais qui sont le dernier refuge

^0

Christophr COLOMa

mprisa, ^conduit, sontenu par la seule faveur d'Isabelle et par


la

conqute de Diego de Doza sa thorie, suivit misdrablement


cour et l'arme de carapement en
l'enif chait d'obtenir.

la

campement

et de ville en

ville,

piant en vain une heure d'attention que le tumulte des

armes
verse,

La

reine cependant, aussi fidle

la faveur secrte qu'elle lui portait

que

la fortune lui tait ad-

protger.

mconnu et .\ le Colomb une maison ou une Son trsorier tait tente dans toutes les haltes de la cour. charg d'entretenir le savant tranger, non en hte 'mportun qui 10
continuait bien esprer de ce p[nie
Elle faisait rserver

aume

mendie des secours, mais en hte distingu qui honore le royet que les souverains veulent retenir leur service.

XIX.
Ainsi s'coulrent plusieurs annes, pendant lesquelles le roi

de Portugal,
tait

e roi

d'Angleterre et

le roi

parler par leurs ambassadeurs de cet

homme trange qui


tenter

de France, ayant enten^lu promet- 15

un nouveau monde aux

rois,

firent

Colomb par des

U-

propositions d'entrer leur service.


qu'il avait

La

tendre reconnais.-ianoe

voue Isabelle et l'amour qu'il portait dofia liaEnriquez de Cordoue, dj mre de son second fils Fernando, lui firent carter ces ofl'res et le retinrent la suite de la 20 cour. Il rservait la jeune raine un empire en retour de sa bont pour luL II assista au i.ige et la conqute de Grenade il vit Boabdil rendre Ferdinand et Isabelle les clefs do cette capitale, les palais des Abencrages et la mosque de l'Alhanjtrix
;

bra.

Ils

fit

partie

du cortge des souverains

espagnol'^
11
'-

If

ur 25

entre triomphale dans ce dernier asile de l'islamisme.

jyait

au del de ces remparts et de ces valles de Grenade d'autres entres triomphales dans de plus vastes possessioiu. Tout lui semblait petit, compar ii ses peues. La paix qui suivit cette conqute, en 1492, motiva une seconde 30 runion d'examinateurs de ses plans Sville : ils devaient donCet avis, combattu en vain, ner leur avis la couronne. comme Salamanq '^, par Diego de Deza, fut de rejeter les ofl'res de l'aventurier gnois, sinon comme impies, au moins comme chimriques et compromettantes pour la dignit de la cour 35 d'Espagne, qui ne pouvait autoriser une entreprise sur d'aussi
purils fundemeuta.

Ferdinand, influenc nanmoins par

Is*-

Cheistophb CoLOMa
adoucit la duret de cette rsolution du conseil en la communiquant Colomb il lui fit esprer qu' lussitt aprs la tranquille posp saion de l'Espagne par l'expulsion acheve des Maures, la cour favoriserait de ses subsides et de sa marine l'expdition de dcouverte et de conqute dont il l'entretenait
belle,
:

21

depuis tant d'annes.

XX.
En
belle,

attendant sans trop d'illusion l'aocompliasement toujours

ajourn des promesses du roi et des dsirs plus sincres d'Isa-

Colomb tenta deux grands seigneurs


le

Medina-Sidonia et
leurs
frais

espagnols, le duc duc de Mediua-Celi, pour qu'ils fissent 10 L'un et l'autre possdaient des cette entreprise.
Ils

ports et des navires sur la cte d'Espagne.

sourirent d'abord

ces perspectives de gloire et de possessions maritimes pour


leur maison, puis
indiffrence.
l'et mrite'e
ils les

L'envie s'acharnait sur Colomb,

abaudounreut par incrdulit ou par mme avant qu'il 15


;

par un succs

elle le perscutait,

comme
;

par

anticipation et par instinct, jusque dans ses esprances


disputait ce qu'elle appelait ses chimres.
Il

elle lui

renona de nouveau

avec larmes ses tentatives.


ler, l'obstination

La

froideur des ministres l'cou-

des moines repousser ses ides

comme une 20

impit de la science, les vaines promesses et les ternels ajourne-

ments de la cour le jetrent, aprs six annes d'angoisses, dans un tel dcouragement qu'il renona dfinitivement toute sollicitation nouvelle auprs des souverains de l'Espagne et qu'il rsolut d'aller ofi'rir son empire au roi de France, dont il avait 25
reu quelques provocations.

Ruin de fortune, abattu d'esprance, puis d'attente, et le cur bris par la ncessit de s'arracher l'amour qui l'attachait doria Batrix, il partit de nouveau de Cordoue pied, sinon avec les perspectives de l'avenir, du moins pour aller retrouver 30 son fidle ami Juan Prs, au monastre de la Rabida. Il se proposait d'y reprendre son fils Diego qu'il y avait laiss, de le ramener Cordoue et de le confier, avant son dpart pour la France, dona Beatrix, mre de son fils naturel Fernando. Les

deux frres, levs ainsi par les soins et dans l'amour de la mme 35 f^ume, contracteraient l'un pour l'autre cette tendresse frater*
nelle, seul hritage qu'il

et leur

l&iasei.

22

OnRlSTOPUB OoLOM.

XXI.
Des larmes coulbrent des yeux du prieur Juan Pores, lorsqu'il son ami pied, vtu plus misrablement encore que la premire fois, frapper la porte du niotiastre, attestant asses par le dnment de ses habits et par la tristesse de son visage
vit

l'incrdulit des

hommes

et la ruine

de ses eape'rances.

Mais

la

Providence avait cach de nouveau le ressort de la fortune de Colomb dans le cur de l'amiti. La foi du pauvre moine dans
la vrit et

dans l'avenir des dcouvertes de son protg, au lieu


charitablement contre ses dislui
;

de

l'abattre, l'indigna et le roidit


Il

grces.

embrassa son hte, gmit et pleura avec

mais, 10
il

rappelant bientt toute son nergie et toute son autorit,

en-

voya chercher au palais le mdecin Fernandez, l'ancien confident des mystres de Colomb, Alonzo Pinzon, riche navigateur de ce
port, et Sbastien Rodriguoz, pilote

consomm de

Lpi.

Les

ides de Colomb, droules de nouveau devant ce petit conseil 15


d'amis, fanatisrent de plus en plus l'auditoire.

On

le

supplia

de rester, tenter encore la fortune, de conserver l'Espagne, quoique incrdule et ingrate, la gloire d'une entreprise unique dans l'histoire. Pinzon promit de concourir de ses richesses et de ses vaisseaux l'armement de
la flottille

immortelle, aussitt 20

que

gouvernement aurait consenti h l'autoriser. Juan Prs crivit, non plus au confesseur de la reine, mais la reine ellemme, intressant sa conscience autant que sa gloire une
le

entreprise qui amnerait des nations entires de l'idoltrie la


foi.

Il fit

parler la terre et le ciel,


la "^passion

il

trouva la persuasion et la 25

chaleur dans
l'amiti.

et dans Colomb, dcourag, se refusant porter cette lettre une cour dont il avait tant prouv les lent.'urs et les inattentions, le pilote Rodriguez se chargea de la porter lui-mme
la

de

grandeur de sa patrie

Grenade,

oti la

cour rsidait alors.

Il partit,

accompagn des 30
revenir triom-

vux

et des prires

du couvent

et des

amis de Colomb Palos.


le vit

Le quatorzime jour
phant au monastre.
elle avait retrouv

aprs son dpart, on

La

reine avait lu la lettre de

JuAn Per

cette lecture toutes ses prventions favorElle mandait l'instant le vnrable 35

ables pour le Gnois.

prieur la cour, et elle faisait dire

vent de

Colomb d'attendre au coudu moine et la rsolution du conseil. Juau Prs, ivre du bonheur de son ami, t seller sa mule
la Ilabida le retour

CiiRisTOPHB Colomb.
sans perdre une heure et se mit en route la nuit
travers les paya infests par les Maures.

98

mme,
que

seul,

Il sentait

le oiel

protgeait en lui le grand dessein qu'il avait an dpt dans son

ami.
vit la

Il

arriva
;

les portes

du

palais s'ouvrirent son

nom.

Il

reine

il

ralluma en

elle,

par l'ardeur de e& propre convie-

tion, la foi et le zh\e qu'elle avait

conus d'elle-mme pour ce


favorite d'Isabelle, se pas-

^rand

uvre.

La marquise de Maya,

sionna par enthousiasme et par pit pour le protg du saint


religieux.

Ces deux curs de femmes, allums par l'loquence


de
la cour.

d'un moine pour les projets d'un aventurier, triomphrent des 10

envoya Colomb une somme mule et des vtements et qu'il se rendt immdiatement la cour. Juan Prs, restant auprs d'elle pour soutenir son ami de ses dmarches et de son crdit, fit passer ces heureuses nouvelles et 15 ce secours d'argent la Kabida par un messager, qui remit la lettre et la somme au mdecin Fernandez de Falos pour tre transmise Colomb.
rsistances

Isabelle

d'argent prise sur son trsor secret pour qu'il achett une

XXIL
Colomb, ayant achet une mule et pris un serviteur, arriva
Grenade, et fut admis dbattre ses plans et ses conditions avec 20
les

ministres de Ferdinand.

"
et

On

voyait alors, crit


la cour,

un tmoin

oculaire,

un homme obscur

inconnu suivre

couronnes dans la
de dcouvrir

confondu par les conseillers des deux foule des solliciteurs importuns, repaissant son

imagination, dans le coin des antichambres,

du pompeux

projet 25

un monde.

Grave,
il

mlancolique et abattu au
qui remplissait
tait

milieu de l'allgresse publique,

semblait voir avec indiffrence

l'achvement de cette conqute de Grenade,


d'orgueil

un peuple

et

deux cours

cet

homme

Christophe

Colomb."
Les obstacles cette
qu'il offrait

30
fois vinrent
il

de Colomb.

l'Espagne,

voulait,

Sr du continent par respect pour la grandeur

mme du
stipuler,

prsent qu'il allait faire au

monde

et ses souverains,

pour ses descendants, des conditions dignes, non de lui mme, mais de son uvre. En manquant d'un 35 lgitime orgueil, il aurait cru manquer de foi en Dieu et de diglui et

pour

nit

en sa mission.

Pauvre, b&uI et couduit,

il

traitait

en

u
penses.

Christophe Colomb.

louverain des possessions qu'il ne voyait encore que dans ses

"

Un mendiant,

disait

Fernandex de Talavera, chef du conseil,


puissance et les

fait les

conditions d'un roi aux rois,"

Il exigeait le titre et les privilges d'amiral, la

honneurs de vice-roi de toutes

les terres qu'il adjoindrait par ses

dcouvertes l'Espagne, la dlme perptuit, pour lui et pour


ses descendants, de tous les revenus
*

de ces possessions.

Singulires exigences d'un aventurier, s'criaient ses adver-

saires

dans le conseil, qui lui attribueraient pralablement


flotte et la possession
s'il

le

com- 10

mandement d'une
limites,

d'une vice-royaut sans

russit

dans son entreprise, et qui ne l'engagent en

rien

s'il
*'
l

ne

russit pas, puisque sa misre actuelle n'a rien

perdre

On
ner
;

s'tonna d'abord de ces exigences, on

finit

par s'en indig- 15

on

lui offrit

des conditions moins onreuses la couronne.

Du

fond do son indigence et de son nant, il refusa tout. Lass, mais non vaincu par dix-huit ans d'preuves, depuis le jour ol il
portait en lui sa pense et

il

l'offrait

de

la terre,

il

aurait rougi de rien rabattre


Il se retira

en vain aux puissances du prix du don que 20


et,

Dieu

lui avait fait.

respectueusement des confrreprit le

ences avec les commissaires de Ferdinand,

nu sur

sa mule, prsent de la reine,

il

remontant seul et chemin de Cor-

duue, pour se rendre de l en France.

XXIII.
Isabelle,

en apprenant

le

dpart de son protg, eut

comme le

25

pressentiment des grandes choses qui s'loignaient pour jamais


d'elle

avec cet

homme

prdestin.

Elle s'indigna contre ses


s'cria-t-olle, le prix

commissaires qui marchandaient avec Dieu,

d'un empire, et surtout


leur faute l'idoltrie.

le

prix de millions d'mes laisses par


et le contrleur

La marquise de Maya

30

des finances d'Isabelle, Quintanilla, partagrent et animrent

encore
hsitait

t^es
;

remords.

Le

roi,

plus froid et plus calculateur,

la

dpense de l'entreprise dans un

moment de

pnurie

du

trsor le retenait.
s'cria

**Eh bien,
Isabelle, je

danc un transport de gnreux enthousiasme 35

me

charge seule de l'entreprise pour

ma

couronne

B
)S

ir

r-

a-

10

IH

15

Ke.
>,

il

es

ue 20
Jr-

et
r-

le
lis

25

lea

ix
lar

ur 30
nt

ir,
rie

me
n

35

e r
II

g
e

h
h
et VI

al

n M
aj

ne p

cl

m
qi
le

ta

be
to

cr
au

ChRIBTOPHK COLOH&
Je mettrai mes bijoux et mes diamants en gage pour subvenir aux frais de l'armement "
peraonnello de Oaatille
I

If

Cet lan du cur d'une


et,

femme triompha de
deux monarchies.

l'conomie du

roi,

par un calcul plus sublime, acrjuit d'incalouhibles trcaors de

richesses et de provinces

Lo

dsintresse-

ment

inspir par l'enthousiasme est la vritable conomie des


la vritable sagesse
:

grandes .mes et

des grands politiques.


le

messager que la reine lui envoya pour le rappeler le rencontra quelques lieues de Qrenade, sur le pont de Pinos, dfil fameux entre des rochers ok les 10 Maures et lus chrtiens avaient souvent confondu leur sang dans les euux du torrent qui sparait les deux races. Oolomb, attendri, revint se jeter aux pieds d'Isabelle. Elle obtint, par ses larmes, du roi Ferdinand la ratification des conditions exiges par Colomb, y En servant la cause abandonne de ce grand 15

On

courut sur les pas du fugitif

homme,

cette partie

cause de Dieu lui-mme, ignor de du genre humain qu'il allait conqurir la foi. Elle voyait le royaume cleste dans les acquisitions que son favori Ferdinand y voyait son royaume terallait faire son empire. Soldat de la chrtient en Espagne et vainqueur des 20 restre.
elle croyait servir la

Maures, tout ce
ajout au

qu'il ajoutait

de

tidles

nombre de

ses sujets par le

la foi de Rome tait pape ; les millions d'hom-

mes

qu'il allait rallier

net aventurier lui taient

par les bulles de la

au christianisme par les dcouvertes de donns d'avance en pleine possession cour de Rome. Tout ce qui n'tait pas 25 de droit toute partie de l'humarque du sceau du Christ n'tait pas
;

chrtien, ses yeux, tait esclave

manit
quait au
le ciel.

({ui

n'tait pas

marque du sceau de l'homme.

Rome
et

les

donnait ou les trola terre et

nom

de sa souverainet spirituelle sur en

dans
assez 30

Ferdinand tait assez crdule politique pour les accepter.

mme temps

Le

trait entre

Ferdinand, Isabelle et ce pauvre aventurier

gnois, arriv pied quelques annes auparavant


tale et n'ayant d'asile

dans leur capi-

aux portes d'un monasIsa- 35 tre, fut sign dans la plaine de Grenade le 17 avril 1492. belle prit elle seule, au compte de sou royaume de Castille, Il tait juste que celle qui avait tous les frais de l'expdition.
que
l'hospitalit

cru la premire risqut davantajjie dans l'entreprise


aussi

il

tait juste

que

la gloire et la

reconnaissance du succs s'attachassent

26
avant tout autre
port do Paies,
n)ni

OnnisTOPUB CoLOMa
l

on nom.

On

assigna

ft

Colomb

le petit

en Andalousie, pour centre d\)rg:ini8ation do l'expuMition et pour point de dpart de son escadre. La penstio conue au monastl're do la llubida, voisin do Palos, p;ir Juan
Prs et par ses amis dans leur premire rencontre avec Colomb,
revenait d'o elle dhiit partie.
5

Le prieur de

ce monantre allait

prsider aux prparatifs et voir, de son ermitage, la premire


voile de son ami he dployer vurs ce monde inconnu vu ensemble du regard du gnie et de la foi
qu'ils avaient

XXIV.
Des
ablos,

obstacles

nombreux, imprvus, en apparence in.surmont- 10


)iux

s'oppimreat de nouveau

faveurs d'Isabelle et

i\

l'aucompIisHemont des promesHO de Fordinand.


q'ia daii3 le trsor royal
tioiis
;

L'argent n^anl'xpo'di-

les

vaisseaux employ.^ des


;

pluM urguntes s'loignaient des ports d'Espagne


si

les

marins
si

refusrent tout enL,'agoment pour une traverse

longue et

mystdriouse, ou
villes

ilji

dsertrent mesure qu'on les recrutait.

Les

du

littoral,

contraintes par ordre de la cour fournir les

bft,timents,

h.sitrent obit et dsarniront les navires con-

damns, dans l'opinion gnrale, une porte certaine.


brisrent cent fois dans les mains de

L'incr-'>

dulit, la terreur, l'envie, la drision, l'avarice, larvult'omfime,

Colomb

et dos agents

de

la

cour eux-mmes
d'fcabelle avait

les

moyens matriels d'excution que

la faveur

mis &a disposition. Il semblait qu'un fatal gnie, obstin il lutter contre le gnie de l'unit de la terre, voult .sparer jamais ces deux mondes que la pense d'un seul 25

homme

voulait unir,

Colomb prsidait tout du fond du monastre de la Rabida, o son ami, le prieur Juan Pora, lui avait donn de nouveau
i
l'hospitalit.

religieux, l'expdition

Tous les moine eut recours

Sans l'intervention et l'influence de ce pauvre ordonne chouait dfinitivement encore. 30 ordres de la cour taient impuissants ou dsobis. Le
ses

amis de Palos

ils

se firent sa

foi,

ses prires, ses conseils.

Trois frres, riches navigateurs de

Palos, les Pinzon, se sentirent enfin pntrs de la conviction et

de l'esprance qui inspiraient l'ami de Colomb. Ils crurent 35 entendre la voix de Dieu dans celle de ce vieillard solitaire. Ils
^'aaBocirent spontauinent l'eutreprise,
'1

ils

fi<urnirent l'argent.

11

CiiRisTOPHR Colomb.
ils dquiiiferont.

if
ils enjacjr-

troi> navires

nppeMs

alors carnvollos,
s et

et, pour donner la fois l'impulsion et l'exeniplo A la confiance do leurs marins, doux des trois frres, Martin-Alonzo Pinzon et VincentYans Pinzon, rsolurent de s'embarquer et de prendre euxujmes des conunar dments sur leurs vaisseaux. GrAce h, cotte

ent dus n)atlots des petits ports de Pale

do Mojuer,

gnreuse asHiHtance des Pinzon, trois vaisseaux, ou piutAt trois barques, la Sauta-Marin, la l'inta et la Nina, furent ou tat de

preudiu

la nier le

vendredi 3 aot

141)2.

XXV.
Au
la

lover

du

jour,

prieur et par les religieux

mer

et ses voiles,

Colomb, acoonipngn jusqu'au rivage par le 10 du couvent dt la llibida, qui bnirent embrassa son fila laiss aux soins do Juan
le

Pers et monta sur

plus ,;rand de es bAtinienta, la Santa-

y arbora son pavilh)U d'annral d'un oce'.ui ignor et de vice-roi de terres inconnues. Lo peuple des deux ports et do 15 la cto se pressait en foule innombrable sur le rivage pour assister ii co dpart, que les prjugs populaires croyaient sans retour. C'tait un corti^'o do deuil plus qu'un aalut d'houreuae traverse ; il y avait plus de tristesse que d'esprance, plus do larmes que d'acclamations. Les mres, les femmes, les surs 20
Il

Maria.

des matelots maudissai--.t voix basse ce funeste tranger qui


avait sduit par ses paroles enchantes l'esprit de la reine et qui prenait tant do vies d'hommes sous la responsabilit d'un do ses
les hommes qui entranent un de ses prjugs, suivi regret, entrait dans l'in- 25 connu au bruit des maldictions et des murmures. C'est la loi Tout ce qui dpasse l'humanit, mme des choses humaines.

rves.

Colomb, comme tous


del,

peuple au

pour

lui

murmurer.

conqurir une ide, une vrit ou un monde, la fait L'homme est comme lOcan, il a une tendance au
et

mouvement
le

un poids naturel vers

l'immobilit.
:

tendances contraires ualt l'quilibre de sa nature

De ces doux 30 malheur qui

rompt

XXVI.
h peine comparable une expdition sur la cte, tait bien propre contraster, dans les yeux et dans l'me du peuple, avec la grandeur et les 35
fotille,

L'aspect de cette

de pche ou de

trafic

28
prils qu'elle allait
si

Ohristophb COLOMa
tmrairement affronter.

Dos trois barque


C'tait

de Colomb, une seule

tait ponte, celle qu'il montait.

de commerce, dj vieux et fatigu des une lame auriiit suffi Les deux autres taient sans pont flots. pour les engloutir. Mais la poupe et la proue de ces barques,

un

troit et frle navire

trs-leves au-dessus des vaoues,

comme

les galres antiques,

avaient deux denii-ponta dont le vide donnait asile aux matelots

dans

les gros temps et empochaient que le poids d'une vague embarque ne ft sombrer la caravelle. Ces barques taient montes de deux matr., l'un au milieu, l'autre en arrire du bti- 10 Le premier do ces mt portait une seule grando voile me. carre xrf second, une voile latine triangulaire. De longues rames, rarement et diflicilement employes, s'adaptaient, dans le calme, aux bordages bas du milieu de la caravelle, et pouvaient, au besoin, imprimer une lente impulsion au btiment. C'est sur 1 ces trois barques d'ingale grandeur que Colomb disposa les
;

Fi

cent vingt
seul

hommes qui composaient en tout ses quipages. Lui y montait avec un visage serein, avec un regard assur, avec un cur ferme. Ses conjectures avaient pris depuis dix-huit Bien qu'il et 20 "ns, dans son esprit, le corps d'une certitude. dpass ce jour-l plus de la moiti de sa vie et qu'il eulrt r'ans
'"

sa cinquante-septime anne,

il

regardait

comme

rien les annes

qui taient derrire lui


il

toute sa vie. ses yeux, tait on avant ; se sentait la jeunesse de l'esprance et l'avenir de l'immortalit.
;

pour prendre possession de ces mondes vers lesquels il 25 il crivit et il publia, en montant sur son navire, un rcit solennel de toutes les phatss que son esprit et sa fortune avaient parcourues jusque-l pour concevoir et pour
orientait ses voiles,

Comme

excuter son dessein


titres,

il y joignit l'nunration de tous les ; de tous les honneurs, de tous les commandements dont il 30 venait d'tre investi par ses souverains sur ses futures possessil

ions, et
foi et

invoqua

le

Christ et les honnues eu protection de sa

en tmoignage do sa constance.

'Et ces* pour cela, dit-il en tiuissant cette proclamation au vieux et au nouveau monde, que je me condamne tt ne plus dur- 35 mit pendant cette navigation et jusqu' l'accomplissement deceg " choses
!
*

xxvn.
d'Europe
le

Une

brise heureuse qui soufflait

poussa doucement

vers les llei Oftnaries, dernire halte des uavig^^teurN sur l'Ocan.

CHRISTOrnB COLOMR
Dieu de ces augures qui contribuaient il aurait pourtant prfr qu'un vent ternpaieux l'emportt plein souffle hora des parages connus et fre'quentds des navires. Il craignit avec raison que la vue des ctes lointaines de l'Eftpagne ne rappelt, par les invincibles attraits do la patrie, les yeux et le cur des marins irrsolus et
T(mt en rendant prco
rassdrdner sea
h,

2d

quip:i,<i;i?s,

.')

timides qui hsitaient encore en s'embarquant. /l)ana les entreprises

suprmes,

il

ne faut pas donner aux

hommes
Colomb
connues

le

temps de
Il

la rflexion

et les occasions

du

repentir.

le savait.

brlait d'avoir pass les limites des vagues


lui seul la possibilit

et d'avoir

10

du

retour, dans le secret de sa route, de ses

Son impatience de perdre de vue les du vieux continent n'tait que trop fonde. Un de ses navires, la /"wto, dont le gouvernail s'tait bris et qui faisait eau dans sa cale, lui fit chercher, malgr lui, les iles Canaries 15 pour y changer cette embarcation contre une autre. Il perdit environ trois semaines dans ces ports, sans pouvoir y trouver un 11 fut contraint de navire appropri sa longue traverse. radouber seulement la Pinta et de donner une autre voilure la Nina, sa troisime conserve, barque lourde et paresseuse qui 20 ralentissait sa marche. Il y renouvela ses provisions d'eau et do Sus btiments troits et sans pont ne lui permettaient vivres.
cartes et de sa boussole.

rivages

-'1
:

1 i

de porter

la vie

de ses cent vingt

hommes que

pou. un nombre

de jours compts.

Apres avoir quitt les Canaries, l'aspect du volcan de Tnr 25 ifl'e, dont une ruption enflammait le<;iel et se rverbrait dans la Ils crurent y mer, jeta la terreur dans l'me de ses matelots. voir le glaive flamboyant de l'ange qui chassa le premier homme de l'Eden, dfendant aux enfunts d'Adam l'entre des mers et des L'amiral passa de navire en navire pour dissi- 30 terres interdites. per cette panique populaire et pour expliquer scientifiquenu-nt Mais ces hommes simples les lois physiques de ce phnomne.
la disparition

du pic de Tnriffe, quand il s'abaissa sous l'horiimprima autant de tristesse que son cratre leur Il tait pour eux la dernire borne, le 35 avait inspir d'elFroi. Eu le perdant de vue, ils crurent dernier phare du veil univers.
zon, leur

avoir perdu jusqu'aux jalons de leur route

travers

ui>

incom-

mensuralile espace.
et

Ils se sentirent

naviguant dans l'ther d'une

comme dtachs de la terre autre plante. Une prostration

so
gdudr.'ilo

CiiiiisTopnB Coi.omu.
de
l'esprit

et

du

corps s'empara d'eux.

Ils

dtaiont

connue des spectres ([ui ont perdu jusqu' leur tombeau. L'amiral les rassembla do nouveau autour do lui sur son navire, relova leur

me par
il

l'nurgie de la sienne, et s'abandonnait,

comme

le

pote de l'inconnu, l'inspiration loquente de ses


leur dcrivit,
les

espe'rances,
les terres,

comme

s'il

les avait

dj frquento's,

les lies,

mors, les royaumes, les richesses, les

vgtations, les soleils,


perles,
les

les mines d'or, les plages sables do montagnes blouissantes da pierres prcieuse, les

plaines

embaumes

l'autre ct

d'pices qui 3e levaient dj pour lui do 10 de cet espace dunt chaque lame portait leurs voiles
flicits.

ces merveilles et ces

Ces images peintes des coules

leurs prestigieuses de l'opulente imagination de leur chef enivr-

rent et relevrent ces curs abaisss

vents alizs, souillant

constamment
elirayer.

et

doucement de

l'est,

semblaient seconder l'impa- 15

tience des matelots.

La

distance seule pouvait dsormais les

Colomb, pour leur drober une partie de l'espace il travers lequel il les entranait, soustrayait chaque jour, de son calcul de lieues marines, une partie de la distance parcourue, et
trompait ainsi de
la

moiti du chemin l'imagination de ses 20


Il

pilotes et de ses matelots.


la vritable e.4ime, afin

notait secrtement pour lui seul


le

de connatre, seul aussi,


les jalons

nombre de
qu'il voulait
elFet,

vagues qu'il avait franchies et


cacher

do route

comme un

secret ses rivaux.

Les quipages, en

illusionns par l'haleine gale

du vent

et par la paisible oscilla-

2&

tion des lames, se figuraient llotter lentement dans les dernires


uiers d'Europe.

XXVIIL
Il

aurait

voulu leur drober galement un phnomne qui

dconcertait sa propre science


c'tait la variation
et,

deux cents
aimante de

lieues

de Tariffo

de

l'aiguille

la boussole, dernier

30

selon

lui, infaillible

guide, qui chancelait lui-mme aux limi-

hmisphre infrquent. Il porta seul en lui mme, pendant quelques jours, ce doute terrible. Mais ses pilotes, attes d'un

s'aperurent bientt de ces tonnement, mais moins raffermis 39 que leur chef dans l'inbranlable rsolution de braver mme la nature, ils crurent que les lments eux-minease troublaient ou
tentifs
lui l'habitacle,

comme

variations.

Saisis

du

mme

Christophe Colomu.
changeaient de
loi

SI

au bord de l'espace
lu

infini,

Le

vertige qu'ils

Ils se communiqurent eu plissant leur doute et abandonnrent les na\ ires au hasard des flots et des vents, seuls guides qui leur Leur dcouragement consterna tous les restassent dsormais. Colomb, qui cherchait en vain s'expliquer luimatelots.

dupposaient dans

nature paasa dans leur me.

mme un
la raison,

mystre dont
ciel

la science d'aujourd'hui

recherche encore

eut recours cette puissante imagination, boussole


l'avait doue.
Il

intime dont le

inventa une explication


10 des astres nouveaux

fausse, mais spcieuse

pour des

esprits sans culture, dtjs varia-

tions de l'aiguille aimante.

11 l'attribua

du ple, dont l'aiguille attire suivait les mouvements alternatifs dans le firmament. Cette explication, conforme aux princi2>e3 astrologiques du temps, satisfit les pilotes, La vue d'un hron 15 et leur crdulit rendit la foi aux matelots. et d'un oiseau du tropique, qui vinrent le lendemain voler autour des mts de la flf/tille, opra sur leurs sens ce que l'explicirculant autour
cation de l'amiral avait opr sur leur pense.
tants de la terre ne pouvaient vivre sur

sans herbes et sans eaux.

Ils

Ces deux habiun ocan sans arbres, leur app;irurent comme deux 20
le

tmoins qui venaient


d'un oiseau.

certifier,
Ils

avant

tmoignage oculaire,

les

mditations de Colomb.
la foi

vogurent avec plus d'assurance sur


suave, gale et sereine de
ciel, la

La tem[ r^ture

cette partie

lames, les
l'air,

de l'Ocan, la hmpidit du jeux de dauphins autour de


les

transparence des

la

proue, la titteur de 25

les

parfums que

vagues apportent de loin et qu'elles

semblent transpirer en cumant, les lueurs plus vive des constelhitions et des toiles dans la nuit, tout semblait, dans ces
latitudes, pntrer les sens
viction.

de srnit
prsages dn

Or

respirait les

comme les mes de conmonde encore invisible. 30

On

se souvenait les jours resplendissants, des astres amis, des

tnbres encore lumineuses des printemps de l'Andalousie.

"Il n'y manquait, crit Colomb, que

le rossignol."

XXIX.
La mer
aussi

M-lames.

commenait rouler

ses prsagea.
lt;

inconnues flottaient fr(iuemment sur

Des plantes Les unes, 3

disent les historiens de cette premire traverse, taient des


jjlante

marines qui ne croissent que sur

les

baa-fouds voisins doa

83
rivages
;

Christophe Colomr
les autres, des plantes saxillaires
;

que

les vajues n'enl;

vent qu'aux rochers

les autres,

des plantes fluviales

quelques-

unes, frachement dtachdea des racines, conservaient la verdure

de leur sve

l'une d'elles portait


toufTo

un crabe

vivant, navigateur

embarqu sur une

Ces plantes et ces trea vivants ne pouvaient pas avoir pass beaucoup de jours sur l'eau
d'herbe.

sans se faner et sans mourir.

Un

oiseau de l'espce de ceux qui

no s'abattent pas sur

les

vagues et qui ne dorment jamais sur


D'oii venait-il
? ?

l'eau, traversa le ciel.

oh

allait-il ? le lieu

de

Bon sommeil pouvait-il tre loign

Plus

loin,

l'Ocan changeait 10
;

il

de temprature et de couleur, indices de fonds varis ailleurs, ressemblait d'immenses prairies marines dont les vagues her-

bues taient fauches par la proue et ralentissaient le sillage ; le des brumes lointaines, telles que celles qui s'attachent aux grandes cimes du globe, affectaient l'horizon 15 les formes de plages et de montaf(nes. Le cri de "terre " tait sur
soir et le matin,
le

bord de toutes

les lvres.

Colomb ne

voulait ni trop confir-

nier ni trop teindre des esprances qui servaient ses desseins en

ranimant ses compiignons. Mais il ne se croyait encore (]u' trois cents lieues de Tnrifl'e, et, dans ses conjectures, il ne 20
trouverait la terre qu'il cherchait qu' sept

ou huit cents

lieues

plus loin.

XXX.
il renfermait en lui seul ses conjectures, sans ams couipagnons dont le coeur ft assez, ferme pour ualer sa constance et assez sr pour contenir ses secrtes apprhen- 25 dans ce' te longue traverse, d'entretien Il n'avait, sions.

Cependant
ses

parmi

qu'avec ses propres penses, avec les astres et avec Dieu dont
se sentait le confident.

il

Presque sans sounneil, connue il l'avait dit dans sa proclamation d'adieu au vieux monde, il passait les jours, dans sa chambre de poupe, noter en caractres intelli- 30 gibles pour lui seul les degrs, les latitudes, les espaces qu'il
croyait avoir franchis
ses pilotes,
;

il

passait les nuits sur le pont, auprs

tudier

les astres et surveiller la mer.

son dsert,

comme Mose conduisant le imprimant ses compagnons par sa gravit pensive, 35 tantt un respect, tantt une dliance, tantt une terreur qui les isolement ou distance qu'on remarque prsloigiiaient de lui
toujours seul
:

de Presque peuple de Dieu dans

Christophe Colomb.
que toujours autour des honimes supvrieurs d'iddes et de rsolution leurs semblables, soit

3S

que ces

.munies inspirt^d aient

besoin

de plus de solitude et de recueillement pour

8'ei \^;gt enir

avec

eux-mmes,
n'aiment pas

soit
ii

que

les

hommes

iriWrieurs qu'ils intimident


5.

les

approcher de peur de se mesurer avec ces

hautes natures et de sentir leur petitesse devant ces grandeurs

morales de la cration.

XXXL
La
dans
les

terre
les

souvent indique ne se montrait nanmoins que


;

mirages des matelots


les

chaque matin
ctes.

dissipait

devant

proues des navires

horizons fantastiques que la

brume du 10

soir leur avait fait


;

prendre pour des

Ils allaient plon-

jeant toujours

comme dans un abme

sans bord et sans fond.

La

rgularit et la constance

mme du

vent d'est qui

les secondait,

sans qu'ils eussent orienter une seule fois leurs voiles depuis
tant de jours,
Ils
le

taient pour eux une cause de trouble d'esprit. 15 commenaient se figurer que ce vent rgnait ternellement mme dantf cette rgion du grand Ocan, ceinture du globe,

et qu'aprs les avoir fait


l'ouest,
il

descendre avec tant de

facilit vers

serait

un insurmontable

obstacle h leur retour.

Com-

ment remonteraient-ils

jauiais ce courant

de vents contraires 20

autrement qu'en louvoyjint dans ces espaces ? Et, s'il leur fallait louvoyer pendant des bordes sans fin pour retrouver les ctes

du vieux monde, comment leurs provisions d'eau et de vivres, dj demi consommes, suifiraient-elles aux longs mois de leur navigation en arrire ? Qui les sauverait de l'horrible perspec- 25
tive de

::..f

mourir dt

soif et

de faim dans leur longue lutte avec ces

vents qui les repoussaient de leurs ports


aient calculer le
jours,

Beaucoup commennombre de jours, de rations ingales ces murmurer contre une obstination toujours trompe dans

leur chef, et se reprocher voix basse

une persvrance de 30

dvouement qui sacrifiait mence d'un seul.

les vies

de cent vingt

hommes

la d-

tion, la

Mais chaque fois qne le murmure allait grossir jusqu' la sdiProvidence semblait leur envoyer des prsages plus convaincants et plus inattendus pour les changer en esprances. 36 Ainsi, le 20 septembre, ces vents favorables, mais alarmants par leui fixit, varirent et passrent au sud-ouest. Les matelots

34

Christophe CoLOMa

salubrcnt ce changement., bien que contraire leur route,

comme
soir,

un signe de

vie et de mobilitiS

dans

les

eimonts, qui leur faisait

reconnatre une palpitation de Tair aur leurs voiles.

Le

de
les

petits oiseaux des races les plus frles, faisant leur nid

dans

arbustes et dans les vergers domestiques, voltigrent en ^azouillant autour des mts.

Leurs ailes fragiles et leurs gazouillements joyeux n'indiquaient en eux aucun symptme de lassitude ou d'efi'roi comme dans les voles d'oiseaux qui auraient t emports malgr eux bien loin sur la mer par un coup de vent.
Leurs chants, semblables ceux que
autour de leurs charmilles, dans
taient de prochains rivages.
les les

matelots entendaient 10
les bois

myrtes et dans

d'orances de l'Andalousie, leur rappelaient la patrie et les invi-

Us reconnurent des passereaux


Les herbes plus

qui habitent toujours les toits des hommes.

paisses et plus vertes sur la surface des vagues imitaient des 15


prairies et des

champs avant

la

maturit des gerbes.

La

vgta-

tion cache sous l'eau apparaissait avant la terre.


les

Elle ravissait

yeux des marins


si

lasss de l'ternel azur des flots.

Mais

elles

devinrent bientt

touffues qu'ils craignirent d'y entraver leur

gouvernail et leur quille et d'tre retenus captifs dans ces joncs 20

de l'Ocan,

comme

les

navires de la

mer du Nord dans


:
!

les glaces.

Ainsi chaque joie se changeait bien vite en larmes

tant

l'in-

Colomb, comme connu a de terreur pour le cur de l'homme un guide cherchant sa route travers ces mystres de 1 Ocan, tait oblig de paratre comprendre ce qui l'tonnait lui-mme et 25 d'inventer une explication pour chaque tonnement de sea mateIota.

XXXIL
Les calmes de
:-..

la ligne les jetrent

dans

la consternation.

Si

tout juaqu'uu vent, mourait dans ces parages, qui rendrait le


souflie

leurs voiles et

le

mouvement
:

leurs vaisseaux?

La 30

mer

tout coup se gonfla sans vent


lit.

ils

crurent des convulbaleine se montra

sions souterranies son

Une immense
:

endormie sur
dvorant

le dos des

vagues

ils

imaginrent des monstres


se 35

les nefs.

L'ondulation des vagues les emportait sur


:

des courants qu'ils ne pouvaient surmonter faute de vei.c

ils

figurrent qu'ils approchaient dos cataractes de la mer, et qu'ils


aliaieat tre eutralas daiia les

abmes et dans

les

r^rvoirs o le

Chbistophb Colomb.
dluge avait tancU ses mondes d'eau. Ils se groupaient, sombres et irrits, au pied des uidts j ils se communiquaient plus haute
voix leurs

36

murmures

ils

parlaient de forcer les pilotes virer

de bord, de jeter l'amiral la mer,


laissait
tre.

comme un

insens qui ne

de choix ses compagnons qu'entre


les

le suicide

ou

le

mour-

Colomb, qui

regards et les murmures rvlaient ces

complots, les bravait par sou attitude ou les dcimcertait par sa


confiance.

La nature
proues.

vint

:l

son secours en faisant souffler de nouveau


l'est

les

vents rafraichinsants de

et en aplanissant la

mer

sous ses 10

Avant

la fin

du jour, Alonzo Pinzon, qui commandait

qui naviguait assez prs de l'amiral pour quil pt s'entretenir avec lui bord bord, jeta le premier cri de Terre !
la Pinia, et

de sa poupe. Tous les ipaipages, rptant ce cri de de vie et de triomphe, se jetrent , genoux sur les ponts 15 et entonnrent l'hymne do Gloire Dieu dans le ciel tt sur la ferfr.'^Ce chant religieux, premier hymne mont au Crateur

du

liaut

salut,

du sein de ce jeune ocan, roula lentement sur les vagues. Quand il eut cess, tout le monde monta aux mts, aux hunes, aux cordages les plus lves des navires, pour prendre possession 20 par ses propres yeux du rivage entrevu par Pinzon, au sud-ouest. Colomb seul doutait, mais il aimait trop crcnre pour contredire Bien qu'il ne chercht sa terre seul le dlire de ses quipages. lui qu' l'ouest, il laissa gouverner au sud pendant toute la nuit, aimant mieux perdre un peu de sa route pour complaire 25 ses compagnons que de perdre la popularit passagre due leur Le lever du soleil no la dissipa que trop vite. Lg. illusion. terre imaginaire de Pinzon s'tait *vanouie avec la brume de la
nuit.

L'amiral reprit la route do ses penses vers l'ouest.

XXXIIL
L'Ocan avait do nouveau aplani sa surface le soleil sans 30 nuage et saiifl limite s'y rverbrait c(^mme dans uu second ciel. Les lames CMrcssautes couronnaient la proue de lgres cumes ; les dauphins, plus nombreux, bondissaient dans le sillage toute
;
;

lu

mer semblait habite


les

les

poissons volaient, s'lanyaieut et

retombaient sur
certer avec

ponts de navires.
la

Colomb dans

Tout semblait se cqn- 30 nature pour entraner par un esjioir

reuaisaut aos m^tdioti

({ui

oubliaient les jours.

Le

1er octobre,

36
T''

Christophb Colomb.
s'imaginrent n'avoir
fait

ils

que
:

bi cents lieues hors dos para-

ges frquentes des navigateurs


u

le livre

d'estime secrot de l'amles signes

iral

en accusait plus de huit cents.

Cependant tous

du voisinage des

terres se multipliaient autour d'eux, mais point


6

de terre l'horizon. La terreur rentra dans leur me. Colomb lui-mme, sous son calme apparent, se troubla de quoique doute ; il craignit d'avoir pass sans les voir travers les les d'un archipel,

de l'Asie qu'il cherchait, maintenant dans quelque troisime ocan. La plus lgre do ses barques, la Nina, qui naviguait en avant- 10 gaide, le 7 octobre, hissa enfin son pavillon de dcouverte ot tira un coup de canon de joie pour annoncer une cte aux deux
laisser derrire lui l'extrmit

de

et de s'garer

autres

vaisseaux.

En

s'approchant,

ils

Nina
dan

avait t due par un nuage.


les airs,

Le

reconnurent que la vent, en l'emportant

emporta leur courte joie. Elle se changea en con- 15 ne lasso le cur des hommes autant que ces alternatives de fausses joies et de dceptions amres. Ce sont Les reproches recommencrent les sarcasmes de la fortune.
sternation.
Ilift

clater

sur tous les visages contre l'amiral.


o^.

seulement leurs fatigues


imputaient leur guide,
If

leurs divisions

Ce n'tait plus que les quipages 20


sans espoir.

c'tait leur vie sacrifie

Le

pain et l'eau allaient manquer.

Colomb, dconcori par l'immensit de

cet espace

dont

il

avait

cru enfin toucher les bornes, abandonna sa route idale trace sur sa carte et suivit deux jours et deux nuits le vol des oiseaux, 25 pilotes clestes que la Providence semblait lui envoyer au

humaine dfaillait en lui. L'instinct de ne les dirigerait pas tous vers ce point de l'horizon s'ils n'y voyaient pas un rivage. Mais les oiseaux mme semblaient, aux yeux des matelots, s'enteadre avec le oO

moment o

la science

ces oiseaux, se disait-il,

leurs navires et do leurs vies.


pilotes,

dsert de l'Ocan et avec les astres menteurs pour se jouer de A la fin du troisime jour, les

monts sur
il

les

haubans l'heure o

le soleil dvoile

en
35

a'abaissant le plus d'horizon, le virent se plonger dans les

mmes

vagues d'o
rent

se levait en vain depuis tant d'aarores.

Ils cru-

l'infini

des eaux.

Le

dsespoir qui les abattait se changea

en sourde fureur. Qu'avaient-ils mnager maintenant avec un chef qui avait tromp la cour, et dont les titres et l'autorit, surpris la conauce de ses souverains, allaient ptk'ir avec ses

ChRISTOPHH COLOM&
illucions

87 son
le

Ii6 suivre plus loin,

n'tait-ce paa s'associer


o.

crime

L'obissance ne iinissait-elle pas l


Kestait-il

finissait

en restait, que de re tourner les proues vers l'Europe, de lutter en louvoyant contre ces venta, complices de l'amiral, et de l'enchaner lui-mme son mt pour qu'il ft l'objet de la maldiction des mourants s'il fallait mourir, ou pour le livrer la vengeance de l'apague si
espoir,
s'il

monde ?

un autre

permettait jamais d'eu revoir les ports ? Ces murmures taient devenus des clameurs. amiral les contint par l'mipassibilit de sou visage.
le ciel leur

L'intrpide
Il

invoqua 10
ce

contre les sditieux l'autorit, sacre pour des sujets, dessouver


ains dont
il

tait investi.
lui.
;

11

invoqua
no
le

le ciel

mme, juge en
;

moment

entre eux et

Il

flchit

pas

il

ollrit sa vie

eu

gage de ses promesses

il

leur

demanda seulement, avec


vulgaire ne voit

l'accent

d'un prophte qui voit ce que

que par son 15

me, d'aj(jurner de
de retour.
que,
ai

trois jours leur incrdulit et leur rsolution

Il fit

serment, serment tmraire, mais politique,

dans

le <>our8

du troisime

soleil la terre n'tait

pas

visi-

ble l'horizon,

se rendrait leurs instances et les ramnerait

en Europe.

continents taient

Las signes rvlateurs du voisinage d'Iles ou de 20 si visibles aux yeux de l'amiral, qu'en mendiil

aut ces trois jours ses quipages rvolts

se croyait certain

de

les

conduire au but.
il

Il

tentau Dieu en assignant un terme

sa rvlatiori, mais

avait

mnager des hommes.


lui.

Les homl'iu'

25

mes, regret,
ipirait,

lui

accordrent ces trois jours, et Dieu, qui

25

ve le punit pus d'avoir trop espr de

XXXIV.
Au
Irver du soleil

du deuxime

jour, des joncs frachement

dracins apparurent autour des vaisseaux.


VvilWo avec la hache,

Une

plancha tra-

un bton artistement

cisel l'aide

d'un

instrument tranchant, une branche d'aubpine en fleur, enfin un 80 nid d'oiseau suspendu une branche rompue par le vent, rempli
d'oeufs

que

la

35

flottrent successivement sur les eaux.

mre couvait encore au doux roulis des vagues, Les matelots recueillir-

il

ent bord ces ttmoins crits, parlants ou vivants, d'une terre C'taient les voix du rivage qui confirmaient celle de 35 voisine.

Colomb.

onuluait par ces

Avant de contera plir la terre des yeux du corps, on la Les sditieux tombrent indices d^ vie.

Chiustophe COLOHa
genoux devant l'amii'al outrag la voille, ils implorrent le pardon de leur dfiance, et entonnrent l'hymne de recuanaissance au Dieu qui les avait associe son triomphe.

La nuit tomba monde nouveau.


Bondor devant

sur ces chants de rgliso qui saluaient un

L'amiral ordonna de carguer les voiles, do

les navires,

les bas-fonds et les cueils,

de naviguer avec lenteur, redoutant convaincu que les premires olarttfs

du crpuscule dcouvriraient la terre sous lesproue-ii de ses vaisNul ne dormit dans cette nuit suprme. L'impatience d'esprit avait enlev tout besoin de sommeil aux yeux les pilo- 10 tes et les matelots, suspendus aux mts, aux ver^nios, aux haubans, rivalisaient entre eux de poste et d'attention pour
seaux.
;

luncer

le

premier rog.ird sur

le

nouvel ht^miaphre.

Un

prix

avait i promis par l'amiral celui qui jetterait le premier cri

de Terre si la terre en effet reconnue vrifiait sa dcouverte. 15 La Providence cependant lui rservait lui-mme ce premier
!

regard, qu'il avait achet au prix do vingt ans de sa vie et do

tant de constance et de dangers, v

Comme

il

se promenait seul,

minuit, sur la dunette de sou vaisseau et plongeait son regard

perant dans

les

tnbres, une lueur de feu passa, s'teignit et 20

repassa devant ses yeux au niveau des vagues.

Craignant d'tre

un blouiasoment ou par une phosphorescence do la mer, il appela voix basse un gentilhomme espagnol de la cour d'Isabelle, nomm Guttierez, en qui il avait plus de foi que dans Il lui indiqua de la main le point de l'horizon o il 2 ses pilotes. avait entrevu un feu, et lui demanda 'il n'apercevait pas une
tromp
p.ir

Guttierez rpcmdit qu'il voyait en effet une lueur fugitive dans cette direction. Colomb, pour se confirmer davantage dans sa conviction, appela R )drigo SanSanchez n'hsita 30 chcK de Sgovie, un autre de ses confidents. pas plus que Guttierez constater une clart h l'horizon. Miis

lumire de ce ct.
tinceler

peine ce feu se montrait-il, qu'il disparaissait pour reiiaratre

dans une uieraion alternative de l'Ooan, soit que ce ft la flamme d'un fuyer sur une phige basse, dcouverte et drobe
tour tour par l'horiz-iu ondoyant des grandes lames, soit que ce 35 ft le fanal flottant d'un canot de pcheurs, tour tour lev sur
la crte et

englouti dans le cre ix des vagues.


la fois

Ainsi la terre et

la vie

apparurent

Coloml> et ses deux confidents

80U8 la forme du feu dans la nuit du

au 12 octobre 1492.

Chribtopiib Colomb.
Colomb, commandant le silence & llodrgo et Gutticrez, renferma en lui-mme sa vision dans la orainto do donner encore une fausse joio et une amre dc^ption k ses quipages. H perdit de vue la lueur teinte et veilla jiiwju' doux heures du
matin, priant, esprant et dsesprant seul Hur le pont, entre lo

89

triomphe ou le retour dont le lendemain

allait dcider.

XXXV
H
(5tait

plong dans cette angoisse qui prcde

les

grands

enfantements de vrits, comme l'agonie prcde le grand afFranchissemont de l'esprit par la mort, quand un coup de canon,
retentissant sur l'Ocan quelques centaines do brasses devant 10
lui,

clata

comme

le bruit

d'un

monde
la

son oreille, et le
0'(^tait le cri

fit

tressaillir et

tomber genoux sur


signal

dunette.

de

Terre
mer.

jet par le bronze,

convenu avec

la Pinta, qui

naviguait en tte de la flotte pour clairer la route et sonder la

ce bruit,

un

cri gnral

de Terre

clata de toutes les 16

On ferla les voiles vergues et de tous les cordages des vaisseaux. Le mystre de l'Ocan avait dit son et l'on attendit l'aurore.
premier mot au sein de
entier
la nuit.

Le jour

allait le

rvler tout

aux regards.
arrivaient

Les parfums
par
haleines

les plus suaves et les plus

inconnus
terre.
1

jusqu'aux

vaisseaux avec 20
lo

l'ombre d'une cte, le bruit des lames sur les rcifs et

vent de

Le

feu aperu par

Colomb annonait
;

la

prsence de

homme
les

et le premier
il

lment de
et

la civilisation.

Jamais nuit

ne parut plus lente

dvoiler l'horizon

car cet horizon, c'tait

pour

compagnons de Colomb

pour lui-mme une seconde 25

cration de Dieu.

XXXVL
Le
les

crpuscule, en se rpandant dans

l'air,

fit

peu peu

sortir

formes d'une le du sein des flots. Ses doux estiiaits se Sa cte basse s'levait en perdaient dans la brume du matin. amphithtre jusqu' des sommets de collines, dont la sombre 30 verdure contrastait avec la limpidit bleue du ciel ; quelque!'
pas d l'cume des vagues mourantes sur
sur les tages successifs de
rires

un

sable jaune, des

forts d'arbres majestueux et iuuouiiiitja a'tendaii^nt tm orradins


l'le.

Des anses vertes

et des clailes

lumineuses dans ces fonds laissaient percer demi par

35

40
yeax coa mystres de
tions dissdmines,

OnRlSTOPHR OOLOMa
la solitude.
^

On y

entrevoyait des

hftT)ila..

semblables des riichos d'hommes par leur

forme arrondie et par leurs toits de fouillmes desaoh^s. Des fumes s'levaient et l au-densus des cimos des bois. Dus groupes d'hommes, de femmes et d'enf.ints, (5tonn<8 plun qu'etfrayrfs, se montraient demi-nu entre les tronc d'arbres leH plm rapprocht? du rivage, s'avanaient timidement, o retiraient
tour tour, tt^moignnnt, par leurs gestes et par leurs attitudes
naves,
l'aspect
floti.

autant de crainte que de curiosit, et d'admiration A de ces navires et de ces trangers apports la nuit par les 10

xxxvn.
Colomb, aprs avoir contempl en silence ce premier
avanc de
la terre ai
rvaj^e

souvent construite dans ses calculs et si magnifiquement colore dans son imagination, la trouva suptrieure encore ses penses.
Tl brlait

d'impatience d'imprimer
et d'y arborer,

le

15

premier
le signe

le pied l'un

Europen sur ce sable

dans

de la croix et dans le drapeau de l'Espagne, l'tendard de la conqute de Dieu et de la conqute de ses souverains par son gnie. Mais il contint en lui-mme et dans ses quipages cette hte d'aborder le rivage, vouUnt donner cette prise de 20 possession d'un monde nouveau la solennit du plu grand acte
accompli peut-tre jamais par un navigateur, et appeler, dfaut des hommes, Dieu et les anges, la mor, la terre et le ciel en

tmoignage de sa conqute sur 'l'inconnu.


roi des

Il

se

revtit

de

toutes les marques de ses dignits d'amiral de l'Ocan et do vice- 25

royaumes futurs ; il dploya son manteau de pourpre, et, prenant dans sa main droite le drapeau brod d'une croix o les chiffres de Ferdinand et d'Isabelle entrelacs comme leurs roytaient surmonts de leur couronne, il descendit dans sa chaloupe et s'avana, suivi des chaloupes d'Alonzo Pinzon et 30 d'Yans Pinzon, ses deux lieutenants, vcch le rivage. Eu tou-

aumes

chant la terre,
cette

il

d'humilit et d'adoration,

tomba genoux pour consacrer, par un acte le don et la grandeur de Dieu dans
Il

partie nouvelle de ses uvres.


il

baisa le sable,

et, le

visage coll sur l'herbe,

et 35 double augure qui mouillaient, pour la premi^ro fois, l'argile de cet hmisphre viait par des hommes de la vieille Europe 1

pleura.

Larmes double sens

GnRIBTOPHB OOLOMa
lantifi

41

de

Joie

reconnaissant et pioux

pour Colomb, qui d^ordaient d'un cur superbe, larmes de deuil pour cette terre vier^^e,
t

qui semblaient lui prsager lus calamits, les dvastations, le feu,


le fer, le

sang et la mort que ces trangers

lui
I

apportaient avec
C'tait

leur orgueil, leurs sciences et leur domination

l'homme

qui versait ces larmes, c'tait la terre qui devait pleurer.

XXXVIIL
" Dieu ternel
son front de
la

et tout-puissant, s'cria

Colomb en relevant

poussire dans une prire latine qui nous a t

conserve par ses compagnons. Dieu, qui, par l'nergie de ta

t<m

mer et la terre que 10 que ta majest et ta souverainet universelle soient exaltes de sicle en sicle, toi qui as permis que, par le plus humble de tes esclaves, ton nom sacr soit connu et rpandu dans cette moiti jusqu'ici cache de
parole cratrice, as enfant le firmament, la
!

nom

sint

bni et

gloriti

partout

ton empire

"
!

15
lie,

Puis
dor.
3S

il

baptisa cette

du nom du

Christ, l'Ue do San-Salva-

lieutenants, ses pilotes, ses matelots, ivre de joie et pn-

i'un respect

surhumain pour

celui qui avait

vu

p-

ur

eux au
de leur 20
(Prior-

deia de l'horizon visible et qu'ils outrageaient la veii


dfiance, vaincus par l'vidence et foudroys par cette
it

tombrent aux pieds de lamiral, baisrent ses mains et ses habits, et reconnurent un moment la souverainet et presque la divinit du gnie victimes hier de son obstination, aujourd'hui compagnons de sa constance, et 25 resplendissants de la gloire qu'ils venaient de blasphmer Ainsi est faite l'humanit, perscutant les initiateurs, hritant de
qui prosterne l'homme,
: !

leurs vie boires.

'^

1
;j

-^^

XXXIX.
Pendant
de
l'ile,

la

crmonie de

la prise

de possession, les habitants

d'abord retenus distance par la terreur, puis attirs 30


Ils s'interrogeaient entro

M
:KI

:4

-^.--5;

par cette curiosit instinctive, premier lien de l'homme l'hom-

'^

me,

s'taient rapprochs.

spectacles merveilleux

de cette nuit

et

eux sur les de cette aurore. Ces

^'

vaisseaux manoeuvrant leurs voiles, leurs antennes, leurs ver-

gues

comme

des

membres immenses

se dployant et se repliant 35

Christophe CoLOMa

l'impulsion d'une pense intrieure, leur avaient paru des tres


anitn.^ et

surnaturels descendu, pendant les toubres, du tirmaleur horizon, des habitants


,

n.ent de cristal qui entourai


flottant sur
ils

du

ciel

des ailes et s'abattant


Saisis
le,

leur gr sur les rivages dont


la

taient les dieux.

de respect
la

vue des chaloupes


tissus clatants
fini

qui abordaient leur


et d'armes

et des

hommes revtus do
lumire,
ils

o se rverbrait

avaient

par s'ea
Ils les

approcher,

comme

fascins par leur toute- puissance.

adoraient et loa imploraient avec la navet d'enfants qui ne

souponnent pas le mal sous l'attrait. Les Espagnols, les exara- 10 inant leur tour, s'tonnaient de ne retrouver dans ces insulaires
,

aucun des caractres physiques de conformation


des races africaines,
l'h'

et

de couleur
avaient

asiati'^ ies,

europennes,
teint

qu'ils

bitude de frquenter.

Leur

cuivr,

leur chevelure

souple et rpandue en ondes sur leurs pau&s, leurs yeux soiu- 16

comme leur mer, leurs traits dlicats et fminins, leur physionomie confiante et ouverte, leur nudit enfin, et les dessins coloris dont ils teignaient leurs membres, rvlaient en eux
brea

our

une race entirement distincte des familles humaines rpandues hmisphre ancien, conservant oncore les simplicits et les 20 douceurs de l't-nfance, oublie pendant des sicles dans ce fond, ignor du monde, ayant, force d'ignorance, conserv la simplicit, la candeur et la douceur des piemiers jours.
'.

Colomb, persuad que


leur

cette lie tait


il

un appendice avanc sur


croyait toujours naviguer, 25

l'ocan des Indes, vers lesquelles

donna

le

nom

imaginaire d'Indiens qu'ils ont conserv jusl'er-

qu' leur extinction par une erreur de langage survivant k


reur du navigateur.

XL.
Bientt ces Indiens, s'apprivoisant avec leurs htes, leur montrrent leurs
sources,
leurs
haV,>itatioii8,

leurs viUagos, leurs 30

canots;

ils

leur apportrent en tribut leurs fruits nourriciers,

leur pain de oassave, qui renouvela les vivres des Espagnols, ot

quelques ornements d'or pur qu'ils portaient suspendus aux oreilles, aux narines, en bracelets ou en colliers autour du cou Ils ignoraient le commerce et l'us- 35 et des jambes des femmes. ge de la monnaie, ce supplment vnitl mais ncessaire h la
Ttirtu

de rhoapitalit

ils

recevaient en change a.vc ivrusso les

CuRisTOPHR Colomb.'
La nouveaut faisait yeux le prix de toute chose. Rare et prcieux est le mme mot pour tout l'univers. Les Espagnols, qui cherchaient le pays
moindres objets usuels des Europens,
leurs

de

l'or et

des pierreries, s'informrent par signes des lieux d'o


;

Les Indiens leur montrrent le midi l'amiral compagnons crurent comprendre qu'il y avait de ce ct une le ou un continent des Indes correspondant par sa richesse et par ses arts aux merveilleux rcits de Marco Polo, le Vnivenait ce mtal.
et ses
tien,

Cette terre dont


selon eux,
l'e

ils

se croyaient maintenant rapprochs

10

tait,

fabuleuse de Cipangu ou du Japon, dont le 10

souverain foulait sous ses pieds des planchers forms de plaques


d'or.

L'impatience de reprendre leur course vers ce but de leur


les
fit

chimre ou de leur avidit


leurs vaisseaux.
Ils s'taient

remonter promptemont sur de


fruits,

approvisionns d'eau frache aux

16

ruisseaux de

l'le,

et leurs ponts taient chargs


;

de 15

racines et de cassaves, prsents d


ens. Ils

ces heureux et pauvres Indi-

en amenrent un avec eux pour qu'il apprit leur langue

et leur servt ensuite d'interprte.

20

XLL
Eu
les

tournant

l'le

de San-Salvador,

ils

se trouvrent

comme

gars dans les canaux d'un archipel compos de plus de cent 20


d'ingale grai.deur, mais toutes l'aspect le plus luxuriant
Ils

de jeunesse, de fcondit, de vgtation.

abordrent

la plus

25

vaste et la plus peuple.

Ils

furent entours de canots creuss

dans un seul tronc d'arbre et commercrent avec les habitants,


(

onnant des boutons et des grelots contre de


ir

l'or et

des perles. 25

Lt

navigation et leurs

relches au milieu de ce labyrinthe


)a rptition

d'les

inconnues ne furent pour eux que


ge San-Salvador.

de leur
les

atterri

La mme

curiost

inoll'ensive

accueill.t partout.

Ils s'enivraient

du

climat, des fleurs, des

30

parfums,

des couleurs,

chacune dt ces oasis talait


vers
qu'ils

des plumages d'oiseaux inconnus que 30 mais leur esprit tendu i, leurs sens ;
dcouvt;rto

une seile pense,

la

du pays de

l'or,

vers ce

supposa'ent l'extrmit de l'Asie, les rendait moins sen ces trsors naturels et les empchait de souponner l'im-

sibles

oo

nienso et

sur cet ocan-^

nouveau continent dont ces les taient les avant-postes Aux signes et aux regarda de ces Indiens qui lui

iJo

indiquaient une rgion plus sploudide encore que leur archipel

44
Colomb
fit

Christophe Colomr
vole vers la cte

de Cuba, o

il

aborda en

trois jour

de douce navigation, sans perdre de vue

les lies

charmantes d

Bahama

qui jalonnaient sa route.


tag^es et prolonges sans limites, s'adosciel,

Cuba, avec ses ctes

sant des montagnes qui fendaient le

avec ses havres, se

embouchures de
resta indcis

fleuves, ses golfes, ses rades, ses forts, ses vil-

lages, lui rappela

en

traits i^lus

majestueux l'antique
le.

Sicile.

Il

si c'tait

un continent ou une
rivibre,

Il jeta l'hiKjre

dans

le lit
les

ombrag d'une vaste


grves,
les forts, les

descendit terie, par.O

courut

jardins d'orangers et de palm-

iers, les villages, les

huttes des habitants.

Un

chien muet fut le

seul tre vivant qu'il trouva dans ces habitations

son approche.
lit

de

la rivire

abandonnes rembarqua et remonta avec ses vaisaeaux le ombrage de palmiers larges feuilles, et d'arIl se

bres gigantesques

couverts la fois do fruits et de

flvMirs.

La 15

nature semblait avoir pris soin de prodiguer, d'elle-mine, ces peuplades heureuses les lments de la vie et de la flicit sans
travail.

Tout rappelait l'Eden des livres sacrs et de pomes. Les animaux inotleasifs, les oiseaux aux plumes de lapis et de
pourpre,
les

perroquets, les piverts, les colibris volaient, criaient, 20


;

chantaient en nuages cilon- de braiiche on branf.lie


sectes
;

des in-

lumineux blouisnaient Tair lui-mme l soleil tempr par l'haleine des montagnes, par l'ombre des arbres, par le courant des eaux, y fcondait tout sans rien calciner ; la lune et les toiles s'y rverbraient pendant les tnbres dans le lit du 25 fleuve avec des splendeurs et des rejailliRsenients de clart douce
qui enlevait ses terreurs la nuit.
tait

Un enivrement g:ral
de ses compagntms.

exal-

l'me

et les

sens de

Colomb
ils

et

C'tait
la fois

bien l une m.uvello terre plus vierge et plus maternelle

que la vieille terre d'o " C'est la plus belle jamais l'il do l'homme
jamais.

taient venus.
crit

30
ses notes,

le,

Colomb dans

que

ait

contemple.

On

voudrait y vivre

On

n'y

ccHi^'oit

ni la douleur ni la

mort !"

L'odeur dos pices qui arrivait de l'intrieur jusqu' ses vaisseaux, et la rencontre des hutres qui produisent les perles sur 35 le rivage lui persuadaient de plus en plus que Cuba tait un pro11 s'imaginait cjue derrire s montagnes longement de l'Asie. de cette ile ou de ce continent, car il tait encore incertain si Cuba tenait ou non la terre ferme, il trouverait les empires, la

Christopub Colomr
civilisation, les

45
dont
les

mines

d'or, et les merveilles

voyageurs

enthousiastes dotaient le

Cathay

et

le

Japon.

No

pouvant

joindre les naturels qui s'enfuyaient tous de la cte l'approche

envoya deux do ses compagnons, dont l'un de ces fabuleuses capitales ol il conjecturait que le souverain du Cathay faisait sa re'sidence. Ces ambassadeurs taient charrs de prsents pour les indignes ils avaient ordre de nu les changer que ciirure de l'or, dont ils croyaient que la source intarissable tait
des Espagnols,
il

parlait l'heln-eu et l'autre l'arabe, h la recherche

dans l'intrieur de cette terre.

10

Les envoys revinrent aux vais^Rnux sans avoir dc<juvert d'autre capitale que des huttes de sauvages et une nature prodigue de vgtation,
des naturels, et
ils les

de parfums, de

fleurs

et

de

fruits.

Ils

avaient russi apprivoiser, force de prsents, quehjues-uns

ramenaient avec eux l'amiral.


dont
le

Le
la

tabac,

15

plante lgrement enivrante,


petits
la

les

habitants faisaient de

rouleaux entiamms par


terre,

bout pour en aspirer


CQton

fume

pomme de

racine farineuse qui se convertissait en pain


;

tout prpar dans la cendre

le mas, le

fil

par les femleurs ver- 20

mes, les orangeSj les limons, les fruits

innomms de

gers, taient les seuls trsors qu'ils avaient trouvs

autour dos

habitations dissmines par groupes dans les clairires.

Dconcert dans ses rves


diriger vers l'est,

d'or,

l'amiral, sur la foi des indi-

gnes mal compris, quitta regret co sjour enchant pour se

30

o il ph/'ait toujours sa fabuleuse Asie. Il 20 embarqua cjuelques homme et quelques femmes de Cuba plus hardis et plus confiants que les autres, pour lui servir d'interprtes dans les terres voisines qu'il se proposait de visiter, pour les convertir la Foi, et pour offrir Isabelle ces mes rachetes, selon lui, par sa gnreuse entreprise. -Persuad que Cuba, 50
faisait partie de la terre il n'avait pas aper(;u les limites, ferme d'Asie, il vogua quelques jours peu de distance du vriSon illusion obstine lui table continent amricain sans le voir. Cependant l'envie, voilait une ralit si rapproche de sa proue.

dont

qui devait empoisonner ses jours, tait ne dans rA.ine de ses 35

compagnons
la

le

jour

mme

oii ses

dcouvertes avaient couronne

pense de sa

vie

entire.

Amrigo-Vespucci,

Flotentin

obscur,

embarqu sur un de ses navires, devait donner son nom ce monde ver^ le4j[uel Colomb sol l'avait guid. Yespucci ne

46

Christophe CoLOMa

dut cette fortune de son

nom

qu'au hasard et ses voyages sub*

sdquent avec Colomb vers ces


alterne et dvou de l'amiral,
cette gloire.

mmes
il

Lieutenant subparages. ne chercha jamais lui drober

Le

caprice de la fortune la lui

donna sans qu'il et


la

jamais cherch troinpcr l'opinion de l'Europe, et


lui

routine la

Le nom du chef dahnt de l'honneur de nommer un monde, le nom du subordonn prvalut. De'rision de la gloire humaine dont Colomb fut victime, mais dont Amerigo ne On peut reprocher une injustice et fut du moins pas coupable une ingratitude la postrit, on ne peut reprochsr un larcin 10
conserva.
!

volontaire au pilote heureux de Florence.

XLIL
Mais l'envie, qui nat dans le cur des hommes le mme jour que le succs, brlait dj le coeur du principal lieutenant de Colomb, Alonzo Pinzon. Commandant la Piuta, second navire de l'escadre, Pinzoi, dont les voiles devanaient plus lgrement 15 les deux autres navires, feignit de s'garer dans la nuit et disparut aux regards de son chef. Il avait rsolu de profiter de la dcouverte de Colomb pour dcouvrir lui-mme, sans gnie et sans efforts, d'autres terres, et, aprs leur avoir donn son nom, de revenir le premier en Europe usurper la fleur de la gloire et 20 des rcompenses dues sou matre et son guide en navi<ra.km. Colomb s'tait t "op aperu depuis quelques jours de l'envie et de Mais il devait beaucoup A l'insubordination de son lieutenant. Alonzo Pinzon : sans lui, sans ses encourugements et son assistance Pains, il ne serait jamais parvenu quiper ses navires et 25 La reconnaissance l'avait empch de engager ses matelots. svir contre les premires insubord'-'.ations d'un homme dont il Le caractre tolrant, modeste et magnanime avait tant reu.
.

Plein de de Colomb le dtournait de toute rigueur odieuse. justice et de vertu, il comptait sur les retours de justice et de 30 Cette bont, qu'Alonzo Pinzon avait prise veitu des autres.

pour de la faiblesse, l'encourageait l'ingratitude. II s'lana audacieusement entre Colomb et les nouvelles dcouvertes qu'il
avait rsolu de lui urrachei'.

XLIIL
L'amiral gmit, entrevit
le crime, affecta
et, cinsrlant

de croire une dvi- 35


avec ses deux navires

ation involontaire de la Pinta,

Christophe Colomb.
au sud-est vers une ombre immense qu'il apercevait sur la mer, aborda l'le d'Hispaniola, nomme'e depuis Saint-Dorainc^ue.

47

il

Sans ce nuage autour des montagnes de Saint-Domingue qui lui fit virer de bord, il allait rencontrer encore le continent, L'ar- 20 lhipe! amricain, en le sduisant et en l'garant d'le en le, semblait le

dtourner

plaisir

du but auquel

il

touchait sans l'aper'

qui l'avait conduit au bord de l'Amrique, s'interposait maintenant entre l'Amrique et lui
cevoir.
l'Asie,

Ce fantme de

pour lui drober par une chimre

la

grande

ralit.

25

XLIV.
Cette terre neuve, riante, fconde, immense, noye dans une atmosphre de cristal et baigne par une mer dont les lames roulaient des parfums, lui apparut comme l'le merveilleuse, dtache

du continent des Indes,


donna
le

qu'il cherchait travers tant

distance et de prils sous le


Il

nom

chimrique

lui

nom

d'Hispaniola, pour la

de de Cipang. DO marquer du signe


d'le

ternel de sa patrie d'adoption.


hospitaliers,
le

Les naturels simples, doux, candides et respectueux, accoururent en foul sur rivage, comme au-devant de cratures d'une nature suprieure
leste leur envoyait der bornes de l'horizon

qu'uix prodige

ou du 35

fond du firmament pour tre adores et servies l'gal des dieux.

Une population nombreuse


et les valles d'Hispaniola.

et

heureuse couvrait alors les plaines Les hommes et les femmes taient

des types de force et de grce.


sion de douceur et de bont.
stjn cts bienveillants

La

paix perptuelle qui rgnait

entre leurs peuplades marquait leur physionomie d'une impres-

Leurs

lois

n'taient

que

les in-

On
eu

et dit
le

du cur passs en traditions et en coutumes. un peuple enfant dont les vices n'avaient pas encore temps de se dvelopper et que les inspirations d'une inno-

culture,

Ils connaissaient de l'agri- 10 de l'horticulture et des arts tout ce qui est ncessaire l'administration, l'habitation, aux premires ncessits de la

cente nature suffisaient gouverner.

Leurs champs taient admirablement cultivs, leurs cases groupes en villages au bord de forts d'arbres fruits, dans le voisinage des fleuves ou des sources. Leurs vte- 15 ments, sous un ciel tide qui ne leur faisait prouver ni les extrmits de l'hiver ni celles de l't, ne consistaient qu'en oruemeuts destins les eaibellir, eu tissus de coton, eu nattes
vie.

lgantes,

48
et

Christophe Colomr

en ceintures, suffisants pour voiler leur pudeur. Leur gouvernement tait simple et naturel comme leurs ides. C'tait la famille agrandie par la suite des gnrations, mais toujours groupe autour d'un chef hrditaire qu'on appelait le cacique. Les caciques
rices
taieiit les chefs,

non

les

tyrans de leur tribu.

Les

coutumes, constitutions non crites, mais inviolables et protect-

comme une

loi

divine, rgnaient sur ces petits rois.

Au-

torit toute paternelle d'un ct, toute filiale

de

l'autre, contre

laquelle la rvolte semblait inconnue

Les naturels de Cuba que Colomb avait embarqus avec lui 10 pour lui servir de guides et d'interprtes sur ces mer et sur ces tles commenaient comprendre la langue des Europens ils
;

entendaient demi celle des habitants d'Hispaniola, branche


dtache de
la

mme

race

humaine

ils

tal)lirent ainsi des rap-

ports d'intelligence prompts et faciles entre


qu'il venait visiter.

Colomb

et le peuple 15

XLV.
Les prtendus Indiens conduisirent sans dfiance
fruits

les

Espag-

nols dans leurs maisons, leur prsentant le pain de cassave, les

apprivoiss,

inconnus, les poissons, les racines savoureuses, les oiseaus au riche plumage, au chant mlodieux, les fleurs, les 20 palmes, les bananes, les limons, tous les dons de la mer, du ciel,

de

la terre,

du

climat.

Ils les traitrent

en htes, en

frres,

presque en dieux.

"La

nature, dit Colomb,

est si

prodigue que

la proprit

n'y

a pas cr le sentiment de l'avarice ou de la cupidit.

Ces hom- 25 au

mes paraissent vivre dans un ge

d'or,

heureux

et tranquilles

milieu de jardins ouverts et sans bornes, qui ne sont ni entours


Ils agissent

de fosss, ni divises par des palissades, ni dfendus par des murs. loyalement l'un envers l'autre, sans loi, sans livres,
Ils

sans juges.

regardent

comme un mchant homme

celui qui

30

prend

plaisir

contre les

faiie mal un autre. Cette horreur dos bons mchants parat tre toute leur lgislation."

Leur

religion n'tait aussi

que

le

sentiment d'infriorit, de
35

reconnaissance et d'amour envers l'tre invisible qui leur avait

prodigu

la vie et la flicit.

Quel contraste entre l'tat de ces heureuses populations au moment o les Europens les dcouvrent pour leur apporter 1

Christophe Colomb.
gnie de l'ancion monde, et l'tat o ces malheureux

49
Indiens

tfmbrent en pou d'annes aprs cette visite de leurs prtondus


civilisateurs
!

inattendue do Colomb
ia vertu et la vie, et

Quel mystre de la Providence que cette visite i\ un nouveau monde, o il croit apporter o
il

sme sou insu

la

tyrannie et la mort

XLVI.
Colomb, en cherchant pntrer successivement anses et dans toutes les embouchti>*os de fleuves de l'le, choua pendant le sommeil de l'amiral. Le vaisseau, menac d'tre submerg par les lames mugissantes, fut abandonn par le pilote et par une partie des matelots qui, sous pr- 10 texte de porter une ancre terre, s'enfuirent force de rames
pilote de

Le

dans toutes

les

puur gagner l'autre navire, croyant Colomb livr une mort


invitable.

L'nergie de l'amiral suava encore, non le navire,


Il lutta

mais ses compagnons.

contre les brisants jusqu'au

dmembrement de
sur un radeau,
il

la dernire planche, et, plaant ses

hommes
il

15

aborda en naufrag sur cette


Il

mme

ote o

venait d'aborder en conqurant.


seul navire qui lui restt.

fut rejoint bientt par le


et

Son naufrage

son infortune ne
il

refroidirent pas l'hospitalit

du cacique dont

avait t l'hte

quelques jours auparavant.

Ce

cacique,

nomm

Guacanagari, 20

premier ami et bientt premire victime de ces trangers, versa


des larmes de compassion sur le dsastre de Colomb.
sa
Il offrit

demeure, ses provisions, ses secours de toute nature aux

Espagnols.

pens, arrachs
vs,

Les dbris du naufrage, les richesses des Euroaux flots et tals sur la grve, y furent prser- 25

mme de Ces hommes, qui ne connaissaient pas la proprit pour eux-mmes, semblaient la reconnatre et la Oolornb s'attendrit, dans respecter dans les htes malheureux.
comme
des choses saintes, de toute violation et
toute importune curiosit.
ses lettres

au

roi et

la reine,

sur la gniosit sans efforts de ce 30

peuple.

"

Il

n'y a point dans l'univers, crit-il,


Ils

un meilleur pays.
ils

aiment leurs voisins


Ils sont nua,

une meilleure nation et comme eux-mmes ;


de
la

ont toujours

un langage doux

et gracieux, et le sourire
il

tenilresso sur les lvres.

est vrai,

mais vtus de 36

leur dcence et de leur candeur."

Colomb, aprs avoir tabli avec

le

jeune cacique des relationi

60

Christophb CoLOMa

de la plus tendre et de la plus confiante hospitalit, reut de lui en prsent quelques ornemonts d'or. A la vue de l'or la physi-

onomie des Europtiens exprima

^^out

coup tant de passion,


le

d'avidit et de frocit dans le de'air,

que

cacique et sus sujets

s'tonnrent et s'alarmrent par instinct,

comme
:

si

leurs nou-

veaux amis avaient chang subitement de nature et de dispositions envers eux. Cela n'tait que trop vrai les co'apagnons de Colomb ne cherchaient que les richesses fantastiques de l'Oril'univers.

pendant que lui-mme cherchait une partie mystrieuse de La vue de l'or les avait rappels i leur convoitise ; 10 leur visage tait devenu pre et violent comme leur pense. Le cacique, apprenant que ce mtal tait la divinit dos Europens,
ent,

leur expliqixa, eu leur montrant les montasjjnes, qu'il y avait der-

sommets une rgion d'o lui venait en abondance cet or, Colomb ne douta plus d'avoir enfin remont jusqu' la source de 15
rire ces

ces richesses

de Sah^mon,
le village

et,

prparant tout pour son retour


il

rapide en Europe afin d'y annoncer son triomphe,

construisit
irtie

un
ses

fort

dans

du cacique pour y

laisser

une p

de

compagnons en
le

s'-et

pendant son absence.

Il choisit

ses (jfficiers et ses matelots quarante

sous

hommes d'lite commandement de Pedro de Arana. Ils taient chargea


des notions sur la rgion de
le respect et

parmi et les mit 20

de

recueillir

l'or et d'entretenir les


Il partit

Indiens dans

dans l'amiti des Espagnols.

pour revenir en Europe, combl des dons du cacique et rapportant tous les ornements et toutes les couronnes d'or pur qu'il avait 25 pu se procurer, pendant sa relche, par des dons ou par dos
changes avec
les naturels.

En ctoyant les contours de l'le, il reneojitra son infidle compagmm Ahnizo Pinzon. Sous prtexte d'avoir perdu de vue
l'amiral,

Pinzon avait
File,
il

profonde de

douceur
iers pas.

et la

route part. Cach dans une anse 30 descendu terre, et, au lieu d'imiter la politique de Colomb, il avait ensanglant ses premfait

tait

L'amiral, en trouvant sou lieutenant, feignit de se


Il

contenter de ses excuses et d'attribuer sa dsertion la nuit.

ordonna Pinzon de le suivre avec son navire en Europe. Ils 35 reprirent ensemble la mor, impatients d'annoncer l'E.^pagne la nouvelle de leur merveilleuse navigation. Mais l'Ocan, qui les avait ports com plaisamment par les vents alizs, de vague en
Vftgue,

la

cte d'Amrique, semblait, avec ses vent t ses flot?

ClIRI8T0>HK

CoLOMR
de
la terre qu'ils

jontraircs, vouloir les repouasor oTjstindment

brlaient do

revoir.

Colonib, grce a ses connaissances en navi-

gation et

i\

ses notes d'estime


la"

dont

il

gardait le secret ses

pilotes, savait seul

route et e'valuait seul les vraies distances. 5

Ses compagnons se croyaient encore des milliers de lieues de

l'Europe qu'il pressentait dt^j le voisinage dos Aores.


aperut bientt.
celds,

Il les

Des coups do vent

terribles, des

nuages araon-

des clairs et des foudres tels qu'il n'en avait jamais vu

s'allumer dans le ciol et s'teindre dans la mer, des vagues

mon-

10

tagneuses et ecumantes faisant tourbillonner ses navires insensi- 10


bls la
v^oile

et

au gouvernail, ouvrirent et refermrent pendant


son tombeau et celui de ses compagnons

six jours et six nuits

aux portes de leur patrie. Les signaux que se faisaient les deux Ils crurent la perte vaisseaux dans les tnbres disparurent. l'un de l'autre en flottant chacun au gr do l'e'ternelle tempte 15 Colomb, qui ne doutait entre les A (;<>res et la cte d'Espagne.
pas
et

que

la

Pinta ne ft ensevelie avec Piiizon dans

les

abmes,

dont

les voiles de'chires et le

gouvernail livr aux lames ne

dirigeaient plus l'esquif, s'attendait chaque instant

sombrer
il

sous une de ces montagnes d'eau qu'il gravissait et redescendait 20

avec leur cume.

Il avait fait le sacritice

do sa

vie,

mais

ne

pouvait sans dsespoir faire le sacrifice de sa gloire.

Sentir le
ense-

mystre de
veli
si

la

dcouverte qu'il rapportait au vieux


sicles avec lui si prs

monde

pour des

du

port, tait

une drision

de la Providence qu'il ne pouvait y plier mme sa 25 Son Ame se rvoltait contre ce jeu du sort. Mourir en touchant du p(td seulemon*^ le rivage de l'Europe et aprs avoir dpos son secret et sou tr csor dans la mmoire de son pays, c'tait une destine qu'il acceptait avec joie mais laisser un
cruelle
piti.
;

second univers mourir, pour

[1

35

emporter au 30 nigme du globe quo les hommes, ses frres, chercheraient peut-tre en vain pendant autant de sicles qu'il leur avait t drob, c'tait un million de Il ne demandait Dieu, dans ses vux tous morts en une les sanctuaires d'Espagne, que de porter du moins la cte, avec 35
"^insi

dire, avec lui, et

tombeau

le

mot

enfin trouv de cette

a
iS

ses

dbris,

les
les

Cependant
tait
le silenoft

preuves de sa dcouverte et de son retour. temptes succdaient aux temptes, le vaisseau


;

rempli d'eau

les

regards hostiles, les

murmures

irrits

ou

t9

morne de

ses

compagnons

lui

reprochaient l'obstination

62

Obbistophr Colomb.

qui les avait ou duits ou forc cette fatale traverse.

Us
ven-

regardaient cette colre prolong*} des lments

comme une

geance de l'Ocan, jaloux qu'un

homme
de

trop audacieux lui et


le jeter

drob son mystre.


obtenir, par

la mer pour une ulante expiation, l'apaisement des flots.


Ils parlaient

XLvn.
Oolomb, insouciant de leur colre, mais uniquement proccup du sort de sa dcouverte, crivit sur parchemin plusieurs courtes relations de sa dcouverte, enferma les unes dans un rouleau de cire, les autres dans des caisses de cdre, et jeta ces tmoignages la mer pour que le hasard les ft flotter un jour, aprs lui, 10 jusqu'au rivap:e. On dit qu'une de ces boues abandonnes aux vents et aux flots fut balotte pendant trois sicles et demi sur la surface, dans le lit ou sur les grves de la mer, et que le matelot d'un navire europen, en embarquant du lest pour son vaisseau il y a quelque temps, sur les galets de la cte d'Afrique en tace 16 de Gibraltar, ramassa une noix de coco ptrifie et l'apporta Le capison capitaine comme une vaine curiosit de la nature. taine, en ouvrant la noix pour s'assvirer si l'amande aurait rsist au temps, trouva, renferm dans l'corce creuse, un parchemin sur lequel taient crits en lettres gothiques, dchiffres avec 20 peine par un rudit de Gibraltar, ces mots "Nous ne pouvons dsister un jour de plus la tompte ;
' :

nous sommes entre l'Espagne et les lies dcouvertes d'Orient. Si la caravelle sombre, puisse quelqu'un recueillir ce tmoignage
!

Christophk Colomb !" 25 L'Ocan avait gard trois cent cinquante-huit ans ce message et ne le rendait . l'Europe qu'aprs que l'Amrique colonise, florissante et libre, rivalisait avec le vieux continent. Jeu du sort pour appendre aux hommes ce qui aurait pu rester cach tant de sicles, si la Providence n'avait pas dfendu aux vagues 30 de submerger dans Colomb son grand messager ?

XLVin
Le lendemain on
cria
:

Terre

C'tait

l'le

portugaise de

Sainte-Marie, l'extrmit des Aores.

Ccdonib et ses com-

pagnons en furent repousss par la jalouse perscution des PorLivrs de nouveau toutes les extrmits do la faim et 35 tugais.

0HRI8T0PHH CoLOMa
de
la

68

tempdte pendant de longs jours,

ila ils

n'entrrent que le 4
jetrent enfin l'anoro

mars dans l'embouchure du Tage, o


prsunt au roi de Portugal, lui
fit

sur une cto europt^enne, mais rivale des Espagnols.


le rcit

Oolomb, de ses dcouvertes,

sans lui dvoiler la nmte, de peur


flottes d'IsHbelle.

que ce prince n'y devant les Los Portugis de la cour de Jean II, roi de

Portugal, conseillrent ce prince de faire assassiner le grand


navigateur, afin d'ensevelir avec lui son secret et les droits de la

couronne d'Espagne sur


do cette lchet.

les terres nouvelles. Jean II s'indigna Colomb, honor par lui, envoya par terre un 10 courrier ses souverains, pour leur annoncer son succs et son prochain retour par mer Palos. Il y dbarqua le 15 mars, au

lever

au milieu d'une population ivre de joie et d'orflots pour le porter en triomphe terre. Il tomba dans les bras de son ami et de son 15 protecteur, le pauvre prieur du couvent de la Riibida, Juan Prs, qui seul avait cru en lui et qu'une moiti du globe rcompensait de sa foi. Oolomb se rendit, pieds nus et processionnellement, l'glise du monastre, pour y rendre grces de son salut, de sa Un peuple entier le suivait 20 gloire, de la conqute de l'Espagne. en le bnissant la porte de cet humble couvent o il avait demand, seul, pied, avec son enfant, quelques annes auparaJamais homme parmi les vant, l'hospitalit des mendiants.
jour,
gueil,

du

qui s'avanait jusque dans les

hommes

n'a rapport sa patrie et la postrit

une

telle

con-

qute depuis l'origine du globe, except ceux qui apporteront 25


la terre la

n'avait cot jueque-l ni

sang, ni

et cette conqute de Colomb un crime, ni une vie, ni une goutte de une larme l'humanit. Les plus beaux de ses jours

rvlation d'une ide

furent ceux qu'il passa se reposer dans ses esprances et dans


sa gloire
le

prieur

au monastre de la Rabida, auprs de son hte et du couvent, et dans les embrassements de ses fils.

anti

30

XLIX.
Et comme si le ciel et voulu mettre le comble i\ sa flicit et venger de l'envie qui le poursuivait, Alonzo Pinzon, commandant de son second navire, entra le jour suivant avec la Pinta dans le port de Palos, o il esprait devancer son chef et 35 lui drober les prmices du triomphe. Mais, tromp dans son
coupable dessein et craignant la punition de sa dsertion rvle

le

64

HRI8T0P1I3 CoLOMtt

par l'amiral, P-zon mourut de douleur et d'envie en touchant


Je

rivage ot en voyant le vaiflsoHU do

port.

Colomb

tait trop
la

Colomb iV l'uncro dans le ^dnroux pour ne rdjouir, encore moiiia

pour se vem^er, et
blait expirer

jalouse Ni^innis des grands

hommes sem5

d'elle-mme ses pieds.

Isabelle et Ferdinand, informs

leur conqute par le me88a^o

da retour de Colomb et do que leur amiral avait env<)y(5 do

Lisbonne, l'attendaient Barcelone avec des ovations et des


ma((niticences dignes de la graiidour de ses services.
lesBo dos

La

nub-

Espagnes y accourut do toutes les provinces pour lui 10 faire cortge. Il y entra on triomphateur et en roi dos royaumes venir. Les Indiens ramons par leacadre, cr^nme uno preuve vivante de l'existence d'autres races humaines sur ces terres dtJeouvertes, marchaient on toto du oorttjge, lo corps point do diverses couleurs et orn do colliers d'or et de perles les ani- 15
;

maux

et les oiseaux, les plantes inconnues, les pierres pr($ciouses

recueillies sur ces rivages, taient talos

dans des bassins d'or et

ports sur la tte par des esclaves noirs ou maures.

La

foule

avide se pressait, les rumeurs fabuleuses couraient sur les pas

des

officiers et des compagnons de gloire de l'amiral. Colomb, 20 mont sur un cheval du roi richement caparaonn, paraissait ensuite uno nombreuse cavalcade do courtisans et do gentilshommes l'oscortait. Tous les regards se concentraient sur cet
;

homme
l'Ocan.
sien,

inspir do

Dieu qui avait soulev


f>es

le

premier

lo

On

cherchait dan
l'y voir.

traita lo signe visible

on croyait

La beaut de

ses traits,

rideau de de sa mis- 25 la majest

pensive de sa physionomie, la vigueur dj l'ternelle jeunesse


jointe la gravit des annes dj mres, la pense sous l'action,
la force

sous les cheveux blancs,

le

sentiment intime dosa valeur


l'avait

joint la pit envers

Dieu qui

choisi
lui

entre

tous,

la

31

reconnaissance envers ses souverains qui

rendaient en honfaisaient

neurs ce
lone,

qu'il

leur rapportait

en conqutes,

en ce
les

moment de Colomb
une do ces

disent les spectateurs de son entre Barce-

figures do^ prophte et

de hros biblique sous

pas de qui lo peuple jetait les palmus du pro lige et do l'adora- 35


tion.

"Nul ne

se mesurait lui, disent-ils


le

tous sentaient en
Isabelle et

lui le plui

grand ou

pins favoris des

hommes."

GiiRisTOPUu Colomb.
Furdiiiand
mit
i

66

le

reurent ur leur trne, gard du Boleil par un daii


levrent duvant lui connue devant un onvoy

d'or.
ciel.

IIh se

du
ils

le

Ils lo tiri>nt asseoir enauite


le rcit

)ins

couteront
la tin

solennel et

au niveau du leur trne, et circonstancit^ du ses voyages.

do
des

(Ue
nob

que l'loquence et la po5ie qui dcoulaient 6 habituellement d'H lvres de l'amiral avaient oolor de Hon inpuisable imagination et allum de son sanit enthousiasme, le rui et la reine, niua jusqu'aux larmes, tombrent genoux et ent(nnrent, comme une pieuse exclamation, le TeDeum, hymne de la plus grande victoire que le Tout- Puissant et jamais 10

du

rdcit,

accorde des souverains.

Dos
10

courriers partirent l'instant pour porter toutes les

lui

cours de l'Europe la j;runde nouvelle et le

nom

triomphal de

unes

Colomb.

L'obscurit qui avait

jusque-l. entour sa vie se

euve
rres
it
\

de
15

changea en un bruit et en un clat de son nom qui remplirent la 16 ender son &me par ces honneurs Colomb ne laissa terre. dcerns son nom, ni humilier sa modestie par lea jalousies qui

ai\i-

connuenaient s'lever autour do sa gloire.


avait t invit la table

Un

jour qu'il

BUsea

or et
foule
s

piW

).nb,

20

issait
ntilsCtit

lude
misot
lesse
tion,
2.")

ilour
>3,

la

31

un des convives, envieux de ces honneurs dcerns au lils d'un cardeur de 20 laine, lui demanda astucieusement s'il pensait que nul autre que lui n'aurait dcouvert cet autre hmisphre dans le cai o il ne Colomb ne rpondit point la question, dans la serait pas n. Mais, prenant un crainte de dire trop ou trop peu do lui-mme. uf entre se doigts, il s'adressa tous les convives et les invita 25 Nul n'y put parvenir. Colomb le faire tenir sur un bout. alors crasa l'uf par une dos extrmits, et, le posant sur son ovale bris, montra . ses rivaux qu'il n'y avait aucun mrite dans une ide simple, mais que nul cependant ne pouvait la souponner avant qu'un premier inventeur en et donn l'exemple aux 80 autres, renvoyant ainsi it l'inspirateur suprme le mrite de son entreprise, r revendiquant en mme temps pour lui seul 1" tirr U primaut. Cet apologue devint, depuis, la
et d'Isabelle, \ se
gr:
>,

do Ferdinand

honeu ce
iarce-

montrer une pour y monter le premier, non pas plus 35 maio plus favoris de l'inspiration que ses frres.
it

homme

lu de la Providence pour

iblables et

U3 lea

ues honneurs, les titres, les dotations futures des terres dont
i

dora- 35

lait

nt en
lie et

trait*

achever la dcouverte et la conqute devinrent, dans les ur, l'apanage de Colomb. formels avec la Il obtiut 1^

66

Christophe Colomb.

vice-royaut, l'administration et le quart des richesses ou produits de toute nature des mers, des lies et des continents o.
irait
il

planter la croix de l'Eglise et

le

drapeau des Espiignea.

L'archidiacre de Sville, Fonseca, fut sous le titre de patriarche

des Indes, charg des prparatifs et des armements de la nou- 5 elle expdition que Colomb allait conduire de plus vastes Mais, de ce jour, Fonseca devint le rival occulte du conqutes. grand navigateur ; et, comme, s'il et t jaloux de ravaler le gdnie qu'il tait charge de seconder, en paraissant prodiguer Colomb les moyens, il lui suscitait les obatacjjs. Ses lenteurs 10 et ses prtextes rduisirent dix-sept navires l'escadre destine ik reporter l'amiral de l'autre cte de l'Atlantique.
le gnie aventureux des Espagnols de cette poque, de proslytisme religieux et l'esprit de chevalerie prcipitrent sur ces vaisseaux un grand nombre de religieux, de

Cependant,

l'esprit

1^^

geniilshommes et d'aventuriers, presss,


les autres,

les uns,

de porter la

foi,

les

de rapporter la renomme et la fortune, en s'lanant premie^H dans ces contres qui largissaient l'imagination

humaine.

toutes les zones, des

Des ouvriers de tous les mtiers, des cultivateurs de animaux domestiques de toutes les races, 20 des graines, des p'antes, dec ceps de vigne, des arbres fruits, des roseaux suc e, des chantillons de tous les arts et de tous les commeras europens furent embarqus sur les navires de
transport pour essayer le
ciel,

fconder

le sol,

tenter les

hommet

de ces nouveaux climats, pour leur arracher l'or, les perles, les 25 parfums, los pica do l'Inde, par des changes contre les choses de peu de prix en Europe. C'tait la croisade de la religion, do
la guerre, de l'industrie,

do

la gloire et

de la cupidit

pour

les

uns

le ciel,

pour

les

autres la terre, pour tous l'inconnu et le

merveilleux.

30
de ces compagnons qui s'embarqurent avec Alonzo de Ojeda, autrefois page d'Ibabelle, le plus
et ses
le

Le plus
Colomb,
'

illustre

tait

beau, le plus intrpide et le plus aventureux des chevaliers de


cotte cour.

Sou cur

sons

dbordaient tellement de
C'tait 35

courage, qu'il en portait


lui c/ji,

fanatisme jusqu' la dmence.

un jour qu'Isabelle tait monte au sommet de la tour dmesure de Se ville appele la Giralda pour en admirer l'tour nante lvation, et pour contempler d'en haut les rues et los
maisons de
la ville

semblables une fourmilire ses pieds,

a'-

OHRigTOPHB Colomb
lana sur une poutre troite qui dbordait
de!

67
crneaux, et,

pirouettant sur ua seul pied l'extrmit de cette solive, excuta


des prodiges d'adresse et d'audace sur l'abme pour plaire sa
souveraine, sans que le vertige de la mort prsente troublt ses

yeux ou

intiuiirl&t

son cur.

IX
cris

1493, la flotte sortit de la bsie de Cadix. De? de tous les rivage taient l'aut^ure de ce second dpart, qui ne semblait destin qu' un long triomphe. Les deux fils de Colomb accompagnrent leur pre jusqu'au vaisseau amiral;

Le 25 septembre
de
joie

il

les bnit et les laissa

en Espagne, pour que la meilleure moiti IQ


l'abri

de sa vie restt du moins

des prils qu'il allait affronter.

Trois grands vaisseaux et quatorze caravelles composaient l'ar-

me

navale.
fois.

L'Ocan

se laissa franchir aussi facilement

que la

premire

La

flotte dcouvrit, le

2 novembre,

la

Guadeloupe,

croisa au milieu des les Carabes, baptisa cet archipel

de noms 16

emprunts deb souvenirs pieux;

et,

touchant bientt aprs d la

pointe d'Hispaniola, aujourd'hui Hruti,

Colomb

fit

voile vers le

20

golfe

il

avait construit le fort et laiss ses quarante

compagIl

nons.

Il

revenait la fois plein d'anxit et plein d'esprance.


le

La nuit couvrait
salve de ses

rivage quand

il

jeta l'ancre dans la rade.

20

n'attendit pas le jour pour s'assurer

du

sort de sa colonie.

Une

de son retour.

canons retentit sur les flots pour avertir les Espagnols Mais le canon du fort resta muet, l'cho seul de Le ces solitudes rptale salut de l'Europe au nouveau monde. lendemain, au lever du jour, il aperut le rivage dsert, le fort 25 'ltruit, les canons demi enfoncs sous ses ruines, les ossements
des Espagnols blanchispant sur le sable, le village
ciques abandonn.
traient

mme

des case

Le

petit

nombre de naturels qui


forts,

mon-

de

loin,

au bord
s'ils

dos

semblaient
le

s'approcher,
<l'un

comme

eussent t retenus par

sentiment 30
hsiter

remords ou par

la crainte

d'une vengeance.
la justice

Le

cacique,

plus confiant
qu'il avait

dans son innocence et dans

de Colomb,

appris aimer, s'avana entin, pleura sur les crimes

des Espagnols qui avaient abus de l'hospitalit de ses sujets

pour opprimer

les naturels,

qui avaient enlev leurs

filles et

leurs 36

femmes, rduit leurs htes en servitude


geance de sa tribu.

et suscit enfin la

ven-

Aprs avoir immol un grand

nombre

58
d'Indiens et

Christophe Colomb.
brW
leura cases,
ils

avaient t immols eux-mrftait

mes.

Le

fort incendie,

recouvrant leurs ossements,

le

premier monument du contact entre ces deux familles humaines,

dont l'une appuitait

l'autre la servitude et la dvastation.

Colomb pleura

sur les crimes de ses


Il

heura du cacique.

rsolut d'aller chercher

compagnons et sur le malune autre plage de

dbarquement et d'tablissement sur les ctes de l'le. Parmi les jeunes Indiennes captives des les voisines, prisonnires bord, la plus belle d'entre elles, Catalina, avait charm les yeux d'un cacique qui avait visit le vaisseau de Colomb. Un 10 complot d'vasion avait t tram entre ce cacique et l'objet de son amour dans ce langage des signes que les Europens ne comprenaient pas. Li nuit o. Coljmb dploya ses voiles, Catalina et SOS compagnes, trompant la vigilance do leura tyrans, se prt

cipitrent

dans

la

mer

poursuivies
le

ei.

vain par leb canots des 15

Europens,

elles

nagrent vers
les guider.

allum un feu pour


de
la colre

ot le jeune cacique avait Les deux amants, runis par ce

rivage

prodige d'audace et de force, se rfugirent dans

les forets

l'abri

des Europens.

LIL
Colomb, abordant de nouveau sur une plage vierge quelque 20 y fonda la ville d'Isabelle, tablit des rapports d'amiti avec les naturels, btit, cultiva, gouverna la premire colonie d'Europens, mre de tant d'autres ; envoya des dtachements
distance,

arms

visiter les pliiiues et les

montagnes d'Hispaniola, caressa

d'abord, attira ensuite, assujettit enfin, par des lois douces et 26


sages, les diffrentes peuplades de ces vastes contres; construisit

deo

forts, traa

des routes vers les dill'rentes parties de son


l'or,

empire, chercha

moins abondant

qu'il

ne

s'y attendait,

dans

ces rgions toujours confondues par lui avec le Indes, et n'y

trouva que lee richesses inpuisables d'un

sol

prodigue et un 30

renvoya la plus grande partie de ses vaisseaux en Espagne pour demander son aouverain de nouveaux envois d'hommes, d'aniiuuix, d'outils, de
peuple aussi
facile

asservir qu' tyranniser.

Il

plantes et de graines ncessaires l'iuunensit des territoires


qu'il

l'Europe.

conqurir aux murs, la religion, aux arts de 35 Mais les mcontents, les anibitieux et le jaloux a'embarqureut les premiers sur sa flotte, afm d'aller semer contre
allait

CiiuiaTOPlR Colomb.
lui lea

59
11 resta seul,

murmures,
de

les nccusationa et les calomnies.

afllig

la toutte, soutlVant

des douleurs cruelles, condamn

l'inaction
assitSgi.^,

le

du corps pendant le travail incessant de son esprit, dans sa colonie naissante, par les rivalits, les sditions, complots, les dbordements honteux et les disettes de ses

(^f|uii)agt'8.

Toujours indulgent et matitianime, Colomb, triomphant, par

de ses compatriotes et des de ses lieutenants, se borna relguer les insubordonns Rtabli de sa longue maladie, 10 l :)rd <ies vaisseaux dans la rade. il parcourut l'le h la tte d'une colonne d'hommes d'lite, chersa seule force morale, des turbulences
rtJvoltes

chant en vain
et les

les

murs de

l'ile,

miuoa d'or de Salomon, mais tudiant la nature et semant partout, sur son passage, le

respeci^ et

l'amour de son nom.

LUI.

n
de

retrouva, son retour,

les

mmes

dsordres,

les

mmes

15

insubordinations et les
la superstition

mmes

vices.

Les Espagnols abusaient

la terreur que Lea Indiens les prenaient pour des tres monstrueux ne faisant qu'un avec leurs cavaliers, frappant, foulant et foudroyant la fois les ennemis des Europens. Grce 20

des naturels envers eux et de

leur inspiraient les chevaux.

cette terreur,

ils

subjugaiont, enchanaient, profanaient, viol-

aient, martyrisaient cette

svit encore contre cette

douce et obissante population. Colomb tyrannie de ses compagnons sur les


la foi

Indiens.

Il

voulait leur apporter


le vice et

et les arts de l'Europe,

Aprs avoir rtabli un peu 25 d'ordre, il s'embarqua pour aller visiter l'Ile, peine entrevue, de Cuba. Il y toucha et longea longtemps ses rives, sans apercevoir l'extrmit de cette le qu'il prit pour un continent. Il navigua de l vers la Jamaque, autre le d'une immense tendue,
non
le joug,

la mort.

dont
de
il

il

apercevait lea

sommets dans

les

nuages.

Traversant 30
cause
les,

ensuite un archipel, qu'il


la richesse et

nomma

lea

Jardina de la

linine,

des parfums do la vgtation qui parait ces


et parvint

tablir quelques relations avec les naturels. Los Indiens assistrent avec un tounement ml de respect aux crm.mies du culte chrtien (}ue les Espagnols 35 clbrrent dans une grotte, sous les imliMiers du i-ivage. Un de
revint
leurs vieillards s'approclia do
dit

Cuba

Colomb aprs

la

cimonie, et

lui

avec un accent solennel

...J

mmm

60
*'

Christophe Colomb.
Ce que

ta viens de faire est bien, car il parat que c'est totl au Dieu universel. On dit que tu viens dans ces re'gions avec une grande force et une autorit suprieure toute rSi cela est ainsi, apprends de moi ce que nos anctres sistance. ont dit nos pres, qui nous l'ont redit. Aprs que les mes
culte

des

hommes sont spart^es des corps par la volont des

tres divins,

elles vont, les une,

autres, dans des rgions

dans un pays sans soleil et sans arbres, les de clart et de dlices, selon qu'elles ont

bien ou du mal mrit ici-bas, on faisant du bien ou du mal


leurs semblables.

Si

soin

de ne pas nous

faire

donc tu dois mourir comme nous, prends 10 de mal, nous et ceux qui ne t'en ont

point fait !"

Ce discours du vieillard indien, rolat par Las-Casas, atteste que les Indiens avaient une religion presque vanglique par la simplicit et la puret de sa morale, manation mystrieuse, ou 15
d'une
nature
primitive

dont

les

dpravations et

les

vices

n'avaient pas encore terni les clarts, ou d'une civilisation vieille


et use qui avait laiss ses lueurs dans leurs traditions
!

LIV.
Colomb, aprs une longue et pnible exploration, rentra mourant Hispaniola. Ses fatigues et aes anxits, jointes ses 20 souffrances et au poids des annes que son esprit ne sentait pas, mais qui pesait sur ses membres, avaient un moment triompli de son gnie. Ses matelots le ramenrent Isabelle insensible Mais la Providence, qui ne l'avait jamais abandonn, et ananti. Il trouva, en 25 veillait sur lui pendant l'absence de ses facults. 'veillant de son vanouissement, son frre chri, Barthlmy Barthlmy Colomb tait Colomb, au chevet do sa couche. arriv d'Europe Hispaniola, comme s'il avait eu l'inspiration
des prils et des ncessits
la force
ol allait se

trouver son frre.

C'tait

de

la famille,

dont Diego,

le
le

troisime frre, tait la 30

douceur, et dont Christophe tait


corps galait celle de sou me.

gnie.

La

vigueur de son

Il tait d'i:

e taille athltique,

d'une trempe de fer, d'une sant robuste, a n aspect imposant, Navigateur d'un accent de voix dcnninant les vents et les flots.
ds son joune ge, soldat et aventurier toute sa vie, dou par la 35

nature et p;ir l'habituf^e de cette audace qui commande l'obissance et de cette justice qui fait accepter la discipline, homme

Christophe OoLOMa
aussi capable

1
c'tait
le

de gouverner que de combattre,

second
circon-

qui convenait le

mieux Colomb dans l'extrmit des

stances o l'anarchie avait jet son empire, et, par-dessua tout,


c'tait
le

un

fi

re

pntr d'autant de respect que de tendresse pour


la gloire

chef et pour

de sa maison.

L'esprit de famille rpon-

dait

Colomb de de
la

la

fidlit
le

de son lieutenant.
tneilleur gage

La
la

tendresse

entre les deux frres tait


l'un et

de

confiance do

le comgouvernement, pendant les longs mois o la nature puise le condamnait lui-mme l'inaction et au repos, 10 BOUS le titre d'atieZanfado ou intndantgn''al et sous-gouverneur des terres de sa domination. V Barthlmy, plus svre adminis-

soumission de

l'autre.

Colomb

lui

remit

madement

et le

trateur que son frre, imposa plus de respect, mais souleva aussi
plus de rsistances.

La

tmrit et la perfidie du jeune guerrier espagnol Ojda 15

suscitrent
colonie.

des guerres de dsespoir entre les Indiens et la Cet intrpide aventurier, s'tant avanc avec quelques

cavaliers jusqu'aux parties les plus lointaines et les plus indpend-

antes de nie, persuada un des caciques

de,

l'accompagner au

retour avec

un grand nombre d'Indiens pour admirer la grandeur 20

et la richesse

des Europens. Le cacique, sduit, suivit Ojda. Aprs quelques jours de marche, pendant une halte au bord d'une rivire, Ojda, abusant de la simplicit de ce chef indien, lui fit admirer une paire de menottes d'acier poli dont l'clat Ojda lui dit que ces fers taient des brace- 26 blouit le cacique. lets dont les rois d'Europe se paraient dans les jours de crmonie aux yeux de leurs sujets. 11 inspira son hte le dsir de s'en parer son tour, de monter un cheval comme un Espagnol, et de se montrer , ses Indiens dans cet appareil prtendu Mais peine l'infortun 30 des scmverains du vieux monde.
cacique eut-il mont en croupe derrire le rus Ojda et revtu
les

menottes, objets de sa vanit enfantine, que les cavaliers

tipagnols, partant

au galop en entranant leur prisonnier dans


l'le

leur couirte,

traversrent

et l'amenrent enchan la colle.H

onie

oil ils le

retinrent dans

fers qu'il avait

innocemment 35

dsir.

Une

vaste insurrection souleva les Indiens contre cette perfiils

die des trangovs dans lesquels

avaient vu d'abord des htes,

ds attBi'des bittoiaiteurs, des dieux.

Cette insurrection motiva


i
I

'f0
la

Christophe Colomr

Ils rduisirent lea Indiens l'tat envoyrent quatre vaisseaux, chargs de ces victimes de leur cupidit, en Espagne, pour en faire un iultne

vengeance des Espagnols.


ils

d'esclaves, et

commerce comme d'un


prix de ces esclaves
1

btail
<;

humain.

Compensant
ils

ainsi par le

qu'ils

s'taient promis

de

recueillir

comme

ne trouvaient que du sang, la guerre alors di^nra en chasse d'hommes. Des chiens apports d'Europe et dresss cette poursuite dans les
la poussire
forts,
fliiirant,

dans ces contres o

d<^chir;int et saisissaTit les naturels

par

le

cou,

secondrent
pays.
K

les

Espagnols dans cette inhumaine dvastation du 10

LV.
Colomb,
rtabli enfin

de sa longue maladie,

ressaisit les rnes

du gouvernement,

fut entran luiniiue par ces guerres allumes


fit

pendant scm interrgne, se

guerrier et pacificateur, aprs


les

avoir t navigateur, remporta des batailles dcisives sur

Indi- 15

ans, les assouplit au joug adouci par sa bont et sa politique, et

leur imposa seulement un lger tribut d'or et de fruits de leurs

C'mties en signe d'alliance plus que de servitude.

L'le refleurit

sous sa modration

mais

le

malheureux
le

et confiant

cacitpie

premier ces htes dan ses 20 terres, honteux et dsespr d'avoir t invcdontairement le comGuanacanari, qui avait accueilli

de sa pairie, s'enfuit pour jamais dans montagnes escarpes de l'le, et y mourut libre pour ne pas vivre esclave sous les lois de ceux qui avaient abus de ses verplice de l'asservissement
les
tus.

25
cette langueur de

Pondant

Colomb

et ces agitatiouK

de

l'ile,

tra\'aillant sa perte ti la cour, l'avaient attaqu dans le cur de Ferdinand. Isabelle, plus inbranlable dans son admiration pour ce grand hf>mme, le protgeait en vain de La cour avait envoy Hispaniola un magistrat 3C sa faveur. investi de pouvoirs secrets qui l'autorisaient informer contre les prtendus crimes du vice-roi, lo dpossder de son autorit Ce juge et l'envoyer en Europe si ses crimes taient avrs. partial, nomm Aguado, arriva I-li;q):uiiola pendant que le viceroi tait la teto des troupes dans l'iiuriour do l'le, occup 35

ses ennemis,

pacifier et administrer le pays.


qu'il devait
,

Oubliant

la

roconnnissnnce

Colomb, premier auteur de sa fortune, Aguado,

Christophe Colomb.
avant

63
Colomb coup-

mme

de

recueillir des informations, dclara

able et dichu provisoirement de ses fonctions souveraines.

tour son
colonie,
il

dbarquement et applaudi par envoya l'ordre Colombe de

les

Enmcontents de la
Colomb,
5

se rendre Isabelle,

capitale des Espagnols,

et de reconnati-e sa misaicm.

entour de ses amis et de ses soldats les plus dvous, pouvait


contester son obissance aux insolentes injonctions d'un subor-

donn.

Il s'inclina,

au contraire, devant

le

nom

seul de son

souverain, se rendit dsarm prs d'Aguado, et, lui remettant


l'autorit tout eJitire, le laissa instruire

librement l'odieux pro- 10

ces

que ses calomniateurs

lui intentaient.
oii

Mais, au
la

moment mme

sa fortune l'abaissait ainsi devant

perscution, elle lui mnageait une de ces faveurs qui pouvai-

ent le plus lui concilier celles de la cour.


ofHciers,

Un

de ses jeunes

Miguel Diaz, ayant tu en duel un de ses 16 camarades, s'enfuit, de peur du chtiment, dans une partie sauLa peuplade qui habitait ces montagnes vage et recule do l'le.
tait

nomm

veuve d'un cacique.


ardent

gouverne par une jeune Indienne d'une grande beaut, Elle conut pour l'Espagnol fugitif un

amour

et l'pousa.

Diaz, aim et couroim par l'objet 20

de son amour, ne put cependant oublier sa patrie ni dissimuler


la tristesse
traits.

que le regret de ses compatriotes rpandait sur ses Sa femme, en cherchant lui arracher l'aveu de sa mlancolie, apprit de lui que l'ur tait la passion des Espagnols,
avec
lui ces

et qu'ils viendraient habiter

contres

s'ils

avaient 25

l'esprance d'y dcouvrir ce prcieux mtal.


ravie
lui

La jeune Indienne,

de conserver ce prix

la

prsence de celui qu'elle aimait,

rvla l'existence de mines inpuisables, caches dans les

montagnes.

Possesseur de ce secret et sr ce prix d'obtenir


frre

son pardon, Diaz accourut apporter


ti'sor.

Colomb la rvlation de ce 30 Barthhimy Colomb, partit avec Diaz et une escorte de troupes pour vrifier cette dcouverte. Ils arrivent en peu de jours une valle o la riv'fere roulait l'or

Le

du

'.'ice-roi,

avec

le sable, et

les

rochers de son ht taient incrusts de

tablit une forteresse dans le O mines dj ouvertes dans l'antiquit, en recueillit d'immenses richesses pour ses souverains, et se persuada de plus en plus qu'il avait abord dans la contre

parcelles de ce mtal.

Colomb

voisinage, creusa, et largit dos

fabuleuse d'Ophir.

Diae,

reconnaissant, et fidle la jeune

I
Indienne qui
il

CUBI8'rOPH OOLOMH.
devait sa grAce, sa fortune et son bonheur,
et
fit

bnir son union avitc oUe par les prtres de son culte

gouverna

en paix sa tribu.

LVL
Colomb, aprs cette dcouverte, cddant sans rsistance aux
ordres d'Aguado, s'embarqua avec son juge pour l'Espagne.
Il

mois de navigation, plus en accus qu'on mne au Hupplice qu'en conqurant qui rapporte des trophes.
arriva, aprs huit

La calomnie,
de
les

l'incrdulit, le reproche, l'accueillirent


s'tait

Cadix.

L'Espagne, qui
la terre

attendue des prodiges, ne voyait revenir

et des esclaves nus.

de ses rves que des aventuriers dus, des accusateurs 10 L'infortun cacique, toujours enchan dans

and

menottes d'Ojda, amen comme un trophe vivant Ferdinet Isabelle par Aguado, tait mort en mer en maudissant

sa confiance dans les

Europens et leur trahison. Colomb, conformant son costume la tristesse et la misre 15 de sa situation, se rendit Burgos, o tait la cour, en habit de franciscain, n'ayant sur ce vtement qu'une corde pour ceinture,
la tte

charge d'annes, de soucis, d'affliction et de cheveux

blancs, les pieds nus

comme un
sa gloire.

suppliant de gnie qui vient


Isabelle seule le reut avec

demander pardon de

une 20

tendre compassion et s'obstina croire sa vertu et ses services.


Cette faveur constante, quoique voile, do
la

reine soutint l'amiral


Il

contre les dnigrements et les accusations des courtisans.

proposa de nouveaux voyages et des dcouvertes plus vastes.


conseTitit lui confier encore des vais-seax,

On
con- 25

mais on

lui

fit

suraer dans des lenteurs systmatiques le peu d'annes que son

La pieuse Isabelle, en accordant ge avanc laissait ses forces. Colomb des pouvoirs et des titres nouveaux, stipula en faveur des Indiens des conditions de libert et d'humanit qui devanLe cur d'une femme proscrivait aient les ides de son sicle.
d'instinct l'esclavage

.JO

que

la

philosophie et la religion ne devaient

abolir

que quatre

sicles aprs.

Enfin Colomb justifi put s'em-

barquer et

faire voile vers sa

nouvelle patrie.

l'envie le poursuivirent jusqu' bord

Mais la haine et du vaisseau o il devait


Broviesca, trsorier 35

arborer son pavillon d'amiral de l'Ocan.

du patriarche des Indes, Fonaeca, ennemi de Colomb, se rpandirent en outrages contre l'amiral, au moment o on levait l'ancre

Christophe CoLowa
Colomb, qui
peur
la

H
A
cette

s'tait

contenu jusque-l par


fois

la force intrieure, la

patience et le Rentimont de l'immonait de sa mission, dborda

premire

d'amertume

et d'indignation.
il

dernire ignominie d ses ennemis,


instant, et,
la

redevint

homme

pour un
6

force

tombant 'le toute la hauteur de son me et de toute de son bru.s redouble par la colre 'sur son indigne
il

perscuteur,
368 pieds.

l'abattit sur le

pont

et le foula avec

mpris sous

de l'Europe celui qui lui semblait trop grand ou trop heureux pour un mortel. Cette vengeance soudaine de rmuiral laissa un nouveau ressentinunt 10 dans le cur de Fonseca et une nouvelle accusation exploiter
la jalousie

Toi fut l'adieu de

ses ennemis.
et

Le vent qui s'levait l'enleva aux indignits de sa patrie.


LVII.

la

vue du rivage

Parvenu
il

cette fois, par


la

une autre route,


puis, la doublant,
il

l'le

de

la Trinit, la vritable

la

reconnut,

nomma,
la

ctoya

15

terre d'Amrique,

prs do l'embouchure de l'Ornoque.

La

douceur de l'eau de

mer, qu'il gota dans ces parages, aurait


fleuve qui se dchargeait dans l'Ocan

le

convaincre que

le

avec une masse auflisante pour dessaler ses vagues ne pouvait

20

venir que d'un continent.

Il

descendit cependant sur cette cte 20

sans souponner qu'elle tait la plage du

monde inconnu.

Il la

trouva dserte et silencieuse


htes.

comme un domaine

qui attend ses


sable

Une fume

lointaine

au-dessus de vastes forts, une


le
Il

25

cabane abandonne et quelques traces de pieds nus sur (bi rivage fut tout ce qu'il contempla de l'Amrique.

ne

fit

25

imprimer un premier pas et qu'y passer une seule mais ce premier pas nuit sous la voile qui lui servait de tente aurait d suffire donner son nom ce demi-monde.
hii-mme q
'y
;

LVIIl.
JO

repartit

du golfe de Paria

et revit, aprs

de laborieuses
Ses SO
l'in-

investigations de toutes ces mers, le rivage d Hispaniola.

peines d'me et de corps, sa longue patience en Espagne,

gratitude de ses compatriotes, la froideur de Ferdinand,


,iv

la

haine

pendant les traverses, les infirmits de l'ge, l'avaient plus bris que les flot^. Ses yeux, chanff.s par les insomnies et par la contemplation des cartes et du lirma- 35
de ses ministres,
les veilles

ee

Ohribtopub Colomb.
;

ment, taient enflamnis


la goutte, refusaient

ae

de

le soutenir.

membres, roitlia et endoloris par Son /Ime seule tait saine


ponse

et son g^nie, perant

dans

l'avenir, le tranHportait par la

au-dessus de ses soutlrances et au del du temps.

Colomb, son

frre, qui avait

continue

il

rgir la

Barthlmy colonie en son


Il

absence, fut encore son consolateur et son appui.

accourut

au-devant de l'amiral ds que ses vigies signalrent des voiles en


mer.

Barthlmy raconta & son frhre les vicissitudes d'HiHpaniola pendant son absence. A peine avait-il achev l'explorati.yn et la pacification du pays, que Ie excs des Espagnols et les conspirations de ses propes lieutenants avaient renvers l'ouvrage de sa sagesse et de sa vigueur. Un surintendant de la colonie, nomm Roldan, homme populaire et astucieux, s'tait fait un parti parmi les matelots et les aventuriers, cume de l'Espagne rejeto par la mre patrie dans la ci>lonie. Il s'tait cantimn avec eur sur le rivage oppos de Saint-Domingue et s'tait ligu contre Barthlmy avec les caciques des peuplades voisines; il avait construit ou enlev des forteresses d'o il bravait l'autorit de son chet lnitime. Les Indiens, tmoins des divisions de leurs tyrans, en avaient protit pour s'insurger eux-mmes et pour r user le tribut. L'ana'-chie dchirait la nouvelle possession. L'nroamo de Barthlmy en retenait seul les lambeaux dans ses fortea mains. Ojda avait frt des navires pour son propre compte en Espagne ; il tait venu croiser et descendre sur la cte mridionale de l'le, et s'tait ligu avec Roldan. Puis Roldan avait truhi Ojda et s'tait rang de nouveau sous l'autorit du Pendant ces dchirements de la colonie, un jeune gouverneur. Espagnol d'une beaut' remarquable, don Fernand de Guerara, avait inspir une violente passion la fille d'Anacoaua, veuve du cacique emmen par Ojda en Espagne et mort captif dans la traverse. Anacoana olle-mine tait jeune encore, clbre parmi les peuplades de l'Ile par son incomparable beaut, par son gnie
naturel et par son talent <)pltique, qui faisait d'elle la sibylle

10

20

25

30

adore de ses cumpatriotes.

Elle avait conu, malgr les malheur 35


et

de son mari, une haute admiration

une inclination invincible

pour

les

Espagnols.

La contre

qu'elle gouvernait avec son frre

tait l'asile

de ces trangers.

Elle les comblait de son hospitalit,

d'or et de protection dans leurs disgrces.

Ses sujets, plus

Crri-

CnRIBTOPIB

OOLOMR

67

Wnn que les autres tribus iiidionnes, vivaient en paix; riche et

heureux

soi^s ses lois.

Rokian, qui gouvernait

la partie

de

l'ilti

soumise la belle Aiuvcoana, avait t jaloux du sjour et de l'influence do Fornand do Guerara la cour de cotto princesse.
Il lui

dJfondit d'pouser sa fille et lui ordonna do s'enih.irquor. Fornand, retenu par 8o amour, avait refus d'u!)i5ir; il conspua

contre Roldan.

Surpris et enchaln(^ dans


il

la

demeure d'nacoana
1^
1

par les soldats de Koldan,


tre jug.
pri^texte

avait

tto'

Une ex])dition, partie do la de parcourir l'le, avait t accueillie avec un empresse- 10 ment amical dans la capitale d'Anacoana. Le ohof perfide de cette expdition, abusant de la confiance et de l'hospitalit de
cette reine, avait fait inviter par elle trente cacirp^es
l'ile

conduit Isabelle pour y capitale do la colonie sous

du midi de
Les Espaassistaient, 15

aux ftes gnols, pendant


tectrice,

qu'elle prparait pour les Espagnols.


les

danses et

les festins
la

auxquels

ils

avaient conspir l'inoondie et

mort de leur gnreuse proIls invitle

de sa famille, de ses htes et de son peuple.


fille, les

rent Anacoana, sa

trente caciques et

peuple con-

templer, du haut d'un balcon, les volutions do leura chevaux et

25

un combat simul entre les cavaliers de leur escorte. Ces cava- 20 liers fondent tout coup sur le peuple sans armes, ra8semV)l par ils le maasacrent et le fou;ent aux pieds curiosit sur la place de leurs chevaux puis, entourant d'une haie d( fantassins le palais d'Anacoana pour empcher cette reine et se amis d'en sortir, les Espagnols avaient incendi le palais, encore plein des 25
;
;

ftes et des festins


ils

auxquels

ils

venaient de s'asseoir eux-muies;

avaient contempl avec une cruaut gale leur ingratitude

la belle et

malheureuse Anacoana, repousse dans son

palais,

expirant dans les flammes et appelant sur eux la vengeance de

30

de ses dieux

30
l'hospitalit,

Ce crime contre
ana tait
le

contre rinn')Conce,

contre la

souverainet, contre la beaut et le gnie dont la clbre Anaco-

symbole parmi

les Indiens, avait jet

dans

l'ile

une
i:i

horreur et

un bouleversement dont Colomb ne pouvait de

long-

36

temps triompher malgr toute sa vertu et toute sa politique. Les 35 flammes et le sang du palais de cette reine dont la beaut les
blouissait et
et

dont

les posies

nationales

les

enivraiont d'amour
les oppri-

d'enthousiasme, s'levrent entre les oi)pre8seur8 et


L'ile dtiviut

ms.

un oliamp de cauage, un bague

et

un cimetire

68
'loH

CiiKiHTopHB Colomb.
malheareux Indiens.

LeR

E^tpai^nols, anasi fnnatiquon

dans

leur proslytisme i\\w barbare daiis leur cupidit, prludaient,


il

Hispaiiiolii,

ique.

aux criuu-a {ui devaient biontAt dpoujder le MexCua deux races d'huiiimos s'toull'oreut ou a'uuibrutiiiaiit.

LIX.
Pendant que Colomb '(tudiait A sparer et et pacifier ces deux parties de la poiiulatioii, le roi Fordinatid, inform par ses
eniiemit dea uialheurs
sait.

do

l'ilo, les

imputait celui

(^ui les

guris-

Cvdontb ayant demanda

la

cour de

lui

envoyer un magis-

trat d'un raiiir lev

royale ses
dilla,

compagnons
L'autorit

homme

pour imposer par ses juofemouts l'autorit indisciplins, la cour lui envoya Boba- 10 intgre de murs, mais fanatique et indomptable

d'orgeuil.

mal d^tinie dont

il

(tait

investi

par le

dcret royal le subordonnait la fois et le faisait suprieur


tout autre pouvoir.
l'amiral,
il

le

En arrivant Hispaniola, prvenu somma insolemment de comparatre en


apporter des chanes,
il

contre

accus 15

ordonna aux solLes soldats, dats d'en charger les membres de leur gnral. accoutums au respect et , l'amour de leur chef, rendu plus vnrable leurs yeux par l'Age et par la gloire, hsitrent et restrent immobiles comme si on leur ei\t connnand un sacri- 20 Mais Ciilomb, tondant de lui-mme le bras aux fers que li^ge. son roi lui envoyait, se laissa enchaner aux pieds et aux mains par un de ses propres serviteurs, bourreau volontaire, vil stipendi de sa domesticit, nomm Espinosa, dont Las Casas a conserv le nom comme un type d'insolence et d'ingratitude. 25
devant
lui, et, faisant

Colomb ordonna lui-mme

ses

deux

frres,

Barthlmy
son
il

et

Diego, qui taient encore la tte du corps d'arme dans


eur, de se soumettre sans rsistance et sans

l'intrijui^o.

murmure

Enferm dans

le

cachot

do

la forteresse

d'Isabelle,

subit
'Ai)

pendant plusieurs mois l'instruction de son procs, o tous ses rvolts et tousses ennemis, devenus ses accusateurs et ses juges,
le chargrent

l'envi des plus odieuses et des plus absurdes

accusations.
liques,
il

Devenu l'objet de la drision et de la fureur pubentendait du fond de sa prison les railleries froces et
de ses perscuteurs qui venaient tous
Il s'attendait

les fanfares

les soirs insulter

35

sa captivit.
bourreaux.

chaque instant voir entrer ses Bobadilla, cependant, n'osa pas le dernier crime. Il

Ohribtophf.
ordonna qae l'amiral
Eapa^^^ne,

COLOMa
de
la colonie et
roi.

9
envoy on

serait expuls

la justice on la merci du

lonzo de Villejo
C'tait
t>i

fut charg

de sa garde pendant

la traverse.

un hointne
6

de c(8ur, obissant par devoir militaire, indi^ri^

misricordieux
entrer dans

juuque dans l'obissance.

0<>lumb, en le voyant

son cachot, ne douta pas que sa dernire heure ne ft arrive.

s'y tait

prpar par l'innocence et par


lui.

la prire.

Lii

nature

pourtant se troublait en

"Oii me conduisez- vous f


de l'accent 10
l'officier.

dit-il

en interrogeant du regard et
10

Aux vaisseaux
rpondit Villejo.

ol

vous allez tre embarqu, monseigneur,

M'enibarquer
rendait la vie
;

reprit

Oolomb incrdule ce message qui lui


.

ne

me

trompez-vou
rpliqua
"
!

pas, Villejo
;

Non,
16
Il

monseij^neur,

l'officier

je vous jure, par 16

Dieu, que rien n'est plus vrai

soutint les pas do l'amiral et le

fit

monter sur

le vaisseau,

cras
Ificlio

du fardeau de ses
populace.

fers et poursuivi par les insultes

d'une

20

Mais peine les vaisseaux furent-ils sous voile que Villejo et 20 Andras Martin, commandants du navire devenu le cachot flottant de leur chef, s'approchrent avec respect de lui ainsi que Oolomb, pour tout l'quipage et voulurent lui enlever ses fers.
qui ces fers taient la fois

un signe d'obissance
il

Isabelle et

un signe de l'iniquit des hommes, dont


corps, mais

dont

il

tait glorieux

dans e>on 26 dans son &me, leur rendit


souffrait

26

30

de ces anneaux. de me aoumotO'est en leur nom qu'ils m'ont charg de fers. tre h, Bobadilla. Je les porterai jusqu' ce qu'ils m'en dchargent eux-mmes, et 30 je les conserverai aprs, ajouta-t-il avec une satisfaction amre de ses services et de son innocence, comme un monument de la " rcompense accorde par les hommes mes travaux. Son fils raconte, ainsi que Las Oaaaa, que Oolomb fut fidle
grce, mais refusa obstinment d'tre dlivr
*'

Non,

rpondit-il,

mes souverains m'ont

crit

cette promesse, qu'il garda toujours depuis ses chaiaes

suspendues 35
il

-rt

BOUS ses yeux dans ses demeures, et que, dans son testament,

ordonna qu'elles fussent enfcmed avec lui dans son cercueil : comme s'il et voulu en appeler Dieu de l'injustice et de
l'ingratitude

de

ses

contemporains,

et

prsenter au ciel
la terre
!

les

preuves matrielles de l'iniquit et de la cruaut de

46

-Vffw-yt).

..^^y,^

.,-v .

70

CaBis-'OPiiK Colomb.

LX.
Cepend'Viit les haines des partis ne traversent pas K
s

ik ra.

Le

dp^'J'licment, la captivit, les fera


et d'indignation le

de misncordo

de Colomb souievieat peuple do Cadix. Q ud on


i

vit ca vieillard, qui avait

apport nagure

t.n

euipuv aa paUie,
vil

rapport lui-m(nne do cet .empire


expier
le service

comme un
les
l

criminel poui

par l'opprobre,

curs clatrent contre


irouade, versa des lartnea

Bobadilla.

Isabelle, qui t?it aiors

sur cutte

indii^iiit,

ordonna que
II

ses fers fussent remplacos par

de riches vtements,
Elle l'appela
il

et ses gvliers par

une escorte d'iKjuneur.


la voix.
le

Grenade.

tomba

ses pieda et ses sanglots de 10

reconi.aissiiiic lai

couprent longtomps

Le

roi et 1
si

reine ne diiiiirnrent pas

mme exuniner
re!j)ect

procs d'un

grand

accus
Ils

il

Jtait

absous par leur

autant que par sa vertu.

gardrent quelque temps l'amiral leur cour et envoyrent

un autre gouverneur,
Ovaiuio avait
les

nomm Ovando,
iriiieux.
le

pour remplacer Bobadiila. 15


C'tait

vertus qui font l'homme intgre, sans la gran-

deur d'ino qui tres o tout

tait

l'homme
troit,

est

mme

devoir,

ressemble une parciuionie de

la

nature.

un de ces caraco l'honntet C'tait rh(>mme le


et
Il

moins
l'ordre

fait

pour suppler un grand homme.


1

reut a'Isabelle 20

de protier

,s

Indiens et

la

dfense de les vendre

comme
dont
ii

esclaves.

La

part des revenus dvolus

Colomb par
flotte

les traits

devait

lui tre

envoye en
\)'m-

Esp.itrne, ainsi tpie les trsors

avait t dpossd

Bobidilla.

Une

de trente vodes
25
les perscu-

porta le nouveau gouverneur lliapaiiiola.


C'jlomb, insensible la vieillesse et
tions,
souflVait
patrie.
dji^
repoi^^:

mme les honneurs Gaina venait de dcouvrir la route des Le mond< tait plein Indes par le cap de Bonno-Espi' ince. d'tonnement et d'admiration p(jur )a dcouverte du navigateur
iuqjatieuimen*^^ le repos ec

dans sa

Vjisco de

'60

portugais.
gnois.

Ui.\o

noble rivalit travaill.ut


la

l';i,.ii.^

u navigateur
crny.Lic

Co:;vaincu de

rotondit du gljbe

il

amver

uux terres prolo'\'..,os de l'est en naviicuaut droit l'orient. Il sollicita de la ctuir d'Espagne le conuuandement d'une quatrime exp-^dition, * s'embarqu, t\ Cadix, ki 19 mai 1"')2, |)(>iir 1 der- 35 Son ftro B.'rthlemy Oo'cmb et son fila Fernando, niie fois. ISa tlolt^ tte composait 4g(5 de quatorze ans, raccompagnaient.

w.iti loIi,-^l/,u^tmkMJfii,i^,^u^.,,.,',,^^^^JJ

:<,,

ChrISTOF

TE

COLOMa
les ctes et

T/

de quatre petits vaisHeaux propres naviguer sur


niera.

entrer sans danger dans les anses et dans les embouchures des
i

fleuves qu'il voulait explorer.

Ses quipat^es ne comptaient que

vieat
iid

cent cinquante hounnes de mor.

Bien

qu'il

approcht de soixh
ni la

on

ante et dix ans, sa verte vieillesse avait rsist oar la vigueur de

piiU-it',
l

l'me au poLdc de aniies

ni des maladies douloureuses,

poui

perspective de la mort ne le dtournaient de son but.

Boiitre

arines
lis

dans

par

lueur,
lots

un outil qui doit se briser l'uvre Providence qui s'en sert pour ses desseins. Aussi longtemps que le corps peut, l'esprit doit vouloir." 10 Tl avait rsolu de toucluir en passant Hispauiola pour se
disait-i, est

"L'homme,
la

main de

la

de 10

radouber

il

en avait l'autorisation de

la

cour.

Il

francliit

et la Kraul vertu,
^'rent
idiila.

l'Ocan par une


ses voiles en

mer orageuse,

et

il

arriva avec ses mts briss,

lambeaux, sea vaisseaux sans eau et sans vivres, en


Ses notions maritimes
lui

vue d'Hi&paaioa.
l

prsageaient un 15
Il

ouragan plus terrible que ceux qu'il avait essuys.

envoya

une chaloupe demander an gouverneur Ovando


s'abriter

la

permission de

graueavucltot
ie 1

danger que
lettre,

Instruit par ses pronostics du rade d'Ibal)dlle. mer allait dchaner sur ses ctes, Colomb, dans sa avertissait Ovando de retarder le dpart d'une flotte nom- 20

dans

la

la

breuse prte partir d'IIiapauiola pour l'Espagne et charge de


tous les trsors

ibelle -JU
>iuine raita

du nouveau
l'asile

niimde,

Ova.ido refuca inipitwyablele

msnt Colomb

d'un mornen: qu'il in.porait dans

port

de sa propre dcouverte. cherchant loin de 25 Ovando.


jusque dans
la

s'loigna indign et proscrit, et

>nt

ii

toiles

aises cartt,s de Vile,

domination d'Ovando un abri sous Jes fal- 25 il y attendit la tempte qu'il avai*^^ pi dite Elle engloutit la flottt entire de ce gouverneur, les

s6culeurs
>

trJsora et la vie d'un uiillior d'Espai^nols.


la

Colomb
inhumaine,
la
l
'.''

la

ressentit

rade o

il

s'tait abrit,

gmit sur

les mii'heura
il

de

des

ses compatriotes, et, quittant cette terre

revit la 30

)leiii

Jaratque et aborda sur

la terre

ferme dans

d'Honduras.
d'un cap

iteur ;U)
itt'Ur

Soixante jours da tempte continue,


l'autre et

le ballottei-ent

du continent aux

lies,

sur les bords inconnus de cette


!

river
II

Aronque dont les orages semblaient lui disputer la conque.' e H perdit un de ses navires et les cinquante hommes qui
montaient \ rembouchurt. d'une rivire
Dsastre.
qu'il

le

35

ime
uer- 35

nomma

la plage

du

ado,
mai^

La mer s'obstmant

lui

f-^rmer la route de ces


il

Indes

qu'il

croyait toujours entrevoir,

jetu l'ancre entre

une

ile

dlicieuse

w
et le continent.

CnHSTorHK Colomb.
Visito par les Indien,
il

en embarqua sept suf

ses vaisseaux pour se familiari.sor avec leur langue et

pour en
les

obtenir des indices.

Il

ctoya avec eux une terre

oii l'or et

perles abondaient dans les uiains des naturels.

Au commence-

remonta la rivire Veragua et envoya 5 de soixante Espagnols visiter les villages de cps V)ords et cherclu-r des mines d'or. Barthlmy ne trouva (|Uo des sauvages et des forts. L'amiral abandonna ce fl"uve et pntra dans un autre, dont les rives taient peuples d'Indiens qui prodiguaient l'or see <[uipa}^es en change des 10 [)lus vulgaires hochets de l'Europe. Il se croyait au but de ses chimres, il tait au c>)mblo de ses revers. La guerre clata entre cette poigne d'Europens et le peuple nombreux de ces rivages. Barthlmy Colomb terrassa de sa main et emmena
il

ment de l'anne 1504,

son frre Barthlmy

la tte

captif le facique le plus

puissant et le plus redoutable des 16

Indiens.

Un
la

village

construit sur la

que les coiupagnons de Colomb avaient cte pour commercer avec l'intrieur fut pris et
;

incendi

nuit par les naturels

huit Espagnols, percs par

leurs ficies, prirent sous les dbris de leurs cabanes.

thlmy
forts
;

rallia les plus

Barcourageux et refoula ces hordes dans leurs 20


p?,r le

mais l'antipathie s'accrut des deux cts

sang

rjiandu, les canots des Indiens assaillirent en foule la chaloupe

de l'escadre qui cherchait remonter plus haut les Europens qui la montaient furent immoles.
lutte acharne,

le fleuve.

Tous
cette
la

Pendant

Colomb, retenu bord de ses navires par


son vaisseau.

25

faibltsse de son corps et par les maladies, gardait ie cacique et


les chefs indiens prisonniers sur

Ces chefs, infornuit

ms du ravage de
mes,

leur territoire et de la capivit de leurs fem-

tentrent de s'vader en soulevant pendant une


la

obscure

trappe qui fermait leur cachot f ottant.

L'ipiipage, 30

rveill par le bruit, les refoula dan.s leur prison et


tiile

ferma

l'cou-

avec une barre de


Ils 3't"'ont

fer.

Le lendemain, quand on
nourriture,
ii

rouvrit

l'coutille

pour leur porter

la

ne trouva que leurs

cadavres.

tous entre-vua de dsespoir pour chf.p-

per l'esclavap

o5

LXI.
Bientt spar pnr
tait
les brisants

de son frre Barthlmy, qui

^ teiry avec

les lestes

de l'expdition, Colomb n'eut plus

.^-.j|!-

Christophe Colomb.
pour oommuiiiquer avec
lui

78
offcierB,

que

le

courage d'un de aes

franchiasant la nage les cueila pour porter et rapporter des

nouvelles toujours plus sinistres.


siens ni les

Il

ne pouvait ni s'loigner des


L'inquitude, la

abandonner dans leurs


si

dbastrea.

maladie, la faim, la perspective d'un naufrage sans refuge et sana

tmoins sur une terre


son

dsire et

si

funeste, combattaient dans

cur

sa constance hroque et sa rsignation pieuse


il

aux

ordres de Dieu, dont


Il

ee sentait la fois l'envoy et la victime.


:

dcrivait ainsi, pendant ses insomnies, l'tat de son esprit

"Epuis,
insens

je m'tais assoupi,

quand une voix pntre de 10


entendre cep paroles
:

douleur et de compassion
!

me

fit

Homme

on

Dieu de autrement pour Mose et pour David, ses serviteurs? Depuis l'instant de ta naissance, il a toujours pris le plus grand soin de toi. Ds que tu as t en ge d'homme, 15 U a fait retentir merveilleusement ton nom obscur par toute la terre ; il t'a donn en possession les Indes, cette partie favorise de sa cration ; il t'a fait trouver les clefs des barrires de l'immense Ocan, fermes jusque-l par des chanes si fortes. Tournetoi vers lui et bnis sa misricorde pour toi. S'il reste encore 20 quelque grande entreprise accomplir, ton go ne sera point un obstacle ses desseins. Abraham n'avait-il pas plus de cent ans quand il engendra Isaac, et Siira tait-elle jeune? Qui a caus tes afflictions d'aujourd'hui? est-ce Dieu ou le monde? Les promesses qu'il t'a faites, il ne les a jamais viols ; il n'a jamais 25 dit, aprs avoir reu tes services, que tu l'avais mal compris. Il tient tout ce qu'il dc't, lui, et au del; ce que tu souffres
si

homme

lent croire et servir ton Dieu, le

l'univers

A-t-il fait

aujourd'hui est le salaire des travaux et des dan^ers que tu aa


subis en servant d'autres matres.
;:0

Ne crains donc rien


:

et

prends

confiance dans le dsespoir


crites sur le

mme.

Touffes ces tribulations sont 30


il

marbie,

et ce n'est pas sans raiscn

faut qu'elles

s'accomplissent.

"Kt la

voix qui m'avali, parl


"
I

me

laissa plein

de

consolation et de constance

5
Enfin
la.

LXIt
Baison apaisa la mer, et les

doux

frres, si
Ils

longtemps

si Aiiis, se rejoignirent

sur les vaisseaux.


de.s trois

regagnrent len- 35

teinent Hispaniola.

Une
rivage.

caravelles
lui

bc appr<.)ohant

dtz

Il

ne

resU

sombra de fatigua que deux barquea

T4
vieillies

Christophe CoLOMa
pour entasser tous
ses quipages.

Ses compa'jjnons
perces,

abattus, sans vivres et sans forces, ses ancres perdues, ses navires
faisant eau et toutes leurs
dit-il,

membrures ront^es des vers et


;

"d'autant de trous qu'un rayon de miel " les vents et la mer impitoyuWes le repoussant d'Hispaniola la Jamaque, ses navires prts s'abmer, lui donnrent peine le temps de les
le

chouer sur

sable dans une baie inconnue, de les lier ensemble

par des cbles et par des planoioa qui n'en faisaient qu'un bloc,
d'dlever sur ces
et d'attendre,

deux ponts runis des tentes pour ses quipages dans cette affreuse situation d'un naufrag, le 10

secours de la Providence.

Les Indiens, attirs par


avec
la
les

le spectacle

de ce naufra-ye et de cette
objtits sans valeur,

forteresse btie par des trangers sur' leur grve, c]i;uigrent

Espagnols dea vivres contre des


faisait le prix

dont mois 15

nouveaut

leurs yeux.

Cependant

les

s'coulaient, les provisions s'puisaient, les terreurs de l'avenir


et les rauruiures sditieux des tJ(piipages jt^taient l'me

de l'annral

dans une pensive anxit.


tait

Le

sou

espoir de salut qui restt

donc un avis de sa dtresse au gouverneur d'Hispaniola, Ovando. Mais cinquante lieues de mer sparaient Hispaniola 20 de la Jamaque, .^n canot de sauvjiges tait la seule embarc;vtion Quel hi-anue assez dvou pour ses frres qu'il pit mettre flot.
jouerait sa vie contre

un lment

si

vaste et

si terrible,

sur un

tronc d'arbre creus, et sans autre grement qu'une ramet

Diego Mendez, jeune officier de l'escadre de Colomb, qui avait 2o dj '' ntr dans d'autres extrmits cet ouoli de soi-mme qui fait les hros et les miracles, s'otVit une nuit la pense de
l'amiral.
Il le
fit

aiii)eler
:

en secret prs de son Ut

ol la

goutte

le retenait, et

il

lui dit

"

Mon

tils,

de tous ceux qui iont


les

ici,

vous et moi nous com- 30

prenons seuls
tive

dangers dans lesquels nous n'avons en petspec-

que la mort. Un seul moyen iions reste tenter. Il faut qu un seul s'exptjse prir pour tous ou nous sauve tous. Voulezvous tre celui-l
"
?
:

Mendez rpondit
frres; mais
il

35

''Monseigneur, je
faveur

me

suis

plusieurs

fois

dvou
disent

j>ur

me

y en a

q>ii

murmurent
il

ec qui

que votre
tenter.

me choisit

toujours quand

y a une action

d'olac

Christophe Colomb,
Proposez donc demain tout l'quiiKigo
m'otfi-ez, et, si
la

75
misaion que voua

nul ne raccei>te, je voua obirai."

lendemain ce que Meiidez avait demande. Tout se rcria sur l'imposHibilit d'une traverse immense sur un morceau de bois, jouet du vent et des lames. Mendez alors s'avana et dit modesteuient :
L'aminil
lit

le

l'quipage

iiiterro'.,'6

votre service et pour le salut de tous

10

qu'une vie perdre, mais je suis prt l'exposer pour ; je m'abandonne la protection de Dieu." Il partit et. se perdit dans les brumes et dans les cumes de 10 l'horizon, aux yjux des E^p.ignols dont il portait la vie avec la
n'ai

"Je

sienne.

Lxm.
15

Cependant
connu

l'attente f-ans

<s|>i>ir,

l'isolemont absolu

du nu ndo
ses oHitners 15

et l'erc.s

do iiiaUiour

ni-^rirent contre l'iimiral ses (oni-

pagiions, (^ui lui impuirent leur perte.


favoris,
ses
tils

Deux de

de Porras, qu'il avait traits connue et investis des principaux commandements dans l'escadre,
et Fraiscisco

Diego

20

furent les premiers lever contre lui le


bientt la sdition.

murmure,

l'insulte et

Protitant d'une crise de ses infirmits qui

clouait leur bienfaiteur sur sa couche, et entranant avec


!)U)iti

eux

la

20

des nuitelots et des soldais,

ils

s'emparbrent d'une partie


et d'outrages

des vivres et des armes, ameutrent leurs coujplicos aux cris de

25

Castille
l'amiral.

Castille

et couvrirent
la

de maldictions

Colomb, que que lever les mains vers


le

maladie dsarmait et
larmes

({ui

ne pouvait

le ciel, les

supplia en vain de rentrer dans 25

devoir.

Ils mcprir'rent; ses

comme ses ordres.

lis lui

reprochrent sa vieillcse, ses cheveux blancs, ses souffrances


corporelles, et ]L-\uiit le fer sur sa tto.
cSO

arma de

sa lance, se jeta entre


et,

eux

et

Barthlmy Colomb rnminl que des serviteurs


partit^ lidle

soutenaient dans leuis bras,


l'ipiipage,
il

second par une

de 30

sauva

le jo ars et l'autorit

de son frre sur

les vaia-

seaux
trent

Les deux Puiras


les

et

cinquante de leurs complices quitla

btiments,

ravagrent

contre,

aou.'ovrent

les

35

naturels par leurs crimes, tenti'rent en vain de construire des

bjuques pour Se rendre Hispc.niola, ptriieut en partie dans


tentative, revinrent attaijuer
lot Vcuiiiiea.ux,

;a

35

Colomb

et leurs conipitriotes

dans

luxeul vaincus ^ar le brus intrpide de liarthlemy,

76
qui tua
ItJiir

Christophe Colomr
chof,

Francisco

Porras, et se soumirent enfin au

devoir, suppliant

Colomb de pardonner

leur ingratitude et

leur rbellion.

Cependant

le

messager de Colomb, sur son frle tronc d'arbre,


il

avait t dirig par la Providence sur ce dsert d'eau, et

avait

chou, coniino
d'Uispaniola.

le

dbris

dun

naufrage lointain, sur


l'le

les cuoils
il

Conduit travers
11 lui

par les naturels,

tait

parvenu, aprs des fatigues, et dos dauyers sans nombre, jusqu'au

gouverneur Ovaudo,
et
il

avait remis le message do l'amiral,

avait ajout par son rcit l'intrt et la piti

que

la

10

situation dsespre de

Colomb

et

de ses compagnons devait

inspirer des compatriotes.


soit attente secrte

Mais, soit incrdulit, soit lenteur,

de

la

ruine d'un rival trop grand pour ne pas

embarrasser
laiss,
ils

la reconnaissance, les

Espagnols d'Hispaiiiola avaient

sous divers j^rtextes, s'couler les jours et les mois.

Puis 15

avaient envoy,

comme

regret, un lger navire,

command
Ce navire

par Escobar, pour reconnatre la situation des vaisseaux naufrags


sans aborder la cte et sans parler aux quipages.
avait apparu et disparu distance,

aux regards de Colomb et de ses matelots, avec tant de mystre, que leurs super- 20 stition l'avait pris pour le fantme d'un btiment qui venait tenter leur crdulit ou prophtiser leur mort.
nuit,

une

Enfin Ovando se dcida envoyer des vaisseaux l'amiral pour


l'arracher la sdition, la disette et la mort.

Aprs un

naufrage de seize mois,


avait fait

l'amir.al,

accabl de ses annes, des ses 25

infirmits et de ses revers, revit,


il

un empire,
Il

et

pour quelques jours, l'Ile dont dont l'ingratitude et la jalousie le

proscrivaient.

a]iparence dans la maison


intluence dans le
ses

y passa quelques mois, bien accueilli en du gouverneur, mais exclu de toute gouvernement, voyant ses ennemis en faveur, 30
perscuts cause de leur
fidlit, et

amis expulss
le

(^u

pleurant

sur la raine et sur l'esclavage de cette terre qu'il avait dc(;ou verte

comme

jardin du

monde

et qu'il revoyait

comme

le

tombeau
la fois 85

de ses chers ludiemi.

Ses propres biens confisqus, ses revenus

dilapids, ses terres dpeuples

ou incultes

le livraient

1r vieillesse, la maladie et l'indif^ence.

Jet enfin avec son

frre, son fils et quelt^ues serviteurs sur un vaisseau qui revenait en Europe, une mer implacable le porta de tempte en tempte

fcJau-Lucar,

ol il

dbarcjua K 7

novembre

et d'o

on

le traus-

"'i'n!^"''^ ?'f""'"r^

Ohristopur Colomb.
porta Sville, vaincu de force, mourant de curps, invincible
d'esprit,

77

immortel de volont

et d'esprauco.

LXIV.
Le possesseur de
tant d'les et do continents n'avait pas

un

toit

pour abriter s.v tte. " Si je veux manger ou dormir,


faut
p.'v8

crit-il

de Sville son
"
!

lila, il

que

je frappe la porte d'une htellerie, et souvent je

de quoi y payer mon repas et Ses malheurs et son indigence


la

ma

nuit

lui taient

moins intolrables

que

misre de ses compagncns et de ses serviteurs qu'il avait


Il crivit

attachs par tant d'esprances sa fortune et qui lui reprochaient 10


leur dception et leur misrr.
leur faveur.

au

roi et la reine

en

Mais

l'ingrat Porras, ce rvolt vaincu, qui devait

15

la vie

sa magnanimit, l'avait devanc la cour et prvenait

contre con bienfaiteur l'esprit de Fenlinand.

"

J"ai servi

Vos Majests
/.le

avec autant de
le

et

paradis, et,

si j'ai

crivait Colninb au roi et H la reine, 15 de constance que j'aurai fait pour mriter failli en quelque chose, c'est parce que mon
!

esprit

" ou mes forces n'allaient pas au del Il comptait avec raison sur la justice et sur la faveur de sa mais ce soutien de sa cause allait 20 protectrice, la reine Isabelle dfaillir aussi l'infortune domestique l'avait atteinte elle-mme.
; :

Elle languissait, inconsolable de la


2.-.

rte expirer, elle crivit dans son testament ce


le

de son humilit dans

mort de safilledeprdilecon. tmoignage rang suprme et de la constance de sa

tendresse pour l'poux auquel elle voulait rester unie juiquc-. dans 25
la

mort

"Que mon
:^o

corps soit enseveli dans l'Alhambra de Grenade,


;

dans une tombe au niveau de terre et foule aux pieds


!

qu'une

Mais si le roi, mon seigneur, se simple pierre y dise mon nom choisit une spulture dans quelque autre temple ou dans quelque 30
autre partie de nos royaumes, je dsire
(jue

mon

corps soit

exhum

et transport et enseveli ct
la

du

sien, afin

de nos corps dans

spulture atteste et signifia

que l'union l'u-'un de nus


ti5

curs pendant notre vie, et, je l'espre, par la misricorde d^ " Dieu, l'union de nos mes dans le ciel ** O mon fils crivit Colomb Diego en api>renant la mort de
'i !

sa bienfaitrice,

que

ceci te soit

une leon de ce que tu auras k

78
faire

Christophe Colomr
prsent
Elle fut
!

La premire
bonne

chose est de recommander pieusela reine,

ment
aine.

et ilFoctueiiHoment
si

Dieu l'me de
et si sainte,

notre souver-

que noua pouvons tre srs de sa gloire ternelle et de son abri dans le sein de Dieu contre les soucis et les tribulations de ce monde. La seconde chose que 5 je te recommande est de veiller et de travailler pour le service du roi il est le chef de la chrtient. Souviens-toi, en pensant lui, que, quand la tte soulfre, tous les membres sont en souffrance. Tout le ni.>ndo doit prier pour la consolation et la conservation de ses jours, mais nouti surtout qui sommes ses ser- 10
;

viteur-s

"
!

Tels taient les sentiments de reconnaissance et de fidlit de

Colomb au comble de
n'entranait

ses disgrces.

Mais

la

mort d'Isabelle
vie.

pas seulement sa fortuie, elle entranait sa

Retenu

So'ville

par

le

dument de

ses quipages et par les 15

infirniit.4 croissantes de ses niembres, il n'avait pour consolateurs que son frre Bartlilemy et son second fils Fernando. Ce fils, g de seise ans, anmniait toutes les qualits srieuses de l'homme mr dans toutes les grces de l'adolescent :

" Aime-le comme un


alors la cour
;

fire, crit

Colomb son
Dix

fils

an Diego, 20

tu n'en as pas d'autres.

frres

ne seraient

pus trop pour


frres."'

toi.

Jamais je

n'ai

eu de meilleurs amis que mes

pria Barthlmy do conduire ce jeune homme la cour et de recommander son fils lgitime Diego. Barthlmy partit 25 Il avec Fernando pour SV<Jvie, rsidence alors de la cour.
Il

le

sollicita
le

pour Colomb. Quand Colomb, accompagn de son frre et de ses fils, s'achemina lui-mme vers Sgo ie. Sa prsence y parut importune au roi, son indigence tait un reproche la 30 Le jugement de sa ''onduite et la restitution de ses biens cour. et privilges furant rei^is des conseils de conscience, qui, sans oser nier ses droits, usrent sa patience en dlais ils usaient en
en
v;iin l'attention et la justice
l'air,

printemps eut tempe'r

mme temps
dnment o
','

sa vie.
il

Ses inquitudes d'esprit, la prvision du


fils,

laisserait ses frres et ses

aigrissaient ses 35

souffrances corporelles-,

Votre Majest,

crivait-il

juge pas propos d'excuter


et de cette reine qui est

de son lit de douleur, ne que j'ai reues d'elle maintenant dans la gloire, Lutter couroi
les prome.-^ses

au

Chris loriiR OoLOMa


tre votre volont(^, ce neniit lutter contre le vent.
je

79
J'ai fait ce

que

devais faire

que Diou, qui m'a toujours t propice,


"
!

fasse le

reste selon sa divine justice


Il Btntiiit

que

la vie, et

non

la coiistance,

Son

frro Barthe'lemy et son fds

allait lui manquer. Diego s'taient absentes sur son


fille

ordre pour aller implorer la reine Juana,


revenait de Flandre en Castillo.
isse

d'Isabelle, qui

La douleur

physicpio,

l'ango-

monde, le sentiment de l'abrviation de ses jours, trop fiourta maintenant pour qu'il pt esprer justice avant sa fin les triomphes de ses enuemid la cour, la de'rision des courtisans, 10 la froideur du prince, les pressentiments de la dernire heure, l'isolement o l'absence de son fire et de son fils le laissait dans une ville oublieuse ou ingrate, les souvenirs d'une vie dont la moiti s'tait passe attendre l'heure d'une grande destine, sans doute aussi 16 l'autre moiti dplorer l'inutilit du gnie la piti pour cette race innocente d'Indiens qu'il avait trouvs libres et enfants dans leur jardin de dlices et qu'il laissait esclaves, dpouills et profans dans les mains de leurs oppres;

seurs

ses frres sans soutien, ses

fils

sans hritage

le
;

doute

sur le sort de sa

mmoire parmi les hommes venir cette 20 toutes ces tribulations de ses memagonie du gnie mconnu bres, de son esprit, de son corps, de son me, du pass; du prs;

ent,

dans sa

de l'avenir, pesrent il la fois sur le vieillard, abandoiui chambre de Sgovie pendant l'absence de ses frres et de
II

ses enfants.

demanda

,1

un de ses

compagnon de
lui

ses traverses,

serviteurs, vieux et dernier 26 de sa gloire et de ses misres, de

VI dans

lit un petit brviaire, don du pape Alexandre temps oii les souverains le traitaient en souverain. Il crivit de sa main affaiblie, son testament sur une pa(;e de ce livre auquel il attribuait une vertu de conscration divine. 30

apporter sur son


le

Etrange spectacle pour sou pauvre serviteur Oe vieillard, abandonn de l'univers et couch sur un lit d'indigont dans une maison d'emprunt de Sgovie, distribuait, dans si>n testament,
!

des mirs, des hmisphres, des


des empires
!

ilee,

des continents, ded

nation;i,

pour hritier principal son fils lgitime 35 Diego ; en cas do mort de Diego sans postrit, il substituait ses droits son fils naturel, le jeune Fernando ; et enfin, si Fernando lui-mme venait mourir avant d'avoir eu des fils, l'hriIl institua

tage passait au frre chri de Colomb,

dou Barthlmy,

et

ses

deecendants,

40

'1

80

Ohristophr CoLOMa
prie

"Je
droits,

mes souverains

et lours

Buccesseurs,

disait-il,

de

maintenir jamais mes volonti^ dans la distribution de


:

mes

Gnes, suis vouu dora

de mes bien et de mus charges moi qui, ^tant i\ leH servir en Ciutille, et qui ai dcouvert,
Indea
.
.

l'ouest, la terre ferme, les lies et les

Mon

fils

poas-

ma

charge d'amiral de

la partie

de l'Ocan qui est l'ouest

d'une ligne tire d'un ple l'autre..."

Passant de l l'emploi des revenus qui


assurs par son
trait(i

lui

avaient t

avec Isabelle ot Ferdinand,

le vieillard dis-

tribuait avec libralit et sagesse les millions qui devaient revenir 10

8!v

famille, ent:

>

ses

fils
;

et

Barthlmy, son

frre.

Il

en assig-

deux millions par an A Fernando, son second fila. H se souvenait de la mre de cet enfant, dona Batrice Enriquoz, qu'il n'avait jamais pouse, et dont sa conscience lui reprochait 1 abandon depuis ses annes de prgrina- 15 Il chargea son hritier do faire une opulente tion sur les mors. pension cette compagne de ses jours obscure, pendant qu'il Il luttait, Tolde, contre les rigueurs de son premier sort. parut mme s'accuser de quelque ingratitude ou de quoique ngligence de cur envers l'objet do ce second amour, car il 20 ajoute au legs qu'il lui fait ces mots qui durent peser t sa main mourante ' Et que cela soit accompli pour le soulagement de ma conscience, car co nom et ce souvenir sont un poids lourd sur nom
nait

un quart

ce frre

me

"
!

25

Se reportant ensuite vers cette premire patrie qu'une seconde patrie n'efface jamais dans le cur de l'homme, il eut un souvenir pour cette ville de Gnes, o le temps avait moissonn toute sa maison paternelle, mais oi il lui restait quelque parent loigne, comme ces racines qui restent dans le sol aprs le tronc 30
coup.
'*

dans

J'ordonne Diego, mon fils, crivit-il, d'entretenir toujours, la ville de Gnes, un membre de notve famille qui y railui assurer
,

dera avec sa femme, et de


telle qu'il

une existence honorabi allie. Je veux 35 que ce parent conserve pied et njitionalit dans cette ville, en qualit de citoyen ; car c'est l que je suis n, et c'est de l que
convient une personne qui nous est
je suis venu.

"Que mon

fiU,

ajoute -t-il avec ce sentiment chevaleresque de

GllIUSTOFIlR
vansalit^ et d'infodation

COLOMA
tait la

61

do floi-mme au soiivorain qui

si'oonde relii;iou do ce temps,

que mon

tils

serve, en nuhnoire de
jusiiu'i la perte

moi, le

roi, la

reine et leurs successeurs,

mme
!

dos biens et de la vie, iniisquo, aprs Dieu, ce sont eux qui m'ont
fourni les

moyens de

taire

mes dcouvortes

" Il est bien

vrai,

repretid-il

avec un accent involontaire


dtoutl

d'amortume, semblable un reproche mal


imninpire,

dans sa

que je suis venu les leur offrir de loin et qu'il s'est dcoul bien du temp avant qu'un ait voulu croire au prsent que maia cela tait naturel, car c'tait j'ai^portais Leurs Majesta un mystre pour tout le monde, et il ne pouvait inspirer qu'in;

l'<

ijrdulit.

C'est pouniuoi je dois en partii^er la gloire avec cea


(jui se

souverains

sont les premiers

tis

moi."

.^

LXV.
Ib

Colomb reporta ensuite toutes


avait toujours considr
il

ses

penses vers ce Dieu qu'il


;

comme

son seul et vritable souverain

15

lui

8cn\blait qu'il
il

relevait directement

de cette Providenco,
et le minis-

dont

s'tait senti plus

que tout autre l'inatrumeut


Il

20

tre.

La
ne

rsignation et l'enthousiasme, ces deux ressorts de sa

vie,

lui

manqurent pas sa mort.


ses

s'humilia sous la main

de la nature et se releva sous la main de Dieu, qu'il avait tou- 20


jours

vu travers

triomphes et ses revers, et


la terre.

qu'il voyait
11

de

plus prs au

moment de son dpart de

s'abma daiis

26

le

repentir de ses fautes et dans l'esprance de sa double immor-

talit.

Pote de cur,
il

comme on
la

l'a

vu dans

ses discours et dans

ses crits,
rivs

emprunta

posie sacre des psaumes les demi- 25

me et les derniers balbutiements de ses pronona en latin l'adieu suprme ce monde, m serviteur satisfiiit remit haute voix son me son Crateur
inspirations de son
Il

lvres.

de son oeuvre, et congdi du

monde

visible, qu'il avait agrandi,

pour aller dans

le

monde

invisible s'emparer

de l'espace incom

,iO

meiisurable des univers iutiuis.

LXVI.
L'envie et
l'infjtratitude

de s(m

sihcle et

de son souverain
ils

s'u/anouirent avec le dernier soupir


avaient fait leur victime.

du grand homme dont

Les contemporains semblent

press:

^Vj
\0

/.

W^

%^
.

O
,<-

o^ \*^>^

,%

{/

.*">/ ^

C^ ^

.<?

y
L^?/

<'-

^
fA

t/j

IMAGE EVALUATION TEST TARGET (MT-3)

1.0

IIIM
IIIM

IIIII25

|m
2.0

M
1.25
1.4
1

1.8

6"

p>
<^ /i
c^l

/.

^^/

///,

W/ m

o7

Photographie Sciences Corporation

23 WEST MAIN STREET

WEBSTER, N, Y. 14580 (716) 872-4503

M
I

Chuistophk Colomb.
(ju'ils

d'expier envers les morts les persdcutiDiia


vivants.

ont

inflig(?es

aux

r--'"
I

Ou

fit

Oolomb du royalea fundniillos.


fils,

Son

corps, et

plus tard oelui de sou

aprs avoir habitt plusieurs luouumetits

funbres dans did'rentes cathdrales d'Espagne, furent transports et ensevelis, selon leurs vux, Hispaniola,

comme

le

conqurant dans sa conqute.


se'cjuence des

Ils

reposent maintenant Cuba.

Mais, par un bizarre jugement de Dieu ou par une ingrate incon-

honnnos, de toutes ces terres d'Amrique qui se

disputrent l'houueur de garder sa ceudre, aucuue ne garda son

nom.

10

LXVII.
Tous
ce
les cn,r".ctres
:

du vritable grand

homme sont
du

runis dans

nom

gnie, travail, patience, obscurit


la

sort vaincue par

la force

de

nature, obstination douce mais infati;4able pour le

but, rsignation

au

ciel,

lutte contre les choses, longue prmdi]

tation de la pense dans la solitude, excution hroque de la

pense dans

l'action, intrpidit et sang-froid contre les

lments

dans

les

temptes et contre

dans

l'toile

la mort dans les sditions, confiance non d'un homme, mais de l'humanit, vie jete avec

abandon et savis regarder derrire lui en se prcipitant dans cet ocan inconnu et plein de fantmes llubicon de quinze cents 20 tude infalieues, bien plus irrm-'iliable que celui de Csar tigable, connaissances aussi vastes que l'horizon de son temps, maniement habile mais honnte des curs pour les sduire la
;
;

vrit,

convenance, noblesse et dignit de formes extrieures,


la

qui rvlaient

et les curs, langage la proportion et la

grandeur de l'me et qui enchanaient les yeux 25 hauteur de ses penses ;


de style qui galait ses
la

loquence qui convainquait les rois et qui dom])tait les sditions

de

ses quipages, posie

rcita

aux mer-

veilles

de ses dcouvertes ec aux images de

nature; amour

actif de l'humanit jusque dans ce lointain 30 ne se souvient plus de ceux qui la servent sagesse d'un lgislateur et douceur d'un philosophe dans le gouvernement de ses colonies, piti paternelle pour ces Indiens, enfants de la race

immense, ardent et
elle

humaine dont
il,---

il

voulait donner la tutelle au vieux


;

monde

la servitude

des oppresseurs

joubli de^ injures,


;

et non magnanimit 35

de pardon envers ses ennemis

pit,

enfin,

cette vertu

qui

ouiient et qui divinise toutes les autres

quand

elle est ce qu'elle

)
.

Christophe Colomb.
dans l'ame de Colomb prsence constante de Dieu dans juatico dans la conscience, misricorde dans le cur, reconnaissance dans les succs, rsignation dans les revers,
^tait
;

83

l'esprit,

adoration partout et toujours Ti,i lut cet honuue. Nous n'en connaissons pas de plus achev. Il en contenait plusieurs en un seul. Il tait digne de personnifier
!

le

monde

ancien auprs de ce
et

monde inconnu qu'il allait aborder le p-'-r-i'^r, de porter ces hommes d'une autre race toutes les ve..,.<, vieux continent sans un seul de ses vices. Son action sur la
civilisation fut sans mesure.
Il

complta l'univers,

l'unit

physique du globe.
lui,

C'tait avancer, bien

qui avait t fait jusqu'


Dtr

l'uvre de Dieu

il acheva 10 au del de ce L'unit mokalb

Cette uvre laquelle Colomb concourut ainsi tait trop grande en effet pour tre dignement rcompense par l'imposition de son -.om au quatrime oontineKi

GENRE HUMAIN.

de

la terro.

15

L'Amrique ne porte pas son nom


et

le

genre humain, rapproch(5

runi par

lui, le

portera sur tout le globe.

--i..

NOTES ON CHRISTOPHE OLMB.


Page
aftairs,
1, liue 1.
*'

The hand

but reveala

itself

of God is not seen in ieolated wheii they are regarded collectively."


.

human

I. 2. aucun sms n'a jamai,) ni que . . ne fimsen relis." "No sensible person bas ever denied that were connected." Wlien nier and douter are used negatively, the verb in the dpendent clause is
. . .

usually

the subjunctive, and

le

any ngative meaning.

preceded by "ne.'^though without

Gomment serait-il avewjle ?" Row shoold he be blind ?" 1. 6. ngative conditional hre iniplies improbability.
1.

The

12.

nom. Au
7)ar-dctM,

appositive

introducing

phrase requires no
1.14.

ac adjective clause or

ftrticle.

Soe Gram., 399.


"Overruling *

etc.Literally "aboveand below." et. " Thia guidance

and underlying."
1.

16.

Cette

c'clii>r>,

of the actions of th huinan

family regarded as a vi^hole."


20. certaine.Tfiot "fixed," 1. sens. See Gram., 442.
1.

'sure," but

in

the indetei ininate

-M
I;

28.

sont de nous
se

ei

nous.

" Are our own doing and our own conita

cern."
1.

28.

Joue

de.

" Uses for


des

own
is

ends."

F^

Page

2, line

I.

hommes.Des

the de accompanying se servir ("to niake use ot ") and the article that fioes witb the noun * hommes" used in its fullc^t sens. Gram., 371.
Voil pourquoi.'* That is why." 1. 5. Voila ( " see-there "), wlien accnrately used, refers to what has been alreavly raentioned or is reniote voici ("see-here"), to what follows or is near at hand.

not partitive, but formed by

s'ohtieut. AU are to be rendered bv the defined," etc. Compare, 7/ se vend 50 centimes la iivrf, "It sells for 10 cents a pound." Giani,, 537 (b). quelque chose c/a //a/.Note that wlien quelque chose, rien, 1. 14. j>enwii)ie, and somo othcr M'ords are folloued by an adjective, whioh is always masculine, de must be inserted lietween. For a complte statement see Gram., GI3.
1.

7.

se dfinit, n'acquiert,
is

English iiassive: "

'

1.

18.

Voil Christophe Columl)."

An

so

y(ju

get

Columbus."
1.

Christopher

33.

chanqes.

"Trade," "commercial exchange."

Page 3, line 1. que.Oiiow useil, as liere, to save tlie rptition of a conjuiiction, such as quand, lorHque, si. Gram., G24.
'ici.

"

d
l.

NoTBa
4.

ent>'<vnrtrU,

etc.

ThH
;

awkward nentpuce cannot be rendered


aud
loadin.; tlie auxiliaries," etc.
;

litarally.
1.

" Kollowed

l>y tlie ga/.o,

Gaul /a ilrande-Brelagne^ Great Britaiu. 1. 15. la il ir Arme. The belongH to arracher, ai)d mut bo icndered by "from." SevcMal other vei'l>8 deuotiuj; deprivaL.on or sep.iration take thi h bet'ore the naine of tlie per-sou or tliing iliapoasessed sacli
10.
les

Pcome

ScotUuid

Gaules,

are ihniaiuler,

i-Di/iru/Ui'r, ter,

soaatra'fe, voiler, vo/cr, etc.

recH'r'e.H. Prol)ably iiore in tho aenno. of remote," thougli 1. 17. often uaed for arrlcr, "beiiind-liand," "haekvvanl."
I ,

1 1.

20. 21.

le

Tn'je. Tho

Tagus

le.

Lihan, Lchauon.

rpond d\ivance. "Foreahailow." Nute the use of (/^' n such des deux cot. '* On both sidcs." 1. 24. expre.-isiona as de. ce ct, '* in thi diit.'cti m," " ou tliis aille "; de cot ei (Vautre, " on one wide and on the otlier," " on both aides." area. lit.'' Rgion," l. 25.

'

1.

27.

Alufti de.

'

So

(it

was) with."
en
est

// ^n est

ainsi
ia

du

rei^ff,

"It

i.s

the same with the


1.

re?it."

S'il

aind, " It that


i-roire is

the case."
iii!i;iitiv(i

31.

croi/nnl

i/

fonder. In Freuoh
avoir raison,
'

followed by an

instead of a
aeuteiico.

,iih.>taiitive olviust;, if tlie

I( croi/ail
(5).'

saiac snhject supplies tlie wlioit; He tlioii,;hl he wa.s right. " fice

Gram.,
1.

.')42,

33.
37.

710 n pins.

"No longer";

literally,

"no more."
tout,

1.

is

VVhen Iouh inight be mistaken for de tous. usiially soundod, although Littr coudenuis the custom.
la
ijloire,

tue

1. I.

38.

de

lui

prparer

The lui refors to


cherchent, etc.

Providence.
clau.-ie

39.

'/MJ ait,

Note
,

the subjuiictive in a

depending on a

Biipcilative.

Page

4,

Oram. Hue 10.


. .

574.

qtii

"For which no means of steor

ing hve yet beon found."


.

iont lui-mme. 13. "Are the means of conipre.%ir>g, couI. centrating the glcbe iiito itse.lf." The last two words arc scaioely The uiithor is, of couiso, speakiii^ of tho rduction of disi3ce.sary. tances by rapidity of transit and conununioatiun.
1.

15.

" xMeans by which men


dessein.

are brought clo.ser togeihir

and mfwi.

more
1. l.

alike."

-See note on nom, page 1, Hne 12. The t has the aouud of , as also in suprmuie, dmocralie, aristocratie, minutie par un xolei' l>r ilnnt. " Unler a scorching sun," Comjv&ro 1. 20, par un temps de pluie, "' in rainy woather."
20.
28.

prophitiiis.

1.

34.

;e/ro/<. "Their foieheads."


5, line 2.

Page

d^autrcs asiles.

d\

See (Jram.,

tj

488.

partitive article.

See

Gram

380, (1).

grand de taillt., "tfill"; rohuite de larmes, " of stiong huild"; 1.6. noble de iront, "with noble br'w"; gracieux et doux de fewcj, "with
uweetauil kiudly
"
lip.s.

NuTKS,
I.

87

8.

tCun blond. -Soe Gram.,

374.

serve a proper ba'anoe in


l.

-iiixiety. Invei-Hion ot 8ui.j.>ot aiul vcib clauses lutroduce;] by th. .dative qie; the reasou
tlie sonteiice.

MU

is

vcrv

coin>..r,M
***

8eom7to b

L ^^" m

i,

15.

liie,n

de.fie Gram.,

J24, (b),
-

1.18.

/Mt-7n'?me. Added toempluLsize thec. 1. 18. 't/wC^'<f?.-Ti.epluporfeet subjunctive may be uaed aftor coud.t.onal danses, instoa,! ol f l.e pluperfoct indic/tive
'^^'^^^^^'^^

i.

boL^'an i.xh^Slir"""'"-'^'^
.roufe'd.

'^^ '"-^"^^ b'h plaoed

>""""' ^ -.^/..--'Whose
las

curiosity and pity were both


"

1.27.

firent entrer

"InvitM

them

Wi.ur.fV.

..

1.31.
1.

o//?-ertU/br/rtmSee Gram., 543.


urtft'. Translate
^'

36.

by adv., "formerly."

Jntr'^r
afLw;rdr""''
1.

'''"^'''^' &c..--Inqaired kiudly about the circnn^^'"'^-^

*'^-"^^''^*^
17.

-^'at

was learned about tl.em

mtier.See note on nom, page


'"

1,

Une 12
^^'i'^^^^

intJLC'"'''"'"-~^^'^"''
I.

''^' ''''''""' **

knowledge had

23. 32.

o nous voyons

le

jour." Where we are boru."


is

1.

Colomb en/uni. -Knfant


lino5.
(KM

in apposition to Colomb.

Page7,

Tcrfmrte.fSecGram

407

(2)

). 1.

11.

/'ewroya, See Gram.,

illS.

intellectueMe. and hntditctueUe 16. are botli iound e.Kse, tnoaghperhap3in<.Ae.^..^/ei,sthebc4terru;u[iug^^^^^


1.

W*!.
"^"^

,..!, ^''^

23.
24.

Soldat, eto.--Appositives.

!.

mo/jto. "Einbarqued."
(/." Withwhidi."

1.26.

Page
l.

6.

1.7.

ybr/ww.. "Liviiig." 8, line 2. aurermt>arlm ..^.-''Ofwiu'ci. i.ealone had caught a glimpse


'

"

1.8.
1.

''amerf'.-~"\Vhic!i followtid." /rmon,<(u7.--'H(i conuiianded."

9. 10.

lUihappcr h.

"To e.scap' froin,"


.

1.

i^esaml

,/'H.f,
-

mmA "Seizcd

an oar."

l.

11.

Le Poriuyai.

-See (ir.an., 375.

a
ff

m
1.

NOTBS.
\n.

Il esp/'rait

y trouver, eto. "

He hoped he wonld

find there."
^^

Se note on croire.
1.

17.

U s'prit
qu'eU
tant.

(l'at,tadtpmnit."Jle conceived an attachment.

l
1.
1. 1.
1.

]9
23.
24.

noft/e /i!a/ten. "Italian

noWeman."

lui avait

in3/4r.-" VVhich ahe had inspired him with."


,

- -.Soc (i

ram.

582.

27. 29. 33. 34.

sur la

foi,

etc. " Tnintiiig


tirani., 407,
is

in Providenco

and theirowu labor."

hti.Sae

(Remark).
S.-e

1. 1, 1.

dit-on.'' It

said."

aram.,

627, (2).

38.

rjn'leorles See Gram., 82. revenant.

lr.deii.--'*\nd\B.."

Page 9
l. \.

3.

5.

vn foyer rie. "A place wherc people diacussod." " grand 'inconnu." Scmc groat thing not yet disoovered. quelque his globes aud luarktd islands and con"As lie fashioned
lii'P 2.
.
.

tinonts on his mups."


1

, , .^ xv. lack there the oouuterLa terre, etc. "The world aeemed to 8 " a continent. balancing weight of fine weather. 111. par des temps sereins. "In since 15.* la vracit.'' Whose veracity time bas

l'

dmU

iiice his (Solomon's) days, becn ^^T^^l^"^ recouvert etc. "Whioh ha-1, niarvoUoua. by tV.o cL.uds of the distant and covercd agfun

1-^6

arae. "Arabian" (noun and


qu'il

adjective).

L
1
1!

27!

ne

Vest

de.-" Than

it is

by."

See Gram.,

G09 and 479.


tlie

30
32.

ne

See

previous note.

qui s'taient,

etc.-"Who had

goue.the fartheat beyond

Azo-o.-^."

1.33.
1
1'

34
3(i'

les

Lcsttn^. "Some." re. "Otliera."


.

ceux-ci. ceux-l . . "otbera." hre, but "'.ome" and d'autres enfin-" Othera 1. 38.

Not "the former" and "the


agam.

latt.M-

curi,.u8 vague instiuut." PPtrpin lino 4. je ne sais je ne sais quoi, etc., are used to oun'IH^ e cxur^ssioi.s: je ne sais quel, indescribable, extraorduiary, or the tlieideaof soniothing atrange,

^/.-"That

vey

liUe.
1,

6. 7.
8.

soi.^^i'-

1.
1.

Gram., 481. exultantes. See Gram..

583.
(1).
is

crites. See Gram., 585,

Page 10, U"e 8.


by
its
l.

mappemondes. - Fminine gender, which


;

explainei

drivation
;.///.^

mapia mundi.

10.

(/'wn. :See Qram.,

602

(a).

1.14.

.se. Indirect object.

NoTBa,
1.

89
attraction

M.
24.

Vattraction

au

cfn<r. *'The

which
put

drawB bodies to the centre."

(Centripetal attraction.)
&n<X

L
L
1, 1.

hornie.Re& home', omit the conima after horizon


ae creuaaient, etc.

one after dcouverte.


25.
'il!),

rapprocher.
lea

3t.

montes

et le

"Yawned into bottomless abysses." R(!ad approcher. cescente. "The slopeB."

Page 11, Une . 2/ 'arat. Attrait ia used both objectively and ul)jtotively ; (Compare 1, 24 p. 9.) hre it is pc-Laps beat translated by " the invincible attraction which this enterprise had for tho poor iprise
:

geographer."
1.

7.

et

oh

Va^co de Gama,

eto.-

-'

And

not long before Vasco de

Gtama discovered." cap de Bonne-prance. 1. 8.


1.

en e'lancant droit devant /,etc. "In sorikingout duewest." Compare, allez droit devant voua, "Go straight ahead.
10.
'

"Cape of Good Hope."


from him."

,e

oouuter-

L L L L

12. 13.

lui

demander.
profit.

au

" For the furttierance."


638.

" To ask

14.
18.

Tcou/o. See Gram.,

pour 7e.Conjunction8 denoting purpose take subjunctive. See Gram., 62.3. L 20. gnois. "Qenoese." Ones, OemoA,

1.22.
.
. ,

d'avlant
.

plti

....

que, etc.

"Ail the more inliuential


fromvulgar prjudice."

because they deviated so

little

128. L 29.

fiworterftt. "Unknown to."


firent partir.

" Sent out."

Page
L
he lattor'
1,
1.

4, 7. 8.

See Gram., g 40. travattx. 12, Une 3. Beaucoup d'annes. See Gram., 619 and 620. nsayf. See Gram,, 574. pour lui, etc. "Inatead of a world for himself which he had

eaught a glimpae of."


1.
1.

14.

cW. " It wa."

14. le aifour mobile.

The seat

of the court

was

at one time in one

city

and at another time

in another.
625.

1.22.

avait cru devoir 1.22. 642 (V). and 643.


1.
1.

26. 30.

"Had bclieved he ought." See Gram pluH rapproches. "More closely affocting them " d'c Von voyait la mer. " From which the sea could be seen."

otwU

(/.See Gram.,

from which the sea was seen. qui s'agitaient dans les esprits. Translate by " Which were Bkoving men's minds." Il s'mut, etc. " He was moved at first with pity." \. 36.
Lit.,
1.

.36.

90

Notes.
13,

Page

Une

1.

enlretitn 8

du

jour. --Vrohah^ y

"Conveisationt on

the topics of the day."

La refitfion, et-o. "Religion undorstudd gu.ius, a rvlation 1.6. whioh, liko the otiier, (i. . revealed ruliKon) u ust hve worsUippers." Letjid'et. "The faitliful," " believers."
1.

12.

le confidents, etc.

Appearii to be
the
vtilgar).

" l'he believers

iu

a futurs

(which seema) impossible


l.
\.

(to

15. 16.

Omit comma
c qu'il aima,

after

Colomb.
bat he likeJ in CJolumbus see Qram., 494.

etc. "
ce,

was not only

etc."

For rptition of

Xotice, that ;>or<^, having an adjectival force agres with la 1. 20. beaut, etc., whil^ revtant, reforriug to the sanie nouns, but having a verbal force, does not. tiee Qram., 582 and 85. Note also tiiat the reading portes violtes a wcU kuown rule of French graiiimiir. See Grani., 426. Ports would be better, or porte agreeing with infortune
alone.
1.

See Gram., 428.


qui d/end,eto.

22.

euoh Word as "us."


l.

Supply in English aftc r dfend and force some " Whioh forbidM ua, etc.

" Who livod near Pa loB." wenir.See Gram., 643. soires. The diffrence between soir and i*oire is that soir 1. 37. refera to a point of time, soire to a period. Dompare also au and anne matin and matine, etc.
30.
voisins de Palos.
1.

31.

Page
little
l.

cnacle. rfrence to tha Laat Supper and the 14, Une 3. uompany of ardent believers prsent at it.

4.
6.

See vocabulary for diffrence between cjnfcfence and

L L

avant

d'clater, etc.
etc.

confit ince.

'

Before being proslaimed lu the world.'

(b).

10. 12.
17.

quand,

\
1.
1.

devaient.'*

ses soins.

26.

ministre, etc.

S6 Gram,, 558. Were to." See Gram., 152 ''In his care." "Ruler of the conscieucea of

*'

kinga, etc.

1.29.
1.
l.

remi^. "Handed."
l'quipage co^ivenable.
il le

31.

33.

recommanda, etc.

" An outfit suitable." He recommended himand his projecl


" The guidi ig stor of
page
A'ur,
14.

to the
1.

God who inspires great thoughts." See Grnm., Ki?. (Rmark). " Who nevep loat sight of him, nor forjiot him, and to whom 36.
etc.

he ever after attributd,

Page
L
l.

15, line
devait.

l'toile

du

gnie.

geniua."

4,

1,9.
10.

projtre.

See note oh See Qram., Maures. Moors."


*'

line 12,
442.

"from."

Me voyaient enlever, etc. " Saw the towiis and the provinces l. 11. takon away from theniselves ;" enlever, as is often the case with verhs following such ver^s Affaire, vor, etc., is usod iu a sort of passive sens.
as is indirect.


N0TK&
dont 1. 12, except, etc."
1.

il,

etc.

" Of

which they uo loDgr occupied any part

16.

(iTT/irher

aux Maures.

"To

take from tho

Moors."

is

or personifiod ol)jtit otVur rsistance, a: il arrache l'enjant samre.'* Ile takea tlie chiltl from his mother rf ia iiaed when thora is losa or no refiistance. As : il arrach>' le clou dumvr." He drawa tho nail ont of th wall."
;

useil

aftcr arracher

whon the peraon

1. 1.

17.

de

En pagnes.*' Of Spain.

20.

bien que.

junctive.
1.

Conjuivtiona denoting a ooncesafon take the su hSee Gram., 62.3.


complter, etc.

30.

comme pour

" Ab

if

to reuder porfect,

by thoir

conibined excelloncea, the reign,


1.3(5.

etc.**

d<^ance."Lack
:

of trust.

1.38. lui manquaient. Literally "failndfco him," (were lacking in him). Note cela me manque. "I lack that." Jl manque n non Je voir. - -" He faila in hia duty." Jl a manqti de tomber. " He waa uearly
t'alling."

manque, lelrain. " He misses the train." Soe a previoua note on thi^ word. Page 16, line "Admiration." " Inapired th.heart 1.4. imjyriraait au,
//
1.

tous.

1.

3.

attrait.

eio.

with."

1.9.
1.
1.

rffux. "dual."
la lettre, etc.

12.
12.

implorer Centre de.

"To beg for admission into." " With the letter of a poor monk iu his hand."

It iH often necesBary to use " with " in ngliah where only tlio article or posijosaive pronoun are naed in Frenoh. l*'or la main, s'^^ Gram., 488.
1.

17.

or

%*ont d'oreiUen. " Hve no eara for bold thoughts ex'jept, etc." " hve ears for bold thoughts only." See Oram., 604.

Qor.' i. 19. n'ont n Hve iieither M m. requires nebefore thoverb tho partitive article ia aiso omibted before thenouu wiiich follows. See Gram., 163 and 387.
;

1. 1. 1. 1.

21
24. 26.
28.
its

contemporain.

See Gram.,

depuis longtemps, etc.

Le

roi, etc.

Colomb
hour."

obstin, eto.

" The king and queen did not eveu hear of him.' "Columbus, steadfast as certainty await-

" Who had been a long time forgotten. "

399.

ing
1,

Freely *' In order to be more near to watch afin d\ eto. See Gram., 626. more a favovrable moment. See previoua tiotea. Gram., 162 (b). 1. 34. devait. Supply " aa " after laisse. 1. 35.
30.
:

for

1.

37.

Jeune, as well as tendre refers to coeur.

Page

not be hidden

"Still his grce and personal dignity could Freely by hia humble oceupation." Becma to mean "'Which like an electric flash, propheaies to 1. 10. us a great deatiny for the one in the humble position." L 12. dont , , , Us noms. " Whoae names,'*
17,

Une

6.

9d
1.

Kom.
13.

pour

le/i

asnoeier,

etc.

"In

oHer

grateful reinembrace of future gonerations. "


1.18.
1. 1.
1.

to groap them for th Fut a oolou aSter futur.

en/ii. "And."

17.

d'vn Ui crdit." Of ao great influence.".


tduiU.

24.
30.

Enohantod. "

tz-y.
it

" To think of," is in French either petuter h or onger &. PenThink of it," but u' enper.at^ vot "What do you think of

too a good exatnple of the usaee of the ImperKtai AenoiG the tate in wnich the spouker fect and Preterite Dcfnite. felt himaclf to be, nivit dnotes ono particular individual act. See Qram. , S 562 and 654. (In De /tixu, unfortunately the remarka on theao tenoea are very meagre and aometimea quite mi.sleading, aa for exuriiple the last sentence of 554 and tho wholo of 65. )

In thia line

we hava

je, tu,

" I waa no longer myself." The pronoun je n'taiplu moi. ils, me, te, e, le, la, le and leur, cannot stand in emphatio positiona ; they must alwaya be used in oloae connection with verbs, and for thia reason are eometiinoa callod " Coniunctive prououna." Wlien, aa in thia line, a prououn is to stand in some emphatic position, one of the forma tho, toi, soi, etc., oalled "diajunctive prououus," mut bo uaed.
1.

32.

il,

Page
1.

18,

Une

5.

7.

oneilfidit.

"One would

enlve

ks yeux. " Captivtes the eye." hve aaid." aurait ia the oommoner

for m.
1. '7.

elle,

refera to la nature.

dcidaient de tout. 1.20. active in the aame sens.

1.24. hi8(i u' autour du trf>ne, eio. throne, ail who incurred, etc."
1.
1.

"Decided everything." dcider also "Even among those around the


ia

27. 28. 29.

professes.
i7

" Lectured on,"


He
hoped."
is

"taught."
of

se flattait. *'

1.

coviparut,

the verb used

when speaking

"appearing"

in

court.

See Qram., 437. "Way of looking at thinga." cherchant Jortune de chimres, " Tiying to make capital 1.34. out of hia chimeras." " Had expressed hiniself expliqu, Page 19, Une
1. 1.

30.

prtendue,
routine.

32.

8.

s'tait

etc.

for-

nially in this matter, in a passage See Qram., 176. Colurabua.'

which they quoted

in opposition to

rien. The origin of the French ngatives rim, pas, etc., is 1. 8. very interesting. They were ail positive words to begin with, and were merely added to the ngative ne to strengthen it : ne anything,"ne pas 'not rien, " not a step" etc., but to-day they are the real ngatives, so much so that often in before the verb ia often omitted. conversation the m However in interrogative phrases rien recovers ita original meaning of '' anything," " la there anything so abaurd f" See also page as in this prsent cas* :

24,

Une 2a

NoTRa.
IB.
que de.**

93

to."

ThU

is

a ose of

qm
in

very mnch Hlte that

Gram., $ 502 (b). en. 1. 10. There are only a few expreaeiouB tiio article. Sne Gram., 614. Is reveraod." 1. 11. et Venver.
referred to in

wLich en

uaed witb

1.
1.

13.

20.

1.21.
1.

23. faota of nature."


1,

tax." He had called the mre belief in . . a gin.' Insert et between il and dit. devait tre. " Must be." qui n'excluait pas la nature,** Which diil not ovorlook the
il

avait

26. 27.

que, objective case.

1.

foudrts.See Gram., 407

(2).

claira, "fire,"

"brilliancy,

'

1.29.

de "With."
soutenu, eio.,
is

Page 20, Une 1. covduit.** diamUsod." only Dy the favor, etc."


1.7. of bien
1. 1.

"battked

a6ene;;(^rcr. ''Tohope well."

This

always the position

with

inflnitivea.

8.

"She had a house


le

10.

savant tranger.
enfiSte, etc.

1.
1.

10. 14.

non
le

"The foreign savant. "not aa a trouhlesoine


See Gram.,
P

or a tent set api.rt for Co'umbus."

gviest

bogging

help.'*

roi de

FrtugaU

1.14.
of,

ayant entendu, etc. "Having

377 (2). heard from their ambass-adors

etc.

l(j. 1. firent tenter Colomb. " Sent persons to tempt Cok bus." 1.20 lui firent carter. "Made him refuse." Indirect object after firent because carter is transitive.

:.
1.

20. 22.

la suite.'*

In the suite."

bont pour, so also bon

pour

il est

bon pour

n.oi,

'

He

is

te

me."
1.25.
1.

kind

For ils rendu.


sur d'aussi.
21, line 2.

36,

"On such

;" d' is partitive.

Page
1.
r>.

i7 lui fit

esprer.

See note
:

on line 20, page

20.

dont

il

l'entretenait etc.

-"

To whiuh he had been

many years," (Conipaie Je suis ici been a year hre." Ttais l dep nid un an son arrive, " I had beeu there a year when he arrived.") See Gram., 557 ^2) and 659 (b). l. 7. ans trop d'illusion. " Without any great expectation."
aU<?ntion for so
hav!

diroctiug it depuis un an, " I

1.0.
1.

isnta.

15.

" Approached." avant que. Takes the


lui diaputot,

though

in older

expressed. reason.
1.

snbjunctive invariably in onr day, Prench it took the indicative when there was no doubt It is ono of those cases in which analogy bas prexailed over

17.

dU

etc. "It contended with him for what.

etc."

94
L
1.
1.

Notes.
J8.
19.

Il renona, to.

Viiouter.

SorrowfuUy he again gave up trying." " In listening to him."

23.

qu^il renona.
solicitatioii

renewed
1.

"That he definitely renoanced at the court of the sovereigaa," etc.

ail

idea oi

2Z.

provocations.
de,

Seems to mean

"proposais," "offers."

abattu d'esprance, " wearied with waiting."


1.27.
1.

"iu;"

" dejected

;"

^y)^^^ rf'aWente,

30.
37.

avec

1.

clause.

seul. the subjunctivo in the dpendent *' Usually requirea See Gram., 574.

les,

etc.

" With prospecta for the future."


is

"Inspired him moine) with confidence." contre, "In spite of." " Passion for." pansion 26. " She sent word to." 36. fatsait dire sa mule. " Had bis mnle saddled." la nuit mme. That very night." la appcars to Page 23, lino
1.

Page
0.

22,
le

Hne

3.

frapper

the coinpletion of mi,


(le

1.

2,

roidU.

1.

de.

1.
1.

elle

h.

38.

Jlt seller

1.

*'

recover
I.

its

dmonstrative force hre,


seems to be
:

{iilm.)

2.

// sentait, etc.,

" He

felt

him
1.

for the his frieiid."


6. 7.

sake of the gieat project which

it [le ciel)

that Heaven protected had eatruated to

1.

conu. See Gram., 588 and 426. grand o-uvre. Masculine, when it signifies an important work,

a great undertakiiig.

1. 9. Ces deux curs de femmes. " Thse two womanly Another reading is femme, which is better. Taken from her private purse." 1. 12. prise sur, etc. 1.15. fit passer. *'&Qu\.." aumdecin. See Gram., 393. 1.17.

hearts.'.

'-'

"Lost to view." aurait cru, etc. " He would hve believed he was lacking 36. in faith in God," en souverain. "Like a sovereign." 37. Page 24, line 20. rien. " Anything." See note on line p. 19.
1.

23.

confondu.
il

1.

etc.

1.

8,

1.

23.

1.28.
1.32.

chemin de.*' The road to." qui maixhandaient, eto. ''Who haggled with
le

God about

the

prioi'," etc.

(mcor. "Still more."


25, liue 3.

Page
1.

lan de
etc.

8.

on sourut,

1.

13.

rei,'int se jelei:

"The fugitive was followed.** "Returneil and thrcw


. .

cur, ** Enthusiasm."

liitnself."

1.21.

tout ce que

de JidtleH,

" Uuwever

mauy

believers."

"

Ail the believers."


1.

25.

tovZ ce qyi.

**

Whoever."

Notes.
L
34.

96

first

" Haviog no other ahelter than." **Took npon herself aloue." au compte prit 1.36. "Inbehalf of." " It waa fair that she who had been the juste, J 37. to believe should risk," See Gram., 572. revenait, etc. " Came back tothe place from which Page 26, line
n^ayant cVcmU que.
elle seule.
rfe,
1.

tait

etc.

etc.

6.

it

had
1.

sta> ted.

"

19.

certaine.

See Gram.,

442.

See Gram., 572. It often seems tobeoptional witli voult. the writer, or spo'-.ker, whether he shall use the indicative or the subjunctive after such expressions as it est juste and H. semble ; often there
1.

25.

is no apprciable diffrence of meaning, but wlien there is any The subjunctive implies a less degree of certaiuty tlian the indicative.
*' Would havefailed." 1. 30. chouait. fect for the past conditional.
1.

A curions

use of the imper-

34.

les

Pinzon.See Gram.,
furent en
tat.

Page
1. 1.

27, line 8,

" Were ready.


This
ia
i\n

409.

13. 17.

mo,ya.*' Embarqued."
After croyaient supply
tre.

ellipse of

frquent

occurrence.

" It was a mourning procession rather than a God-speed on a 1. 18. happy voyage. 1.21. maudissaient. See Gram., 301. Supply celui, qui is often used as a corapound relative. 1. 31. qui. " Hardly to be compared with a fishiug or coastii:g expdition 1. 33.

(ofourday)."

Page
1.3.
1. 1.
1.

28,

Une

2.

montait.

" Commauded."

7.
8. 8.

fatigu. ** Stvsiimd." U vide seems to mean the space oovered by the half-decks. dans les gros temvs. "In rough weather."

"Hindered the weigbt of any wave they empchaient, etc. might ship from sinking the vessel." empcher ahould take the subjuiictive with ne, though one finvls it sometimea with the indicative and withoutne, as cela ' empche pas que les Flamands ont de beaujc cJievaux. (Victor Hugo.)

1.

13.

s'adaptaient, etc.

*'

Would, wLen
of the ship,

it

low bulwarks in the middle part " give it a slow motion.

wascalm, be fixed in the and could, in case of need,

"AU told." Lui seul; en tout. because it does not stand next the verb.
17'
1.

L L

15.

c'e*. "Itwas."

lui in

aaed instead of
(of thought)

il,

19.

"Hia

become, in hia mind,

conjectures, after " k. certainty.

eighteen yeara,

had

L h

20.

bien que.

junctive.
21.
pt*,

Conjunctiona denoting for bien que. See note on

a concession take the lub* page


3.

li/ie 1,

Notes.
L
l.

24.
26.

Use aentait.*' He
oriemtait.

felt in

hmself."
set

Origiiially,
and he

" to

towards the eact," then to et


one's bearings."

in

auy direction; note


I.

30.
32.

dont
il

il,

etc.

"With which he had just beeu invested."


mcan
*'
:

also s'orienter,

"to take

1.

invoqua, etc., seema to

keep liim
1,

in the faith,

oalled on

men

He prayed his Saviour to to witness his constancy."

35.

ne plus. hoih. are put before infinitive, like ne pas, ne point,

etc.

Page
1,
1.

29,

Une

1.

he was thanking
3.

God

tout en rendant grce, etc. " At the same time that for," etc.; or, "though he thanked God for," etc.

/'emportt. See Qram., 569. que il crai'init . ne. " He feared lest." craindre always takes the subjunctive preceded by ne when craindre ifl pnsitive, but when craindre is negativ.^ the ne is oniitted. Je crains qu'il " 1 am afraid he will come." Je ne crains pas qu'il vienne. ne vienne. " I do not fear lie will come."
4.
.
.

inco

d'avoir a lui seul, etc. " To hve in his sole power . he alone knew well his route," etc. qui jaisait eau dans sa cale. " Which had aprung a leak." 1. 14. lui fil cheA-cher. " Forced him to go to." 1. 15. Hre "'that which supports life ;" ' food." la vie.' 1.23.
1.

10.

1.23.

etc.

etc.

" For a limited length of time " crurent y See Gram., C42, (V). 1.27. "Forbidding the children of Adam to enter," djendant, 29. " Inspired them as much with sadness as," leur imprima, etc. 1.34. "The very means of recognizing." 37. jusqu'aux jalons, jusqu' leur iomheau. " Even their tomb." Corn Page 30, line
pour, etc.
voir.
1.

etc.

1.

2.

pare pievious note.


1.8.
I.

/esso/eeV. "Theclimate."

10.
15. 17.
3.

de Pautre ct."
seconder.

l.

1.

" To be in harmouy with." leur drober. "Tohide from them."


:

On

the other side."

See note on Une

15,

pnge

" And thus made his steeramen and sailors believa Fieely 20. I. " they had come only half as far as they really liad. " To hide from." See note on line 15, page 3. cacher h, 1. 24.

1.

2H.

sefiquraient.See Gram.,
il

1.

28.

aurait voulu.
se

Page
another.
l. \.

31, line 2.
"

" He would hve liked." communiqurent. "Tliey comniunicated


se,

542 (V).

to Q

6.
7.

lui-m'me.
recherche.

Addod to givo emphasis to See note on liue page


10,
4.

Kotisfl.
'

97
iol-

1.

I2.

Whose

corresponding movementa the attraoted needie


. .
.

lo./ed."
1..16.

qui vinrent

1.21.
1.

qui venaient certijer."

vo/er." Which came flying." Which came to prove true."

32.

bright;"

tnbres encore lurnineusea." " i. e., " the twilight.

Th& darkneas which

is

atill

Pa/e 32, Une 1. que les vagues, etc." Which could only corne from waves having toin them from the rocks." 1.10. P/w/on. "Fartheron," herbues. 1. 12. " Covered with weeds."

bord de totttes les lvres.- -" Was on every tondue." did notthinkhe wasfarther yet thaii tliree himdred leaguea from Teneriffe."
1.

16.

tait

sur

le

1.

19.

"But he

1.

'^3

anaamw, etc. "Withoutany


steawifast to," etc.

friends

whose hearta

wouUi be

L
1. 1.

26.
30.

See Gram., 674. " And trustworthy enoiigh not to tell," etc. chamhre de poupe. " C&hin lu the steru."

31. les espaces qu'il,

eto. "The distance he believed he had

tra-

versed."
1.33.

a. "In."
33, line
soit
1.

Page
1.

rfe. "In."

que, etc.' Whether it be that thse inspired geniuses hve need of more solitude and retirement in order to commune with them2.

selves, or that," etc.


I.
1.

5.

de peur de.

" Because they are afraid to."


Without
their having to shift their sails
etc.

sans qu'ils, etc. " once for so many days."


14.

Com

1.

19.

Comment,

" How

against that outrent of contrary winds

should they ever again corne back except by tacking in that


for

expanse "
1,21.

"And

if it

was necessary

them

to

keep on tacking

for

ever," etc.

et se reprocher. 1. 30. " that stubborn dvotion," etc.

And

inwardly to reproach themselves for

i/aw cAoue /ow, etc. " But every time that the murmura 1.33, were about to buret into mutiny," etc.

Le soir." In the evening." 34, Une 3. qui auraient t, etc. "Which, inspiteof themselves, might hve been carried far out to sea by a wiud storm."
1.

Page
8.

h L L
1.

10.
16.
16.
19.
.

entendaient.
imitaient.

" Used to hear." "Looked like,"


it

avant la matui

u'ils craignireni,

des gerbes." Before the grain ie ripe," etc. "Tha,t they wtre afraid th7 would
it.'

gttt

eatangled iu

98
L21.
1.22.
etc.
1.

NOTttl.

25.

" The So great u the terror whioh the anknown ee qui rtonnait lui-mme. " That Mrhioh astoniahed himself."
iea

glacM.

ice-fields."

tant, etc.

'

lias,"

/ui-m7ne

is

L
1.

28. 29.

la ligne.

added for empliaais. " Tlie equator. "

" They thought there were," eto. se communiquaient, etc. " They murmured more Page 35, Hne loudly to oue another," qui ne laismit, etc. " Who left no other choice tb h't corn1.

mourait.
i/s

See Gram.,
ils

566.

31.

crurent.
2.

1.

4.

panions than suicide or murder."

" And who was sailing near enough the admirai to be able to 1. 12. talk with hiin sideby aide."
1.17.
1.18.
1.
1.

TOOwt. "Which rose."


jeune.

"Newly diacovered."

23.

sa terre lui.~"IIis land

24. il laissa gouverner.

" He allowed them to


Who
For
cents see

;"

" the land he was looking


steer."

for."

1. 37. qui otliaient les tiine."

jours.'*

did not notice the lapse of

Page
1.4.

more than

point de terre.

L7.
1.

" No land." U craignit d'avoir. He feared he had."


'

le livre. 36, liue 2. eight hundred."

" The admiraPs private log-book registered


Gram.,

73,

11.

of

them
1.

pavillon de dcouverte should disoover land.

means the signal agreed on

in case

any

II.

tira un coup de canon. " Fired a canor. shot."

de joie

is diffi-

cult to translate ; we may say "for joy," but thia ia not very exact; it ia used in a spcial seuse and aeema to mean ' such as would be tired at a clbration." Compare : /eu de joie, " boafire."

1.15.
1.

dans

les airs.

'\Into the air."

17.

ce sont.*'

1.
1. 1.

19.

Ce
il

n'tait,

They are." See Gram., etc. "It was, etc."

492 and 493.

1. 37. uhief,

1.

" They believed542 (V). were bonndless.** the watera "Why should they now treat kindly a Qu'avaient-ils, etc." " Obtained by playing on the trutsurpris la confiance, 38.
23.

avait cru.

See again Gram.,


eto.

35.

Ils crurent, etc.

eto.

ful nature, etc."

Pa^e
1,

6.
8.

Emphatio. ports. d'en revoir


lui

37. line 3.

s'il

en

restait.

" If indeed any liope remained."

mme.

les

(o dnote posHession

It ia more uaual to use en and the article wnen the autcedeut is uot the name of a peraon.

8ee Qram., 490. l 12. dont.-~"Byyf\iom.**

NoTBfl.
1.22.
1. 1.

99

a. "From.*

24. 26. 31.


32.

But he had men to manage.**


"for."

d'

cndu. "Hanging." " On which the inother waa movement ef the waves "
1.

ausi

1.

still sitting,

(rocked) by the gentle

1.

37.

on la concluait.
38,

"Ita existence was inforred."


la

Page

Hne

1.

ouUag

wi^/e. "

Who

had been insulted on the

previous day."

Nul is one of the ngatives which was ngative in Latin. It 1. 9. takes however a ne before its accompanying verb just like the others aux yeux. "Fiom their eyes." 1. 10.

1.

12.

nm/waicni.Freely

"rivalled

each other in attention to

duty."
1. 1.

16.

27. 31.
32.

lui-mme. A.no{her example of emphatic construction. de ce ct." Ou that side," ' in that direction."
constater.
e montrait-il.

1.
1.

"To dclare there was." See Grain., 627

(4th).

1.32.

g-u'. 'Before."

dans une m^rsion alternative, 1. 33. and) eniei'gin^ froin the ocan."

etc.*' In alternat (sinking in

Une 6. dont, etc." Wbich the morrow would dcide." Such words as dizaine, vitujtaine, etc., express the ideas "aboutten," "about twenty," etc.

Page
10.

39,

1.

of

1.13.
1.

18.

allait le rvler.

1.20. 1.21. 1.29.


1.

convenu. "Agreedon." "In the depths au sein de la "Day would reveal par haleines. "Ingusta."
nuit.
it."

of ihe night."

Le jour

owitm "Outline."
en. "Like an."

" Forests of majestic andunuamed trees rose des forts, etc. like atcps on the successive levels of the islund."
32.
1.

35.

Page
1.13.
1.

40,

" Allowed the eye in a measuro to see into thse, etc." liiie 10. la nuit. " Duriug the night." aiwic. "Theout-post."

15.

d'imprimer, etc."

To be the

first

European to plant

hia foot,

etc.
1.

16 and 17.

He

1.22.

jawiata. "Ever."

erected a cross and unfurled the colora of Spain, This ia of cours* the original meauiug of

jamais.
l.
1.

22. 28.

h dfaut des hommes.

" Because men were absent."

woveu together
itftry

the nanjes of Ferdinand and Ysabel were nionogram to show the union of the heredkiugdofiM of thse monarchs.
initial letters of

The

into a sort of

100
1.

Notes.
35.
le

visage coll aurVherbe.

With his face touching the ground. "

1.35.

" Of." or " With."

Une 6. qui devait pleurer. This phrase would odinarily " which was to M'eop, but it seema in thie case to meau " which ought to hve wept." 1. 10. qtie. "Let." In ail cases of this kind there is evidently au ellipse of somo stich phrase as je veux, je voudrais, je dsire, eto. 1. 14. soit. See Gram., 509.

Page
:

41,

niean

'

1.
1.
1.

16.

San-Salvador.

Spanishfor "Holy Saviour."


" They were insulting by.'" htnwr.- " Had just beeii blaspheming.**
folio wed

19.

cc/m. "Him."
ils

20. 26.

outrageaient de.
b'.asj

l.
1.

venaient de
hriter.

27.
32.

Is aiways
"
1.

by

de.

\,

I/s s'interrogeaient entre

eux sur,

" They

asked one another

questions about.

Pa.ge 42, Une


1.

^impulsion

de.

."Impelled by."
-'

4.
7.

flottant. See Gram., 5S2.


ils

1.

avaient Jini par s'en approcher.

They

at laat

drew near."

1.
1.

17.

enjln." AlBO," "even."


pendant des
sicles.

21.

"For ageo.**

1.

2. 24.
26.
27.

/ond "Out-of -the- way


un appendice avanc.
ont conserv.
survivre, is
/ea vivres.

1.

" A point jutting out."

part."

L
1.

1.

32.

" The stock of

"Retained." Soe Gram., aiways folio wed by .


provisions."
etc.

556.

Page
1.9.
11.

43, line

stood there was


dont

crurent comprendre, in that direction, etc."


6.

" Thought

they under-

ils se

croyaient rapprochs.

"Near

which they believed

themselves to be."
1.

foulait sous ses pieds.

'

Trod."

1.

17.

pour ge.Conjunctions denoting purpose are followed by the


creuss, etc.

Bubjunctive.
1.

23.

*'

Dug out

of

a single tree."

1.
l. 1.

25.
,S0,

contre." For."
tendu
vers.

" Intent on."

36.

Aux."

Influenccd by the."

f.

Page 44, Une 4. Cuba, etc. "Cuba with itsshores slopiug (ba.ck from the water) and extending indefinitely with mountains in the buckground, etc. a'adossant refers to cotes. larget feuilles. "With large leavea." See Gram., 419* l. 14. "Spontaneously." d'elle-mme. 1. 16.
1.19.

aux plumes. See Gram


e.~-"Like.

419,

1.21.

NoTEa
1.
1.
1.

101

22.
27. 28.

blouitsaient Pair

qui enlevdU, etc.


c'tait

"Which

lui-m^me." Made the rery Jr

glitter,**

vated and
1.32.

'* Thalwan indeed a new land lefis cultibien l, etc. yetmore productive, etc." aU contemple. For nU Bee Gram., 674, Sta lot contempla,

robbcd night of

ite

terrors."

Gram.,
1.32.

588.

voudrait. "\Vo\i\\\\ie"
5.

Fai^e 45, Une


1.17.
1.
1,

la recherchede.

" To look for."


niisuuderstood."

por." At."
dissmines par groupes.

22. 24.
33.
35.

mai compris.
qui devait.

"

" Scattered in groupa."

\N

hom he had

1.

lui voilait.*'

1,

Hid fi jvh him." '' Which was to."

1.35.
1.

36.

^ai^n^c "Had a.isen." U jour mme. '"On the very day.


rfera<. "Wast."
46, line 1.

1.38.

Page
1.

3.

1.6
1.
1.

routine.

6.
9.

"Fashion," "custom." nom. Nominative absolute.


lui drober.
*'

dut." Owed." " To rob him of."

L
1.

17.

20.

Posterity may be chargeil with injustice, etc." OMx. "Fromthe." de revenir, etc. " o be the first to return to Europe

in order

to claini for himself the chief glory, etc.


1. 1.

"

22. 23. 25. 27.


30.

devait.''

"Colmnbus had beon Owed.

for

sometime only too conscious."

1. 1. 1.

parv>emi h quiper.
rfoni!. See
il

"Succeeded in equippiug." Gram., 503 and 504. comptait^ etc. " He looked for justice and virtue from

others in return."
1. 1.

35. 35.

entrevit le

affecta, etc.

crime. "Began to see through the treachory." Pretended to believo that the Pinta had
'*
'
.
.

left

him invountarily,

etc.

which made "If it had not been for this . he woitld still bave found the maiidaud," In allait we bave an example of the use of the impcrI. 3. fect indicative where we might expect the past conditional. " Which he was very close to." auquel il touchait. 1. 6.

Page

47, line 3.
rount',

him veer

1.

11.

roZa/i. "Wafted."

1. 18. comme au devant de. * As if to meet." devant de quelqu'un, " To go to meet sonjeone." 1. 27. on eut dit. " Oue would tion of quite frquent ocQunence,

Compare

aller

au

hve said they were."

construc-

102
1.

NOTKS.
31.

r administration.

A vague tern meaning

be "management of farms," or oryanized eociety." jrgan


it
1.

may
31

" management ;" here "management of the allaira ol


col-

Vhahitation,
'

cniea,'* or

perhaps
8.

*'

le also vaguo; it muy niean '* formation of the building of and living in houses."

Page 48, Une


1.

d'un

16.
18,

venait visiter.

l.

from
1. 1.
1. 1.

"CBgava,"a product resembling tapioca, cassave. the same plant.

" On one aide." "Came to


ct,

visit."

dcrived

20.

au. See Gram.,


en.*' Like."
loyalement.

419

(3).

22.
29.

31.

1-33.

" Honestly. " mal . " To do wrong Jairt aKS. "AIbo.


dcouvrent.

to,"

"

to hurt."

1*37.
better.

Another

reading

is

dcouvrirent

which appears

Page 49, Une .3. Quel myatrt'y etc. " What a inystery of Providence is tliis visit, etc." The Bnglish word which is the neareat appioach to a translation of (/ue lu this audsimilar phrases is "uamely." SeeUram 502 (b.)
1.

II. 11. 17.

1. 1.

force de rames.

1.29. 1.30.

"Ashore." " By dint of rowing." venait d'aborder. " Had just landed." s'attendrit, "Manifeated motion."

terre.

sans

efforts.

"Spoutaneoua."
chanij de nature.

Page
pare
:

50, line 6.

j'ai

chang de chapeau.

"

"Changed
my

in nature."

Com-

hve changed

hat."

leur vm.<je. It will hve been noticed that the French often 1. 11. prefer the aingular to the plural in speaking of tliose parts of the body which are single, even when moie than one per.son is referred to.
1.

15.

1.
1.

20.

" Columbua doubted no longer that he had," etc. quarante hommes d'lite. " Forty of the beat nien."
recueillir des notions sur.

22.

"Gather infoi-njation about."

1.28.
1.

"In

coastiug around the island."


terre.

31.

descendu
3.

" Landed."

Page 51, Hue


1.

3.

l.
1.

6. 7. 8.

1.
1. 1.

10.
13. 13.

" Reckoning.'' Whose secret he kept'from." gardait, etc. dont " While he was already aware of," etc. qu'il pressentait, etc. des nuages amoncel^. " Masses of clouda." " Such as he had never seen blaze forth," etc. " No longer obeying either or rudder," insensibles, etc. " withii\ aiyht of," avjc j'nrtes de. " Close to que. See note on 10,
notes d'estime.
'

il

tels qu'il, etc.

sail

;"

1.

p. 5,

ToTB.
1.

103
the other was lost whilat

14.

lia crurent,

eto.~"Each
1.

believed

Hoating at the mercy," etc.


1.

17.

See note on
s'aUendait

2, p. 1.
.

omrer.-" Expeoted to be engulfed.'* . pifi.Shoi read pit. Mourir, etc." To die at the very nroment lie touched 1. 26. the shore with lus foot," etc.
.

1.19,
1.

26.

1.

29.

mais
/c

laisser,

etc. "But
solution."

speak," etc.
1,31.
1.

to let a second univetse die, ao to

ww^" The

33.

drob,

"hidden;"

c'tait,

"wouldbe."

Page
1.

15.
18.

jour." Some day." 52, line 10. ily a quelque temps.'* Not long ago."
si

1.

l'amande

Btood,

etc.
s

The

the captain
1.

mind.

aurait rsisU, etc,~" Whethe* tho kernel h ad conditional is used to indicate the doubt which was iu

19.

Pcorce creuse.'*

The hollow

shell."

1. 1.
1.

22. 24.
29.

1.

36.

" We cannot stand the storm a day longer." puisse, etc. "May some one," eto. ce qui, etc. ' What might hve remained hidden," ' Again the prey of," etc.
53, line 4.

eto.

Page

prsent." Introduced."

ceded by
1.

de peur que . 1.5. ne. fearing lest." de penr que und de . crainte que, a weU as ail verbs denoting fear take the suhjmictive ure.
ne.

7.

jaire aasas.'^iner."
se

To

order the assassination of."


(1).
??

1.
1.

18.

rendu, " repaired

;" j>ieds nus.

28.

Les plus beaux de

ses

See Gram., 423 jours." His happieat day a. "

1.29.

a. "In."
auprs. ''W\ih." meUre le comble . " To crown."

1.30.
1.

32.

Page
1.

54,

10. 11.

Une 4. Nmsis." The avenging Godde3S." pour lui/aire cortge." To foUow iu hia train."

1.

en. "As
avenir,

1.12.
1. 1. 1. 1. 1.

14,
18.
18. 19.

"Future." lecorps. See note on L


tte.

a."

11, p. 50.

sur la

See previous note.


les

26.

1.29.
1.

29.

The eagpr crowd flocked.** pas de." Followed. " 071 croyait l'y voir." They tliought they saw it there." /orc-. "Strength." " The inward consciousness of h;g worth." leseh'lment, etc.
couraient sur

La

foule avide se pressait."

104
1.

81.

qui lui rendaient,

Noim " Who repaid hini eto.


ttce
**

in houors for

what

ho brought baok to them ii* conquests." lui. For position of this pronouti 1. 36.

Oram.,

469

(b).

Page

55,

liie 3.

Ils le

firent lUMoir.
ia

hey mado him

lit

down."
is

The pronoun
l.

(m) of any reflexive verb A8 the completion of /aire.


3.

omitted wlien the verb

used

1.
1.

8.

au niveau de. "On a level with." mus jusqu'aux /armes. " Movod to

16.

1^

ne laissa ni enfer son me.


humilier.

" Neither allownd his mind to be


1.

teara."

puffed up."
1.
1.

17.

22.

dans

le eas.

To be humiliated." See note on 11, p. "In caae he had not been born."
See note on
1.

15.

1.26.
1.

<nr. "Stand."

27.

par.**A.t."
renvoyant.
dpolis.
et

1.31.
1.33.
1. 1.

35.

go

38, to ftnish."

" Attributing. " Afterwards." " pour y monter premier. " And to be the to ascend "Whoae discovery and oouquest he might dont
le

frst

it.

il

irait

eto.

Page
plant."
1.

56, liuo 8.

o&

irait planter.

"Wh re ver

he might go to

8.

jaloux de ravaler.
presss.
le

1.

IS.

"In

**

Anxious to disgrce."

haate."

1.24.
1.34.

cieL** The climate."


et ses

Son coeur
Freely

sens.

Is about
as

equal to

" His

mind and

body."
1.

35.

"Thathedid

many

foulhardy thiuga as a mad-

man."
1.

36. tait

monte. See Gram.,


4.

170, 171

and 172.

Always takes the fubjunctivo. Page 57, prsente. Threatenng." 1.4. tobe crossed," 13. se laissa franchir. Allowed
Une
sans que.
'*

1.

**

itaelf

i.

t.

"waa

croased."
1.29.

deUAn.

"At a

distance."

Page
etc."
1.

58, line 2.
d* entre.

" The burnt fort whose ruina oovered their bones,

9.

1.

12.

langage.

L 23.

L
1.

27.

Haa the same meanngas parmi, " amongat." The aenae of langage a modo of apeech." See Gram., note at foot of page 307. envoya " Made rouds." traa des
la
''
.
.
.

visiter.

routes.

28.

qu'il
is

noua and

ne s'y attendait. " Tlian lie expocted to be." y Isa proused iustead of le, bccause s'attetdre takes after ii.

NOTBS.
wht

105

Page
1.

59, line 6.

7.

par

aa

dhordemmtt." RxGeuM.** smU/orce morale." By elioer moral

force "

uaad

1.11.

L
1.

19.
2.S.

hommes d'lite" ChoBen meiu" eava/iers." Ridera. "


tncore.

"Again."

L 28.
to be
1.

33.

peine entreme." Which he had hardly seen." parvint ." Succeo^ed in. "

*\ """* "^^ />.-" TJinlnf the second pcrson siugular What yon hve just .lone^' donc. rhe use of {<) in acf.lressiuu Der8on 18 familiar and its effect cannot be ropro.luced in nglLh!
1.

a^
.

7. 9.

les

unes

les

autres." Some
in

others."

1.

Omit the

firat

du

thia

line.

adverbs, the othera are nouna.


1.

The

firat

bien

and mal are

10. 11.

lit."
light

1.

381.
1.

" If then you must die a wcll aa we." See Gram., 152 (b). de mal. de and uot du because preceded by pas. See Gram.
,

11. 15. 16.

qui ne Ven ont point

fait.

-"

Who

hve never done you any."

fo

to

1.

Ott. "Either."

dont
ses

L 18. L22.
1.24.

tes clarts." MVhoBehrightneaB.'* ^Meur. "Glimmering tracea."


. .
.

un moment." For a moment."


ananti.

*'

Prostrate."

and
aad-

L
be.
1.

29.

OU

allait se trouver

son Jrre.** In which his brother would

29.
32.

c'tait. "
Il tait

He

waa."
had.**

1.

L36.
18

de. " lie de. "With."

1.37 occf^/er.May be taken aa a passive, or we mav suoDoae an elhpae of aome auch expreaaion ailes gerls, "

thpr*,

peopl^^^^

was

Page

61,

Une 5

Freely:

"The

IZni
L
les.

fact that he was his brother '^'"'^ "^ ^'' lieutenant." Compare :
le.

waa

JS

10.

/tii-m^w*!!. Strengthena

L 18. L 19. L24.


1.

guerrei de dseapior." Dcsperate wara."

30.

iro-

L39.

au retour.--" On his retnrn," (to the settlement.) luijit amirer." Sho-wed him." d peine we. "Hardly . . , before.* motiva." Excited."
. .
.

Page

62, line 6.

'Indiiect object.

lO
1.

NoTBS.
8.

dresti

h."

Traincd for."

L
1.

13.

14.

fiU eth-ah lui-mme par. e^t." Bocanie."

" Bccaine involvod hinisclf

In,

LIS.
1.85.

rem^wtt. " VVou."


orcuj> .

*'

Engage! in."

Page
1.6.
1.

63,

liiie 2.

dchu." Depiived."

pouvait contester,

"Might havo refusod,"

'

10.

h lainsa

instruire.

AUowed
odiuua

hini

freely to

limiaury proi eedingH for the wero bringing against him."

proeeoution

hia

conduit the prncaUuuinaturH

"It waa propaiing for him oiu of elle Ini mnmjcait, etc. 1. 1.3. those favorswMoh would be the inoat likuly to piocure him thefavurs of the court."
1. 1.
1.

21.
'23.

ne 7)ii. Sec (3ram.,


lui arracher.

607.

*'

To draw from

him.**
(b),

" In a few days." bnir son union, etc. " Had hia union with her Page 64, Une, conaecrated, p/tM en accus. " More like a criminal."
1.

32.

Ua arrivent. Seo Giam., 548

33.

en pev. de jours,
1.

fit

ett)."

1.

6.

1.

18. 16.

tait

niort.SeeGvam.

171

(a).

1.

en habit

de." Clothed

1,19.
1.29.
1.

qui vient etc.

"Who
*'

like a."

cornes to ask pardon


of."

for

the glory h

" has won.


rfevanotcn^.

81. 36.

ne devaient,
se

etc.

" Were only to aholish, etc."


" Burst into insulta."

Were ahead

1.

rpandirent en outrnycs.
1.

Page
1.

65, Une

Uuderstaud /ar bcforo la patience.

For peur read pour. Freely " Forgetting his natural diguity of mind and falling with thefuU strengtii of his arm, etc." " Soornfully apurned him with hia foot." le foula, etc. 1. 7. n exploiter ses enemis. laissa " Lef t to hia enemiea 1. 10.
3.
1.

5.

to

make

1.16.
1.
1.

Ornoqne.

17.

"Orinoco." convaincre. "Ought to hve conA'inced him." aurait d


le

capital out of."

"The aleepless niglita." Indirect object. Page 66, Une 14. L 19. e/e;<.~"Taken." Had profited by them. L 21. en avaient
1.

26.
25.

fut tout, ce qu\" Was ail that." '" AU that he did himaelf waa to, etc." Il ne fit, etc.
les veilles.
*.

1.33.

profit.

'*

1.24.
bia

pour son propre compte.


pruilt."

-"Oa

hi*

own

re^ponsibilitj-,"

"for

owu

"

KOTM.
1

107

M.
38.

The
I.

Sibyllae of anoient mythology were Immrwl pronhoteaM aeno horo i that tho avag. r..^ar.ie.f Anacoanf^

The

in^p^ed

Elle le,

comhIaU (/._"

Slio lavished oti tl.om. "

Page
1.
I.

10.
13.

67, linc 9. avait t,

partie de.-''

Which had

startod fiom.-

J\l?i ""T'*''^. protectress, her faniily


1.

etc.-" Had Inon heartily welcomo.l." avaUjaU imnter, etc.-" Had got her to invite, etc." con>.inr, etc.-" Ha.l made a plot fe> kill their
.

19.

1.20.

an.l to burn her palace." haut (Vun balcon.' From a balcouy. combat Himul" iiha,m {\g\\t."
.

kind
'

,.

(lu

1.22.
1.

aur /a //arc.~" In the Fquaro."


tt le

22.

foulent,

fret."

etc.-" And trample the.n under

their horge.'

24 1.24.
the

rf'enortir.~'Togetout."

28 auxquels, etc.-" At which thoy then.selves had just sat down " 34 dont, etc.-" Over which Columbua could net for a loug time trinmph."
1. 1.

Page
were

80011,

68, 1. 2. etc."

prlndlrmt.-" Foreshadowed

the crimea which

cibraung.
otJior,
1.
1.

i.

c.

tl

ey

than they

fell

to killing each other.

had no soonor made the acquuintauce yuajniauoe oi each of eac

11. 18. 17.

en. "With them.'


(/"<. Seo

murs." Upright in morale.' faiHanl apporter c/e^c/taie._"Oidering " cliaitw to be brouuht "
intgre de

**

'

20.

note onl. 18

p. 5,

21.
22.

m:me." Of bis own (iwar /}/(/. " By the f cet."


de lui

aocord."

23. The bourreau is the hangman hre it signifip.g a mean wreteh who willmgly assume, the ugly duty of n.anading \Z m "er '"'" ^^^'^'^^ "'"^''^ ^'^ li"g p-eliSna^, Iiil^"'"""^*
;

'''""'^''^'^ ^ ^'^'^'
hii; t^'th."
'

'^'"

^'i'i

with one another in chargig

'

1.

33.

publiques. See Gram.,


69, line
1.

425.

'

Page
^

lowed by the subjunctive

serait. -Varha

expressing a

commaud

in the

depondot

are genf-rallv

clause, (s.e

Gmm
.

TS

for

rn":aVrbSn^:x:cXl!'

the hke. the dpendent verb nuty be in theinchcativeor liSnal for ''-'probabiU^rol'tt

'"

^^*-^-

108

Notes.

obinsant, etc. Freely : ** Olieying Jrom a sens of his duty as 1. 4. a soldier, indignant (at tlie hardslupa of Colunibus) aid merciful even while discharging his duty."
1.

6.

See note on
innocence.

1.7.
1.9.
1.
1.

"Confession."

1.

2. p. 1.

SeeGrara., 548(c).
ainsi qu.

22.
26.

" As well as."


Thankcd them."
OTi.

leur rendit j/r.ce. "

1.27.
1. 1.

29.
32.

amjeaftx. "Chains." indefinite ; would be more commonly ils.

de."
70, line

In."
1.

1.37.

ywfsent. Seo notfeon


1.

1.

Page
1.
1. 1.
1.

/es

hahies den partis. " Party hatred."

3.

de."
/c

VVith."
'

6. 8.

curs.

fmaent.

Men's hearts." This au exception to the rulo stated in the


is

note on

1, p. 69.
1.

11.

" Prevented him a long time from speaking."


le

1.

12.

procs de.

1.
1.

26.
33. 33.

insensible .

" Superior to."

" Tlie charges

against."

For orient read occident.


terres jrro/onyes ds l'est."

1.

Countries of the east which project

(into the sea)."

Page
till

71, line

8.

qui doit se briser

turre."

Who ought

to

work

hebreiiks."

1.11.
1.
1. 1.

pour
du.

xe radoubir.

"To

refit."

13. 18.

par. "In."
terre ferme.

31. 34.

"Respecting the." "Continent."


the stotms seemed to contest with him."
en
2.

1.

"

Whoae conquest

Page 72, line well as things."

e. "From them."

may

refer to persons

lavished gold on hia crews in exchange for the oom1. 10. uionest play things of Europe."
l.

"Who

11.

i/

6 croyait,

etc. "

He

thought he had realized his dreams,

(whereas) he waa in the thickest of his raisfortunes." ia nuit." iJuring the uight." 1. 18.
des deux cots par le sang 1. 21. of tlie blood that had been siied."
1.
1.

rpandu. "Ou both

sides on account

34.
37.

pour." In order

to,"

etc. "The only means of communication that Columbus had with him now was the courage," etc.

Gohmb

n'eU plvs,

Page

73. line

2.

franchissant

la

nage.-" Swimming over."

Notes.
L
1.
1.

109

10.
16.

je m'tais

tmsmp. "Thii dozed.

19.

In the wliole earth." jusque l. " Till now."

pa9

toute la terre.'*

n tient tout ce qu'U doit, lui, et au del.-*' Ife 1. 27. keeos ail hR promises and exceeda them." If it is necessary to nKtke a perSna nr aoun emphatic a " disjunctive " mut be used. No o"i|jutjia can ^e >e placed on auch a Word as t/.

empC

1.

29.d'
31.

is partitive.

1. I.

34.
36.

1.

le marbre." Fized by fate ;" " invitable. " " At laat the season (of calm weather) quieted the sea " somhrade fatigue.-" VoundeveA, wornoutwith

crUessur

long service."

1.19.

tait

7am. "Waa tosend

Word."

1.23.
1
1.
,

27.

yoera. "Would risk." s'offrit. " Occurred. "

28,

Il

le fit

appeler."

He

sent for hini."

,leed is to be attemp^ed " 1. 38. tmter.lt seems best to translate such lorma iuto V,J,M.u ^'^'"s "*< l^ughsh by a passive construction: " To be atteiupted. '

1.

38.

action d'clat,

etc.-" Noteworthy

Page
halids!
1.
i.

75, liue 22.

a ux

cris.

" By the cry "


.

3"

^'^

-P^"^* 2^ i^^r,

etc.-"Who

could only raise his


iiis

28

e.

levrentle fer sur tte.-"Bahed the sword over threatened to kill him."
les jours.

neau, head "

1.31.
1.

"The

lie."

contre. 33. contre and pays, the

When
.

there

is

differpnr'*.

former

signifies a

diS or ocamT'""'
giSu
Situde

r>f

,<>.

i,

o< 12. ozV._' Whetlier it was . . . . or" rival trop grand, etc. seems to mean either- a riml ,..iL """' 80 great that they felt no shane for thcir lack of t^w . F or he waa too much their rival for them "' to be to hlm pour l'arracher ." To free him fioni.' 1. 24.
1.
l.

Page76,
13.

un

1.26.

rfoK. "Of which." </on<. "From which."

1.27.

.J.32.

?'^^aiMtc.-"Whichwaslikeagardenwhenhediscovered
77, Une 1. vaincu de force." Broken in stiongth " de quoi. "The whorewithal ;" V the
'

Page
l.

7.

means.

uight's lodginga." ue j' Mirais fait." Aa I would hve exercised " sometimes used in French as do su freouentlv s l\^v%\ orne precedmg verb which cannot b"'oonve,fiJnti;
l.

1.7.

Twami. 'My

16.

A-^.v^'^*^^

"

'^'"""*

18.

n'allaient

pas au

del,

" Did ngt

expt'atj"

suffice.

"

110
1.22.
1.
1.

N0TE&
JilU d prdilection.--" Favorite da.\ighter."

28.

foule aux pieds.

**

Trodden by the

feet of

men."

31.
32.

soii.See Gram.,
afin
<jue.

569.

1.

Conjunctions deaoting purposo tako the subjuuctive.


e disgrces.

See Gram.,

623.

Page 78, Une 13. au comble de tunea were tbe greatest."


1.

" When

bis misfor-

15.

par

le

dnment de

ses quipages.

tu n'en as i as d'autres. " You bave no other ;" " you bave oly hiin." Notice the partitive en (of thom) whicb aeema so unneces8ary to the English mind, but wbich must be used M'ith ail expreasions

1.21.

"From lack of

ineans."

involving tbe idea of nuinber if the noun is underatood. Compare combien de pommes avez votis " How many apples bave you " J'en
:

ai trois,
1.

'

3C.

I bave three." parut importune au

1.34.
1.

inquitudes d'esprit.
elle

" Worricvi the Kiag." " Trouble of mind."


roi.
fail

38.

refers to Votre majest.


a/lait lui

him." manquer. " Was about to "The men of tbe future." 28. traitaient en souverain. " Treated him like a sovereign." "Substituted in tbe enjoymeut of his substituait 36. (Diego rights," venait mourir. " Should happen to die." 38. dont, etc. "And for neglect of whom bia conPage 80, science piicked him, etc." qui durent peser " Wbich must bave weighed on." ont d 1.21. hre for durent. might be See Gram., 152 aprs tronc coup. " After the truuk bas ben eut." 30.

Page
20.

79, line 4.
/es
le

1.

hommes

venir.

1.
1.

ses droits.

's)

etc.

1.

lii''

14,

et

useii

(b), (9).

1. 1.

le

35.

" Such as
81, line
3.

is

maiutain

tlje cliguity

and position

suitable for a peison." " 1 wish tbis relative to of a citizen in that city."

Page
1.4. 556.
1.
1.

mme jusqu'

qui m' oht fourni.

" Who

la perte.

" Even to tbe loss."


me
witb."

furnished

See Gram.,
171
(a).

8.
9.

que je suis venu. "That I came." See Gram., 6em du tempt. " Mucli time," See Gram., 402

and 556.

" Before people were willing to beliove in tbe gift," "Who were the Srst to place confidence in me." L 19. Il s'humilia, etc. " Freely "He submitted to the law of nature, but be rejoiced in it as ordained of God." " He waa lost in rept utance for hia // s'abfma, etc. 1. 21. Freely lins and in hope of a double immortality."
1.

9.

1.

13.

1.
1.

24.
24.

Pote de cur. " A natural poet." vu. As we hve eeen." comme on


:

l'a

'

Tbe

l'

in tbis sentence

U mucb

like the one epokeu oi in Gram., 479.

Notes.
1.^4.
prer,ift.~" In h&ste."
3.

111

Page 82, Une


1.12.
ly^me,

mon iirnoUs fiinhre^. " Tomba."


The yuiding
star," 'Mestiny."

etc. See Giarn., 404.

1.18.

/Vto/e."

1.23. maniement, heurta of men to leail


1.

etc. " SkilfuI, but honest management them to the tiuth."

of the

24.

forvie.1

extrieures." Outwurd appcarance."

26 langage.*' lofty thoughts."


1.

manner of speaking appropriate


:

to his

broad and

jusque, etc.Freely 1. 30. serve it."

" Even when

it

has forgotten tbose

who
e

Page
refera to
1.

83, line 5.

"We

do not know a more complte one."


or

homme.
auprs

7.

de." To,"

16.

rapproch.

"

in."

Brought nearer to one another.'*

f^.'

"'-> *!

ABBBEVIATIONS.
masculine.

adj. adjectlve.
adv.

mas.

adverb. Anglo-Saxon, cotiditional.

M. H.
Neth.
n.
n.
f.

O Middle High Oerman.


Netherlandish.
,

Arab.Arabia
A.
S.

noun fminine.
masculine.

cond.
conj.
dirn.

m. noun
P.Old

conjunction, diininutive.

O.

Prenoh,

O. H.

G. Old High Oerman.


pars. persoaal.

En^. English.

part.participle.
per.,

et etymology.
fcm.

fminine.

plu. plural.

Flem.riemiah.
Qer.
Or.

po88.possessive.

German.

prep.prposition.
prs.
prt,

Oreek. imp. imperfect. imper. imperative.


It.-Italian.

prsent.
def. preterite
deflnite.

pro. pronoun.
Scand.

Scandi navifto.

ind. indicative.

sing. singular.
8p.

Spaniah.
neuter.

L.

Latin.
;

L. L. Late Latin. uaed rather loosely


ulossical furiub).

sub.subjiinotlvo. T. a. verb active.


it staiida

(This slgn has b^ea for ail non-

V.

n.verb

. r.

verb reflexlv*

^-.

VOOABULART.
a. n. m., (the flrst letter of the alphabet).

absolu,
solute.

e, adJ., (et, L.

absolut

),

ab-

, prep., (et. L. ad.), to, at, in, on, for,

absorber,
absorb.

by, with, from, towatds.


a, 8rd. Bing, pree. ind. of avuir ; il y a, there is, there axa; il y en a qui, there are some who.

v. ., (et, L.

absorbere), to

absoudre,
absurde,
Burd.

v. a., (et.

L. absolvere), to

absolve, 10 acquit.
adj., (et. L. absurdus),

lerman.

ab

abaisser,
to lower, to
tr,

v.a., (et. , baisser from ha), humble, to dgrade ; t'abais-

to

fal),

tosiiik.
n.

abuser,
niiHUbe
;

v. a., (et.

alms, L. abusus), to

abandon,
periiiisbion.

m.,

(et. ,

Compare

O, F, bandon, Eng. ban), aban-

vantage

ab<ser de, to take an unfair adof.

doniuent, cnrclessiiess.
lan.

abandonner,
abanil<.ij,

accabler, v. a., (et L. L. cadabulum. a catapuit), tu overwlielni, to oppress.

v. a., (et.

abandon), 10

forsake, to quit ; s'abandonner, to givo oneself over to, to rfcsiirn


oneself.

to

accent,
voice.

n.

m.,

(et. L.

accentua), accent. '

accepter,
accei^t.

v. a., (et.

L. acceptare), to
(et, L.

abattre,
re),

v. a., (et. , battre,

h.

batuto

lo

fc'tat

down, to knock down,

acclamation,

n.

f.,

acclamare),

to trrieve, to dishearten, to cast s'abattre, to alight (of birUs); abattu, cast down, dishearteued,
afllift,

accluuiuUuii clieeriri^.

Awin

accompagner,
to acionipany.

v. a., (et. ,

cmpagne),

m., abyssus), abyss.


n,
>it.

abme,

(et. L. L.

abvssimus, L.

abmer,
abolir,

v. a., (et.

up; '6fmej-, to 8ink.

abtme), to swallow
to nbolish.

accomplir, v, a., (et. L. ad, complere), to uccoiiiplisli ; s'acciinplir, to be acioniplii-hed, lo be fulfilied.

v. a., (et. L. abolere),

abondance,
abundiuHo.

accomplissement, . m., (et. accompUr), aic.jinpj.Biinjetit, fulfilmeot.


accorder, v. a., (et. L. L. accordare). to luuKc cigree, to graiit.
accourir, v, n., run u|>, lo lla^ten.
(et.

n. f., (et. L.

abundantia),

abondant,
abonder,
abouiid.

, ^d}. (et. L.

abundantem).
abundare), to

abutidant, plcntiful,
v. n.,
(et. L.

L. accurre/e), to

accoutumer,
actuhtoni.

v. ., (et. ,

coutume), to

abord,
arrivai
;

n.

m.,
v.

(et.

, b,rd),
fir^t.

approach
abord), to

d'abord, at

aborder,

and
n.
f.,

n., (et.

accrditer, v. a., (et. , crdit), to acciciit, to give influence; accidit


(parf.), influential.

toucli, to (ipprooch, to land.

L. abbreviatiotimii), abbreviation, shoitiiess.

abrviation,

accrotre,
increasfc
;

(et.

y. a., (et. L. acorescere), to n'accrotre, to be increused to

grow.
accueillir,
v.

abri, n. m., (et. suppcsed to be L apricum), shelter ; l'abri de, sheltered

(et. L.

to rcceue, to welcoine. is pronounced as eu.1

ad, colligere) [lu tins word u


L.

abriter,

v. a., (et. abri), to shelter. n, f,, (et.

absence,
sence.

L. absentia), ab'
L. ab.<ibriteiu), ab'

accusateur, n. m., (et. torcni), uci'usor, informer.


accusation,
n.f.,(et. L.

accusa-

accusationem),
cul-

absent,
sent,

e, adj., (et.

accuHation, ctiarge.

s'absenter,

v. r., (et.

onewjlf, to 8tay awajr^*

abtetU), to absent

accus, n. m., (part, of acauer), prit en accus, like a culprit.


;

accuser,

v. ., (et.

L, accuaare),

to

i-i

114
oCTise, to indlcate
;

VOCABDLARY.
t'aceuier, to accuse

adorer,
adore.

..

(et.

L.

adorare),

to

oneself.

acharni e. adj.,(part. of acharner), furioub, infuriated.


acharner, v. a., (et. L. ad, camem), to provoke ; l'acharner, to be enrajjeJ ; ttacharner ur, to attack niadly.
chemin), to set out, to procoed on a jonrney.

adosser,
baclc
lear).

v. ., (et. d, dos),

ajfainet

sonietliin^.

to lean one's l'aUuimer, to

adoucir,
tt)

v- a., (et. ,

doux), to sweeten',

sotten, to ease, to niitijjate.

s'acheminer,
acheter)

v. r.,

<'ct.

d,

adresse,
dexttirity.

n. f., (et. adresser), addreas,

> (et.

L. L. adcaptare), to

buy.

achvement,
pletioii.

n. m., (et. achever),

com-

adresser, v. a., (et. a, dresser), to address s'adresser, to addre.ss oneself, to apply.


;

achever,
to complte.

v. a., (et. , ehet),

to finish,

n. m., advoraary, opponent.

adversaire,

(ut.

L, adversarius),

adverse,
(et.

adj.,

(et.

L. adversus), ad-

acier, n.m.,
L. acies), ateel.

L. L. acieriiim, (rora

veruc.

ronaute.
;

n. m., (et. Or.

V^p, and
'jjp

acquire

v. a., (et. L. acqiiaerere), to (nexac'iurir, to hc acquived ; qviert, 3rd, cin^r. prs. iud. ; acjuit, 3rd, sing. prt. de(.)

acqurir,

vauTt/), aeroiiaut.

arostat.
affaiblir,

"

m-,

(et.

Gr.

and

rraTos), ivir-balloon.
v. a., (et.

laible), to

weaken.

acquisition,
eini, acquisition.

"

t.,

(et. L.

aoquisitioaact, action.

affaire, n- t., (et. , faire), aflair, business a aires, business.


;

acte.

't.

m.,

(et. L. actns),

affaisser,
fruiii

v. a.,

(t. ,

faix, aburden,
to depres, to

actif, ive. adj., (et. L. activus), active.

tascis),

to prcss,

action,
actuel,

n.

t.,

(et. L.

actioneni), action.
L.

cast down.

le. adj., (et.

actualis), ac-

affecter,
to affect, to
to.

tual, prsent.

and assume
v. a.

n., (et. L. affentare),

affecter , to affect

adapter,
adapt, to
fit,

v.

a.,

(et.

L. adaptaroX to

adieu,
well.

n. m., (et. , Dint), adieu, farev. a., (et. L.

affectueusement, adv., affectueux, euse, acij.,


nffcctionate, kind.

aflcctionntely.
(et. affection),

adjoindre,

adjungere), to

affid. e, adj., (et.

It.

atfidato), tnisty.

adjoin, to associate, to unito, to add.

affliction, n.
tion, sorro'.v,

f.,

(et.

L. affliger), afflic

admettre,

v. a.,

et

L. odmittere), to

admit, to allow.

affliger,
flict,

v. a., (ot.

L. affligere), to af-

lo irouble.

administrateur,
administration,
administrer,

n. m., (et. L.

admn-

igtratorum), administrator,
n.
f..

cliir,

affranchissement, n. nn., (et. affran fiom fiaiic), enfraiichisement, deaffreux, euse,


aiij.,

(et.

L. admlnisL. adnunis-

li.v;t>'.

trationeni), administration,
v. a.,
traru), lo atiminister, to

management.

(et O. P.

afifre,

(et.

frit.>lit:,

trigblful.
v. a., (et. affront), to face, to

govern.

affronter,
attack.
inliiiitive),

admirablement) adv., (et. admirable),


adiiiiralily.

admiration,
admirer,

n-

f-,

(et. L.

admiration-

afin, conj., (et. , fin) ; afin de (with afin que (witii subjunctive), in

cm), .admiration, wonder.


v. a.,
i,et.

order to, in order tiiat


admirare), to

L.

admire, to wonder

ge,
years.

n-

m., (et L, L. aetatlcutn), ge,

at.

admis,

participle o( admettrr.
n.

g.

e, adj., (et. ge),

aged, old

dgi

adolescent, tem), a youth.

m.,

(et.

L.

adoloscen-

de neize uns, sixteen years old.

s'adonner,
apply

v.

oiieself to,
".

r., (et. d, dunner), to to be devoted to.


t.,

agent,
a<.'sri

n.

m.,

(et. L.

agens), agent.
(et.

aggraver
a\ ace, to
V.

v.

a.,

grave),

to

adoptioUi
adoption.

(et,

L. adoptionent).

make
,

worse.

agir,
t.,

(et. L. agere), to act.

adoration, n.
(Klpi-atiop,

(et. L.

adorationcm),

agitation,
trouble.

n.

f., (et.

agiter), agitation,

VoCABULABY.
agiter, v.
tato;
., (et.

115
n. t., (et. allier), alliance.

L. (ritare), to

aji-

alliance,
allier,
to
lii;|,t.

*'(i//j7cr,

to be a^'itated, to be work-

v. a., (et.

L. alliKare), to ally.

agonie,

n. f., (et.

Gr. 'ayiuvia), ajfony,

allumer,
catch
flre.

v. a., (et. L. L.
;

adluminare),

(leuih btniu'Kle.

to klndle

g'allumer, to light. to *

agrandir, v. a., (et. , ffrand), eiilarKu, to incieaso, to aiijjinent.


agriculture,
a;,'iiouItuie.
n. f., (et.

to

tnei],

alors, adv., (et. L. ad, illam, at that tiiue.


,

horamX

agor, colre),

L, altemuH), alteniaie, alternative, reciprocal, correa(et.

alternatif, ive, adj

ai> iHt, Bing. prs. Ind. o( avoir.

iwiidiiig.

aide. n. f., (et aider, from L. aiijutare), aid help d l'aide de, by the help ot.
;

alternative,

n.
t.,

f.,

altemation.
L.

amande,

n.

(et.

amygdahnn),

aient. 3rd, plu. pies. eub. of avuir.

aliiiodd, kernel.

aigrir,

v. a., (et. ajre,

from
L.

L. acrem),

te sour, to inccnse, to exagtrerate.

amant, n. m., (et, L. amantem), lover. ambassadeur, n. m., (et. ambnwade,


frnni L. aiiibaotus, a servant), ambassador.

aiguille,
needle.

n.

f.,

(et.

L.
is

acurla),

[In this
f., (et.

Word the n
(et.

soutided].

ambitieux, ouse,
osiLs;,

aile n.
whert..

adj., (et. L. ambitl-

L. ala), wiiig.
L. aliorsum), elaeL.

ambitioua.
n. f., (et.

ailleurs, adv.,

ambition,
ambition.

L.

ambitionem).

aimant,
load.st(j)ie,

m., inagnet.
n.

(et.

adamantem),
uiasr-

me. n. f., (et. amener, v. a.,


to take, to lead.

L. anima), goul, raind.


(et. d,

aimanter,
netize.

mener), to brinur.

v. a., (et.

aimant), to

amer,
v. a., (et. L.

re, adj., (et. L.


n.
f.,

aimer,
like
;

amarus), bitter,

amare), to love, to
ante,
natus),

grievou.s.

(itm-'r

mux,

to prefcr.

amertume,
ameuter,
ami,
n.

(et.

an, e, adj., (et. L. elde-t, flrst boni, eldur.

amaritudi-

neni), bii.tcniess, grief.


v. a., fet. d,

ainsi, adv., fet. L. i.i, si'), so, thu auixi q e, as well as ; ainni de, so with.' thus il) thu case of.
air, n. m., (et. L. aor), air.

meute, a pack of
amicus),
f riend
:

ho\nid), to Btir up, to urge on.

m.,
e.

(et.

L.

adj., friendly. adj., amicatile, kiiid.

amical,

(et.

L. L. amicalis).

aisance, n. f., (et. ni:<e, from L. L. a.sa: L. aiisa), weaith, competeiiL-e.


ais,
do.'
e, adJ., (et. aii'e-),

amiral,
admirai.

n.

m.,
f.,

(et.

Arabie,
L.

amir)

easy,

"well-to-

amiti,
ait, 3rd,
sinjir.

n.

(et,

L.

amidtatem),

prs. sub. of atwir.


n.
ii.,

fritindship, affection.

ajournement,
ajourner,
to imt,
of.

(et.

ajourner),

postpoKmiciit, delay.
v. a., (et , jour),

amonceler, v. a., heapj, to heap up.

(et. ,

monceau,

to adjourn,

amour, n. m., (et. L. amorem), love, amphithtre, n. m., (et L. amphltheatrum), amphithtre,

ajouter,
akl.

v. a., (et. L. L.

adjuxtare), to

an,
e,

11.

m.,

(et. L.

annu8), year.
(et.

alarmant,
alaniiiii','.

adj.,

(et.

alarmer). '

anarchie,
anarc:hy.

n.

f.,

Gr.

'avaoya). '*

alarme,
,

n.

f.,

(et.

It.

ail'

aniis) alann, fear.

anne, to

anctres,

n.

pi., (et

L. antecessor),

anceators, forefathers.

afarme), to alarm tuluniiei; to be alanned.


y. a., (et.

alarmer,

ancien, ne.
ancre,
'i.

adj.. (et. L. L. antianua).

anoicnt, o!d, former.

aliz, adj. (e^. O. F. venw ahzfs, tradu-flinds.


allait, 3rd,
siri}.'.

ails,

regular)

f.,

(et

L. ancora), anohor.

anantir,

v. a., (ot. d,

nant), to anni-

allgresse
ttlacris-i,

n.

f.,

imp. ind. of aller. (et alU re, from L.

hilt*, to prn.strate.

eheerfiilnesH.

ange, n. m., (et. L. angeliis), angel. angoisse, n. f., (et L. angustia),


anguinh.

fo.

aller, v. n., (et. j-robably L, adriare), to

animal,

n. m., (et. L. anim*I),

auimaL

....,,.,JHI

ne
animi
iivin'.

VoOABULARY.
e, adj-i (6t.
v. a., (et

animer), animated,
L. animare), to anl-

apparu, paat
apparurent,
apparatre.

part, of apparattrt.
3rd,
piu.

animer,

prt.

dof.

of

mati;, toencoui-agc, to excite.

anneaui
liiik.

n. m.,

(et L. anncllus), ring,


L. L.

appeler,
pall
;

v.

a.,

(et.

L.
;

appcllare), to

anne,
aiiiiiis),

n.

f., (et.

annata, (rom L.

s'appeler, to be eallrd to appeal to.

en appeler

d,

a year.
t
>

annoncer,
aniimmci!,
proiiiisi!
()f.

v, a., (et. L. aimuntiare), to indioatu, to (ort'tell, to ive

appendice, m. m., (et. appendix, appendajre.


applaudir,
v. a.,

L,

appendioem),

(et.

L. applaudere),

anse.

n. '.i (et. L.

ansa), creek, covo.

to ai)pland.

antenne.
yaul

'-,

(et. L.

antenna), latcen(et.

applaudissement,
di/), api)lau8e.

n.

m., (et applau-

antichambre,
anticipation.

n.

f.,

L.

ante,

ehtnn'rei, atite-chambcr.
.
f.,

apporter,
briniur,

v. a., (et.

L.

apportare), to

(et.

L. antlcipa-

to convey.

tioMeiii). anticipation.

antipathie,
antiputhy.

n.

t.,

(et.

'avrin0ei.a.),

apprcier, v. a., (et. L. appretiare), to value, to appreciate, to eaiiiuate, to flnd out.

antipodes,

n.

pi.,

(et.

L. antip-

apprhension,

n.

f., (et.

L. apprehen-

odes), antipodea.

aionem), appreliension, fear.


anto
(et.

antique,

adj., (et. L. antiquus),

apprendre,
learn.

tique, allaient.

ti(piit,\

antiquit, n. f., former times.


,

antiijuc),

an-

qui'lqii'un, to teach

v. a., (et L. approndere), apin-endre qfv.lque chone aom no BDinethintf ;

anxic!:,

n.

t.,

(et.

L. anxietatem),

(a 'prend, 3rd, sinj.:. prs, ; id. ; upreiid, 2nd, 8in)f. iiiiperative ; apprit, Srd, aing:. prt. def.

anxiun.
aot.
n.

m.,

(et. L. auguatiis),
if

August.
apaiser),

[Proriourice as

tiare),

apprivoiser, to tame

v. a., (et. L.
;

L. apprivi-

s'apprivoiser,

ou].

to grow

tame, familiar.
m.,
(et.

apaisement,
pacifying-,

n.

approche,
v. a., (et. ,

n. f.,

(et.

approcher), ap-

apaiser,
to quiet.

paix), to pacify,
O. F. apaner, to

proaoh.

apanage,

n.

m.,

(et.

nourii.h, from L. panl^), appanag-e, portion, inlieritance.

approcher, v. a., (et. L. appropiare), to brinjf near, to conie near as neuter verb with de, to draw near, to approach ; alao a.s reliexive with de in similaraenses.
;

apei'Cevoir.

v. a., (et. ,

percevoir, L.
;

approprier, v.a.,(et
adapt, to
fit.

L. appropriare),to

pereipere), to jjerceive, to discover percf'roir de, to notice.

s'a-

approvisionner,
ion), to siipply

v. a., (et.

, provis-

aplanir,
to
blIlOOtll.

v. a., (et. L. planus), to level,

with provisions.

apologue,
aptre,
apo-tif.
n.

n. m., (et. Gr.

arrcJoyo),

appui, n. m., (et. appuyer, from L. podium), prop, atay, support.


pre, adj.,
(et.

apoli^uOj taie.
m-,
(et.

L. aaper), harah.

L.

apoatolus),

apparaissait, Srd,
aj paraiire.

sing. imp. ind. cl

aprs, prep., (et , prs), after;M ad verb, after, afterwarda d'aprs, fol lowing, according to aprs que (conj.),
.

after, after that.


v. n., (et. L.

apparatre,
to
a|'|'e.ir.

appareacere),

arborer, v. a., (et. L. L. arborare, L. arbor), to erect, to hoiat


arbre,
n.

from
;

appareil,

n.

m.,

(et.

appareiller, from

m.
n.

(et.

L. arborem), tree
(et.

pa/ti). diaplay, outflt.

arbre fruit, fruit-tree.

apparence,
poaraiice.

". ',

(et.

apparent), ap-

arbuste,

m.,
n.

L.

arbuatiun),

en apparence, ajiparently. apparent, e, adj., (et. L. apparentem),

ahrub, sniall tree.

archevque,
archidiacre,

m., (ot L. archiepiaoom., (et Hybrid


Or.

apparent.

pus), archliishop.
v.

appartenir,

n.,

(et

L.

ad, pertl-

n.

nero), to appertain, to belong.

'apx^i ^' diaeouua),

archdeacon.

VoCABtJLARY.
robpel,
litre.
t,

117

n. m., (et.

It.

archlpelagro),

aruhipuU^;|).

asservir, y- , (et. L. aMcrvire), to BUbJcct, to enslave, to subdue.

de(.

of

ardent,
ardeur,
fer

e,

adj.,

(et.

L.

ardentemX
ardor,

asservissement,
enslavenient.

n, tn.,

(et asservir),

buriiiii)c, violent.

ellare), to

n. f., (et.

L.

ardorom)

assez, adv.,

(et.

L, ad, satint, ..nouj^h.


(et.

appeler

cm

y.
')

argenti
)cridioem),

i-t (et.

L. argontum),

il-

e. ad]., siiiuoiis, dilig'ent,

assidu,

L. assidiiua), as-

Ter, inoiiey,

assiger,
bewieu'e.

v. a., (et. L. L. as^edlare),

to

^rgile,
iplaudero),

". ', (et. L. nrjllla), clay.

armateur, n. m., (et. L. anuatorem), shipowner, owner or captain of a privateer.

assigner,
aasijfti,

v. a., (et.

L. asaignarc), to
L. assimilare), to
def. of

to appoint, to scttle.
v.

it

applau-

assimiler,
n.
f.,

(et.

arme.
ortare), to

(ot.

L.

arma), weapon

assiuMlato, to inake like.

armux, arms.

s'assirent.
(et.

3rd,

plu.

prt.

arme,

n.

f.,

armey, army

arme
assistanCdi n.
t.,

namili', tieet
refciare),
kte,

(et.

assister), assist-

to

armement,
ment,
out
;

n. m., (et,

arme), equlpfit

ance.

to flnd

outflt.
v. a., (et.

assister,

armer,
appreheniprondere),
e

arme), to ann, to
oneself.
I..

to

as.iist

n., (et. L. assistcre), assister A, to be prosent at.


v. a.

and

H'anner, to

ann
;

associer,
associ vte, to t e, to join.

v.

a.,
;

(et.

L.

assooiare), to

ehoe
;

eradicaro), to pull ont, to (Iraw arraehi'r , to siit<.'h from ; ^arracher to tear onesolf away from.

arracher,

y. a., (et.

group

s'aMocier, to associ-

loinethinif
;

assoupir, v. a., (et. L. ad, .sopire), to put to sleep ; i'ass nipir, to fall atileep, to
doze.

diiprendn, Snl, ngr.


apprivi-

arrter,

v. a., (et. L. ad,


:

arrest, to stop

restare), to 'ariter, to stop.

assouplir,

v.

a.,

(et.

toupie),

to

[i, ,

to grow
ap-

arrire, adv., (et. L. ad, rtro), bohind, back en arrire de, in the hinder part of, in the stem of.
;

maUe
sive.

siipple, to

bcnd, to

make

subinis-

arrive,
arriver,

n.

t., (et.

arriver), arrivai,

assujettir,
to coiiquer.

v. a., (et. sujet),

tosubdue,

v. n.,

(et.

L. ad, ripam), to

(icher),

arrive, to iiappen to,

assurance,
ance

n. f (et, assurer), assur-

n'iiliiioiice

pproplare),
;

sirrondir. v. a., fet. rond, from L. rotunilus), to round, to round off.


art. 1ni,, (et. L.

assurer,

v. a., (et. , xr), to asure, lo


\t is

a^ neutcr
;

artem), art
arti^iano), arti-

approach

attirm, to oiiibolden ; on asKuri'., s'anmtr^r, to a-ssure oneself.

said

ilar senss.

turtisan,

n.

m.,

(et. It.

astre,

n.

m.,

(et. L. a.stnim). star.

san, niechanic.

'opriare),to

astrologie,
(et.

n-

(et.

Qr. a<TTpo\oyia),

arttstement, adv.,
It.

artiste, artistai, urtistically, skilfully.

from

astrology.

, provig-

aa. 2nd, sing. preo. ind. of avoir.

froai L.

asiatique, adj., Asiatlc. asile, u. ui (et. L. asylum), asyluin,


shelter.

astrologique, adJ., astrolocrk-al. astronnniia), astronomie, n. f., (et


I...

asf.ro nom y.

astucieusement, adverb, cunningly,


craftily.

rsh.

after;

m., (et. L. aspectus), aspect, sight, look, appoarance. [Pronounce as if

aspect,

ti.

astucieux euse,
cr.ifts-,

adJ., (et, L. astucia),

ounninj,'.

aprs, fol

asp. ]

ue

(conj.),

aspiration,
in;,',

n.

f.,

(et.

aspirer), inhal-

siiiall piei'e of

atelier. ". m., (et. L. L hastella, a wood), wovk'iO!).


a*lj., (et.

rare,

from
;

aspiration.
v. a.,

athltique
(et. L.

atUlbu. from Or.


(et.

aspirer,

aspirare), to in-

'aKr\Tr\<;\. atll'ctic.

em), tree

hale, to aspire to.

attachement.
(et.

"

m.,

cUlacher),

rbiistiim),

assaillir. \'. a., aaHaiilt, to attack.

L. ad, salire), to

attachnient, affection.

roliieplsoo-

assassin, from Aral). Iiashiijh, an intoxicating drink), to

assassiner,

v. a., (et.

assassinate.

attacher, v. a (et. ad, and a Teutonio Pomparu Kng-. tack), to tie, n'attacher, to attacb to bind, to att4U3h onesolf, to clif.jf, to keep close.
,

ra'lic;il, tac.

asseoir, brid
:

v. a., (et. L. assidere),


;

to set,

attaquer,

v,

a (et Picardian (orm

ot

Or.

to set

down

t'cuseoir, to ait

down.

attacher), to attack.

m
atteindre,
oTvi)

"VOCABULART.
auprs de. prep., t. au, pri), near, by, with, alongside of.
auquel,
whicli, fur
pro.,

v. a. and n., (et. L. attlni;atteindre , to to ri^ach, to uttuin. roaoh ; altrvinit, Sril, slng, prt. def. atteint, past part
;

maa. slng., to whom, to


etc.

attendrei

v.

a.

and
wait

n., (et.

L. atten-

whom,

dure), to walt.

to

(or,

to expect.

aurait, Snl,

h n^f.

prs con. of avoir.

attendre

to expert.
v. a., (t. <#idrc),
;

attendrir,

to inovo, to affoot
teridor, to tnelt.

to aoften, 'attfndrir, to k^ow

auras, 2nd, sing. (ut. ind. of aooir. aurore, n. (., (et. L. aurora), Aurora,
niorriing.

attente,
hopu.

"

aussi, adv.,
(e*.

(et.

'-i

attendre), waitlnK,

l'Uuwisi:

auiiii

bien
qin',

ang^i Ion .tnni'g


diately

L. aliud, sic), aliso, too, que, as well as j as lon;.r a,

attentif, ive. adj (et. L. altontivus), atturaiMi, full uf uttciitioii.

aussitt, adv., (et


;

atmi,

ll),

imm*-

aunsitdt que, as smou as.


adv., (et. L. aliud, tantum), as

attention,

". t.. (et.

L. attentionem),

autant,

attuiitioii, care.

atterrage, n.m.,
;.:..'

(et. , terre), landinar.


(et.

attester,
I

v.

a.,

L.

attentari)

to

nmcli, so niueh, as niany, so many; aillant q e, a tnuuh as, dm well ao aillant de (with a noiin), ati uiucb, as
;

attest, 10 certify, to prove.

many,
to attracA,

etc.
,

attirer, v.

a., (et. , tirer),

to

alliiro.

auteur, n. m (et. L. autoren?), author. autorisation, n. (., (et. autorier),


aiithiirization.

attitude,
titude.

n.

f.,

(ut.

It.

attitudine), at-

autoriser,
n.
f.,

v. a., (et.

L. L, auctorlnare), L.

attraction,
attrait,
n.

(et. L. attractionein),

to aiitliorue, to

cmpowcr.
f.,

attraction, charin.
attractus), allurement, attraction, charni.

autorit,

n.

(et.

auctoritatom

m.,

et. L.

autliority, power.

attribuer, v. a., (et. L. attribu'^re), to attribute, to aseribe, to allot, to graiit, to confor.


attrister,
v. i., (et. L.

de, around, about.


ottier

autour

prep.,

(et.

au,

tour),

ad, tristla), to

l'iiutri',

autre, adj. and pro., (et. L, alter), l'en ftt'ftrfi, one anothcr l'un et both l'un ou l'autre, either ni
;

makc
etc.

sail,

to tjricvo.
of

l'un ni l'autre, neither.

au, contraction

(et.

le,

to the, at tho,

autrefois, adv., (et. autre, fait), ttnierly, in former times.

aubpine,
hawthorn.

n.

f.,

L. alba, spina),
aliquls, unus), (with ne), no, no

autrement,
aux, rhiral
auxiliare,
iliariH),

adv., otherwlso

of au.

aucun, e, adj., (et. any sonio, some one


one, net any.

L.
;

adj.

and noun,

(et. L.

aux-

wuxiliary.
lilural of

auxquels,

auquel.

audace, n. f., let. L. audauiu), audacity, boUlML'ss. assurance.


if

a'/aient, 3id, plu. imp. ind. of avoir.

audacieusementi
suinptuonsly.

fidv.,

lioldiy,

pre-

avait, 3rd, sing.

inip. ind. o( aviir.


;

avancer), advance d'avance, beforehand.

avance,

"

f-,

(et.

audacieux, euse
auilaeious, bold,

kJj

(et.

audace),
s'avtncer, our.
;

ilurili;^'.
,

avancer,
above, over.
in

avant), to advance; to advance ; avance, jutting


v. a., (et.

au-desBUB de, P'cp

au-devant
audience,
audience,

de,
n.
f.,

prei.,

front of

alitr aii-(li-ranl de, to


liearinj,'.

go to
L.

nieet.

(et.

audientia),

(et. L. ab, ante), before avant, forward, ahead avant de, avant quc^couj.), before, (prep.), before
;

avant, adv.,
;

e,i

before that.
L. auditorium),

auditoire,
audience.

n- ni., (et.

augure,

n.

m.,

(et.

avant-garde, n. (., eanguard, van. avant-poste, n. m., out post.


avarice,
av arice.
n(>

augurium),
au, jour,
cF,

(et.

avare, L. avarus),

augury, oinen.

aujourd'hui,
hni,
t'roiii

dv.,

(t.

avec, prep.,

(et.

L. apud, hoc), Ith.


d, venir), tnture.
(et.

L. hodie), to-d;vy.

avenir,

ni., (et.

auparavant, adv,, (et. au, par, avant),


before formeriy.

aventure,
ture.

n.

(.,

avenir), adven-

VOOABULARY.
aventnreux, etue, adj., (t aotuiur),
dvfiitiiroii!).

119

bassin,

m.ui
n. m., (t.

n. m., (et L. L. bohlnon, Coliio bac, a hollow), basin.

avonturieri
Ten tarer.

aventure), ad-

bataille, n. t., (et. batalla, oouimon Latin for pu>rna), battle.

avrer>
prove.

'' (et.

I<.

L. adverare), to

btiment,
bip.
btir, tnict.

m.,

(et. btir),

building,

avertir,

v.

a.,

(et.

warii, tu inforii) ol,

L. advertere), to to viiiiunish.

V. m., (et. T),

to bulld, to con-

aveUi n. m., (et. ai'oner, aiid votier), coiifcH.iion, acknowlc<iifinfjiit.

bton,

n.

m.,

(et. 7), stick.


,

aveugle,
bliiKl.

adj.,

(ut.

L.

ab,

oculus),

beau, belle, adl (et *i. bollus), fine, beuutifui, liuppy, fortunato.

beaucoup,
adj.,
(et.

adv.,

(et.

beau,

coup),

avide,
(frcLily.

L.
(t.

aviduH),
L.

eager,

niuch

beaucoup

de, niiioli, niany.

avidit,
((ri'CdiiieiiH,

n.

f.,

avlditatom),
vlsutti),

covctouMuess.
(et. , vi,

avis. n. m.,
tiOD.

from L

ml vice, counsel, opinion, notice, iiiforuia-

beau-frre, n m., brother-in-Ia. beau-pre, . m., fathur-In-law. beaut, n. t., (et. L. belHtateni), beauty.

avoir,
fret
;

viii'/t

v. a. (et. L. haberc), to hve, to axnnr lifu, to take place ; avoir ans, to be twenty yeiirs old.
,

belle-mre. n. f., motber-in-law. bnir, v. a., (et. L. bonedlcere), to


bls.", to

consecrate.
(et.

besoin, n. m.,

toin), need,

want;

avril, n.

in., 'et.

L. aprilis), Aprll.

au

beiKin de, in case of need.


n.

ayant,
azur,
lazuli),

prs. part. o( avoir.

btail,
cattle.

m.,

(et.

L.

L.

bestiali),

II. m., (et. L. L. lazur, the lapis azur.

bible, n.

f., (et.

L. blblia), Bible.

b, n.

m.
n.
t.
,

bagne,
baie,
bat)i(!,

m.,

(et. It

bap:no), prison,

biblique, ad]., (et. bible), biblical. (et. L. bene\ well, very, bien, adv nnich biiui du lemp, niuch time; bien
,
;

n.

(et. L. L. baia), bu.y.

baigner,
baiser,

v. a.,

(et.

I<.

balncare). to

que, thou^h property.


benefactor.

bieii,

n. m.,

good

bietu,

to wash.
v. a., (et. L. basiare),

bienfaiteur,
to
1<188.

n.

m.,

(et.

bien, /aire),
L. tostus),

balbutiement,
L. balbutire),

n- m-, &tainmerin^.

(et,

halhulier,
t

[Pronounce

bientt, adv., sbortly, soon.

(et.

bien,
f,,

tt,

iike

].

bienveillance,
n.

n.

(et bienveillant),
V!

balcon,
COII.V.

m.,

(et.

It.

balcone), bal-

goodwill, kiiidncss.

bienveillant,
n. f., (et. L. balaena),
v.
a.,

e, adj., (et. bien,

vmii-

baleine,
balla^ to

whale.

tant, obsoli'to participle friendly, kindly.

of

vouloir),

ballotter,
toi^s

(et.

balte,

O. H. G,

M
'

about.
f.,

bijou,
brav

n.

m.,

(et. 7),

j^wel.

banane,
banana.

n.

(et.

Spani^h, banana),
L.

bizarre,
e), otid,

adj.,

(t.

Spanish
(et.

bizarro,
ii.

atrange.
adj.,

baptiser,
baptizc.
baiu.<),

v. a., (et.

baptizare), to
L. bar;

blanc,

anche,

o.

blanch), white.

[/( is sileiit].

barbare,
bari.an.

ndj.

and noun,
savage,

blanchir,
blasphemy.

v. a., (et. n.

blanc), to wbiten.
(et.

(et.

barbarous,

cruel

bar-

blasphme,
blasphmer,
bleu,
bloc,

m.,

blaiphiWner),

i,

^an.

barbarie, n. f., (et. L. barbarus), barbarisin, barbarity.

v.

a.,

(et

L.

blasphe-

mare), to bla.spheine.
e, iidj., (et.

barque,
a va rus),
beat, bip.

n.

f.,

(et.

L.

barca),

bark,

p. H. G. blaoX blue.

n.

barre,

n.

f.,

(et.

L.

L.

barra,

from

m., (et. 0. H. O. bloc), block,


e, adj.,

soliil niass.

Celtic), bar.

blond,
baiTire, n. f., (et. barre), barrier. bas. pe. adj., (et. L. L. bassus), low
n
/'.s.
;

et

),

fair, liifht

bois. grove.

n.

m.,

(et.

L. L. L.

boscum), wood,
lus),

bolov/, undeniiost.
n.

baS-fQnd,

m., bhallow water,

bon, ne. adj., (et. bonne h^ari-^ early.

bo

gctod

de

h'\

120
bondir,
tnake n
v. n.,

VOOAUULABT.
(l L. L. bombltare, to to bouiid, to frlnk, to capor.

brumtt.

n. f (t.
aoj.,

brutn>, mlat, tog.

iioiH),

brun,
bruwu.

e,

(t.

o. u.

o. bran),

bonheur,

n. m., (et. L.

bonnm, augur-

tuiii), liai)pliiuM8,

gw)(X fortune.

bont. " '! (t. L. boiiitatem), RroodneHH, kindiieu.


Netherland boni), bord de, on board bord bord, alon^'Hide. bordage. n. m., (et. bord), boarding, plankln^, bulwark.s (o( a bip).
bord, n. m., (et. eil^e, coast, giiore ;
;

but, n, m., (et doublet of bout), alm, obJiHjt, goal, deNtination, deiitirn au tmi de, at tlie ftiiniment of. |.Manv pcrNoiia alwayspronounif'the final t of but; 80016 t)ronounco it at ibe end of a phraNe and )efore vowelB wliile Littr Nuys that It ahuuldbe pronounued ouly before voweU].
; ;

Oi n.

m.

borde. . (., (et. bord), tnck, tncking. borne, n. f (et. L. L. bodlna), boiind,
bouiulary, limit, milestone, enclosiire.

, adv., (et. L. ecco-hi^), hre; f l, hero and thore.

et

borner, v. a., (et. borne), to boxind, to limit; ne bdmer, to reutrain oneseK, to conHne onesolf.
boue, n.
buoy.
t.,

cabane,
cble,
cable.
>)

n.

f,, (et.

L. L.

capanna), cabin,

but, cui.iage.

m*,

(t. L. L.

oaplum, acord),
eher), hidden,

(t L.

[j.

boja,

fettcr),

cach,
uniicmi,

01

adj.,

(et.

boleversement' n

bouie, a bail, aiul fusion, conoteiiiution.

">.. (ot. htmlevemer, cfriier), (ilHordor, con-

cacher, v. ., (et. L. cnaotare, to prem to ponceal, to hitle ; ne cacher, to bide oncHclf, not to be seen.
tO!,'i;tlir),

bourreaa.
executioiier.

n.

m.,

(et. ?),

hanginan,

cachot,
dungeoii.

11.

m.,

(et.

cacher),

prison,

bourse,
box),

n.

t., (et.

L. byrsa), jmrae.

boussole,

n.

f.,

(et. It.

bosolo, a snioll

cacique,

n.

m., ohief, chieftain.


n.

iiittriner'B i'0inpa(;8.

cadavre,
corp8(!.

m.,
(et.
f-,

(et.

L.

cadaver),

biuter, whlch once mcaiit to push, huDce haut nuniiiH that part of a body which puahes llrat), end.

bout.

n. n.,

(<;t.

caisse,
calaniity.

n.

f.,

L. eapRa), case, box.


(et. L.

calamit,
calciner,

n-

calamitatem),
to cal-

bouton,
ton.

n. m., (et. bouter),

bud,

b'ii-

v. a., (et. L. calcena),

bracelet, n. m., (et. L. L. brachile, frcni Ij. braihium), bracelet.

cine, to Ijake.

branche,
bras.
n.

n.

f.,

(et. ?),

branch.

calcul, n. m., (et. L. caloulus), calculation, reckoning,

m.,
n.

(et.

L.

brailiimn), arm.
braihia), fathom.

calculateur, trioe,
ealculatin^'.

dj., (et. calcul),

brasse,

f.,

(et. L.

braver, v. a., (et. brave), to brave, to defy, to ^ot at liefiaiice.


brviaire, " ni., (et. L. breviarium), breviaiy, prayer-book.

calculer,
to reckoii.
cale,
8hi|>).

v. a.,

(et ea 2cuO, tocaloulate,


Jt.

n.

f.,

(et.

o.da),

hold

(of

brisant,

n. m., (et. briser),


(et.

breaker.

calme.
calni
;

<ulj.,

(et.

calme,

n.

It. calma, a cahn), m., calm. calinness.

Eng. breozo), breeze. briser, v. a (et. O H. G. hristan, to burst), to break, to l)ruise, to break down,
brise, n.t.,
,

calomniateur, trice,

adj., (et. calom-

nie), caluniniator, lanUerer.

to idjiiro

se briner, to break.
(et.

brod,

e, adj.,

broder, doublet of

border), cn.broidered.

calomnie, " ^> (et. L. calumida), calunmy, alandcr. camarade, n. m., (et. L. camra), cornrade, oonipanion.

bronze,
br.iss
;

n. m., (et. It. bronzo), bronze,

gun.
e, ndj., (et. bronzer),

campement,
camp, houx
L.

n. m., (et. camper, froai campus), encampmeiit.

bronz,
Bun-burnt.

bronzed,

canal,
chaiiiiol.

" m., (et.

L. canals), canal

m., (et. doubtful, perhaps L. bruit, ruifire), noise, lame, Sound.


n.

candeur, n. dor, fiankne8s.


candide,
frank.

f.,

(et. L.

candorem), can

brlant,
8cor'
lihiij;.

e. adj., (et. brler),


(et, L. L.
;

burnlng,

adj., (et. L, oandidus), candid,

brler, v. a., bijrii, to acorch

perustulare), to brler de, to lonff to.

canon, a. m., (et. canne, L. canna), caunon ; coup de canon, cannon-8bot.

VoOAnULART.
im), miat, tog.

121
;

ranott
b<'iit.

>*

"n.,

(et, ),

onnno,

Kliip'a

U. O.
;

brii),

(tubjcet), tliat which, whal Jaot), that which, tvhat.

qu (ob-

86 cantonner,
of bout), atm,
;

v.

t.,

(i-t.

ninhni), to
I

oe cet. cette
ec<;ii luit'),

(Oitlt.V oiit'Uflf.

ttim,

IohIki)
t
>(

au but
cap. n.
laiid.
Ul., (et.

heval-ei,

thiH

I.Manv persoiis
of hut ; some u phraxe ami NuyM that It belore voweUi].

L. cai ut), ca|H>, hiad-

hu riui

adJ . (et. L ces. du (hai, tiiiiw, tli"e ee ctt elicval l, thut ;

tiofHe.

capable,
aille.

ad].,

(et.

ceci, pro., (ot. on,

ici),

thia.

laiMMIla), cap
8i>airmh

;r

cder, y a. and >ieM, to Hul)inlt.


cdre,
n.

n., (ut.

L. oedere), to

caparaonner,
(Ui>ui'u>:<iii).

a.,

(t.

m., (et. L. reiirUMi, cedar.


n.

to caparlMui) 'a (n'ine).


n.

ceinture,
giidle, belt.

L,
e,

(et.

L.

cinctura),

^c),

hre

et

capitaine,
tr.in
T..

m.,

(et. L, L.

capltanuua,

('apiit), oaptalii.
II. t.,

7a)<anna), uabin,

capitale,
cit.v.

(ut.

I.

la.dtalls) ch'of

cela pro., (et. clbre. adJ.,


bratoil, tainouH.

l\ that.
colclirem), celL. celebrare), to

(et. L.

Dapluin, a eord),

caprice,
ciprico,

n.

m.,
adj.,

(et.

U.

rapiiccio),

clbrer,
Celclirato.

v. a., (et

whim.
Ive.
(et.

Mhir), hidden,
lactara, to ne cacher, hiile
;

captif,
captive.

L.

capihus),

cleste. adJ.,
celle,
fi

(et.

caeleatia), celeatial.
;

tu

ifi)f.

of Ofiia

ahe, her.

pren

captivit
car.
'iiij
,

" ', (et- eniiti/). ciiptivity.


(et. L. qiiun.'
,

cellule
celui.
.

n. f., (et. L. celliila), cell.

st'On.

for, bi-'iuuce.

i>ro

et

L. occe-illi huio), he,


;

cacha-),
chieftain.
l.

prison,

caractre,

n. ni.,

(t.

L.

charactei),

him cel i-ct, thi;i the lattcr that, the former, ihat one.
cnacle,
n.

celui-l,

oliurac u;r, clittiacterintic.

L.

cadavar),
case, box.

caravelle. . f., (et S' aniah cara\ella, t lur^u >l(>op>, t'Aiavul, hip.

m.,

(t.

wlu ru ihu Last reiiniun.

Supper waaeaten;
et
L.

L. caenanulum), socitly,

carueur.
&),

n.

m.,
m.,

(et.

carde,
L.

(roni L.

cendre,

n. t.,
(et.

dnerem), auhea,
c^nt),

ardmin), i-urdor.

b oalainitatem),

cardinal,
cardinul.

(et.

cardinulla),

cent' adJ.,

L. centum), hundrcd.
(et.

centaine,
(et.

n. f.,

hundred

Une ceniauf, abuut a hundred


, nlj.,

calcem), to cal
loulu8), calcuij.,

caressant.
Miiii^, ),'eMile.

caresser), car-

centre,

n.

m., (et. L. centrum), contre.

caresser, v. a., ^ct. careii>nf, l^. L. Mrii.ia, L. cunis), to care8-<, to be kiiid to.
to

cep, n. m., (et. L. cipput), vine atock. (l'fonounce the p],

(et.

calcul),

Oargaer. v. a. (et. doublet clow up (the huIIh).


,

of char er),
ll(

cependant,
jit}iilaiit\

ndv. and conj.,

(et.

ce,
3'et,

lueanwhile, neverthel'.as,
n. m., (et L. nounce u as If

ul),

to caloulate,

carnage
Ironi

n.

cariiuiii),

m., let. L. L. carnatlcum, carnage, slan^hti^r.


(et.

wovor.

cercueil,
colliii.

8arcopl.,t){Uhj,
it

ll'r

were

ni).

la),

hold

(of

carr,
iqtiart'.

e,

adj.,

L.

quw'ratus),

crmonie,
ceroiiiouy.

u.

(., (ec.

L. cacrtn.onia),
L.

cnlina,

a cahn),

OGJ^te

>>

t'i

(at. T),

map, hart.
.

certain,
tain, bure.

9% adj., (et.

certua), cer-

caliniiess.

cas.
hut.

II.

'H-, (et. L. asiis), case.


f,, (et.

udj., (et. calnmler.

case. n.

L. caaa), houue, cottage,


f.,

certifier,
to coitii.\
.

v. a., (et u. L. certiflcare), to teatify, to attest,

caluiniila), cal-

cataracte,

n.

(et.

L.

cataracta),

certitude,
certaiiity.

n.

f-.

(et

L.

certitudo),

walertall, .ataract.
L.

camra), coui

cathdrale,
lecelt'Bia]
),

n. f.,

(et L. cathcdralla

cutliedral.
f.,

cesse, n. t., (et. cesser), (.'ca.'-ing'. cesser, v. n., (et. L. ceusare), to


to
tiiii.Hh.

eeaa),

t.

camper,

froni

cause,
cau.ie
lie,

n.

(et.

L. cuiitsa),
ot, l.jr

;n<!a'nipnieiit.

on account
*
.

cause the saKe of


;

ceux. maa.

plu. of

e/.lui,

eaimlia), canal

causer,
sa\ alcade.

a., (et. c(ii<-<;,

to cause.
It.

chacun,
every
<.>iie.

(et. L.

quiaque anua),
chain,

cavalcade,
jandorem), eau
iididus), candid,

n.

f.,

(et.

tavaloata),

chane,
fctters.
n.

n.

f.,

(et.

L. catena),

m., (et. It. cavalire), horfeiiian, rider, cawiliynian.

cavalier,
ce.

chaleur,

n. f.,

et.

L. calorem), beat,

une,

L.

ua'iiiay,

that,

it,
it;

pronoun, (et. L. fccc-hno), he, they c'eut, it U, tiu \a


;

wanuth
this.
;

urdor.
n.
f.,

c\nt

chaloupe,
bbip
ii

(et

It.

acialupp),

jauiion-sJiof..

noW.

if

we

c<:

sont, they aie

ce-

uut

boai, lonj^-boftt)

123
chambre,
n.
t.,

VOCABULABY,
(rt.

L. camra), eham(Icld.

chev^horise
;

n.

m.,

(et.

L.

L.
ridt

bri', njnirtinciit,

ibin.

t.toiilcr

cheval, to
adj.,

cahallus), on horue-

champ,
totter, to

n.

m., (et L. campus),


to be tiiisteady.
n. m,,
(et.

back.
to

chanceler,

wm or,

v, n., (et. L. rance'laie),

chevaleresque,
chivalrcuH.

(et.

cheiulier),

changement,
chan)re.

chanjer),

chevalerie,
nlry.

n. f., (et. chevalier), chlv-

changer,

v. a.

and

n., (et. L.

L.

canw

chevalier, n.m., (et L. L. caballarius),


knight.
hair.

biaro), to ohaitfre ; cfin7i rr contre, to i'xchanjfe (or ; chanifr le. to chfi')2;e ; se ctiaiiiier, to chantre, to be Lbanjroij.

chevelure, n. f., (et head of hair.


chevet,
n.

L. L. capillatura),

chant,

n.

m.,
v. a.

(et.

L. cantus), singlng,
of
n., (et. L.

m., (et chef), pillow, head

^'W

80ny^.

the bi d.

chanter,
to
siti;,'.

and

cantare),

cheveu,
les

n. m., (et L. capillus), a hair cheveux, the hair.

chaos.
confusion.
silont).

'<

m., (et. L. chaos), chaos, [Pronouiice ch like & ; > is


adj.. (et. L.

chien,

n. m., (et. L. can3ni), dog.


(et.

chiffre, n. m.,
chijfres, initiais,

Arabie

sifr),

figure

nionourain.
f.,

cbaqae.
every.

quisque), ech,

chimpre.

n.

(et L. chimaera), chl-

me;a, idlu fancy.


'

charge,
office,

f.,

(et

charger),

charge,

chimrique,
nieiica!, fanciful.

adj., (et chitnre), ohi-

api>ointnifnt.
v.

charger,
froni
L.

a.,

(et.

L.

L.

carricare,

wei^h dowii,
with sume.
;

carni"), to charfre, to le: to to conmiissic n, to inist se charijtr, to undtitake. to as-

tast(j),

choisir, v. a., (et. Gothic, kausjan, to to choose se choisir, to choose


,

for oneself.

(et choisir), choice, opchoix, tion, liborty of choosinif.


n. m.,

charitablement,
oharitably

adv., (et charit'-Me),

chose,
fair.

n.

f.,

(et.

L. cau8a\ thing, afadj., (et L.

charmant,
charmer,
nien), to
c

e,

adj.,

(et.

charmer),

charminjT, delightful.

chrtien, ne

noun and

a , (et. charme, L. carhanu, to encliant.


v. n.
f.,

chiis(innus), Christian. afttr like in],


teiii),

[Pronounce en

charmille,
chasse,
hurninii,''.

(et.

L,

carpinus),

chrtient, n. f (et L. christianitaChistendom.


(a.

hedffu of yok''elm trees.


n.
f.,

(et.

chasser),

hunt,

n. m., christianisme XpiCTTiavitr/ao), Christ ianity.

Grcek

ciel. n. m., plu. cieux, (et


v. a., (et.

coeluni\

chasser,

hunt, to ehase, to

dnve
m.,

L. L. captiare), to out.
(et.

heaven, sky.
n. f., (et L. L. cynia, a uummit), top, aiininiit, ridjre, mountain ranife.

cime,

chtiment,
casti^'nre),
<

n.

chtier,

L.

hastii^enient, punishnient.
adj., et. L. calidus),
;

cimenter,
caein(-iiti.rn),
il

v. a.,

et.

ciment, from L.

chaud, e
ardent,
fait

wami,

tocennnt.

eaictr
it

chaud,
n.
f..

n.

hcat;

chaud,

iswarm.
(et.

cimetire, n m., (et. h. coemeterium), eeniotery, burial-^'ioui.d.


cingler, v. Scandinavicn
n., (er.

chaussure,
chef, n.
leader.
(.,

chausser,

L.

ealcoari;', elothin^r for


(et.

the

feet.

F. sinpler, froni

sigla, to sail), fo sail.

L. caput), chief, head,


^et.

cinquante,
fifty.

adj., (et L.

quinquapinta),
flfty-seventh.
L. circumferL.

chemin,
wuy, road
;

m-, cheviin
.

L.

L.

caminus),

de. ler,

railway.
,

cinquante-septime,
circonfrence,
fciitia),

cher re.

adj., (et. L.

carus

dcar.

n.

f.,

(et.

chercher, v. a., (et. L. cinnrc), to etek, to look for, to 8' arcb ; chercher , to try to, to e-idea><.r to cnviyer chercher, to end for aller chercher, to ao for, to fetch, to go to.
; ;

circi.niferencc.
n.
f.,

circonstance,
etantia
,

(et.

circum-

emimstaiiee.
,

chrir, v. a,, (c*. cher), to cherish, to l^ve dearly ohri, cherished, beloNcd,
;

oirconstantier. y ti. {tt circontf.ivee), to cirwn^Miiniiate, to dttiill circvnstanc', circunistantial, detaiicd.


;

circulant.

6.

^j.> circulation.

VoCABULARt.
L. cahallus), ride on horse-

123
n. f,

circuler,
circ'itlatu.

v. n.,

(et.

L.

circuHrl), to

colonne,

unm,
f..

(et L. oolumna), !

iiody.

cire.
et.

II.

(et. L. cera),

wax.

ckeiulier),

ciseler,
citailt;!.

v. a., (et.

cwi/), to carve.
(et.
It.

color, e, adj., (part, of eclorer), coloreu, riiiidy.


Cirlorer, v. a., (et. L. colorare), tocolor.

citadelle,
evalr), chiv-

n.

t.,

cittadella),

citation,
quotfr,ioii.

n.

f.,

(et.

citer),

citation,
city.

colorier,
coloiito),
t(j

v. a.,

(et.

eolorin,

from It

color.
n.ni., (et. cninhattre). conilmt,
sliiiin

(.

caballariuB),

cit, n.

f.,

(et. L. civitatein)

combat,

n-ht, battle; combat simul,

>.

capillatura),

citer, V. a., (et. L. citarc), to cite, to mention, to iiaiiie, to quote.

Hght

combattre,
tiir

v. a.,

(et.

cm-,

battre), lo

t,

to uuiiihat.
n. m., he'aht;
(et.

citoyen, ". m.,


pillow, heod
citizen.

(et.

L. L.

civitadanu8\

comble,
suinniit,

au
(et.

L. cunmlnai, top, c^nnble de, at tlic

civilisateur,
illus),

a har

Cet. cioil, fr iser.

adj., L. dviiis), cialising. civil-

trie,

noun and

neight

of.
v. a.,

combler,
heap, to
tilt,

L. cumnlare),

to

to load.
ri.m., (et.

!!U), fiog.

civilisation,
tion.
;

n.

t.,

(et. civil), civilisa

commandant,
oominander.
er), coiiniiand,

commander),

sifr),

figure

civilis, e, adj., civilised.


limaera), chi-

commandement,
to civilise.

civiliser,

v, a., (et. civil),

n.m.,(et. cvmmatidinamJate, power.


L.

clairire,

".

f.,

(et.

(?>,

from

L.

commander, v.a., (et.


comme,
qnouKHio).
adv., prep.
as, like,

commandare)
conj., (et

Mmre), chikausjan, to to choose


choice, op-

clarus), (iperiitij;

iii

a wood,
(et.

jjlaile.

to coniniand, to order, to as
if,

rtvlo.

clameur,
clanior.
,

n.

f.,

L.

rlamorcm),

and

ir,

clart,
nc8s.
clef, n.

n. f., (et. L.

licrlit,

clar'tatcm), cleargplendor, brightness.


(et. L.

commencement,
cer), conuiienctiuent,

a- m., (et.

commencum.

beginning.

I,

f.,

clavis),

K
8a\ thhig,
aij-,
ftf.

key.

IThe

silentj,

commencer,

v., a.

and

n., (et. L.

Initiare;, to coinnienre, to begiri.

clerg,
clerjjry.

n.

m.,

(et.

L.
L,

clerjcalus),

comment,

how, why, what.

adv., (et. L, quoiuodo, inde).

(et.

L.

climat,
chniate.

n.

m.,

(et.

L.

clnatem).

'roiiounce en
christianita-

commerce, n.m.,(et. L. commcrcium) coniniercc, trade, business.

m., (et. L. clau.strunO, clotre, oloister, oonvent, monastery.


n.

commercer,
trade, 10 tratfic.

v.n.,

(et.

cmnmerce), to "

(<-t.

Orcek

d. , fromL. claviie) to nail, to fasten, to contino.

clouer,

V. a., (et.

commercial,
conimurcial.

e, adj., (et.

cmnmerce)

t.

coeIuin\

m., (et. Portuiruese ci^eo, originallr, head or skull), cocoa, cocoa-mit.

coco.

n.

commissaire, n. m., (et, cmmetlre, from I, ouininittore;, oonmiissioiior.

cur,
a,

n.

a Mummit),
raiiife.

age,

affection,

eut,

from

L.

brave man, kind-liuarted nian. coin, n. m., (et. L. cnnous), corner.


colre,
n. f.,
;

m., (t. L. cor), heart, cour\o\-q hnmwe de cur


; '

commun,

e.

adj.,

coinmon, teneral,

(et. L. usiial.

comuiuids),

communaut,
.

n. f., (et. L.

alita un), coinniunity.

L commu v

xtneterium),
injrler,

ra^e,

wrath

choiera), an<'er tre en colre, to be aiigry.'


(et.
?),

(et.

L.

communication,

n. f., (et.

iqu'r), cominctiication.

commun
commun

colibri,
froni
lo Bail.

n.

m.,

liuniming bird.

communiquer,
ieare), to

v. a., (et. L.

linquafinta),

coller, V, a., (et. colle, from Groek KjSAAa), to glue, to flx, to attach, to brinif " clone to.
collier,
colliir,
n.

eom compacte,

iitiicato,

to impart. L.

adj.,

(et.

compuctus),

compact.

m.,
''

(et. col,

from

L.

y-seventh.
'j.

ne klace.
<'^*-

coilum),

fircutnferL.

r.fr l^'P^i " COlIls), hill.

^-

=o"'"a.

dim. of

compagne, n. f., (et. L. L. companio, L. eiim-|.anis),fenialuconipanion,c nsort.

compagnon,
comparable,
parable.

n.m., (et. L.

L eompan-

cireum-

colon, n. m., (et. L. roionus), colonist colonie, n. f., (et. L. colon ia), colony.

ionenr, ciiipanion, oomriwle.


adj., (et.

(wn^ arer), com-

irconsiavee), rail ctrccM;

colonisation,
coloniser,
o oettte.

n.

f.,

(et.

c^,loniser),

comparer,
v. a., (et. colon), to

v. a., (et.

L.

comi aian).
L.

iled.
linjf,

colonise.

compare.

to

comparatre, v.a., (et

compar

124
edcere), to ppear 0n court), Srtl, Hiiip. prt. def.

VoCAIiLAtl^.
comparut,
L.

oonclnsion,
conclusion.

n.f., (et.

L &

ndunionCtn),

compassion,
Bioiieiiii,

n.

f.,

(et.

compasL.

se concorder,

v. r., (et. concorde,

trom

coni|>a8sion.
n-

contordia), to agre.

compatriote,
patriotus),
Diati.

m.,

(et.

L.

L.

com-

coiiipatriot,

fellow-country-

concourir, v. n., (et. L. concurrere), to coircur, to contribute, to co operate, to

work together.

compenser,
to

v. a., (et. L.

coiiipeii^ate,
for.

to

compensarc), counterbalance, to

make up

condamner, v. a., (et. L. condemnare), to condeiiiii, lo blaine, to adjudge. [l'ro nounce like m],

(et. L. comphocere), complaire, to (jlfase. ( Alwnyv folle iwed by \


v. n.,

condition,

n.

f.,

(et.

L.

conditiononi),

condition, State, offer.

complaifan^ment.adv.,

(et.

complai-

conduire, v. a (et. L. c.O"ducore), to conduct, to lead, fo take, to lu in;: cori


,
;

ant), coiiiphnsaiii.,\, obli;;ingly.

complet

e.

adj., (et.

L.

completus),

iluUirent. 3rd, plu. piet. def. comluiHez, 2nd, plu. prcH. ind. ; conduit, paet part.
;

conipitti-, fiitire, full.

conduite,

n. f., (et.

oonduire), conduct

compltement.
rely.

a<lv, complotely, en-

behavior, direction.

confrence,
v. a., (et.

"

f..

(et.

con

crer,

complter,
pUto, to

comi>let),tocomL.

oonferrc), corderence, intoiv iew,

from L meeting

ruiiiler perfi'ct.

confesseur,
L.
Ij.

n. m., (e^. confefger. froi ounfessare), corif>!H80r.


i.
f.,

complice,

n.

m.,

(et.

coinp'.icem),

ac'Ciiniplice, conipaiiio.n.

confiance,

(et.

confier),

trust

confidence, hope, boldnesa.


plot, conspiracy.
cvinj-cse), coui-

complot, n m.,

(et.

?),

compos,
posod, iiiade

e,

adj., (et
of.

confiant. e.adj..(et. c n jfr), Cdiiflding tnisting, bold, presumptuous.

up composer, v.
of.

confidence,

n.

r.,

(et. L.

ccntldentia)

a., (et. L.

cum, pansare),
to

confidence, intiiiiacy.

to coiiiix)8e, to niake

uj>; cotiii/ugtr,

confident, " m.,


lid.mt.

(et.

con' dence), con


L.

be inaue up

comprendre

v.

n.,

(et.

L.

compren-

confier,
intrust, to

v. a., Cet.

dcre), to coinpieln-i d. to un(ler^tllld; etiinprenonn, l.-t plu., jnes.. a. j., cum^rit, 3rd, niriL'., prt., def.

comndt

confldaro), to to one's charire.


I.

L.

confirmer,
continu
onc.'-elf,
;

V. a., (et.

conirnur,
v. a.,
(et.

confirnuire), to to strcngtheii

compris,
Cluded,

e, (part, of coinj-rendre), in-

to bc eonfirintd.
conflscare), to

confisquer,
v.

compromettre,

a.,

(et.

L.

com-

confiscate.

proiiiitteri'), to cunipr<in)ise, to coinn it, to iinplicatu; euin remettant, e, (prs, part), conii>roniisiiig, datij,'erou3,

confondre,

v. a.. Cet.

L confumlore),
,

compte, n. m., (et. comi.ter), account. compter, v,, a. and n., (et. L. ccniputarti), tocouiit, to reckou, to nuuiber eom/iter $ur, to rely on.
;

to coiifouiid, to niinulc, to ui it to take one for the other, i.ot to ie()L;nize, to puzzle, to abash. to overwhelm se njondre, to be Uiittd.
;

conformation, n f., (et. L. conformationciui, eonfoimati m, forin.


conforme,
adj..
(et.

L.

concentration,
ooineiitratidi).

conformis
tn

n.

f.,

(et.

concentrer),

conforniable, suitable.

conformer,
concentrer,
coiiceiitrate
;

v.

a.,

(a.

cnfinne),
like.

v. a., (et.

con, centie), to

contorm,

tv)

buit. to

make

ne eotici'nlrer, to cunctiitre, to co/ioentrate oiieself.

confus,

e, adj., (et.

L. co>ifMsua\ conet.

fused, oliscure.

concerter,
concert
ti)

v. a., (et
;

contrive

onreitare), to se cdiicerter, to cmiIt.

cert. to bit coiiceited.

con , C0ng'dier, csnuueatns), to disihaige, todi


v. a.,

':

)in L.

inivg.
,

concevoir, v. a., (et. L. concipen), to coKcivo, to ereato, to jirodui'e.


confillare), to ooni'iliate, to reconcile, to gain, to prov, a., (et.

conjecture,
conjecture.

n.

t.,

(et. L.

conjectura

concilier,

conjecturer,
conioi
tiire.

v. a.,

(et.

conjecture), te

to RUppoSo-.
uf.

eure

conclure,

v.

connaissance
,

(et.

roiniattre},

(et. L.

concludorc), to

oouclude, to Infer.

kii. Il du'e; l'iKin.oxxa.f-**, ledi^e, atta'iiiiiiit(i.

gnerai kiiow-

VOCABULABT.
connatre, v. a., (et. L. cogno8{!ero), to xnow, to uiiderstaul (muaisK'ntg, Ist, plu. prs. ind. connu, pasC part.
; ;

126
,

status,),

constater, v. a (et. tonned from L. to authenticit, to ascertain, tO verify. to dclare.

conqurant
oonqueior.

". m.,

(et.

conqurir),

constellation
tionexji;,

n.

t-,

(et.

L.

conatella-

con-icbation.

conqurir,
to
coiiquer, part.

v. a.,

(et.
;

L. conquirere),

to
.

aubdue
t.,

conquig,

piist

consternation, n. f., (et eutistemer), consteriiuti n, a.i.azcaiei.t.


consterner,
v. a.
,

(et. L.

conslernare),
constituere),
constituer),

conqute.
qiieHt.

(et.

conqurir),

coii-

to dispirit, tu disiieurten.

constituer,
.

v. a., (et

L.

consacrer, v. a. (et. L. conseciare), to consecnite, to hallow, to e.stablish.

to coiislitute, to estabiisli.

constitution,
constitution.

n.

f.,

(.

t.

conscience,

n- ^. (ut. L. oonscientia),

conscience, coimciousneas.

construction,
L. consecra-

n.

t.,

(et. L.

constmo-

conscration,
tioiieiii),

n.

f.,

(et.

tioiieni), Cl iiBiruclion.

conscration.

conseil,
sel,

n. couiicil ;

m.,

(et. L. conailiuTi), connconxc/'i de cinmeienee, a


kiiijf,
hi.s

L. cnnstrucru), to i.onstruct, to btiild citasiruit, past part. ; ciing.'ruisit, 3rd, sing. prer. dof.

construire,

v. a.,

(et.
;

privy council, compcsed of the


ronfessor, and
luattei

aonie others, to dcide rblatinjf to the clersry and oliurch.

consumer,
oonsuine, to

v. a., (et.

I-.

consumere), to

vvarite, to iicnd. (et. L.


ilie ct\.

v. a., (et couxt'U, to counU> aiivise; cuniifil'e.r quelqu'un tie faire quelque ehoxe, to adviae soiue ojic to 'lo 8ome ihing.

conseiller,

contact,
tact,

n. m., [l'nn niice

contactus), con-

sel,

contemplatif, ive,
pler,, oontenipiative.

adj., (et.

contem-

conseiller,
scllor, adviiser.

n.

m.,

(et. e

nseil),

coun-

contemplation,
contempler,
v.

n. f., (et.

eontemi>ler),

coiiienqi.ation, mditation.

consentir,

v. n., (et. L.

consentire), to
L. conseqnen-

a.,

(et

L.

contemL.

conscrit, to allcnv, to yicld.

plari), to oonieuiplate, to >;aze on,

consquence,

n.

f.,

(et.

contemporain

e,

adj.,

\6z.

con-

tia), e(>:itiiqiietK'e,

resiilt,

issue; en aniet.

tquence, in consquence.

tempiiraiieiis), ci>nteiuporury.

corservation.
conserve.
".

n.

f..

(merver),

contempteur, m.,
toreui). de.-piser.

(et. L.

contemptenir),

con.'Crvation, prservation.
f-i (et.

coiMener), convoy.
conaervare), to

contenir,
;

v.

a.,

(et.

er.i

to

conserver
considrer,
to consitlur.

v. a., (et. L.

prserve, to ktep, to retain.


v, a., (et. L. considorare),

contuin, to conipri e. to keep biick, to ge conlenir, to restiaiii oncseif, rcstrain ountenu, past pan. to forbear
;

tciitu,-.

consister,

n. n., (et

h. consistere),

to

v. a., (et. cimtint, L. conc ntent. to satisfy ; se contenter, to be san-lied.

contenter,
,

to

oonsist, to be (compose..' of.


(et. consoler, consolateur, i. L. coiisolarii, consoler, eo torter.

contester

\'.

a., (et. L.

contestari), to

m,

from

coiiiesi, to refuse.

continent.
(outillent.

ti.in.,(et

L. continentem),

consolation,
Boiatioii.

n.

f.,

(et.

cunncder), con-

contint,
ten'i

;*rd,

sing. prt.

licf.

of ci-n

e. a<l]., (et. crmmmmer), perieot, iii'coniplished, flrst-olas.

consomm,

continu,
contiiiiieil.

e.

<i-lj-.

(et.

L. continuus),

consommer,
>US|\ COIl-

v.a.
n.

(et.

I,

oonsuniinare),

continuons, incessant
aiiv.,(et. eonttnuel),

to c(iii>\iiuiiiate, to acconiplish.

continuellement,
v.

conspiration
',

f.,

(et.

cmspirer),

contiii 'a;Iy, e<>iiM>aiilly.


a. and continuer, to continue.
,

';

jm

L.

conspiiucy, plot.

n.,

(et L. con-

n)ii<8.
iiiji'ftura
,

conspirer,

v. n., (et. L,

conspirare), to
(et.

tinuu'^

conspire, to plot.

contour,
*lv.,
i.,

n.

m.,

(et.

eojitourner), con-

constamment.
fcttire), te

constant),

toiii

(iiithiie, windiiijf,
\. a.,

constar.tly.

contourner,
n.
(et. ccniitan>).

constance,
Btaiic\,
(il

con-

to

yive a proper

(ft cm-, tourner). outlino to, to turn (et L. L. coutrao

limes.', s

ability

around
L. constanten)),

constant,

e, aJJ., (et.

contracter

v. a.,

oonstant, rta.

taio;, to coutract.

126
contraction,
oontrac^tion.
n.
f.,

VoCABULARt.
(et
contraetet),

cordage,
rigging.

n.

m.,

(et.

cord),

cordagre,

contraindre, v.a
contraint,
e,

(et. L.

constringere),

to coiistraiii, to force.
ad].,

corde, n. (., (et L. chorda), cord, rope. corporation, n. (., (et. L. corporationem), corporaiion.

(part,

of

con-

traindre), constrained, forced.

contraire, adj., (et. L. contrarias), contrar\ adverse ; au contraire, on the


,

corporel, corponl.

le, ad]., (et. L. corporalis),

contrary.

corps, n. m., (et. L. corpus), body, maticr, hape, substance, strength.

contrarier, v,
thwart, to oppcse.

a.,

(et.

contraire), to

correspondance,

n.

f.,

(et.

corres-

contraste, n. m., (et. It. contrasto, L. uoiiira, stare), (oritrast.

pondre, from L. L. correspondere), correspondence.

correspondant,

e, ad].,

(part of cor-

contraster,

v. a.

ami

n., (et. contratte),

respondre.,, coriesponding.

to contrast, to niaise a contrast.

corrompre,
to corrupt
;

contre, prep.,
(or.

(et. L. contra), againat,

v. a, (et. L. corrumpere), corrompu, past part. cortge, n m., (et. U. corteggio),

contredire,
contradicD.

v. a., (et. contre, dire),

to

train, rctinue.

contrata, from L. contra), country, rygion, district.

costume,
cte, n.
f.,

n.

vn..,

(fit.

L, L. costuma), shore.

contre,

n. f., (et. L. L.

coHtunie, dress.
(et. L. costa), coast,

contre-prauve,
prouver),

n,

f.,

(et.

ayntre,

counter-proof,

(ceble

imita-

tion.

ct. n. m., (ot. L. L. costatum), eide, way, part de ae. c6l6-ai, on this siae ; de ce cfit-U, on tiiat side ; den deux cts, on
;

contre-poids,
couiiterpoi.ie,

n. m., (et. ccmtre, poids),

both sides
coton,
cotton.

cal
n.,

de, beside.
(et.

counterbaiance.
v. a., (et. L.

11.

Spaniah algodon),
to go

contribuer,
to coiitribute.

contribuere),

ctoyer,
cou,

v. a., (et. cte),

by the
'

contrleur, n. m., (et. contrle, contre and rh), ooiuptroller.

eide of, to coast.


n- ni., (et. L.

collum), neck.

convaincant,
convaincre,
part.

e,

ad].,

(part,

of cn-

vamcre), convinciiiy.
v. a., (ot.
;

L. convincere),
c<i7ti'ai/ctt,

to conviiice, to persuade

past

couche, n. f., (et. coucher:, bed, oouc i. coucher, v. a., (et. L. collocare), to lay down ne coucher, to lie down, to go to
;

bed.

convenable,
able, bcuttiiiv'.

ad]., (et. convenir), suitn.

couler,

V. a.

and
(.,

n.,

(et L. ooiare), to

fiow, to run.

convenance,
abloiioss,
netk-i.

f., (et.

convenir), snit-

couleur,

n.

(et L. colorem), oolor.

dcconcy, propriety, aj^rocable-

coup,
kiiocii
;

n. in.,

(et.

coup

de

eanmi,

convenir, v. n., (et. L. convonire), to agrte, to uit ; il convient , it siiits ; convenu, p.it>t part.
converser,
con\t.>rsi!

00 p de vent, gust o( wind, squall coup, siiddenly.

Gr. xAa^os), blow, cannon-sliot tout ;


;

coupable,
pablu, guilty.

adj.,

(et L. culpabilis), oulto eut, to eut


court,

v. n., (ei. L. conversari), to

couper,
v. a., (et.

V. a., (et. c'/ft/i),

convertir,
convort, to
conviction.

liiaiig'o,

L. convertere), to to traiismuto.

oflf,

to iiilorrupt (the voice).


n.
(.,

cour,
yard.

(et.

L. cohortem),

conviction,

o.t., (et. L.

convictionem),

courage,
n.

n.

m.,

(et.

L. L. coraticum,

convive,

m.,
n.

(et, L.
f.,

conviva), guest.
L.

froni L. cor), courage, \alor.

convoitise,

(et.

L cupiditia

(or L. cupidiiaH), CAivetousnesa.

courageux, euse,
coiirageous, bravo.

adj., (et courage),

convulsion, u
oonvulsiuii.

f.,(et. L.

convulBionem;,
oo, ordinare),

couraient,
courir.
(et. L.

3rd,

plu.

iuip.

ind.

of

CO-ordonner, va.,
to arrange in urder.

courant'
the
bouk),

n.

m.,

(et. couru-),
Ij.

current

corau, Korau.

u.

lu.,

(literally,

courir,

v.

n.,

(et
t.,

cunere), to run.
corona), orowo.

couronne,

n.

(et. L.

VOOABULABY.
couronner,
orowii,
i.o

127

v.

a.,

(et.

couronne), to

cri, n. m., (et. erier), ory.

u'jvor.

crier,

v.

a.

and

n.,

(et.

porhaps L.

courrier,
COUrSi
II-

n.

m.,

(et.

O. F. courre, from
airsus), courne.
li.

quiritare), to cry out, to screaui.

L. currure), courier.
lii-,

crime,
curga),

".

m.,
n.

(et. L. ni.,

cnmun), crime.
L.

(et. L.
(et.

criminel,
crimiiiai.

(et.

criminalis),

course.

f.,

uourse,

ruii, runiiing, cruisu, jouriu;y.

court,
courtier.

e, adj., (et. L.

ourtus), short.
It.

crise, n. moiiuint.

{> (et.

L. crisiti), crisix, oritioal

COurtioan,
coter,
V.

n.

m.,

(et.

cortigianoX

cristal,
crystal.

n.

m.,

(et.

L.

crystallum),

n., (et. L. constare), to oost.


".
'.,

L. L. costuma, L. eoiitue, imiMom), oustom, habit.


(et.

coutume,
couvent,
couver,

croire, v.a., (et. L. credere), to believe, to think ; croire or en, to believe in croire, to believe onesclt ; croit, &t, aing.
;

prea. ind.
'>

">.,

(et.

L. conventum),

couvent, iiionastery.
L. cubaro), to ait on, to lirood, to hatch, to cherish ; se couver, to bo liatched, to be born.
v. a., (et.

croisade,
croiser,

n.f., (et. L.
v. a.

crucom), erusade.
(et.

and
adj.,

u.,

croix),

to

croas, to ciuiHe.

croissant,
v.

e,

(part, of crotre),

couvert,
couvrir, u^. imp.

e.

ailj.,

(part,

of couvrir),

increaiing, tfiowing.
n., (et. L, crescoro), crotre, grow ; oriiinsenf, 3rd, plu. prs. ind.

covered, hid, ol>acure.


v. a,,
(et.

to

'

L.
;

cover, to hide, to conceal


iiid.

cooperiro), to couvrait, 3rd,

croix, n.

f.,

(et. L.

crucein), cross.
Icolaiidic kroppr, a in<j,,ter en cr-.upe, ;

croupe,
(et.

n. '! (et.

crabe, . >., craiudre, v.


fear ; 3rd, Bing. irap.
ent,'irdi, MniLT.

Oer. krabbt;), crab.

protuboraK.e),

rump

a., (et L. tremere), to crav/uant, prs, part. crairnait,


;

to ride betdnd.

croyait. Srd, sing. imp. ind. of

croire.

irid.

and

plu., prut. dof.

crainil, ciaitinircraint, ;

croyant, pred.
believer.

part, of croire;

osnoun,

2nd, sing, iiuper.

crainte,

crainu
.
.

". '., (et. craiiidre), fear ; de, for fear of ; de crainte que

de
. .

cru, past part, of croire,

cruaulf,

n.

f.,

(et.

L. crudelitatem),

ne, for fear lest.


n- ni., (et. L. crater),

oruelty, barbarity.
crater.

cratre,

crancier, ". m., (et. crance, L. L. credentia>, creditor.

cruel, le, adj., (et. L. erudelis), barbaroua, frightful.

cru'l,

crurent
prt.
ciel,

a>>d crut, 3rd, plu.

and

sing.,

crateur,
Creator.

n. m.,

(et.

L.

crcatorem),

of

cruin

crateur, trice, cration, n. t.,


cration.

a<lj.,

crative.
L.

cuivr, e, aJj colored.

(et.

cuivre),

coppor-

(et.

creationem),
L.
creatura),

culte, n. m., (et. L. cultus), worship, divine norvice, religion.

crature,
crature.

n.

f.,

(et.

cultivateur, n. m. (et. cultiver), bandiaan, eu'tivator, fanner.


,

hiis-

crdit,
liiHuenco,

n.

m.,
adj.,

(et.

credituni), crdit,

cultiver,
oultivate, to

v. a., (et. L.
till.

L. cultivare), ta

crdule,
loua.

(et L. credulus), creducreduZe), credulity.


create.

culture,
cupidit,
cupidity.

n, 'm (t- L. cultura), culture, n.


t.,

:#

vCt. L.

cupiditatem),

crdulit.
crer,

n.f., (et.

v. a., (et. L. creare), to

curieux, euse,
curiosit, u.
f.,

adj., (et. L. ourioaua),

crneau,
battlemeut.

n.

m.,

(et.

cran, a notch),
L.

curions, iiiquisitive.
(et.

L, ouriositatem),

crpuscule, n.m.,
twlli:ht.

(et.

crepuseulum),

curioaity.

crte.

d. n.
11-

m.
v.

t.,

(et. L. orista), crest.

creu.'ier, v. a., (et. creux), to dlg, to hollow, to dig out j <e ereuter, to open. to

daigner,
deij.;!!.

n.,

(et L. dlgnari), to

to condescond.
n.

yawn.

dais,
se,

m.,

(et. L. discus),

canopy,
I '!

creux, boUow.

adJ.,

(et.

L.

corrosuto),

danger,
danger.

n. m., (et L. L. doiuinarium),

pppp

il

128
daaSi praP'i
danse,
dfciisn),

VOCABULAEY.
(et. L. de, iiitus). in, into. (et.

doisif, ive,
cini^t.

adJ.,

(et.

dcider),

d<

danger, O. H. 0. dancu, dancing.


n.

t,

dcision,
deciniOM.

n.

f..

(et.

L.

deuisionem),
declarare), to

(taapMn.
dolphiti.

n.

m., (et L. delpliinus),

dclarer,
dclare.

v.

&.,

(et. L.

davantage,
de, prep.,
for,
(et.

adv., (et de, avantage,

trom avant), more.


fi.

de), of, froni, witli, by,


to, in.

dconcerter, v. a., (et. d-, concerter), to discoiii ert, to oonfound, to disappoint, to frnstratc.
dcouler, v. n., run down, to flow.
(et.

oui

of,

with respect

d-,

couler),

ta

d-t ds-, nnd dis-, tnseparnble prfixes ; tiv and ds, diffrent fornis of tJie 8UU10 word, froni eitiier L. de, L. dis, or
L.
(le,

dcouragement,
jection.

n. m.,

ai/er), (liscoiiray:ement,

i^et. dcourconeternatiun, d-

ex

',

d was
.'^atin.

datu from

introduced atalatcr They expreaa tiie Ideas

of sparation, losa, opposition, etc.

dcourager,

v. a., (et.

rfrf-,
;

courage), to

dbarquement, " m., (et dbarquer),


dieeniburkinr, landing.

discourai^e, to dishearten se dcourager, to despond, to be discourajred.

dbarquer,
dbattre,
v.

v.

a.

and
(et.

dcouvert
n
,

e. (part, of

dcoumir), dii!corivrir), dls-

(et

di;

coNtred, riveuled,

barque), to disembark, to land.


a.,

d ouverte,
battre), to

"

f-.

(et.

d-,

coveiy

dbute, to discuss.

dcouvrir,
n.

dbordement,
Ovei(lo
JMi{,

dborder), bieaking out, debaucliery.


(et.
v. a. oikI n., (et.

m.,

di,-co>er,

and

di-, couvrir), to to revoal, to sliow dcouvrit dC'Unrirent, 3rd, Bina;, aud plu.,
v. a., (et
;

dborder,

d-,

l>urd),

prt. def.

to overMow, to fluw, to jutuut, to project, to boii over, tn well iip, dbriSi n. m., (et. d-, briser), wrecft,
(rav;nifcnts.

dcret,

n-

m., (et L. dcoretuui), dccree.


v.

dcrire,

a.,

(et L. describere), to

describe, to paiiit.

dcemment,
ly,

adv., (et. dcent), dcentf.,

beooiuingly,
n.
(et.

du, past part, of dcevoir. ddain, n. m (et. <ldai<jnfr,


,

L. dis,

dignari), disdaiii, conteinpt.

dcence,

dcent,

trom

L.

dei.entem), decency, dcorum.

dfaillir,

v. n., (et.

d;faiUir\

tofail.

dception,
dcerner,

n.

f.,

(et. L.

deceptionem),

dfaut, n. m., (et. d-, faillir), defect, fauh dfaut de, for wani, of, for lack
;

deceition, disappointuient
v. a., (et. dcrue, to jurant.

of.

L. dcerner), to L. decipere), to

dfendre,
Bonie thing.

v, a.,

(et.

L. defendere), to

dfend, to protect;

dcevoir,
dt'ceive.

v.

(et.

de laire qiu'lque chose, to forbid

doendre quelqu'un oneto do


L.

L. h. dis-catendchaner, are), tu unuliain, to lut loose.


v. a., (et.

dfense, n. f., (et defeiice, prohibition.


dfiance,
n.
f.,

L.

defensa),

dcharger,
,

v. a., (et. d-,

diKcimrjje, to rdease, to dtcliirijer to (lischar>{e, to

set

chanjer), to freo; se

(t. di-, fier),

distrust

suspicion, ditlidence.
dfil, n. m., (et. dfiler, froni dfil), delilo.

empty.

and

drchiffrer,
dcuipber.

v. a.,

(et.

d-, chiffre), to

dchirement,
dchirer,
to
ti,ar,

n.

m., (et dchirer),

dfinir, to deienuine

v.

a,
;

(et. d-, finir),

todeline,

e dfinir, to
v. n., (et. L.

be defined.
degenorare),

tcurinii;, runduij,', broils.

dgnrer,
to dcifonoate.

v. a.,

(et O. H. G. ukerron),

10 roiid.

degr,
degveo.

n. m., (et L. de, gradus), atep,

v. n., (et. d-, choir, L. cadere), to decay, to fall off, to fall from, to forfeit, to be deposcd ; dchu, past Dart., deposed.

dchoir,

dj,
already.

adv.,

(et
(et.
;

L.

de,

ipso,

Jam),

dcid, e, adj , (part, of dcider), detcrniined, resolved.


dcider, v. a. and n., (et L. decidere), to iletide, to dtermine ; ge, dcider, to

del, prep., del de, beyond


dlai,
"

d",

l),

oeyond

au

ou

dild

(ailv.),

beyond.

m., (et L. dilatare), delay.

dlicat, e, adJ., (et. L, delioatus), deli<te, Une, eloi^ant, daiuty.

VOOABULART.
dlices, n. f. pi., deiigtic, l'iuasuie.
(et.

12d
v.

L.

deliciaX

dployer,
unfiirl.

.,

(et d-, ployer,

L.

plicare), lu dispJay, to opeii, to unf.jld, to


adj.,
(ot.

dlicieux,
n-

ense
(ut.

dlice),

deliciuus, (iuii){iattil,

dposer,
L. delirium), deliri-

r.

a.,

(et.

d-,

poter),

.i

m-, dlire, util, frmizy.

dpose, toeiitrust, toleivo.

dpossder,
dpt,

v. a., (et. d-,

possder

to

dlivrer, v. a., (et. L. L. duliberare, froiu L. liberare), to deli\er, to free, toset


(rce.

dispOfse.-b, to deprive,
n. ui.,

(et L. deposituni

de-

posit, charge, trust

dluge,
lioluge.

u.

m.f

(et.

L.

diluviuin),

dpouillement,
spoliation

n. m., (et. dpouiller),

demain,
moiruw.

adv., (et. L. de, nians), to*


v. a., (et.

dpouiller,

v. a., (et. L. du8i)oliarc), to

strip, to deprive, ta rob.

demander,
B8k,

L. demnmlare), to
;

dcinander lo lieinand, to beir quelqu'un de /aire quelque ch nf, to ask deniduier BOine one to do sombthinj^ quelque chi se quelqu'un, to ak some
;

dpravation, u. f., (et. dpraver, u depravarej, Ocpravation, dc|'ravity, debaiiciiery, vicu.

depuis, adv. and prep


sincc".

(et L.de, pont),


' 't

ont for 8omothin>f.

sinuu, atterwards.after, frotu; depui que,


f.,

d marche,
steii,

n.

(et,

d-,

marche),

uianiier, proceediiijf,

iiit?a>^iire.

d membrement,
i:

" na-, (et. d-,

mem-

(et d-. racine\ to root out, to root up, to pull out by thc

draciner,

v.

a.,

bre), diaineinbtirmuiit.

roots.

dmence, n. f., niiidness, iiisanity.


d mentir,
belie, to
v.

(et.

L.

dementia),
mentir), to

drision,
derisiijii,

n.

f.,

(et.

L.

derisioMem),

niockery, irony.
adj., (et L. L. derede, rutro), last, final.

a.,
;

(ot.

dernier, ire,
traiiu^^, iroiu L.

contradiot se d iientir, lo helie onosulf, to be incuuuistunt, to fail, to fla^.


L. dis,

drob,
drober,

e,

adj.,

(part
d-,

of

drober\

dmesur
demeure,

e,

adj.,

(et d-, meture),

stolen. private.
v. a.,

huje, eiioiinouB.
),

(et

O. P. robor, to

to fail.

n.

t,

(et.

demeurer,

L.

rob, to rob, to hide, to conceal.

duiiioiari), dwelliiig', ab'jde, rsidence.

defect, for laok

drouler,
;

v. ., (et. d-, L. L. rotulare),

demi, e, adj., (et. L. dimidius), half di'int, half, aliiiost, partly.

to uafold.

demi-monde, ". m., hmisphre. demi-nUi e, atlj., baU-uakcd. demi-pont, n. m., half deck. dnigrement, ".m., (et. dnigra, d;
and
L. nigor), aspersion.
e, adj., (et. L.

derrire, prep., (et L. de, rtro), bohind.


des, contraction of de les, of the. ds, prep., (et. L. de, ipso), froni, ince ds que, as soon a, since.

dsarmer,
deiiudare), desii-

v, a., (et. ds-,

armer), to
sliip).

disann, to disiiiantle, to unrig (a

d nu,

tute, de^oid.

dsastre,
n.

n.

m., (et
n.
ra.,

It. disastro), dis-

dnuement,
dpart,
tire),
de.

m.,

(et.

dnuer), desti-

astor, luintortune.

tution, l)arent8H,
. >,

lai k.

descendant!
descendant.

(et.

descendre),

(et dpartir, L. dispar-

departure.

descen

ire, r.a-

andn.,

(et. L.

descend-

passer, v. a., (et. d-, panser), to get beyond, to exoted, to surpass, to ffo
atiead, to outrun.

ern) t<i desicnd. to corne down, to go down, to lau..,. descente, n.f.,(et. dexcendre), deacont,
detilivity, lowering.

:.?;.*

dpendance,
de(Hindere),
ci es.

n. t.,

(et dpendra, L.
;

dpendance
n.
f.i

plu.,

dependen-

dsert, e. adj., (et. L. desertus), dsert, solitary, w'ild. dsert,


n.

m., dsert, wilderneu.


v. a.

nd au beyond.
;

dpense,

(et.

dpemer, h, dispend-, peuple), to

are), exponse, cost.

dserter,

and

n.,

(et dsert), to

dsert, to ruii away.

lelay.

d peupler, v. a., (et. depopulate, to desolate.

dsertion,

n.

f.,

(et dtert), dsertion.

licatus),

dplorer. . a., dplore, to bewaiL

(t. L, deplorare), to

dsesprer, v. n., (et. dn-, uprer), te despair; diusprde, desperateat, in deep


Kriet at.

ISO
d sespoiri
dexpair.
n.

VoCABULARt.
m.,
(et.

dit; etpoir),

devancer,

a.,

(et.

devant), to oui

strip, to out.rnn, to arrive beforo, to surpasH, to leavti behind, to go beforc.


v. a.,

dshriter,
diBiiiliurit, ti>

(et ds-, hriter), to


" ra.,
(et.

doprive.
diin-

devant
In frunt of.

prep., (et

de, avant),

before,

(lsirtcreasement.
dsir,
loogiiiic
II.

dvastation,

n.

t.,

et dvaster, L.
7),

tireiuift), (lihirittireisteilncgs.

devasiaru), deviistation.

m., (et dsirer), doairo, wlsh,


v. a.,

d vlo per,
to uritold.

v. a.,

(et

te dcvelop,

dsirer,

(et L. desiderare), to
(et dt-, obir), to dis(ot. ds-, ordre), dii-

dexire, to long for.

bei-ome
Hiiig,

dsobir, obev.

v. n.,

d venir, v. n., (ot. L. dovoniro), to devenu, pastjiart devifut, 3rd, prs. ind. decinrent and dccint,
; ;
;

3rd, plu.
n.

and

sing., prt. def.


n. f.,

d sordre,
crUur,
hericisforth.

dviation,

(t. L.

deviationcm),

itiH^tipatloii, JicentiouHiiess.

deviition, wanduring.

dsormaiSi
dessaler,
8al), to

aJv.,

(et.

ds, or, mais),

deviner,
divine, to

v.

a.,
ijy

know

(et L. divinus), to intuition.

v.a., (et. ds-, saler,

from L.

dvoiler,

v. a.

(et.

d; voiU), to un-

frcMhen.
r, . , (et. ds-, scher, L. dry up, to witlicr.

des 4 ch
siccare), to

veil, to ro\ eal, to discover ; r dvoiler, to unvtiii oneself, to be inanifost

dessein
dessiller,

m.,

(et.

L.

designare),

devoir, v. sh uld, must,

n.,
is

(et.

L. debore),

ought,

design, piii'pose.
v. a., (ot. dfs-, cil, oyelash),

which was

to ; qui devait devenir, to beconie.


e,

dvolu,
dvorer,
devour.

Hdj.,

(et.

L.

devolutui),

to open one'rt oycs, to undeceive one.

vested, fuUiiig, belonging.


v.

dessin, n. m., draught, design.

(et.

dessiner), drawlng,

a.,

(et

L.

devorare), to

dissiner, v. a., (et. L. dosignaro), to draw, to sketch, to design.


destin,
(ate.
n.

d vou,

e, adJ., (et. dv: uer), dovoteil.

doVOuement,
dvo
er,
;

n.m.,

(et. ttJuoucj),

dvo-

m.,

(et.

destiner), destiny,
of
destitier),

tion, Silf-duvoiion.
v.

a.,

destin,

e,

(part,

dia-

dvote
risl<

se dvouer,
life.

(et L. devotare), to to dvote oneself, to

tined, designed.

one's

destine, n. (ate, fortune.


Oestiner,

f.,

(et.

destiner), destiny,

diamant,
dianiond.

n.

m.,

(et L. admantem),

v. a.,

(et.

L. destinare), to

Dieu,

n.

m.,

(et.

L. deum), God.

destine, to appoint.

diffrent,
m., (et dtacher),
difficile, cult.

e, adj.,

(et L. differcntem),
difficilis),
diffl-

dtachement,
detachnient.

n.

diffrent, various.
adj.,

(et L.

dtacher,

v. a., (et. d-, attacher), to

detach, to separate ; se dtacher, to l)ecoiiie detachcd, to loosen, to conie ofl, to be detached.

difficilement, adv., veith diffloulty.

digne,

aiij., (et.

L. dignus), worthy.

dtail, n. m,, (et. talearei, dtail, dtails.

d;

tailler, L. L.

d gnemont
dignit,
n.

adv., worthily.
f.,

(et L. dignit^item), dlgL. dllapidare), to

dtourner,
tu

v. a., (et.

d; t(mmer), to
(et.

nity.

aside, to dissuade, to hiiider.


e,

dilapider,

v. a., (et.

d tourn,
unfrequciited.
AktroiRe, n.
trcBs.

adj.,

dtourner),

dilapidatti, to wastc, to ruin.

dme,
(.,

n,

t., (et.

L. deoiina), tcnth wrt, L.


dicere), to say, to
ia
;

(ot.

L. destriotus), dis-

titlie,

dire, v.
v. a., (et.
;

a.,- (et.

d traire, de
-il, n.

desiroy, to ruin

L. destniere;, v dtruU, past part.


L. dolcre),

teU

c'st--aire,

tiiat

to

say

pnur

ai.>" -t. Y.

'-"

--*"''

e dire, to

say to

oneself, to call oneseii.

m.,

(et.

mourning,

Borrow.

dire t[The linal


nounccd).

e, ad.1.,
t

in this

(et L. dlreofis), direct. word is generally pro-

deux,

ad].,
;

(et.

L.

duos),

two

tous

deux, both

d de

x,

double.

directemen

adv., directly.

deuxime,
devait,

adJ.,

second.

i^rd, sing.

imp. ind. o( devoir.

direction, n. f., (,t. L. directlonom), directiou, governaient, guldancw

VOCABULABY,
diriger,
v.

m
.

.,

(et.

L.

dirigere),
;

to

diviser,
divide.

a.,

(et.

L.

divisua),

to

dlruut, to tfiildo, to to jirocued,

con luct

ge diriijer,

disait.

'<rd,

aing. imp. ind. of dire.


n.
f-,

dis:ipline,
d)8ci|>Iin(i.

(et.

L.

diHoiplina),

discours,

n.

m.,

divis'On, n. f., (et. L. divislonoin), division, digcord, diNKunsion. dix. adj , (et. L. doceui , ten. [Whon dix ia final, z is soundtd as s ; when before a vowel, iw z and when beforo a consonant it is )nute].
,

(et.

L.

diHcursuH),

'

dis'Oiirae, speeoh.

dix-huit,

adj., ei^ditoon.

[Pronounce
[Pronounce
doctorem),

z
dise, Ist and 3rd, nini?. prca. sub. o( din- ; dmnt, 3rd, plu. pies. ind. and aub. of dire.

like

z].

dix-sept. adj., seventeen.

like

].

disette,
Btar\!itioi).

n.

l, (et
n.
f.,

7),

want, dearth,

docteur,

n.

(et

L.

doctor, learncd nian.

disgrce,

(et. dit-, grce), dis-

dogme,
doctrine.

n. m., (et

do^fina), dogina,

grce, inisfoi'tuiie.

disparatre,
to disapixiiir
;

v. n., (et. di-,

paraUre),

doigt,
dois,
d^V'jir.

n.

(et. L. dijritus),

flnifor.

digparais-^aient, 3id, plu., and di.iidiiaitiinit, 3id, sirij;^. iiiip. ind. ; a, ut, 3rd, awg. prt. def. di

doit,
n.

parts
n>..

of

prs.

ind.

of

domaine,
domain,

(fit,.

T.-

'^on-.SMiiii,!),

disparition, n.
diHiiiipeuranoe.

t.,

(et.

digiiaraitre),

domesticit,
poser), to dis-

n. f

(et L. L. donutsti-

disposer,

v. a., (et. dit-,

oitateni), iiou.>iehold.

posa, to onler,

domestique,
n. f., (et.

adj., (et. L. domestious),

disposition,

doniestic, piivate.

diaposition-

ein), (iispositioii, order, disposai.

domination,
ein), donilni&n,

n.

f.,

(et. L.

domination-

authority.

disputer,
[ititer

v.

a., (et.

L. disputare), to
;

disiHite, to conteiid for, to

quelque

c/io.s'f

te.st a tliiiij witii ; to c ritend for, to strive for.

oppose dis quelqu'un, to con.sonie ono se disputer,


dissendnare),

ari),

dominer, v a. and n., (et. L. dominto doniineer, to rule, to overpower, to surpass, to rise above.
dominicain, dompter, v.
don, don,
n.

n. m., dotninlcan friar.


a.,
(et.

dissminer,
to
.st;atter,

v. a., (et. L.

L. domitare), to

to hpread.
v.

subduo, to conqucr.

[The

is silont).

disHimulare), to ditistiinblo, to dlsguisc, to concoal.


a., (et. L.

dissimuler,

m., (et. L. donuin), gift

dissiper,
dissipaoe, perse.

v.

(et.
:

L.

dissipare), to

titlc.

n. m., (et. L. doniinus), a .Spani.sh quivalent to Lord, and sometinies

to dispcl
n.
f.,

se dissiper, to disL, di8tant.ia\ disdistance, at a dis-

toMr.
doiia, n. f., Spanish for Lady or Mrs. [Pronounce don-ya].

distance, tance, romoteness


tance.

(et.
;

donc,

conj.,

(et

?),

therefore,

thon,

accordingly.
(et L. distinctus),

distinct, e, adj., distinct, diffrent.

donner,

v. a.,

(et L. donare), to give,

to grant, to con fer.

distingu,
di8t)n(uuri,'),

e, adj., (et. distinguer, L.

distinguished.
v.

dont, pro., (et L. de, \inde), whose, of wliom, of which, from which.

distribuer,

a., (et. L. distribuero),

dormir,
Bleep
;

v.

n.,

(et.

to ili.stribute, to divide, to scattcr.

Uurjnent,
n.

3rd,

L. donnire), to plu. prs. ind. j

distribution,

n.

f.,

(et.

L.

distribu.

dormit, 3rd,
dos,

sint. prt. def.

tionom), distribution, division.

m., (et L. dorsum), back.

dit. e, (part, of dire), called, sald.

divers, e, adj., diverse, various.

(et.

L.

diversus),

dot, n.f.,(et. L. doteni), portion, dowry, uiariiage-portion, [Prono.ajce the (].

divin,
sacred.

e, adj.,

(et L. divinus), divine,


divin), todeify, to
h.

dotation, endownient.

n.

f.,

(et.

L. dotationem),

diviniser,

v. a., (et.

maku

divine.
n. t,
(et.

divinit,
divinity.

divinitatcm),

doter, V. a., (et. L. dotare), to endow. double, adj (et. L. duplua), double. doubler, v. a., (et doubk), to double. doucement, adv., (et duu), softlyt
,

geutly.

132
douceur,
wi'iaiiuM,
n.
f.,

VOOABULART.
dulcorem), (ot. L. tru.-hnosH (of wutur).

chantillon, "in,
a coriiei,
cap)ii),
...

fet.

1,.cx,0.P. cant,
n.,

inildiius-',

i;,i.

tliu..;,

Miiiipiu.

douer,
liJK, i>uin,

v. a., (et.

L.

do
L.

are), to

endow.

chapper,
(,()

v.

a.

and

(et.

L.

ex,

douleur, n

f.. (et.

dolorom), auffor(t. L.

uscape.
v
a., (et. L.

KoiTow,

(frief.

chauffer,
to
lii.ai.,
i>j

nitlaiiiu,
,

douloureux, euse,
OSUH
,

ailj.,

dolor.

ex, (>alcfaeere), to irritutu.

|.a iilul,

ort. w,ul, ^niovous.

cho.

n. n

(ot. L.
*].

cho), cho.
(et.?),

[Pro

nouni'u ch likc

doute,

"

m.,
;

uiK'i'itainty, (oai-

douiei), doubt, niti doutf, ildubtless.


(t.
(et.
;

chouer,
clair,
fla'li

v. a.

and

I).,

tontrund,
lail.

to ruii ai^'rouiid, to niiscarry, to


n.

douter,
,

v.

n.,

L.

diiMtiiru),

to
;

m.,

(et. clairer), liglitiiing,

doiU) u< (jucatl'in j en dmtle, l le dunter, 10 bii8i>eci je tn'en.


;

.(iiilit it

du^e,

of lijfhtriing.

UH()t;(t
t.-

it.

doux, douce,
milii, ),a'i,lle

<mIJ-i (^t.

alj , (part, e. enii>;littine<l, intelligent.

clair,

of

clairer),

dulci8},8wcot,

clairer,
li^'lit,

v. a., (et. L. exdarare), to lo tlirow light on, to shiw the way.

drapeau,
:

>.

ni., (ot. draj>,

L, L. drap(roin up, to in-

't

puin), Kttuiilard, bannur,

clat, n. m., et clater), poiiip, glory, briyhtnoss.

frasfment,
of l'clater),

dresser,

v, a., (et. L. L. drictiaie.


l'iii.se,

L. dhcciiiK), t truct, 10 train.


t.-;.

to

clatant,
8hilall^,

e,

ailj.,

part,

titit

bi'ij.,rht,

illuHtrioii.s, strikinvc.

droit,
I).

e.

adj

;et.

L. dlroctu), rluht,
;

Btiaif^ht, upritjlit, ifooil, rightoiHiH

droit,
fnll,\
;

m.,

rijjlU, claiiu;

de droit, riyh

C dater, v- n., (et. O. H. O. 8kloi7.an), to break, to l)rcak ou, to break forth, to fiy iiito a passion, to flasli.

dro t, adv., aller loaldroit, to go straight ahuad.

cole,
to hhow neKieut.

n. f., (et. L. sc'hola),

schiol.

conduire.
out,

v. a., (et. L. ox,

du, (contraction of de
the,
.soiiie, uiiy.

le),

ot the, froin

conducore), to disiniHS, to reject, to


(et.

d, due.

(part, of devoir), due,


,

owlng
[l'ro-

conomie,

n.f

conome, L. oecono

duc,

n.

(ft. L. ilucein),

duke.

mus

econoiny.
adj.,(et. L.

DouiK-e the

c],

conomique,
t.,

oecono m icus),

el. " n., (et. L. duolluni), duel.

oononiical, fru^jal.

dunette,
di\ a
def. of
tr-;
iiill),

n.

(et.

dune
of

fron Irlsh
the prt,

coice.
rltul, shell.

n.

f.,

(et.

L. cortlccm), bark,

poop, hurrieaiic dcck.

durent, and dut. part


(le

voir.
ii

duret,

f-. (l't.

dur, L. durus), hard-

couler, V, n, (et. L. h. ex'^olare), to ruii, lo H )\v out ; 'rcoiiler, to How eut, to elapse, to ^fo by, to pas.

neiM, harshnesa, eeveiity.


0, n.
-,

couter,
hcar, to

v.

a,
to.
f.,

(et.

L. auscultare), to

li.slcii

m.
("^t.

coutille,
^u*^),

n.

(et.?),

hatchway.

or ex-,
'I.

insparable preflx.
;

craser, v.a.,
to cruMli^

(ci.

Scandina\ian
t.)

kraw%
on^

eau

f..

(et.

L. aqua), water
(et. ?),
f

to crash,

bruiso.

/aire
s'crier,
to excl.m.

uu, to leak.

v. r., i^et. -, c,i,r),

to ory

blouir, v. a., cause 1,0 iflitter. to

to dazzle, to

sciiiale.

crire,

v. a., (et. L. gcribcre),

blouissant,
glare,
(l..//.li;ig.

e, adj., (lazzlin;;.
n.

crivait, 3i(l, siiiff. iiiic. in,l. ; ciit, past part. iiintf. prt. uef.
;

to writ; crivit, rd,

blouisscment,
branlefi move.
v.

m.,

(et.

blouir),

crit,
shoal.

n.

m., (part, of ciire), writing;.


n. n;.,
(et.

cueil,
a.,
(et. T),

L. soopulug), rock,

to shako, to

cumant,
;

e.

adJ.,
(et. o.

(part. o( cumer),

carter, '' a., (t. L. L. exquirtare), to x'i'eardispcrbo, to turn ii^ide, lo rejtei, ter, to rauible. to deviute, to wantler ;
cart, part.,

foaniinjf, frotiiy.

cume, "
froth,
f

f.,

H. G. scm), Bcum,
cume), to foa. [l'ronounce d#n].
face), to efface.

rem
n.

am.
v. n., (et.

.te.
(,

camer,
t.

change,
ohan^'e,
intc

ni.,

changer),

ex-

den.
effet,

n.

m., Eden.
v.

rehange
v. n.,

mi change de. In
changer), to

xchan^'e for.

effacer,

a
;

(et. -,

" in.i

(et.

L. eflfectuni), effoct,

changer,

(et. i-,

realilv, fact
realitjr.

en

efftt,

indeed, roaUy, is

xohauge, to buter.

VoCAbULAUY.
ffort. n
eff' Il
,

133
n.
t.,

'"., 'ti.fffiircer, L.

ex, forcer),
<

manation,
niunaie
,

(t.

maner,

L.

exeriiuii.
v. a., (et.

manation.
n.f SpaniMh.etnbar* viHNel, craft.
.

effrayer,
friK'lituii.

L. ex, frUidiu), to

embarcation,
(aciiin
,

(et.

..iijali

effroi.

Il

m.,
A<)J

(et.

efiayi-r),

U\^M..

embarquer,
ciiili.irk,

v. a., (et.

en, banjue), to

terri. r, dreail.

to Bhip,

to

jiiit

on

8hii Itoard

gal,

6,

(et.
;

L. niqiialU), e(|nal,

i'emharquer, to eiiihark, to

takeKlil|i(iinj,'.

veil, like
;

.mie

fi

'inil

ilc,

cqnal
also.

to,

im

much OH :iui, ii. m., t'<\Hn\. galement, a^Jv., tiiu iiiy,


galer,
v.

embarrasser,
liane), to trouble.

v. a., (et. etni>,ir,an:

en,

embarras,
v. a.,
(et.

to

porplex,

to
i

a.,

(et.

jal), to eipial,

to

embaumer,
.

en, baume, L.

make iqual
gard.
respect
;

to.

baUanniiii;, to perfuiiie.
!
;

".

C' t

m., (et. nanti-i), re.Rrd, jard, in tliat lespcct.


t\<ia,ri.

embellir,

v. a., (et.

en, bel), to ombel-

Ii>ili.

to adorn.

gar,

e, aUJ.,

uf aarir),

wan

deruK', loet.

oucli 're. n. f , (et. en, bouche, btici'u), iMOiith vof u ri\er;, liarl)')r.

em

L.

garer,
deceive, tu
oiie'H

v. a.,

(et.

rf-,

f/arer, to

put into

embrassem
l'inli.ucc

nt,
v.

n-

m.,

(et.

emhrasgerX

dock, from 0. H. G. warn), toinislo.Kl, to

ad astrav n'nirer, to loue way, to wander, to go a.str y.


1
;

embrasser,
t(i

a.,

(et.
;

<,

eiiilM-no, to kis8, to greet

bras), to ii'embraiier,

embraie, to grect each other.

glise
'

f-.

(et.
(et.

eccloKJa), church.

mersion.

n.

t.,

(et.

L.

emorgere),

lan, n. m., enthusiasin.

lancer), Jerk. gtart,

enu'iKiii-, reapi>earani e.

cminent,
i.iiiiiieni..
;

e, adj.,

(et.

L. eininentcin),

er, v. a. and ii., (et. i-, lanc ), to to d.it n'rlniiCfr, to riisli, to spriiig, to piisli 011, to uiiibark, to laii!i(!li.

lan hoot,

emmener,

v.

a,,

(et.

en,
L.

meivr), to

load iiway, to tako

away, to carry away.


(et.

largir, v.a
to
wi'Jiii.

(et.

<,

lar;ie),

to

cil

aKo,

cmo

voir.

v. a.,
t,

emovurc), to
;

ilectriqne,
electric.

adj.,

(et.

L.

electrum),

inni, tu atfo' tu be iiio\ed.

to stir

up

n'eut'. uvuir,

s'tmparer,
e,

v.

r,

(et.

en, parer),

to

lgant,
elegaiit.

adj.,

(et.

L.

ele^antem),

seize on. lo iake possession of,

emp
n.

hor,
n.

v. a.,

(et. ?),

to hinder, to

lment,
lment.

m.,
f.,

(tt.

L. elcinentuni),

prevent.

emrire.
(ot. li-ner),

m.,

(et, L.

imperium), em-

lvation, n. lev, e, adj.,


neiH.

lvation.

pire.

(,t.

lever), raised,

omi-

emploi,

n. m., (et.

employer), cniploy,

eiiipluyir.ent, u.se.
v. a., (et. -, lever),

lever,
briii^'

to raiae, to

up

v'levir, lO rie.

employer,
eiii)lii\
,

v. a.,

(et L, implicare), to
en, poinon, L.

to use.
v. a., (et.

lire, v. a., (et. L. oligtre), to elect, to

ohoosc.
lite, n. f., (et. lire), choice choseii, pickod.
;

empoisonner,
emporter,
carry
t,ft,

potioueni), to poison.
d'lite,
v.

a.,

(Pt.

en, porter),
(et.

to

elle. fem. pro. sing., (et, L. lll;i), she, her, it; Ue-mme, iwrav:]f; elle, p\.,thvy, thein.

to c:irry

away.
tn
,

empressementeag(;iiies8, ze^W,

empresser),

ardor.
v. a., (et.

loign,

e,

adj.,

(part,

of

loigner),

emprisonner,
inipris
II,

en pmo), to
loaii;

reihovid, distant, rt-mote.

to confine.
n.

loigner, v.a., (et. -, loin to reniove, to keep at a distance ; s'lviner, to withdraw, 1,0 dpare.
,

emprunt,

m.,

Cet.

emprunter),

d'emprunt, borrowed.

lcqnence,
eloquenie.

empr
mu.
adj
,

nter.

v. a., (et. 7),

to borrow.

n. '

(et

L.

"loquentia),

e, (part, of mouvoir, used as iiioved, afi'cteiJ ; mut, 3rd, sinjj.

loquenti
eloquuiit..

e, adj.,

(et. L.

eloquentem),
eectcd,

pr..t.

def. of 7n()uui}ir.
(et. L.

en, pro, and adv.,


d|.,
(j'art.

inde), of hirn,
it, soirie,

lu,

e.

of lire),

of her, of thetn, of

It,

from

any.

ChoscM,

loin ttame word

is

%!eo ueed as

a prefix to

134

VoCABULART.
'nivrement.
enivrer,
to
In), In, lnt'i,
Im)

oto.,

tinnu-ner, " tolood ruii -iway,"

nia'iy verlis in ttio Nnso o( "off," "aw.iy," finiHirter, "to carry awftv;" uway ;" a'i)\lmr, " to

n.m.,(Ht. enivrer), lniox[-

m:

oatliiM, i'('iitay, wtld delit;ht.


V. a., (et.

l'it 'xi(^ato, t'i

en, iure), toincljriatu, unflaino ; i'eninreriie, to


ivr).
'f,
.,

en. preii.,(ot L.
T)ii^

wonl

18

tn iho 8(i8c of

alMO iiswl as a "in," as


rayiir,

like, to. prtflx lo vorlis

in rupiuri'i)

vvltii.

emfriKonitcr,

emirannfr, eue

enlever, v. a., (et. en, ( awu\ to tuko away, to


' ,

avvjiy, to

take ^a
n.

(urt),

t<

to oarrv to l>ear to oaptl-

enchaner, v. a., (et. en, ehiihve), to chum, lo liacklo, to (i; tor, to ca|tti af.o.

vate.

ennemi,
eniMoy.

m.,
a.,

(et
(et.

L.

inimicun),
nu'le),

enohant
eni:iiaiit,

r. v. a., (ot.

L. Incantaro;, to

tu charin.
aiv.,
(ot.
i-till,

ennoblir,
L. hanc, horaui), uven, yi^t.
..

v.

en,

to

encore,
aifivin, oiiro

Oiinmilu,

more,

ensanglanter,
L. L.

v.., (et. en,iinuilant,

encouragement.
aje-r),

"

(t.

mcour-

iian::>iiluiituii),

to niado
L. L.

btoody, to
Insignaro),

uncouroKianviit.
v.

tain uitli blooil.

encourager,
OiKouia'.;!',

(ot.

en, courage), to
to

enseigner,
tu.ii
II,

v. a., (pt

tu HtiiiiiilalK.
v.

10 (lireot, to luCorni.

encourir,
Inciir,
p:iMt
r
t

lot.

L. inciurore', to
;

ense'nble.
tOiioilicr aeinlilo
;

adv.,

(e..

L.
lu.,

in,

co

draw iipon otiujeK


e,
ailj.,
(ot.

encouru,
donU-ur),

t-nevmble,

n.

whole,

Hlmul), on-

|>ill't.

endolori,
achiii),',
i>i

tu,

en evelir,
to iiury.

v. a., (ot. L. L. tnsepellro),

pain.
v.

endormir,
lull iibifiip
;

a.,

(et.

en, <li>rmr), to

ensuite,

ailv,,

(et.

en,

mute),

aftur,

eudormi, paat part., asloop.


n'-i
('!'.

afterw.ird8, then.

nergie,
enfance,
ilniui.tioU.

Gr-

"i'pyta),

entasser, v. a., (et en, a he.ip of corn), to heap 111

t"n, Nutli

tas,
j,y.

tow n
'ndti-j!)

n.f., (tt.

L. itifantia), infancy,

entendre,
;

* a.,

(et.
;

enfant.

"

>>'>.

a>l

t., (et.

L.

iiifantuin),

ohilit, 1)0V, g\r\,

hoar, to understirid en to hear of s'entendre av-.., lusion with.

to larler de,

Uo in eol(et.

enfantement,
nfanter,
fortli,
II)

n.

m.,

(et.

m ant),

enthousiasme,
'efWovcrtacriu)

n.

Oroek

c)iil(i-l>iiih, ruvrlatioii.
v.

t'hthusiasMi.

a
t<)

(if.

m/VinO. to bring

enthousiaste, n and adj., (et. enlhomiiarme), entlul^u^8t


etytire,
;

niake,

crcatu.
(et. eit/iinf, rhildlsh.
(et.
e,

efitiiusi!i.--tii-.
.

enfantin, e. adj., e f imer. v. a.,


lu cliut in, conlinc.
sliiit,

to tu luck up, to enclose, to


,

ennfr

(et. entier, iro. wlj wholc, complte,

L.

Ititej;runi),

entirement, a., entonner.


^

adv., cntircly, wboily.


(et. en.

dm,

!..

tonuH),

enfin, adv.,
k,:

(et.

en,
n.

fin),

at last in Une,
influmn.are), to iiglu up.

to buyin biinfiny; (a tune), to btrikc up.

'n sliort, fi"aliy,

aya

entourer,
r^.

v.

a.,

(et.

en, tour), to sur-

enflammer,
enfler,
pi^tf

v. a., (et.

round.

to ihHuMiu, to kindle, to
v. a., (ut.

littht,

inllaruj,

toswell, to
to slnk,

up.
v. a., (et.

entraner, v a., (et. en, train, h trahere), to drni^ aloiijr, to oarry away, to carry, to draw on, to attruot.
v- ^, (et L. L. intrabare, L. shacklo, to clog, toemlcirrass, to 8top, to entan^le.

enfoncer,
to
lilll,\.

en, fond),
re,

entraver,

traiiuiu), to

s'enfuir.
\v y, lo ti'U.

.'

r.,

(et.

fuir)
en,

to

ruu
to

entre, prep.,
v.

engager,
eii^raifL',

(et.

gaiye),

into

(et. L. intra), betweun, in, d'entre, auion;j:st.

to indur, to prevall upon, to biiid, to piess upon.

entre,

n.

f.,

(et entrer), entry, en-

trancc. admision.

engendrer,
btget.

v.

(ot. L.

ingenerare), to
to

entrelacer.
lacii,

i.trin),

^ a., (eten<r, tocer, from fro.n L. lrtf|neu), to inter-

engloutir,

v.

(et. L, in, glutire),

lace, to intervveave.

wallow

up, to en^'ulf.
n.
f.,

entreprenant,
enij^ma), entama.
(prt.

e.

a<ij.,

(et.

entre-

('nigme. #ivTant,

(et, L.

jyrendif). onterprisintr, boid.

61

odj.,

of enivrer).

entrepiiso, n

f.,

'et entreprendre),

Un

'.Ottliiig, cxcitiii^'.

enterprine, undertalcing.

VOCABULART.
ntrr,
to
K<>
>

fH
v.a., (i. /.,
t,n

v. n.,

(et

Intrare), to nter,

puiser,
n'e

mUer

l'-

a vtli), to draiii,
V. a., (<t.

lenir], (o (iiit<n't;iiii, tu kuup, tu Hii[i|K)rl, luinturi'St; entrefenail, 3rd, mii^. iiiij. iml. 'fnlrt-

entretenir,

tu'

cxliauitt, to

from puiU, wear lUt;

e.

uter, to uxliauitt omi:m.'I(.


u.

quilibre,
equilil.niiin.

m.,

^et.

!..

ao<|UilihriuiiiX

tr'iitr

aoee, to coiivorse svith, to coiniiiune


n,

wiilt.

tquip ge,
m.,
v.r.,
,

n.ni.,(et. ('7i>/rr),ei)iiipaK0,

entretien,

(et.

entretenir),

drosH, l'ipiipiiieiit, outflt,

crow

(of

liip).

muiiituiiaiioo. oonveraation, talk.

quiper,
fit

v. u., (et.

equi/) to tquip, to

s'entre-tuer.

to

kill

one another.

ont,

entravoir, v.a

(et. r^ intra, viiliim. to

to i-u(< iliialy, to forueu; aUienii, paNt part.


oait:ii U);iiiii|iu uf,

ermitage, n.m. (et. ermite,L


herinitatfe, retiuat.

ereiuita),

numration.
ratiuiit'iii;,

n.f

(et.

L.

enumer

erreur,
mixtiike.

n.

(.,

(et.

L.

erroroin>, orror,

un II ail lut joli.

envers. prep.,(ut. K invorgU'v.tnwardg envim, n.iii., ihu wroiijf id!; l'enveii, "wron^ ond to", iimlde
(in luoiul eiise);

rudit,
Icuriit!
;

ail.|.aiid n.

m., (et, L. erudituH>,

a chul

ir.

ruption,
ruption.

n. (.,

(et L. eruptlonum),
It.

ont.
invltna), witli utiu uiiothui, ciiiuiouHiy.
1'), atlv., (ot.
[-.

envi (

vylnu
onvv;

escadre
ron.

n.

f.,

(et

gquadra), s<piad>

envie,
It.

n,

t.,

(et.
I

l..

invidia),

fai envie de

le

Jaire,

huve u uiind to do
envie),

escarp
esclava
esclave,
escorte.

e,""lj ,(ot. car/**, It svarpa),

stocji, i\iu'm.il.

envieux, ease,
vious.

udj., (et.

je, ". m., (et. enclave), sluvury.


n.

an-

m,, (et
f.,

L
It.

L. biuvus, Sla-

voniiii.). alavo.

environ, prep.,
aliiioM
.

(et.

en, virer

aliout,

".

(et.

worti), cscort,

comoy.
(et. en, vitaije), to liic tacet'f, to vi<'w, to ooiibtUur,
v.
a.,
oiiu. ulf.

envisager,
iook ut to seo liufoio

escorter,

v. a.,

(et escorUi), to osoort,


(et.

to aiMHxiipany.

envoi
envoy,

n.

m.,

(et.

en

ver),

sendingr,

espace, .
dislui'.ce.

ni.,

L. spatium),

iipaci^,

coiioijiiiiiieiit.

n. m.,

(et en

er),

envoy,
send;

imjssuii^or,

espagnol, esp e>


sort.

e,
'..

.'kIJ.. ^s

anish.
speules), fipcd',

\vt-

envoyer,
go
for.

v. a., (et. L. in, via), to

envuie, aiil, >iiu. piis. ind. ; envoyer cfurcher, to Mi.!n.l (or; e. ouyer trouoir, to

esprance,
expcct.itioii.

n.

'.,

(et esprer),

iioiv.

pais, se,

a<lj., (et.
t., (et.

L. splsaus), thick.

esprer,

v. a.,

et

L. sperare), to hope.
Hi)es)

paul

>'.

L. spatu'a), bhoulder.

epios, n.

(., (et.

L. peines), spice.

espoir, m., (et. L. speres for hope. i,vp<!Ctatioii.


esprit.
miiid.
. >.,

pier, v. a., (et. O. H. O. spuiiiin, ooinparc Eng. sp) ), to watch, to spy.

(et L. BpiritiiB

spirit,

poque,
era, date.

".

f.,

(et.

Gr.

'no^iji,

epoch,

esquif, .
aniali ship.

"i-, (et

o. H. G. sklf),

skifl,

pouser,

v. a., (et. L.

/.

sponsare), to

essayer,

v.

a.

and
(et

n.,

(et.

emii, L.
to

e>.p<iU8e, lo nrtrry.

exayiiiiii), to try.

pouvanter,
poux, ouse,

v. a., (et.

L.

(<,

expaven(et.

essuyer,
wipe,
t
.

v.

a.,

L. exsuocare),

tauy, to friy liteii, to terrify.


n.

siifTer.

m.

at.d

f,,

L.

et

n.

m.,
t].

(et

Eng.

oaat),

east

(Pro-

Bponsus), spouse, niarried band or wife.

nouiice tfie

persor,

hua-

s'prendre,
(ail in love.

v. r., (et.

-,

prendre), to
trial,

es inie. n.i.,(iit.eKtiinpr, L. ac8timar), reckouing; livre, il'eatime, lojf l)ook.


et, eoa}., (ut. Lu et), and.

[Final

U-

wa.Ns siient.

preuve,
prouver,

. ',

(et.

prouver),

grief, attlicticn.
v.
a.,

tablir, v-.a.,(ct L. stabilire), to


lith.

eijtk-b

(et.

-,

prouve,

L.
j

probaru), to try, to

(eul,

to exprience.

^. ,.. ^^., ta'blisssement, n. m., (et tablir). etkw.Vhru^utrBetUuinent,

i>

136
tag^e.
i<i\frti*i,

VoCABOLARY.
n.

m.,

(et. L. L.

Rtaticum), tory,
to elevate (by

et, eu. eut, eussent, parts of aviit.

hfii-ht
v. a.
,

eux. mas.
et. .liKf),
,

plu. |>io.,

ut. L. ills),

the>,

tager,
.itoricH

thuiii

euxtuiiiK, ilieiiiselvea.
v,
r.,

ur

staj^'t'ii

to range.

s'vader,
esuape, tu

(et.

L,

evudere), to

tai

3ril siiiK'. in)p.

ind. of Hre,

h l'al awa.\
v. a., (et.
<!
,

(taler.
tftb. Ut

v. a., (et.
,

digplaj

'tal, from O. 0. II. to offcr, t" sprcad out.

valuer,
to est. mate.

valoir), to value,

tancheri
Btaiioh, to

v. a., (ei. h.

stancare), to

vangtliqUP
eus
,

adj.,

(et.

L.

evangell-

dry up,

to

empty.
state, to, to

e^uiiguiic..!.
.

tat.

tant, prs. part, of tre. Il' m., (ot. L. status),

vangile.
gospel.

m., (e

L. cvangeliuui),

cotiaiiioii; lre be ready to.

en

tat de, to be

tit

s'vano
\o
vaiiLtii.

ir. v.r.,(et. L. ex, vanescore),

t. n. m., (et. L. aestatuiu), suinmer, t, paxt. part of tre.


to exsJiiKiipri! t;o ont, lo diu; piui. dui.; teint, \at
,

vanouissement, im.,
BVi )uii,

{vt.

vanouir),

State ut uiicuiisChvUsiieni).
(., (et.

teindre'
exiiiigulah;

v. t., (ot. L.
*'(

h indif, to

^asion, n. capc

L. evasioueui), es-

iUi/iut, Srd

siii^.

vi
wakeii

't.

iller, v. a., (et. L. L. exvigilare), to to r. u.'^v ; s'eveiiler, to uwaken.


". m., (et. L. l'roiiouiice second as u.
f.,

tendard,
staKla
II,

m.,

(et.

Ger.

stand),

vnement,
evt'iit.
>

evemre),
if ],

colors.
v. a.,

(et. L. exte-ide o', to tendre) xtuiid, to Hpruad, toslrctcli; Vi/ic/;Y, to

viden'^.e, evi i:i,(;e.

(et.

L.

ovidvntia),

stretch uiiehelf.

vident,
f.,

e.

adj.,

(et L. evidentem),
L. evolutiouem),

tendu j)
8))ac'u.

n.

(ot.

tendre), extent,
L.

evi'leiit.

volution,
le,

n.

f.,

(et.

iterneli
eteriiai,

adj.,

(ot.

aeter

alis),

volution.

iidlc'^8.

teiuellement. adv., eternally. Ilm., (et. L. aether), ether. the


.

exalte", v. t , (et. L. exaltare), exali, to extol, te praiae, to excite.


>i.

to

IProiiouiice

tlio

/].

examen), examexamen. ination. [Pronounv e tue en in thie word


m.,
et. L.

(tinceler, v. n., spark e, lo bliiiK!


toile.
II.

(et. L. scintillare),

to

like in],

examinateur,
Stella), star, gruiding

n. .n..

(et L. examinexaminare), to

f.,

(et.

L.

atore^ii), exauiiiier.

sbnr, dcsciny.

examiner,
e, aili.

v. a.,

(et

.'.

tonnant,
a8t'<iiishiii^,

(part o( itonner),
m.,
(et.

examine.

woiideifui.
n.

except, prep., (et tac'itUr), except,


itonner),
Rave.

tonnetnent.
tonner,
v.

asio .ish.iui.i. woiidcr.


a.,
;

exception,

n.

f.,

(et.

L. exieptionem),

(et.

agtofui-h, to ainaze
,

L. extonare), to 'itnnne>\ to wondur.


j-

exception; l'excei'tion de, w^'h the exception of.

touffer, v a (et,?), to s;iflrf, tosuff cale, UP jiuppress. to choke, to throttle.

excs,
ationeiii),

"

m., Cet. L. cxcessus), >xce88.


n.
f.,

exclamation,
exclure,
v.

(et

L.

ex dam-

trange,

adJ.,

(et.

L.

ext.atieus),

exclamation.
a.,

straiixe, wonderful.

tranger, re.
L.
exiraiiuariuM),
litr^ii);er,

dj.

and noun,

(et.
;

L.

(et L. excludere), to xclude; exclu, past part

strange,

(oreifirn

excuse,
exfiine.

n. t.,

(et exeua

r, L.

excusare),
Ij.

furei);ner.

tre,
exii
;

V. n., (et. L. L. esscre),

to be, to

tre, n. ui.,

buing, crature.

excuter, v. a., (et. L. L. exccutare, ex, seei.tuK), to execiitt-, to pcifunn.

troit, e. adj. (et. L. strictus), trait, uair>,w', biuall , l'irot, iiarrowly,

ex ution,
exemple,

n. f., (et. L.

executionein),
L.

excution, purfoiniance.
n.

cnuupeil.

m.,

(et
(<-t.

exemplum),

tude, n. tudier,
t'liidiei
.

t.,

(et. L.

studium), stiidy.
;

oMiniple,

v. ., (et luiif), U) study to eridoavor, to niaku cfTorts.'

exhtun
disiiiu^r.

r.

^,

exhumars), to

eorop en, ne, DOUDce, iu this Word, Huai vh like


a<ij-.

K<iio(ieaTi.

[l'roinl.

igtiiu.-,

exigence. ". urgeucy

t.,

(ot L. exigenik), ex-

VoOABULARir.
Ziger,
V. a., (et. L.

137

exigere), to exact,

to riiquire, to deniaiid.

existant,
existence,

e, ad]., (etez^gter, L. exls-

lerii), oxistiiiy.

faiblesse,
Weai. lies,

n. f.,

(et faibe, L.

flebilis),

"

n. t., (et. exister)

existence,

expdition
xpedition.

n.

f.,

(et, L.

expeditionem),

faillir, v. n., (et. L. falere), to coines-hort.

fail,

to

faim,
n.

n.

f.,

exprience,
exprience.

f (et L. experk'ntia),
e, adj.,
(et.

(et L. fame), hiuiKer.


L. facere\ to niakc, to

faire,

v. a., ret.

exprimental,
expiation,
expier,
n.

O. P. ex-

priment), exporiniental.
t.,

(et. L.

expiationem\

xpiatidn, atoiienient.
v. a.,

oneself.
L. expiare), to exan.i

/aire vinl , or fairf du mal , to fa reenif dre, to niaue tohear, i.e. to tell fai a,))<>'W, to .anse to be oalIe.il. ,.., to serid for ne fain: ina; to do not,hini,' bnt ge fain; in make for
;

ao

niirt

to

h.Ht

oneself,
;

(et.

faimn', pies part


latm,!, 3rl,
itii, Binjr.

to

become

; .

piate, to atone.

faimient, 3rd, plu

sinjr.
;

expirer,
pire, to die.

v. n., (et.

L. exspirare), to ex-

prs. Ind.

inip ind. ; fait, fait, paat part.

fait, n. ni., (et./ai>), fact.


n.f.,(et.L.

explication,
explaiiation.

explicatione),

falaise, n.
lacIviMj,',

f.,

(et 0. H.

felisa), clifT.

expHcare), to eplain; 'a;///i(//-, toexplain to oneself, to expiai n oneself.


(et. L.
j

"xpliqner,

v. a.,

exploit, n. m., achievement.

(et.

exploiter\ exploit,
L. L. oxplititare,

falloir, *. n., et L. falle<e\ to bc to he ncce^sar". niu.st il faut .faire cela, that niint he done il yne/aut une maiiton, I need a house, or. I must nav e a house /allai/, inip, ind.

fameux, euse,
fanions.

adj

(et L. famosug).

exploiter,

v. a., (et.

froiu L. exDlicare), toperform to make capital out of.

an exploit,

se faniiliariser. v. r (et. familier. L. familians', to familiarise o:KHelf.


,

exploration,
em), expluratioii.

n,

famille,
f.,

(et. L.

exploration-

n. f., (et. L. familia),

family.

fanal, n. m., (et It fanalo), ship's


(et L. explorare\ to
ex, poH-r), tocxpo<ie,

explorer,
explore.

v. a.,

fanatique,
fant
ic,

adj.,
al.
>.

(et

L.

fanations),

fana' i.

exposer, v.a.,(et
to ditiplay
;

fa- atiser,

a.,

x'ex/i<,ger,

to expose oneself.
L. exprimere), to

makeenilmsustic.

(et fanatique), to
(et /anatioue).

exprimer,
expreHS.

v. a., (et.

fanatisme,
se fan
u.
f

n.

m.,

expuLjer,
expel.

v. a.,

(et L. expulsare), to
L. expulsioneni),

r, v. r., (et L. L. foenare, t'iuin), to fiule, to wither.


n.
f.,

from

expulsion,
expuidion.

n.

f., (et.

fanfare,
tnniipi.r
1

(et

?),

hoastinjf,
n.

flourish (of a
Jt.

ji'erinj,'.

extrieur, (et L. exterioreji>, extenor, external, outward.


e, a.lj.,

fantassin,
fOOt .-iuMitT.

m.,

(et.

fantaccino) '

exti Ction,n.f.,,et L. exstinctionem),


extinction.

fantastique,

adj., (et L. fantasticim),

faiita.siir, " liiinsu.al.

extrmit,

n.f

let.

L. cxt.-eiuitatem).

fantme,
pliai, ton,,

extienut>, e d, liinit
f,

n. w.., (et L. phanta^ma) appariiion, spectre.

fardeau,
n.f.
adj., (et
L.

n.

(e.t 7i,

load,

nurucn.
fabulog

woight '

fabuleux, euse,
us), Iiit)Uloil-.

farineux, euse,
lann), farinaccovis.
Sri naf. fasS? '"
'"'''
"^

iulj

(et farine, L.

face.

ut.

(et. L. facics). face

ae, opposite.

en faee
'

fasciner,

v.

a.,

(et

L. fascinare). to '

facile, adj.,

(et. L, facilis), facile,

oasy.

fasse, Srd,

einjr.

prs. sub. of faire.


(et.

facilement, adv.,
facilit,
n.
f.,

easily.

fatal, e.
fa^-ilitatcm),

adj.,

L.
exil.

fatalis),

uniucky, unfortunate,
fatalit,
n.
t.,

fated.

(et

L.

noiUty,

eaa*).

(et L.

ftitalittem).

138
fatigne.
har(1shi|),

VOCABULARY.
n. f., (ot. fatiguer), fatigue, straining (of ships).

lievera,

trustworthy. len fidHei. the faithful, worsh ppcrs.


fldli'.,
11.

t>-

fatiguer,

v.a., (et. L. fatigaro), totire,

f.,

(et

L.

fldt'-tatem),

to wc:ir, to atrain.

flde'.ity.

faucher,
L. taicein
i,

v.

a., (et.

L. L. fa Icare

from

fier, V. a

to

mow,
in<i.

toconfide;
to,

(ot. L. L. fldare), te , ne h-r , to rely on,


in.

"itnwt,

tmbt

to confide in, to believe


,

faut, proo.

ot falloir,
L. L. fallita, for

faute,
falluie
,

n.

f., (et.

faiilt, frror;/fl(i//cd<,
ailj., (et.

from L. wnnt of.

(et. h. frus), proud. fier, fire. adj [Tronouiice the final r].

flgjre,

n.

t.,

(et L. figura),

figure,

faux, fausse,
untnie.

L. falsus), false,

foriii, fa<;e.

faveur, n. f., (et. L. favorem), favor. favorable, adj., (et. L. favorabilis),


favorable.

figurer,
figuie
;

v. a., (et. L. flgurare), to ge fifftirer, to fanoy, to imagine.

fil, n.
is

m.,

(et. L. filuni),

thread.

(The

piono

nceilj.

favori,

te,

a<li.,

(et.

It.

favorito),
filer, V. a., (et. fit), to spin.

darlinjK^, fa\orite.

favoriser,

v. a.,

(et.

favor ),
L.

to favor,

filial, e, adj., (et. L. flliali-),


fille, n.
f.,

filial,

to befricnd, to helv).
e, fruitfiil, fortile.

(et.

[..

aiia), girl,

diughtcr.

fcond,

adj.,

(et.

fecundus),
to

]Tho U'a are liquid].


fils, n. ni.
l

f onc'er,
fertdi!-e, to

v. a.,

render

f-,

L. focundare), fruitful.
(et. (et.

sileiit,
f.

(et L. filius), son, boy. fThe but the is pronov nced].


(ot.

fin, n.

L. flnis^, end,

a.nti,

design.

fcondit,
fceunilit\
,

L. fecuiKiitatem),
L. fiiifrere), ebjnit, 'dt, siiig.

fertility.

flnu),

finance, n f. (et f.. [.. flnare, to pay a fUMh fin'incrs, finances, exchequer.
;

feind

e, *. a.

and

n., (et.
;

to fi'i-ii, to liissciiible prt. def.

finir, V. a. and n. (ot L. flnire), to finish, to enii, to conelude.

firmament
L.
L.
felioitatiin\
firni;>inent, sky.
fis
(et.

u-

m.

(et. L.

flrmamentum)

flicit,
felioiti
,

n-

f..

(et.

hnt>)>iiic.<i.

fminin,

e,

n'ij-,

femininns),

sing.

nt. 3rd plu. Imp. ub. ; fV, 3rd inip. sub r>nd fit, 3rd sing. prt,
;

fminine, woinanlilie.

def. of faire.

femme,
wife.

"

'-.

(et.

L. femina^,

wonian,
f,o

fixer,

V. a. (et. L. flxus),
f.

to

fix,

to settle.

fendre,
fer, K-

fixi'i, n.
a,, (et.
iliv

(et. r':xer), flxity, flxedness.

L. flndcre),

spHt,
ord.

to l'ieave, to

ide.

flairer,
to cent.

v. a. (et. L.

fragrare), to snell,

m.,

(et..

L. ferrum), iron,

n\

ferler,
(sails).

v. a., (et.

Eng. to

fiamboyant.
teniiig, Hliiriiiig,

furi),

to furl

e, adj. {et. flamboyer) glisfla>hing.

ferme
ix)sc)I\ilc
;

adJ., (et. L. firmus). finn .solid, terre erme, terra firnia, conti-

flamme,
flatter,
ho,'e.

".

'.

(et L. flamma), flamo.


(et.

v. a.

doubtful, see Skeat),

nent.

to tliitcer; gejlaHer, to flatter oneself, to


v. a., 'et.

fermer,
to close.

L. flnnirc), to ghut,

froce, adJ.,
fiercc.

(et.

L. ferocem), feroolons,
(et.

flche, ".f. (et M. H. arrow, dart


flchir, bend, to relent, to
fleur, n.
f.

flitsch,

arrow),
to

V. a.

and

n. (et. L. fleotere),

.^llb^uit,

frocit,
feroeity.

n.

t.,

L.

ferocifciteni),

to give way.
blo-

(et. L. (ionm), flow er,

festin,
bani(uer.
fte, n.

n.

m.,

(et.

It festino), feast,

eoiu, )>loom.

fle
f., (et.

ve.

n- n. (et. e, a<lj

fluviua), river.

L. festa, festival, hollL.


focus),
firc,

florissant,

{ot.

fiwir, L. florere),

day, feast.
feu,
n. m.,
(et.

f^ouri^hi.lg, thri\ing.

beat,

flot. " "> (et

L. rtuctus), billow,

wave;

warmth.
ferillage,
lcave.
n.

fiot, afloat

m.,

(et. feuilli

,,

foliage,

flotte.

11.

f-,

(et. flotter), fleet,

navy.
;

boiter,
f.,

V. n.,

(et

Jlot),

to tloat
flotUl.

Jlot-

feuille, n.

(et. L. tolla), leaf,

blade.

tant, pri'8. part.

Adle.

Mlj.,

(et L.

fldelis),

taittiful,

flottille, n.

f. (ai,, flotte),

^J'

:l.

VOOABULART.
fluvial, e, adj., (et. L. teiiiing to rivers, river.
foi, n.
iu.
(.,

139
. .,

fluvlalia), per-

f0Urnir<
to
fnriii.sh.

(et. 0. il.

0. frumjan),

(et. L.
;

confidence,

word

ur la

fldein\ faitb, boliot, loi de, trusting

foyer,
L. focus),

n.

m.,

(et. L. L.

focarium, from

hearth, centre.
(et.

once la o), the saille tiriie.


fonction, n. tunctioii, duty.

fois, n.f., (et. L. vice9\ time ; altoi^ether, at ;

une fois, one and

fragile, adj.,
fraii,

frajilis),

fragile,

wi;iK, dlicate.

fra.hement.
f.,

ath., reocntly, newy


aiij.,

(et.

L.

(unctionein),

frais, frache,
cool, frusii.

(et.

A. S. fruac),

fond, n. m., (et. L. fundus), boftom, groiind, farth'T end, rcmote part,, dopths.
fond,
0,

frais,
ex|)eiiHet)

n.
;

m., plu., (et.?), chargeM, d leur frai, at their own


a*lj., (et.

expense.

(part,

of /ondir),

founded,

franais, e
fruni
().

L. L. francensis,

reaHonalile.

li.

G. franco,!, French.
v.
a.,

fond ment,
fonder,
fondre,
melt, to

n.

m.

(fuii^antentuni),

foundation, bani.
v. a. (et. L.

franchir
cro.Ms.

(et. fraiic,

free),

to

fundirc\ to (ound,
to

to CNtablish.
v. a.

franc scain. n. m., FranciBcan incnk. frapper, v. a., (et. Siand hrapjia, to
handlu ioughI.\), to btrike, to knock, to
niake nn iiupreMginn, to
atluct.

and
fiill

n. (et. L. fuiidere),

siiik,

to

on, to luah <ipoii.

font, 3rd plu. prs, ind. of faire.


force, n. f. (et. force Jorcex, 8treii|,'th the force of, by diiit of.
;

L. L. fortia) str<;M^th,
;

fraternel, le, adj., (et. frateriiul, l)iotherly.


frayer,
v. a., (et.

fratemalis),

force d', froin

L. frlcare), toopcn,

to traco ont (roadu), to explore.

forcer,
fort,

v. a. (et

force), to force.

frle. 3j
dlicate.

(et. L. fragilis), frail,

weak,

n.

f.

(et.

L. L. foresta, from L.

foris), fore.st.

frquemment,
(et. L.

adv.,

(et.

frquent)

forme,
prt.

n-

'

forma), form, niake,


formai,
ex-

froquontly.

buitd, niaiincr.

formel,
I

le, adj. (et. L. fonnalis),

frquenter

v. a., (et. L.

fr^quentare),

settle.

express.

to fro(nieiit. to llve In, to kiiow, t) be ac<|unii ted uith

edneaa.
sinell,

formellement,
pressly.

adv.,

fonnally,

frre, n. m.,
frter,
t

(et.

L. fratein), broibor.

former, mako.
;

v, a., (et.

forme), to form, to
stronp,

v. a., ^et. fret, 0. II.

G. freht;,

frei-bt, to charter.

fort, e. ad]., (et. L. fortia), powe'.hil fort, n. m., fort.

fro

(1

e. <<]< (et. L. frijrldus), cold. n.


f.,

froideur,
iiidiltireiioe.

(et.

froid),

coldncw,

forteresse,

n.

f.,

(et.

L.

L. fortalitia,

foiii L. forlU), fortruss.

front.

"

m.,

(et.

I,.

fronten), foreh'ad.

arrow),

fortifier, v. a., (et. L. fortitioaro), to strenjithen se fortifier to BtrciiKthpn oneself.


;

fruit, n. m.,
fugitive,
tive.

(et. L.

fructus), fruit.
(et.

fugitif, Ive, adj.,

L.

fugitivu),

wavering
V.

fujitij, n. ui., fugi(et.

fortnne,
fOBs, n
(>

n. f (et. L. fortuna),

fortune,

go<Hl luck, living.


ni., (et. L. L.

L. fosr-a), ditch,
lontri.

trciiuh.

fosHatum, from [Pronounce the

fuir,
shuii,
1
1

a.

and
f.,

ii.,

L.

fugcre), to
L.

fly,

to ruii

away, to

flec.

f.;me, n.
snioKe.

(.et.

fumer,

funinroi,

foudre,

n.

m. and

f.,

(et. L. fulj.'urtitn),

thundor-bolt, thunder.

funbre,
ing to
.i

adj., (et. L funcbrl), pcrtaiiifuiieral, fuiiercal.


nf.,

--I

foudroyer,
foole, n.
lavy.
f.,

v. a., (et.

foudre), to thun-

der-strike, to shoot.
(et.

funrailles,

plu.,

(et,

L.

funeralia), luneral rites, obsequics.

fouler), crowd, throng.

funeste,
uiiliicky,

adj.. (et. L. funestus), fatal

JM-

fouler, V. a. (et. L. L. fuUare. ta (-leaiiHu cloth', to tread, to traniple on, te crush; joulfr aux jfieds, to tranipic uiider foot. to tread.

fure .t, fureur,

Ar^\, plu.

pr
L.

't.

def. of

Ure.

n.

f., (et.

furorem), fury.
8ub, of
iftrt.

U foruilot^are), ant-hili, crowd.

fourmilire,

n.

(et.

fourmiller, L.

tussent. 3rd, plu


futi Sni,

iiiip.

Hinjf. prt. def. of (tr^.

140
futnr.
g,
11.

VOOABULART.
6, adj., ^et. L. futurus),

future.

geste.
action

0-

m.

(et.

L.

gestun), geHture,

m.

gigaitsquo,
giu:uiric.
;

adj. (et.

It.

gigantesoo),

gage, n. m., (et. fid'.ifr, from L. L. vmli ne, to plLilifuV pledt^e, token, pawn mettre en jraje, to jiawii.

glace,

n.

(.

(et. L. glacies), ice.

glaive,

n.

gagner,
his li\ing.

v. a., (et.

to p.i-curu L'itMu),

to -et, to gct to

G. weidanjan, to frain, to win, te earn, <nijii.fr sa vie, to earn


O.
il.
It..

globe,

n.

m. (et. L. irladius), gword. m. (et L. ^lobus), globe.


f.

gloi
honor.

e,

n.

(et.

L.

gloria),

glory,

gale
peMjli;

e, n.
II.

(., (et.

traler.i>,
jfiili

galley.
ft

glorieux eose,
glorious, proiid,

adj. (et. L. gloriosua),

galet,

m., (et. O. F.

tebble),

les iialets,^\\\n\!,\o.
II.

galop. ga: de.


t'Kly

ni., (et. iiaiifx'r),


(.,

allop.

glorify,

glorifier, v. a, f.o praise

(et.

L. gloriflcare), to

n.

(et.

'tarder), giiard, eus-

golfe,
Bweli

n.

m.
v.

(et. a.

Gr. At^ov), guK.


(et.

gonfler,
v a., (et. o. H. a. wartnn, to
;

L.

con tiare),
L.

to

garder,

se <jmifier, to swell, to rise.

watch), to kcep. to piottxt, to prserve,

gothique,
goiliic

adj.

et.

i^othicug),

gazouillementi n.m.,{ot.
cliir|iii

lazi^uUler),

x, waibiiniT.
v.

gouffre.
abyss.

I).

n>.

(et.

Qr. A^Kt), gull,

gazouiller,
Wrtrbk-.

n., (et. T), to chirp, to

gmir,

v. n., (et.

I...

g:omr>n"), to irro.-in,
su,i.

to si^'i, to lanient.

t<>

luoinn, to he
(ot.

gnral,
gnerai,
erai.

e,

atlj.,
;

L.

gencrali^),

got, n. m. (et. L. gustni), taste. goter, V. a. (et. L. L'u<Ure), to toate. goutte, n- '. (t. L. giitta), drop, got. go veruail, n. m. (et. la. gubernaculuni), rud'Iar.

universal
n,

gnral, n. m., gn(et.

gouvernement,
f.,

n. >n. (et. (jouvemer),

gnration,
eni), treneration.

L. genoraUon-

goveri'in

lit.

gnireasement.
nobly.

dv.,

generouaiy,
(et.

gouverner, v. a. 'et. L. to jiovorn, to ruie, to stuer.

gubernare),
L.

gouverneur,
.iil].,

n.

m.

(et.

guberna-

gnreux, euse.
pnr08it5, n. teni\ gne rosi ty.
f.,

L, gener-

toremi, uovcrnor.

OjUs), p;enei()ii8, noble.


(et.

grce,
L. generosita-

n.

f.

(et.

L. irrntia), grce, l-

gance,
(/race

u^'k "?''iiifHs,

gnis,

n- in-, (et. L. (fenius)

genius.

relu

m
y.

, tlmnl<s lliaHk><.
.

to

piidon, rendre
et. L.

thanks
griXce,

to

dim. of mettn- ijenaux^ toviiier u i/enuux, to kneel down.


n. ni., (et. gun\icu;iini,

geuo J,

gracieu
jrriiu'ful,

euse,

aitj.

L.

(.'cnii'.

kiice

ajrree .b e,

gracions,

*(

^ntiosus), kind,

kind
Btei>

genre, n
sptiiirt
;

(ot.

jrer

ore), kind,

gradin,
;

n.

m.

(et.

'-rade, L. u:radus\

(leiire

liuniain, niankind.
n.

(jradiiK, seati

risi

oiie

ahove the
gran,
L.

gentilhomme,
tjeiiti is

other.
(ot. ^jeniil,

L.

and

lioirme), gentleman, noblctreojjrraplier.


(et,.

graine,

n.

f.

(et.

L.

L.

ninn.

gra'iiin). seed.

gographe, n m. gographie, n. f.
geouriiiihy.

grand
hiiih,
tall.

e, adj. (et. L.

grandem), grai,
size, large-

L.

geogiaphia),

grandeur,
adj., geojrraphioal.
(et.
'jele,

n.

f.

(et. ,',Tfrid)

gographique,
gelier,
jaikT.
n.

ne

s, jjri'^riioRS,

grandeur.
n.
(ot.

m.

L. caveola),

grandir,
grow.

v.

(et
L.

grandire\ to
grave,
to

grave,
8erioii8.

adj.

gravis),

g' mtre, n m. (t. L. gcometra), peoMieter, >,'i'onietrician.

graver,
eugrnve.

v-

(et.

Ger.

graben),

gcom
gerbe,

trie,

n.

f.

(et.

L.

geometria).
sheaf.

gi'iiiK'try.

gravir,
n.
t.

v. a,

and

:..

(et.

L. L. gradireX

(et.

H. 0. garbn),

to elimb up, to a:sceud

,i'

VOOABULARY.
grarltf
gr, n.m,
tioii,

141
n.
f.

n.

t.

(et.

L.

gravitatem),

haleine,
wi
iil,

(et.

L.

halare), breath,

gritvity, Bcriousncss.
(et. L.
;

l)rec-zo.
I).

liking

gratum), will, Inolina son iir-', in accordanco

'halte.
in;,'-|.laci!.

f.

(et.

Qer. hait), hait, halt-

witli one's likint, at one's wlll, at one's

'hardi, e, adj. ut. O.


hanuii), boM, daring.

n. G. hartjan, to

pleuMire.

grement,
(of

n.

m.
(et.

(et. crrer),

rigging
of

'hasard,
tlico),

sliipi.

m. (et. Arab. al-sar, ganie hazard, chance.


n. n.
f.

grelot, n. m.
little
l.fill.

diin, of 0. F. grelc),

'hte,

(et.

Gor. ha.st\ haato.

'hter,
n.
f. (et.

v. a. (et. hAtt), to

hasten.

grve,

0. F.

Eiig. gravel), stranri,

grave beach.
L.

compare

'haubans,

n.

m,

^et.

F.em. hobcnt),

ahroiuls, riggiii;;.

gros, se, adj.


lari;e
;

(ot.

L.

^.'.ossisX hig,

lex i/rns

temps, Htoriiiy w. ather.

grossir,
big;,'er,

v, a.

and
(et,

n. (et. !ir('S),

toniake
grotto,

haut, e, adj. (et. L. altu^>, bi-h d hauie u,i,x, in a loitd voit-e hiiiit, n. m, height, top liant de, Uwu abovo.
;

Wm
f.

'Il

to

grow
n.
f.

bigircr, to swell.

'hauteur,
'havre,
ha> en.
n.

n.

(et haut), heiglit, cmihafen), harbor,


et.

nence, baii;.'htinu8s.

grof e,
cave.

L. crypta),

m.

(et. Gei'.

groupe, ri. m. grouper, v. a.


gurir,
defeiicl), to

(et.

It.
;;

groppo\ gronp.
ti/ie),

hbreu,
Hel)re'.

adj.

and n.m,

L, hebrieus),

(et.
(et.

to grout.

a.

Gothic warjan, to

hmisph
herbe,
jtl.iiit,

e, n.

m.

(et. L.

hetnispbri\>'".i

cure, to henl.

uni), )it;iiii4phere.
n.
f.

guerre, n. f. (et. 0. H. G. werra\ war. guerrier, n. m. (et. <nierre), warrior. guide, n. m. (et. ;)uide), guide.
guid'r, V. a. (et. L. gfuide, to conduct.
L. guidare), to

(et.

L. hcrba), herb, grass,

vgtation.
e,
'"^'U-,

herbu

geassy, weedy.

i.

hrditaire,
hoi uilitury.

aUj. (et. h. h. rcaitarius),

hrsie,
ing), hurtsy.

n.

f.

(et.

Gr. Vipfens, choos(et.

[h asplrate in indicated

thus

hritage,
'ftj.

n.

rn.

hir ten, inheri-

tance.

h, n. m. or

f.

hriter
Inhorit.

(de), v. n.

(et L. hereditare), to
(et.

habile,
Bkillul.

adj. (et. L.habilis), able.clever,

drt.s.f,

habiti n. m. (et. L. habitas), coat, garb habilB, clothes.


;

hritier, n. heir. inhcritor.

m.

L. hereditarius),

habitacle,
binnacle.

n.

m.
m.
f

(et.

L. habitaculum),
habiter), iiihabi-

hroque, adj (et. L. heroicus), heroic. hrosme. u. (et. Mnix), heroisin.


'hron, n.m. (et. 1-. L. aironem), hron. 11. m. (et L. hros;, hero. 'h [The
;

habitant*
tant.

n.

(et.

habitation, n
habiter,
^na,
L.
v. a.

(et.

[..

habitationem),

#i.S

^..

.,1).

habitation, i.ouse, colony.

hsiter,

V. n,

(et L. hsitare), to hesihora), hour, timo.

and
f.

n. (et.

L. habitare),

liltO.

to inhiibit, to dwell.

he re
(et.

n. f. (et. L.

habitude,
(reftt,

n.
;

habit,

>;usti)in

L. habitulinem), nvuir l'habitude de, to

heureux, euse,
hier, adv.
this

adj. (et. heur,

from

j.

aiguliiimi, liapi)y. fortunate.


(et. L. heii). yestcid.ay.

bave the hahit


^

of.

[In

large*

habituel,

le, adj. (et. L. L. habitualis),

'>d

liiiai

is

proi.ouncedj.

habituai.

'hisser,

v. a.

[re\ to
Igrare,

habituellement, ndv., huoitually. habituer, v. a. (et. L. L hal)ituare),


to tjubituate, to aucu,stoni.

histoire,
histori^i
to
iiill.

n.

f.

(et Oer. hissun), to boist (et L. historia), higtory.


histoire), histoiian.

hitorien, n.m. ^et


e, adj.

'hache,
In),

n.

f.

(et.

Oor. backe), axe.


liecige.

(et L. historicue), hisL. hibernus), wintr.

to

'haie. n. f. (of -.o'diern).

(et L. L. haga),

Une

''iver. n.
[P.
ni.uiice

m. (et
the
n.
r\,

ladlre),

'haine,

n.

^ct.

han;

of Oer. origin),

'ho het,
pi
,

m. (et hocher, to shakc),

liiing, toy.

142
hommet
Iroin
"

VOCABDLART.

^*'
"

^
'.

hominem\ man.
(ot.

idal,

e,
(.

adj. (et. L. Idealia), fdeal.


(et.

homognit.

homo<ikne,

ide,

n.

L. idea), idea,

thought.

Gr. 'o/noytc^t), Imilarity.

hoinojreneousnesp,

idoltrie,

n.f. (et. L. ldolat,rla),idolatry.


".
f.

honnte, ad], (et. L. honcstus), hnnest. honntet) n. f. (et. honnte), hoiiesty,


virtiiu.

ignominie,
ignorance,
Ignorance.

(et.

I<.

Ignoniinia),

lunoininy, diHt,'race.
n.
*.

(et.

L. ignorantia),

honneur, honorable,
honorable,

n m. (ot, L. honorem), honor.


adj.
(et.

ignoreri
iK'norant

v. a.

(et.

L.

ij^norare), to

be

L. hotiorabilis),

of,
;

Ignorant o(
v.
a.

know; iiinoiant. /.(jnord-', unknown to.


not
to pro. (et.
L.
Ulu), he, it,

honorer,
)ioiior.

(et.

L.

honorare),

to
il,

ils, per.

h'mtv, o. H. 0. hiiiila), Hham.'fuI, asimmed, bashful.

'honteux, euse,
i.

they.
le, n.
sion.
f.

iidj.

et.

(et.

L. inBula), island,
f,

isle.

'horde, n. oampi, horde.

(et

Turkish

ordA,
horiaon.

illusioni

n.

(et L.
v. a. (et.

illusiiotieni),

illu-

horizon, horreur,

n.

m.

(et. 'opl^uiv),

illusionner,
ludo, to
Jill

Uhmon),
lllustris),

to deillua-

n.f. (ot,

L. horroi-em), horror,
L. horribilis), hor-

witli illusiona.

fri^ht. dete.station,

illustre,

adj. (et.

L.

horrible, adj.
rible.

trion!(, fainous,

(et.

celebrated.
a.

illustrer,
(de), prep. (et.

v.

(et L. illustrare), to

'hors
bej'i iid.

L
f.

foras),

eut

of,

illustrate, to adorn.

horticulture,,
cu'.turai

n.

(et.

Ix

hortus,

horticulture.
(et. L. L.

hospitalier, ire, adJ.


pitalirius), hospitable.

hos-

im-, in-, ir-, (et. L. in), insei)arable preH.v, ro uetimes with a ney:ative force, as: impit."iiahli;, ingii, irr chi, sonietinies wich an intensive force, aa'.imiioser intimider.

image,
L. hospifcallta-

n.

f,

(et L. imaginem), image,

hospitalit,
hostile, adj.
unfrietully.

n.

f.

(et.

pioture.

tein), hn.ypitality. (ot.

L. hostilis), ho^tilo,

imaginaire, adj. (et L. imatjinarius), imat;inary, ohiiuerical.

imagination,
m.
(et.

n.

f.

(et.

L.

imagina-

hte,
guest.

n-

L. ho9pitein\
(t. htel), inn.

host,

tioncm), imagination.

imagineri
n.
f,

v. a.

(et.

L. iinav^inari), to
;

htellerie,

imagine,

to

conoive
'

t'iinajiner,

to

'huit, adj. (et. ]>roiiounced t

octo), eight. when at the end

L.

[The of a

fancy.

clause or before vowelH].

hutrei

n.

f.

(et. L. ostrea),

oyster.

imiter, v.a. (e' immdiaterr. t

imitari), to imitate,
i^'.,

immedatoly.

humain,

e,

adj.

(et.

h.

humanua,

immense,
menae, vost.
immen.sity.

adj

immen-sus), im-

huinan, hnmane.

humanit,

n.

f.

(et. L.

humanitatem),
humble,
otioself.

immensit)
immobile,

n.f (et. L.

immensitatemX

huiiiaiiity, kindness.
ailj.

(et L. immobilis), imf.

humble,
;

a<lj. (et.
v.

L, hnmilis),
fj.

mov.ible, nuitionless.

humilier, humble s'huiailier,


a.

(et.

hirniliare, to

to

humble
L.
S.

immobilit, n. teui), iitiniobility.

(et L.

immobiUta

humilit,
hu'iiility.

n.

f.,

et.

humilitatom),
huii),

immoler,

v.

a.

(et.

L. irauiolare), to

immolato, to slay, to
n.
f.

kill.

'hune,
'hutte,

(et, (at.

A.

top of a

immortaliser,
immortalise.

v. a.

(et immortel), to
(et L. immortall-

'1. f.

Ger. htltte),

hufc.

m. and f. (et,. L. hymntis), hynin, anthcin ht/m is foinniiiic whun meaninif a hymn of the church, autsculine In other aenaea.

hymne,

n.

immortalit,

n.

f.

tatem), imuiortality.

immortel,

le, adj. (et. L.

immortalisX

immorial, etcrnal.

1,

n.

m.

impassibilit,

n.

f.

(et L. imimssibili-

adv. (et. L. ecoe-hic), her'. hither ; iei-km, hre belo"*' ; Jusqu'ici, till the presvnt.
ici,

tatem), iinpassibility, calmiiew.

impatiemment,
Impatiently.

s^y. (t itoiiotittU),

VoCABULAnf.
impatiencOi
Impatience.
n.
t.

U3
v. a.

(et.

t..

mpaticutia),
L. impation-

innondier,
to SCI
lire t<i

(et incendie), to (et (ot

bum,
an-

impatient,
impie> ^iprofane.

e,

adj

(ot.

incertain,

e, adj.

in-, certain),

teiu), iiupatient.
{.ot.

certain, doubtful.
L.

uwinun), iinpious,

incessant,

e, ndj,

L.

L.

Inccssaninclinati-

tcm', incessant.

impitt

'

(et. L.

impie'atcm),

lin-

pifty, iinpo iliness, profanity.

f. L. inclination, on(!ni), inclination, affection.

n.

(et.

impitoyable.

lulj

fet. in-,

iloyable),

incliner,
cline
;

v. a. (et. L.

indinare), to
adj. (et. L.

in-

pitilesa. mcrciless, cruel.

n'incliner, to

bow.
ineom-

impitoyablement,
implacable,
itnplaciilile,

Iv., cruelly.

incommensurable,
incomparable,
ahili),

nJj- (t. L. implaeabllis),

mensurabiii), incommensurable.
adj. (et L. lnc< mparincomparable, wondeiful.
in-,

not to be appeaseil.
v. a.

implorer,

(et L. implorare), to
L. Iraportare),

implore, to heg.

important,
iinpoi'tant.

e. adJ. (et.

incomplet, te.adj. (et Incomplte, imperfect.

contjkt),

importun,
imposant,
in^, awful.

e. adj. (ot. L.

impcrtunus),

inconnu, e, adj. (et known, ecret.

in-,

connu), un-

iniportunatc, tfOublosuiiB, tlreiwiiie.


e, iwij. (et. imiitatr),

inconsquence,
inco solab

n.

f.

(ot L. inconse-

impoa-

quentia), incoiisistency.
e. adj.

(et L, InconaolabiL. incrcdulus),


L. incredilit-

imposer,

v.a. (et. in-, poser), to

Impose,

lis',

inconsolable.
adj.
(et.

to lonipcl, to force.

incrdule,
L. impositioncm), (et L. imposa iblliL. impoi^sibilis),

imposition,
imposition.

n.f. (et.

incredulous.

incrdulit,
n.
f-

n.

f-

(et.

teni), incrodulity, unbclief.

impossibilit,

tatuiii), inipossibility.

incruster,
to incrust.

v. a.,

(et L. L. Incrustare),
L.

impossible, adj.
imposiiblc.

(et.

inculte, adj.
tivated.
(et. L.

(et.

incultu), uncul-

impression,

n.

f.

impressionemX

indcis,
decided,

e,

adj. (et L. indecisus), un-

iuiprt:s.sion, feeling'.

impivu, imprimer,

e, adj., unforseen,
v. a. (et. L.

indpendamment,
dently.

adv.,

indopoti-

imprimere), to

inipreds, to print, to implant, to pres, to plant, to inspire.

indpendant,
indice,
indication
n.
;

e, adj. (et.

in-,

dpen-

dant), indepcndent.

imprimerie,
ing, printing

n.f.

(et imprimer), print-

m.

(et.

L.

indicinm),

sijfii,

oltii:e.

des indices, information.

puissant, from h. L, posijuntem), impotcait, ineSectual.

impuissant,

e, adj. (et in-,

indien, ne, adj. and noun, Indian. indiifrence, n.(. (ot L. indiferentia),
indiffrence.

impul ion, n. f. (et L. Impulsionem), impiilaion, impulse.


imputer,
impute.
v. a.

indiifreni.
Indilferonteni
,.

e, adj. and noun, (et. L. indiffrent. .


f.

(et L.
(et.

imputaro), to
L. L. inoccessiinac-

indigence.

(et

L.

indigcntia),

Indigence, jwverty.

inaccessible, adj.
bilis), ina>.ue8tiible.

indigne,
gcna), native.

adj

and noun, (ot L.

indi-

inaction,
tion.

n.

f.

(et.

in; action),
7i-,

indigent,

e, adj. (et

Indigcntom),

inattendu,
unexpeotud.

e, adj. (et.

attendre),
attention),

iniii^ent, poor.

indignation,
.
'

n.

f.

(ut L. indignationL.

inattention,
i..ittfllt.lOM,

(et. in-,

eni), indignation.

DC^lOCt.
"* "
(et.

indigne,
"^oulable),

adj. (et

indignus),

un-

incalcuialls. i^
incaloulaliie

worthy.
initrnh.
a. ndl.

in en die,
coiilla ration,

n.

m.,

L.

incendium;,

fet indiuner), indig-

buming.

Daut.angT}

144
indigner,

VOCABULARY.
.
'<
a-

(et L. Indignari), to

influencer,
Influence.

t. ^

(et L. influente), to
intoruia-

raise imtiifnation, to irri'uiti ; n'indigner, to liccoine indi'^'naiit, to got aiiK^y-

indignit.
in(li),'i)ity,

(et.

L. indigi.itatem),

f. (et. L. information, tionein), infi'rmatlon, iDquiry.

n.

insult.
v.

indiquer,
liidii'uto,

a.

(et.

L.

indicare), to

to point ont.
,

informer, v. . (et. L. Informare), to Infonn, to inqutre alter, to inatitrite an ln(|uiry ; fii\/omur, to ank, to Inquire

about
(i.

indisciplin

e.

a<ij-

L. indiscip-

litiatiiH), uiKtiHcipliiied.

Infortune, n. f. (et L. InfortuniumX misfortiinu, adverflity, distrcss. infortun,


unfoitiinato.
L.
o, a<lj.

indiscutable, lulj. {in-tdiaeuti'.r, froin L. (iihiKuteru), which doea tiot admit of


discussion, uiiduut>tt'd.

(et L. Infortunatus),
tn-,

individu,
Individual.

n.

m.

(et.

inJividuu),

infranchissable, adj. (et


ehiri, itii|iasMul)le.

/rcn-

):,','i"-'

indomptable,
indulgent,
industrie,
dustry, art.

adj. (et. in-, domiter),

infrq lent,

e. adj.,

unfre<iuented.

ungovernab'u, uncoixiiierable.
e, adj.

ingrat,

e,

adj.

(et L. IndulgenL. industria), in-

jfrateful, fr;iitles9,

(et L. infrratus), unill-rewarded (labor).


f.

teiu), indulgent,
u.

kind.
t.

ingratitude,

n.

(et. L. intfratitudi-

(et.

neni), ingratitui'.o.

industriel,
industrial.

le,

adj.

(et
in-,

inhumain,
industrie),
branler),

o. adj.

(et L. inhumanus),
(et. L. initiaro),

Inhuniaii cruel.

inbranable,
jnuiiovabie, linii.

aJj.

(et.

wh

initiateur, boKns, an iunovator.


n.
'

m.

one [Pronounce

flrit

like

].

ingal,

e, adj. (et.

L. in(0(iuall8), un-

equal. rut of proiiortion.

iniquit, n. t. (et. L. iniquitatem), Iniquity, wiekedneas.

inp isable, Inexhausiible.


int^vitablo.

adj

(et.

in-, ipuiaer),

injonction,
Injuiiction.

n.

(,

(et L. injunctionem),
injuria),

invitable, adj. (et L,


infaillibilit, n.
intuilibility.
f.

jnevitabllla),

iig'ure. n. t. (et L. affront, insult

Injury,

(et in^/aiUir),

injustice, o.
justice,

f.

(et L. .njustitia),
adv., Innocently.

in-

infaillible, adj., infallible. sure, infme, adj. (et. L. iofamis). infarnous, hanioful.

innocemment,
innocence,
Innocciioe.
n.

f.

(et

innocentia),

infatigable, adj. (et. L. Indefati^jahle, unwearied.


infodation.
foodu
'

infatigabilia),

innocent,
innocent.

e, adj.

(et L. innoc-entem),

),

in/'A dcr, L. L. iiifuudation, subordiiiatiuri.


n.
(.

(et.

innombrable,
ilis),

adj. (et. L.

innumerab-

iiinunierable.
e, tvdj.,

infriear,
Infeiior.

e, i^dj.

(et L. inferiorem),
(et.

innomma

unnamed.
(et m-, offeneif),
inquietudi-

infriorit,
ority.

"

f.

infrieur), InftriL.
infestare),

inoflFensif, ive, inotfcnsive.

a^ij.

infester,
liifost.

v.

a.

(et.

to

inquitude,
inquisition,
inquisition.

n.

f.

(et. L.

nom), inquitude, iinoaainess.


n.f.

infidle, adj.
ful.

(et.

L. infidelis), unfaith-

(et L. ioquisitionem),
L. inRectum), insect

infime, adj.
lowt'Bt,

(et. L. lufinma), vtry buiuble.

meanest
inflnl-

insecte,

n.

m.

(et.

infini, e, adj.

and noun (et L.


f.

insens, e. adj. and noun, (et. L. inseiisaLu.s), .senseless, in^aTie, fool, nianiac
insensible, iwlj. (et L. insenaibili.s), iuaeusiblc, not feeling^, unoonctou8.

tus), intinM', intitiitude.

infirmit,
iiilirniity.

n.

(et L. iufirmitotem),
(et.

insensib'ement,
v.

adr., inaensibly, im-

infiiger,
inHicM.

il

L.

inflisfcre),

to

perc jptib y.

insolemment,
o.
t.

adv., insolently.
t,

infl :ence, infliMuce.

(et

L.

infiuentia),

insolence,
Inaolt-uce,

a.

{aL L. inaoleati).

VOCABULARY.
insolent,
illHU Uni.

U6
(et.

e.

dj, (et. L. insolentcm),


n.
(et.

intgre, adj.
rnptil)le,

L.

Jntoger),

incor-

npri^ht.
le. (et. L. intelleutuallsX

Insomnie,
insouciantt

(.

L.

Itisoinnia),

leu|>li!>sni'MS, waiit of rest.


e, iwij. (<h

intellectuel,
intelluctnal.

in-, icncii-r, L.

olli<;itarc), carulusH, imlifFurent, h( (jdlusfl.

intelligence, n.f. (et. L. intolliKentia), Intelli;,'-'!!, e, undcrstandii^.


intelligent, e, a<ij, (ot. tein), intolli({ent.
intelligible, adj.
IntoUijfible.
et. L.

ins; irateur. adj

and
(.

n.

m.
L.

(ot

L.

liisi>iiatoreni). inspiring, Inspirer.

L.

Intelliaron-

inspiration,
tioiiiMii),

n.

(o

inspiraintciHicibiiM),

inspiration.
v.

inspirer,
insiiiie;
hing-.

a.

(et.

L.

inspirai

e),

to
intoiidaiit,

ins^rer quelque cl^me qiuiu'ith Hniue-

?it un, to inspire dumiu ono


instance,
instant)
n.
t.

intenlant, n. m. (et.L. intendontom), steward; mUiul mt iiiural,


intenter,
;

gnerai steward.
v. a.
(et.

(et.

gt'ht'.v, S'jliuitation,

L. insUntiu', urentreuty, tleiiiaiul.


L. inst.intani), in-

L.

itrt<Mitare),

to

beunn intenter action ogainst.

un procen
f.

, to enter

an

n.

m.

(et.

stant, moment; iinniudiately.

l'inttant, instantly,
1
I

intention,
ivitiuti,

n.

(et.

L.

intentionem)

purpo.se, design.
v. a. (et. L.

instantanit n. f. (et. instantan, froni niH ant), iiistaritancoUHnc'SS.


instinct,
insti loi
;

interdire,
ini.ndict, to sing. imp. Ind

forbid
;

in^enlicere), to in'enl'miit, .'Ird,


intresse), to

n. m. (et. L instinetus), d'instincf, instinctively,


(et. inttincl), In-

int^ rdi', p.i8t part.


v. n. (it.
>

intresser,
intrt,
.

L.

interest, to niove, t

nrouse.

instinctif, ive, udj.


Btinuiivc.

m.

(et. L. interest), inti-rest.


(et. L. in-

L. in^tituere), to institute, to estaiilisli, to appoint.

instituer!

v. a. (et.

intrieur, e. -idj. md noun trim Tenu, iiiterior, innei'.


i'

institution,
ueni),
il

n.

f.

(et.

L.

institutio-

terlocuteur,

n.

m.

(et.

L. int riocu-

Htitiition.

t'irem),

inierlocuti)r,

interrogator,

op-

ponent.

instlllCtion. n. f. (et. L. instructioneni instruction, information; l'instruction d'un /iroces, e.vauiina'jn pre.iniinary to a trial.
,

interposer,
i

v. a.

(et. inter,

poser), to

itorpose.

interprte,
interprett-r.

n.

m. m.

(et. L.

Interpretem),
Inte rognum),

instruire,
instruit,

v.

a.

(et.

instiu.'t; to propare,
e,

L. instmere), to or condnct \a, trial).


(ot!*

interrgne,
Intel' regnuni.

n.

(et. L.

a'j-

inutruire),

leariuil, taught,

warned.
'.

instrum^'nt.
insu,
07
n.

(ot.

L.

instrumen;

interroger,
to interrojato
;

v. a.

(et.

L. interro^rare),

tum), in.strument

^iuterrOi/er, gte one anotlier.

to interrn-

m), lirnoranoe d insu, unknown to him, to it, without


(et.

m.

in-,

interrompre,
peri,'),

v.

a.

(et.

L.

interrum-

knowii'g

to liitorrui)t, to lireak
.

it.

off.

insubordination,

n.

f.

(et.

in
in-,

mbormborinsu-

intervall
in trval.

n.

m.
u.

(et. L.

intorvallum),
L.

di nation), .riHuUir lination.

insubordonn,
donnt'f
,

interv ntion,
tiiiiioiii),

'.

(et.

interven-

e, adj. insubonliiiate.

(et.

intervention.
adj. (et. L. Infinus), intim.ite,
v. a.

insulaire, adj. and noun,


lariai, iii>ul,ir, i^lander.

intime,
(et. L.

inward.

intimider,
insuUare),

(et.

m-,

insulte.

"

'.

(et.

L. Insultus', iiisult.
n. (et. L.

timiile), to

Intimidate, to terrify.

insulter,

v. a.

and

intimit,
intolerablo.

n.

f.

et.

intime), intim.aoy.
in ole:abilis),

to inult, to aiuie.

intolrable, adj.

(et. L.

s'insurger,

v. r.

(et. L.

insurgere), to

rise ajainf-t, to rebel.

insurmontable,
ter),

adj.
f.

(et. in-,

surmoninsurrec-

intrpide,
trepid. brave.

adj. (et. L.

intrepidu8\ laintrpide), inintrigo),


in-

iiisunnounlable.
n.

insu rection,
tioiiL'in),

(et.

L.

intrpidit,
trepid It y.

n,

f.

(et.

insurrection.
(et. tarir, O.

intarissable. adJ.
atia)^

U. G.

intrigue,
trij^ue.

n.

f.

(et.

It.

tharrjau), inexha..8tible,

146
introdactoar. n m.
reiiiji

VoCABULXKY.
(et. L.

Introducto
HHcleM.

jalon "er,
to murl( out.

(et Jalon), to ntake eut,

ininidiKor.
L. initilts),
(iit.

inutile, a^j' (et


inutilit,
n.
f.

L.

inutilitaleni)i

jalousie n. f. (et ,'iaUnuc), jcaloiisy. jaloux. OUSe. adJ. (et. L. Ztilosua),


jealoua, enviouH, anxiousi.

Inatility, UHelesHncijx.

inventer,

v.

a.

(et.

L.

L. Invcntnre,

jamais, adv.
witJi
i)e),'ati\e,

(et. L. jani, may-is),

ovor

froiii L. irivBiiire),

to iuvunt, to (U-viHe.

nevcr

pour jamais,

invente
idvt'iiUir.

ir.

n.

m.
n.

(ot. L.

inventorum),
(et.

jainni, for evor.

jambe,
m. and odj.
L.

n. n.

f.

(nt

L. L. pramba), leg.

Investigateur,
Injr.

jardin,

m.

(et.

Qer. tfarton), iranien.

Investiifatorcin), invcHtij^ator, iiivciitii;at-

jaune,

adJ. (of. L. ^ralbinu), yellow.

investigation,
investir,
Invent,
ti)

n.

f.

(ot.

L.

investitf-

tioiuMii), iiiventi^ation, ruBoarch.


v.
a.

j ter, V. a. (it L. jivutaro), to throw, to cast; jt^tte, Snl, gin,'. pre. ind. se jeter li tienoux, to (ail on oiie'ti kneoM, to knoel
;

(ot.

L.

invusMre),
).

to

down.
jeu- n. m. (ot L. ]o ub), giuno, sport,
piay.

veat, to l)oit<iw (a titl


i"'j. (< t. L. tiucorK|Uura''ilo.

invincible,
invinciibU;

invinoibiUs),
tnvIolabillH),

je Jne, adJ.

(t.

L. juvenl), .oung.
(t jeune), .youth.
jfauili.'i), J ly.

Inviolable, adj.
inviuiable.

(et.

U.

jeunesse,
joie, ".
to add,
f.

".

invisible, adj.
vlsibli!,

(ot.

L. lii\l<iil)ilU), In-

(et L.

uiiHccn,
n. f. (ot. L.

joindre,
Invitatiouom),
invitaro),
to

v. a. (.'. L.

junir re), to join,


jvint,

invitation,
invitatiun.

ovortako

past

i>art.,

added.

inviter.
Invite.

".

(l't.

L.

to

jono
jouer,

n.

m. (et L. junous), rush, bul-

rush, rd.
adJ.
.

involontaire.
tanuh),
i^.

(ot

L.

involuninvulun-

v. a.
;

and
se

n.

(et.

L. jocarl), to

iiivoiiiiitar.\

play, to risk

jouer de, to inock, to


jouer), playthinpr.
L.

involontairement,
tarily.

adv.,
L.

niake eiport

of,

jouet,
v.

II-

m.

(^tit.

invoquer,
Invoke.

a.

(et.

Invocare), to

joug.
Blavery.

n.

m.

(et.

Juijum),

yoke,
lljfht,

irait. 3'"d, sing. prs. cond. of aller.

irrflchi,

e,

ad], (et. m-, r^'jl'chir, L.


>

llfo

jour. 1- "> (ot. L. diurnus), day, de nuH jours, in our day.


;

ri)Hectre), thoni,'htk'S8, indiwrcot.

joyeux, euse,
joyful.

adj. (ot L. gaudiosus),

inindiable,
bilis'i,

adj. (et. L. irromodlairreniodialilo, desporato.


f.

juge, n

(t. L.

Judlcoui), Judge.
(t.

irrsistibil.t. n.
Irresi-tibility.

(et.

imUistibU),

jugement.
juger,

n.

jager), Jadg-

nient, decroe, trial.

irrsistible. adJ.
Irresisiible.

(ut. L. in-, rsiste ro),


V. a. (et.

L. judlcare), to judj^e,

irrsolu,
ROlutU.

e. adj.

(et in-, rsolu),

irre-

to suppose, to try.
jur;;r, V. a.
sweai'.

and

ii.

(et

L. Juraru), to

irrit, e. adj. (et. L. Irritare), Irritatcd.

islamisme,
isol, e,
olitary.

n-

m-, Islamism.
L. insulatus), i jlated,

atlj- (et.

far as,
juK'iu'

hitber

jusque, prej). (et. L. de, usfpioX to, as evon jusque-l, np ti!l that time, ju.s'^x' (i lui, up tiil that tinie
; ;

ce que (with subjurictive),


(et.

till.

isoilement- n. m. (et
lonelincs.^

isoler). Isolation,

ivre. adj. (ot. L. ebrius), intoxicated, (rantic, enraptured.

juste, aJjab e. justice n.


uprif^litiieas.

L. ju=tu9),

just reason-

f.

(et L. Justitia), justice,

ivresse, n. (. (et. ivre), intoxication, enthusiaain, rapture, extrme joy.

justifier, v. a. 'et. L. justilicarn), to ju tify, to exeulpato.


1, n.

j, n.

m.
n.

m. or

f.

jalon,
(uark.

m. (et?),

ple, stake,

land-

l, adv. ti>uuo9.

(et

L.

illao),

there

die

14,

VocabuLau^.
laborieux, euse.
uh),
n<ij.

m
n.
[.'/"

Ot.

I..

luborlo-

le

m.

(rt
.

lguer,

L.

IcgareX

laixil'um.i, iiitiuninoiiK.
(ut.

lepu-y
iftliyrlnthu),

HllmitJ.

labyrinthe. " mlitbyiliith, iiiiizc.

lendemain.
lent.
0. lulj.
('

m.
!..

(et. l'en

demain),

iiext (luy, f.'llnwiiigday.


i.

ioiitus), slow,

lche. adj.(et.
ly, l)aNu.

L. laxus), looae,

cowardcow-

lentement,
lenteur.
tiCH.i,

udv., siuwiy.
f.

lcheti
ardii'c,

n. f

(ot.

L. Inxitatcin),

(et.

L. lentoretn\ ilow*

buMonosa.
;

dolay.

laine, n. '. (t L. sn), wool drlainf*, wool i;oiiibor


laisser,
to
v. a. ^et.
l..
1

eardeur

lequel, laquelle, lesquels, lesquelles, (ut. If, quel, in:.), whicli, wli.', whoiii, that.

abuiiil')!!,

to lut, 1
n.
f.

laxarc), to Icave, ullnw,


),

lest. " m. (ot. (l'foiiounce the <].

Oor.

laat),

ballast,

lambeau,
lame.
wave.
lance,
thr<iw.
ti.

m.

(t.

ra,

froKmcnt
blido,

lettre, ".

'

(it. L. littcra), lottor. (et,

(ut.

L.

lamina),

leur.

I>ro.
aii<l

aUi) eiir,
n.f. (ot. L. lancea),
a-

L. illorum^, to leur, a<lj., thuir.


(et.

them

lanco, Hpear.

lever,

lancer.

(t.

lancf),

to dart, to

rame
ii'Ut-r,

langa^^e,
gpt'oi h, lu

n.

w.

(et.

langue), inanner of

rise

L. levure), to lift, to Ifver l'ancre, to welgh anchor n. lever du, soLcU, 8Uii, risiiiif ; se Lver, to riso.
V.
a.

;;li:v,'<'.

lvre,
lingua), tonirne,

n.

(.

(et. L.

labruni), lip.
L. Uboralis), libo-

langue.
laii}{U;i.;o.

(et. L.

libral,

e. odj.

(ot.

ral. ;:uiiurous,

niunificunt.
m.
(.

languour,
laiigiuir,

f.

(et.

L.

languorom),
languere), to
bUio, azur.

libralit,
liberiiiiiy.

(et. L.

libcralitatcm),

weakru;S9.
\.

languir,
lan^^uish, to

n.

(ot.

L.

libert,

n.

f.

(et. L.

libertatem), liber-

ty, (ruucom.

flnj;.

lapis, n. w. (et. L. [Proiiounce the ].

libre, adj.
lapis),
deiit.

(et. L. liber), free,

indepcn-

librement,
L.

adv., froely.

larcin.
larctny,

".

"^.

(et.

latrocinluin),

lien,
lie

11.

"'. (et.

lik'ainon), tle,

bond.

tlieft.
(et.

[l'roiiouiK'i.''/!

liko

i/.).

large, adj-

L. largua), wide, broad.

V. a.

(et L.

U;.'are),

to tJo, to bind,

larme,
lasser, weaiy.
lasaitiKli',

v.

'.

(et. L.

lacruna), tear.
to tire, to

to

tu..,!

OU.

&

(et. L. lassaro),

lieu, ".m. (et L. locus), place, spot; au iieu de, iii8t> ad of.

lassitude,
latin,
iatitudu.

n.

f.

(ut.

L. latisitudinoni),

lieue, n.
licnlenaiit,.

f,

(et L. louca), leaffue.

wcarincss.
e, aJj., Latiti, lateen.

lieutenant,
L.

>q.

(et lieu, tenant),

latitude,

".

'

(tt.

lar.itiidincm),

ligne,

n.

f.

(et. L. linca), lirie.


;

le, la. les, (et. illi'im, illilni, 11168), the.


le,

liguer, V. a. (et. 1j liiraru), to league se limer, to Jolti, to combine.


limite,
liuiitiitiori
;

la,
\h:y,

les,
il.,

(et.

iUm,

illam,

ills),

".

f.

(et
(et.
f.

L.

limitem),

lirait,

him,

liiuiu.
f.

nans

liniitf, fu.ly.

leon,
pC.
U-ill.

n.

(tt. L.
f.

leetionem^

Icssoii.

limon.

".

m.

It limone), lenion.
(et L. L. limpidlta-

lecture,

n.

(et. L. lectui-a), rcadiiig,

limpidit,
liquide,
lire,
V
.

n.

tcui), clearness.
'wlj. (et^.

lger, re,
IcNisi)

L. L. Icviarius,

Li.

a<l].

(et L. liquidas), liquid.


(Ot
[,.

lig'ht,

oasy,

t.riHint,'.

a.

Ituere),

to

read

lgrement,
niiiiliiy,

adv.,

liglitly,

slightly,

livait,

3id,

sitisr.

inij

ind,

ca

ily.

lit. n.

m.

(et. L,

lectum), bed, bottom,

lgislate
Icjfi'^l

-r, n.

m.

(et. L. leffislatorem),

ehaiinel, aro.

ttor, law|,'iver.
. f.

littOiaire,
(ut L. logislationem),
litcrary.

adj.

(et

L.

litterariu),

lgislation,
lef^i.slatiuii.

littoral, n. m.
ehoit:.
r,,

(et. L. littoralis). coast,

lgitime,
mate, just,

bA\. {ot.

legitiumc),

lejfiti-

livre,
regiHter.

a.

m.

(et

L.

liUruiu),

lKH>k,

riglilful.

iA

VoOABULARir.
mais, non), (et. L. maison, )>(. (ot. L
buitiiiiM'i tiriii.

livrer, v. . (et. L. Ilberar*), to ilollver ap, to liai)d ovcr, to Al>uiiil(iii,to coriiloinii; livrer, to iflve ontMcIf up, to devotfl
OiKwelt.

macrl"),

bni
hoiiM,

maii.nloiitiu)),

lOgiquOf
loi. n.
t.

<i<U

(et. L. Ioi;1i'Uh), logtoal.

maitre,
niaNirr.

n.

in.

(et.

L.

niairiatruiii).

(et. L.

luKum), luw
;

loin,
loin,

ftilv. (et.

fi'oiii

L. ioD^fC), fttr, far off dlNtaiico, at a tlintaiico.

rf

jest,

n.

(.

(et

L.

inajatattn),

inaJuHty.

lointaiu. e. adj. (ct. L. L. !on';itanu^, roinoti', diiaiit; tuiniain, n. 'iHianco.

majestueux, euse,
niujvatic

adj. (et. mckjMtii^

loilir.

II.

m.

(ot.

lirort>),

leiuro.

long. U6, adj. (et. L. loin^n), long. longer, v. a. (nt. loni), to((oaloni;ido
o(, t"
i

mal, n. m. (ut. L. maluin), ovil, lU | fairf mal .irid/air du mal <), to hart { aa ad utb, liadly, ill, riot wull, wroiigly.

oaxt
ill

malade,
;

adj. (et. L. maie, aptUD), liok*


(enf/rit).

crii/..>

longtemps,
tenipn, (or u

n. in.,loni{ tiinp;

d Um/-

loiii;

tLiie.
(et. tor,

maladie,

n,

t.

(et.

malade),

tiickiieM,

dlL'U.s(-, illiies.

lorsque, conj.
lourd,
dull.

O. F. rore, L.

hitia, atid que), whuii.


e, adJ. (t.

mle, a(<J. (et. L. inasculuH), mivrilv, vi^>.nni8, strong.


maldiction,
iic'ui),

maie,

L. luriduM), Imavy,

n.

f.

(et.

L.

inalcdictlo-

inuk-diction, curue.

louvoyer, v. n. (ot Eng. luflf), to tack. loyalement, adv. (et. loyal, L. lejjalis),
fu'.thfiilly, lairly,

malgr,

prep. tet. mal, gr),

i-i

gplto

of, Ii<itkitli8tai)diiig.

honostly.
{l'iv.

malhflur.
hiii\),

n.

m.
;

^et.

la, pnfit part, ot


1'
(,'ai

miafortuno
),

F., maliu i, augur^nalhtur *'oe t/).

cre>
.

n.

m.
f.

(ot.

L.

lucrum),

lucre,

lueur,
il';!,',

n.

(ot.

L.

L.

lucorom),

ffliitr

malheure x. euso, udj. and tioun, uiihappy, v.iifortuiiii'e. (et. mu hi'tii mandefi v. . (f*- L. n'andare), to
seriil ;.
-

MCI', faint. light.

1':

hiiii,

lui, pro, (ct. L. llli-huin\ ho, hiin, to to her ; lui-mine, hinijelt.

mang
eat.

r. v.

a. (et.

L. man.luearo), to

lumire,
lijjlit
;

n.

f.

(et.

L.

\,.

Unninaria),
L.

.mr-?((,

kn 'Wlodge.
"dj. (et.

maniement, n. m. Cet. mnnif.r, niaiiK'urf). Iiaiulliiig, iiiaiiugoinetit.


mani'^estat on.
ti('iii:ui)

L.

lumineux, euse,
0^u^
,

lumln-

".

f.

(et. L.

maniff-ita

luininonH, liright.
n. n.
f.

iiiaiiifostation.
v.
;

lune,

(et.

L. luiia),

moen.
to .stiu;;glo.

manifester,
oiieself.

a.

taru), u) luaiiifest

lutte
1

f.

(et. L. lucta), stni^irle.

(et. L. L. imwifesse manijt-iler, to bIiov

lutter.
luxuriant,.

*'

n. (et. I

liictari),

manuvrer,
manu,
opi'ia), to

v.

a. (et.

mtnueuore,
L.

L.

luxuriant,

e, adJ. (eti L.

luxurUrc

work
uml
;

manquer,
caroi, to

v. a.

n. (et. L.

manbe

nii.ss,

to fail

maiiqwr
mante,
t,

de, to

m, n. m. magistrat,
inuj;intf.tti..

lacking
n- n. (et.
li.

in.

magistratus),

manteau,
tuiii)

n.

m.

(et.

L. L.

man-

cloak, inaiitle.
"
'"'

magnanime, adj.
iiiaK'iiioMuous.

(et. L. ma(,'iiaiiinui8),

mappemont^p
niUlidi), niup

L.

raappa

'11'

magnanimit,
niituti.'iii),

n.

f.

(et.

L. nmt'Dani-

mai

-1X9

ownioreia).
iroAand, L.
oat
',

iiiugrianiiiiity.
n.
Ij-

mahomtan,
mai,
'1-

Mnhotuetaii.
M.iy.
al.

to haggl*

l-

(t'.

niaiii,'*),

main, n. f. (et. L manua), i.and. maintenant, adv. (et. maintenir),


now.

nuirohandi
nicii
li.ii

dise

n. f. (ot ,, jiiimodity.
'.

marchana)^

mar
v. a.

he,

'

'et.

marcher), raarch,

maintenir,
niaiiit.iiii, t
>

(et, rp,nin, tenir),

to

Btep, walking, >-.peed, progresu.


v. u. (ot. L. L. marcaro, beat ddwii, froiii L. niaicua, a hanicni to walk, to maruti, to go.

hupport.
(et.

marrher,

mas.

!' ">

Spanish

niaiz),

uiaize,

liiUiau coiii.

iProiiouiice thc a\.

VocAnOtAfttr.
m. (et. L. mariag0, n.m. (ut.
filftri, n.

149
ion, n
f.

maritui), huRband.
L. L. maritaticuni),

mdita

(et. L.

medltatinnom),
niodltaroX

iiiiMliiai Kin, (iruyer.

iimrriai^u.
a. (et marier. L. nmiitaro), to nmri> . mnrr, to ifet, nianiod.
;

m
bcttor
;

iter, v. a.

and

n. (ot. L.

to mi'ditate.

meilleur,

marin.
marin,
n. f.. tlon.
n.

e>

ii<lj.

(t.

l-

iiiarium), mari no;

e. ndj. (et. L. (r iilrUliitr, tlio lingt.

mollorem),

m., millor, Bi'Utiiuii ; iiininn', marine, nuvy, m-a alliiirn, iiaM({andj.

mlaicolie,
molitni'iioli
,

n.

r.

(et.

L. nulaiioholla),

Ha nivB.
adj. (et
L.

mlancolique,
(ut
L.

melancho.

marit me.

maritlniuR),

li(

US', nii'luiii;fii'ly, (,'looiiiv, ad.

nmrii.iiiit:, iiavul.

m
(et.

1er, v. a.

(et

L.

L.

mUctilaro), to

marque,
toktti.

n.

t.

Gcr. iimtk), mark,


to mark.
L.

iiiix.

marquer, v. marquise,
m.'trclicdtiii'i,

a. (et. j/kim/i/c),
f.

mlodieux, euse. adj. (et (mnitir. fi<Aoia) m^|o,|loin.

inil4ie,

'

(ot.

tnarqui,

membre,
menili.i,
u( a
nIii|i

n. linib. ".

m.
f.

(et.

L.

memlirum).
(of

marohi'>iioM8.
(et. L.

mars. n.m.
noiince the
].

m ^mbrure,
[Pro
L.
.

(et.

membre), rtb

Marx), Maruh.
a.
(et.

mtime.
martyr,
8nnio,
veil.
et.

adj. (et.

L.

L.

inetipsigsimtin),

martyriser, v. martyr to torl.iire.


,

self,

very

*iiiie,

very
L.

a adv.,

massacrer.
wiili
(ici.

..

[XM-h-ipscormcitcd
to
iiia.-Siicro,

uutZKt'ii),

to

moire, n. f (ot. m'iiii'rv, ronieiiiliiiiifc.

memorlaX
h.

biifrhiT.

menacer,
maHfl, lar^fe

v. a.

(c

imuiac,

mina-

masse, n. f (et. L. massa), bo ly lof people, etc.).

cia), to iiiciiaoe, to

ilmaien.
(et

m. (et. Oe.. mnst), mast matelot, n. m. (ut. ?>, sailor, mariner,

mt.

I"

mna>ie, fr L.L. maiiMoiiuti uiii) to manajce, to spart, to troatgenth to procure.


v. a.
,

nager

sniriinit.

mcn
le. ailj.

iant.
,

u.

m.

(t meudii^r),
L.

l>i)ftrar,

matriel,
m.i
li^
l'j'iul.

(et L. maturiali),
t.
i,.

mendie
bu;,',

v.

a.

(et.

mcudicaru;, to

Lo liiiploro.
v. a. (et.

maternel,
,

le, 'IJ.

L.

muttnjamatiie-

mener
dn\e.
h.ai,dc:iir-.

L. minaro), to lead.to

muteriiul.
m.
r.

mathmatiques
matin.
momirii.'.
i>.

pin. (L.

menottes,

n.

t.

plu. (ei. dim. of Tna),

mutica;, mutheiuatuts.

m.
n.
f.

(et.

L.

lUAtiitinu n),

aij. (et. l menteur, L. uitntiii). liar, lyiiiK', faliu.


n.

m. an

mentir,

mat'rit^.
mit, iiity.

(et.

raatiiHtatum),

mpris,
scoin
:

".ni. (et. /((!/'>/"/),

.'ontempt,

arfc in/rin, scoriilully.


v.

maudire,
eu
-

v. a.

(et.

L. maledicere), to

mpriser,
?j>(.sv/.

a.

mi

(.v),

I,.

minus
to

L.

L.

pri'tiaru',

to du^pisc,

m %i

maure, n. m. (et. L. maurm), Moor. mcanisme, n. m. (ot. inicaniinte, L.


.iiiiciis),

8CUIM.

mer.
de
iiu'r,

meoliiinisin, Miiuitiirti.
e, ailj.'ct. L.

n. f. (et. L. manO. sua Itniume seafarin^f iiian n>'r, at sea.


;
;

mchant,
wirvid,
Ijad.

minus, cad tc),


uiyxa), wick,
L. coyiii/u,
)>iirt.

merci,
th.llllt^i.

u.

f.

(et.

L. mcrocdrui),

mercy

mche,

".

m.

(et.

L.

L.

lot-k (i) liair).

L. rcnii, m/'if l'itirie, iiuitJie-coiiniry.


f.

mre

n.

(et.

ma

mothor

mconnatre,

v. a. (et. in,\s).

fnm

mridional,
ali.s;, s aii.li,

e,

adj.

(et.

L.

mciiionmerit,

niiims. luiJ cnunallrc), tint to r< to miiuridersiaiid mconnu, \vd>t


;

^oiiUii liy.
II.

mrito.
WOltll.

m.

(et.

L.

mentum),

mcontent,
her), luarch.

e, adj.

and

noiiri(>

t.

(.s),

L. inipiis, ttiid ciutenl, h. conte nialcoiitent, (lissatisfled, aeditious.

tu),

mriter,
desfix
c.

v. a. (et.

lariia; to meiit, to
{et.

mdecin,
mdiocre,

n.

m.

(et.

L.
L.

medicinus),
mt'ilioort'm),

ph\ sician, doetor.


adj.
(et.

merveille, n. Mondur, iH.irvcl.


fully.

f.

L.

mirahilia),

miduiiug, urdiuary, poor, humble.

mervei leusement,

adv.,

wonder-

'

150
merveilleux, euse, "vdj. (et
woiulorf\il, iiuirvelous.

VoCABULAftY,
merveille),

mission,
mit.

n.

f.

(et. L.

mlsaloncm),
d<f.

r.Ms-

Bion, iUilhorify.

mes. plural
iaes3age,

of m(/n,

ma,

iiiy.

3ni, sing. prt.

o( mettre.

n.

m.
n.

(et. L.

h. missaticum,

mobile,
chnj,'iri(j.

adj. (et L. mobills), movaltle,


n.

froiii I/. inissiiiii),

niessago.

mobilit,

f.

(et
f.

L.

mobilitatcm),

messager,
eriffer.

m.

(et.

meagf), mes-

nioiiilit}'.

modration,
n.f. (pt. L.

n-

(et L. moderatio(et
L.

mesure,
iiiexure
tiieasiiro

mensura), ineastire;
a.s

neiii),

modration.
adj.

'jue,

ai-cording as,
(et.

fast as.

moderne,
tnodei
II.

modcrnuB),

mesurer,
;

L. mensuiarcl, fco se viesarer, to iiieasiiie onosclf.


v. a.

mO'.ieste, adj.

^et. L.

modcHtiis),mode8t
moicstiy.
L.

mtal, n. m. m taphore,
niolaphor.

(et. L.
ri.

motixllum', mtal.
Or. ieTa(/>op),

modestement,
modestie,
incxlcsty.
n.

(niv.,
f.

f.

(t<.

(et

modeatia),

mtier,

m.

(et

L.

ministerium),

modique,
ato, H
.

adj. (e^.

inodicus),

modermores),

trade, occupation.

ail.

mettre,
to place
;

v. a.

(et.

L. mittere), to put,
lit.

mur^.
moi.

n.

f.

plu.

(et

L.

se mettre,
n.

en rnute, to set ont.


h. h.

morals, iiiannerH.
per. pro.
(>

meartre,

m.

mordruin,
ixiaati-a),

t.

L. iiiihi),'ine,

tome,
;

I.

nninler) iiiurder,

a8s:is,-,iiiatn)ii.

moindre,
m^'iiidr/:,

adj. (et L. minor), lsa


leivst.

le

miasme,
niiasiua.

n.

m, (et Ciicek

the
n.

moi e
n.

m. (et
(et

L. L.

mon! us, from


lsa
;

raidi, n.in. (ot L. inciiinni, dius), noon; South.

Or. fi^o), nionk.

moins, adv.
mtiiii.i,

L.

iniiiu.-i),

au

miel,
rather
;

m.

(et.

L. inel), linney.
L.

itu

moing, at

lea.st,

mieux.
le.

!w'v.

(et
(et

melius),

better,

mieux, the
M

be.Tit.

milieu,

m.

\j.

inodiuii, locuni),
L. militina), mili-

mkidie, niidst, ine.iiiin, eiiviionmciit.

mois, n. m. (et L. menais), month. moissoner, v. a. (et. mi^igmin, from r,. L. me sionem), to reap, to harvest, tocut down.
moiti,
innincrit
n.
f.

militaire, adj
tary.

(et.

(et

li.

racdietatem),
L.

h.klf.

moment,
atij- ('-t L. inillia), thoiiaaiid.

n.

m. (et
n.
t.

momentuni),
/xoKapx").

raille,

lime, period.
(et.
(ir.

millier,
and.

n.

m. (et.L.ini
m.

liaiiiMi), th us-

monarchie,
m(iiuni.-li\'.

million,

n.

(et. mille), millioi).

monastre,
riiiiii),

mine,
mine.

n.'. (et. mitier,

from L. mitiare),
min-

n. m. (et. L. L. moii.islery, coiuort.

monaste-

ministre,

n.

m. (et

L. minister),

monde, " m. (et T,. unindus), world tout i 'Il mit, every luxly.
monnaie,
inoK'v,

ister, luler, giiido.

n.

f.

(et

li.

moncta), coin,

minuit,
inidni^j-iit.

n-

m- (et mi (medim;, nuU),


n,
ui.

'liaii;.'e.

iriracle,
niiraulo.

(et L. niiraculum),
mirer, L. inirari),

monseigneur, n. monstre, n. m.
mi)iist>.!r.

m.,

my

lord.

(et

L. inonstrum),

mirage,
iniratfi.'.

n.

m.

(et.

monstrue \x, euse, inij. striiosusi, moiisti'iiis.


montagne,
mountain.
n.
f.

(et.

mon-

miroil', n. m.
lng-;.'la39.

(et.

mirer), niiiror, look-

(et L. L. montanoa),
adj.

mis. past part of meHre,

montagneux, euse
miserably,
tU'jne),

(et

monaL.

misrablement,
wreti'hiMlly,

'Iv.,

mountainous.
.
v.
1

uii.sory.

monte,
r, moiiiciii), 1

f.

(et.

no/*r>,
n.
(et.

risini,

misre.

"

(et L. miHeria), niisery,


n.f. (et. r miscricordia),

cent, acdivity.

distross, poverty.

mont
!i.iid

a.

and

m<nt,

misri 'Orde,
mercy, pity.

to

misricordieux, eu8e.a<lj,(et mitvH*iirde\ iiierciful.

cnrry np, to ascond. to riae, up, to fur lish, to en, h irk; mnnter un elieval, to ride a hors; niunter un vai-sneau, to command a ship, to mait m
;

ship.

VOCAHULARY.
montrer, v. a. (et. l,. monstrare), to Bhow ,sr niintrir, to appuar. monument, n. m. (et. L. monumen;

161
n.

myrte,
mystery.

m.
n.

(et

L. inyrtus^, m.vrtle.
(et.

mystre,

m.

L mysterium),
mysUre),

tuu.), nioiiunuiit, toki-ii.

moral, e, adj. (et. L. moraiis), moral. morale, n. f., morald, ethics, inorality. moralit, n. f. (et. L. uioralitatem),
moralicy.

mystrieux, euse,
mystterioua.

adj. (et.

morceau,

n.

m.

(et.

n, n.

m. orf.

L morcelluin,

froai L. niorsum), bit, pice.

morne,

a?lj.

(et.

O. H. G. mok-nen, to

nage, n. f. (et. na:jer). MV-mmirig, A la iMi/e, by swiinining. nager,


v. n. (et

uit)), (lui),

suHen.

L. navi-nre), to

swim.

mort. 11. f. (et. L. iQorteni), death. mort, e, past part, of mourir, dead. morte!, le, aUJ. (et. L. mortalis),
inortal.

nagure,
.

adv. (et. n'a gure), a little

before, lately.

naf, ive, adj. (et.L. natlvus), artlcsa. smiple.

mot.

. ni. (et.

L.

L.

niuttum) word,

naissance,
birth.

n.

f.

(et.

L.

nascentia),

motiver,
to
l'f tliu
I

v.a. (et. inotir, L. h. motivus), otive of, to cause, to lead to. v.a. (et. L. L.

mouiller,
!..

moll are, from

iMolli),

to wet.
v-n. (et L. L.

mourir,
to
iUti
;

mourait, 3rd,

sinj^.

prs, part., 3nl, sinir. ])ret. def.

jiiuraiU,

moririfor niori), imp. iiul. dyinK mon riU,


;

nuwly boni, rising. infant; iiaisent, plu. prs, ind.; //ai', 3rd si!i4f. nrea. ind.; fairi: natre, to pro<l"ice. to crcate.
part,
;)rd,

L. L. nasfure), to be liorn, to arise, to sprinif; nai^mnt, prs,

natre,

v. n. (et.

navet,

n.

f.

(et.

naf),

lngenuausnf natre.

nens, innocence.

mouvant,
iixu
iiij:,

adj. . aniinatijd.
n.
,

(part, of mouvoir),
_

naquit. narine,
nation,

3rd, sing. prt, def


L. L.

1...

n. f, (et. narifi), nostril.

naricula froni

mouvementtuiii)

iiioveiiieii
v.

m. (et. L motion.

movimei)-

n.

f.

(et. L.

nationem), nation.

mo
iM.'

a. (o'. L. movere), to ivoir, ut inonovir, to niove.

national, e atlj. (et. nation), national. nationalit, u. f. (et nation), nationabty.

moyeu,
and
of.

n.

m.
;

(et.

L. liiediaiuis), sing.

plu.,

means

an 7noyeude,
(et.

natte,
plaitiiig.

n.

f.

(et.

L.

b\'nieans

matta), niattinir. *'


natura), nature,
(et.
I..

muet, te, atlj. diinih, sileiit.

L. imitus),

mute,

natu

e, n.

f.

(et. L.

naturel,

le,
;

adj.

naturalia),

mugir,
to uxii;

;iatural, native
V. n. (et. L.

muglre), to bollow, mvri^mvt, bcUow'rig, roaring.


s

as noun, native.

naufraga.
ipwreck.

n.

m.

(et.

L.

naufragium),
(per-

mule. 11. f. (et. L. miila), she-mule. multiplication n. f. (et L. multiplioationein;, inultiplicition.

naufrag,
SOIl).

e,

al).

Bhipwrccked

multiplier, v. a. (et. L. multiplicarc), to inultiply ; * multiplier, to be reriewed, to iiicrease.

naval,

e. adj. (et. L. navalis),

naval.

navig
navijjaliiu.

ble.

aj.

(et.

L.

navigahilis),

niflcence,
II.

n.t'.

(et. L.

mnniflcentia),

navigateur,
eiii),

n.

m.

(et.

L. navigator-

mnriiticciKo, Ixjimty.

iiavijrrjtor, f-oanian, 8,ai!or.


n.f. (et. L.

mur, mr,
ripe.

m.

(et.

L. munis), wail.
L. matuius).
n. (et.

navigation,
navii^ation.

na\ ij^tlonem),

e. adj. (e^

mature,

naviguer,
v. a.

v. n.

(et.

mrir,

and
n
v.

L. navijraro), to

m'), to ripon,
L.

navigaui, to stcer, to

lil.

to >;row ripe.

murmure,
muiinur.

navire, m.
(et

n.

m.

(et.

murmur),

L.

L.

navillum).

snip, vessel.

murmurer,
to niurijiur.

ne, adv.
n. (et.
r,.

(et. L.
(,
;

non), no, not.

nnirimrare),

n, e, adj. naiti-f, i)orn

musulman,
myrrli
n.

n.
f.

m., Mua.sulmari.
L. myvtha,),

t. I,, natus), past part, of in-inoir nt', flrst liorn.

nanmoins,

alv.

(et.

(et.

myrrh.

n^anl,

uu'iiit),

iie\t:rtlioles8, hovvBVer.

'mfm'^mm.
,

J WyjJIPMUiWWPPiPP!!

162
nant.
iiifCiieH-i.

VOCABDLABY.
"
m.
(t. L.

nec, entem), nothnecessarius),

nouveaut,
nouvelle,
.

n.

f.

(et.

L. L. novellita-

teni), novel ty.


a<lj(<>'
L,-

ncessaire.
iie>

t.,

ing.

and
L.

plu.,

issary.
n.
f.

news,

tidiM>r.s.

ncessit,

(et.

L.

necessitatem''.

novembre,
Nuveniber.

n.

m.

(et.

november),

ncessit', need.

nef, n. t. (et. L. noiinue the/].

navcii), ship.
f.

[Pro-

noyer, v. a. and n. (et. L. necare), to drown, to inundate, to bathe, to wini in.

ngligence
ne(,'li;rt'i]oe,

n.

(et.

L. nefrligentia).

nciflect.
v.

nu, e, idj. (et. L. de-ititute.

nudus), nakeii, baro,

ngligeri
iiejileit.

a.

(tt.

L.

negliuere), to

mage.
nudit,
nuit,

n.

m.

(et. L.

nubem), olond,

n.f. (et. L.

nuditatcni), naliedr

neuf, ve. adj(Pronounco tho/].


ni, conj. (et. L.

(et,

L.

novus),

new.

noss, mulity.
II.

(et.

L.

icteiu),

night

la

i>ec),

ncither, nor.

nuit, at

iiix'ht.

nid.

n.

m.

(et. L. niilus),

ncst
t
>

nuitamment,
deny.
levol
;

adv.,

by night

nier,

v. a. (et. L.

negare)

niveau, n. m. (et L. libella), au nKPan de, on a ]e\e\ with.


nivei'T,
V. a.

nul. le. adj. pro. (et. L. nulius), nons, no, nobody.

(ut

7iiveiu). to level.
tiouri (et.

0, n.

m.
n.
f.

noble, "dj, aid nol)lo, n. bleman.

L. nobilis),

oasis

(et.

Or.

'rfoo-t),

oasis.

[Pro-

noiuiee o-d-zig].

noblement,
noblesse,
nobleiK'Bh.
ri.

adv., nobly.

ob
nobility,

ir, V.

II.

(et. L. obc<iirc),

to obey.

(et.

7i(Mf),

obissance,
obcis'ant,
snbiui-bive.

n.

t.

(et. '^Wir),

obdience.

e, aij. (.t.

btir),

obedi
<

nt,

noir,

e, odj. (et. L.
II. 1-

iiisnim), black.

noix.

(et. L. jtDCoiu),

mit.

objet
thinif.

11.

m.
v,

(et.

L.

objectufi),

bjeot
to

nom, 11. 'U. (et. L. nombre, n. ua.


luiuiber.

noiuen), naine,
(et.

h.

iMimenis),
L.

obliger,

a.

(et L.
L.

oblij,'are),

obliyv, to conipel.
adj. (et.

nombreux, eus;,
osii~'>,

numer-

obscur,

e,

adj. (et.

obscums), ob-

iiUii:erous.

^cure, dark.
part.,
(et.

nomm, e, P^^st nommer, v. a.


iiaiiu',

named.
nomitiare),
to

L.

obscuritr, obscunty.

n.

f.

(et

L. obseuriUtein;,

to iioniiiiate.
L.

OOServer,
non), no, not
It.
;

v.

a.

(et L.

ohser\are\ to

non. adv. (et. iiias, no more, no

non

fibs<e."ve.

Io!)!.'er.

obstacle,
obst-K'i';,

non-e,
the
l'ope'.s
11.

n.

m.

(et.

liunzio), niineio,

'i. m. (et. L. obstaculnm), nnpediment.

auibassador.
Il),

nord
1

(et.

Oer. nord), nortli.

obstination, n. f. (et. L. obstlnationeiii), oliaiiiiacy, steadf.astnesH.


obstin, e, adj. (et. l.,. ob.stlnatua>, obti.iute, stiibborn, steadfast, bent.

nos, plu. of notre, rnt.

ote

11.

f.

(Pt.

L. nota), note.

noter,

v. a. (et. I-,

notai

obstinment,
obstiner,
y.

adv., obstlnatt
(it.

ly.

e),

to note.

a.
;

notion,

n-

f.

(et. L.

notionem), riotion,

niakc obstinate
nale, to peisist.

idea, iiiforniatioii,

knowled-o. notre, posa. pro. (et. L. nostiuni), our. nourricier, ire. adj. (et. nuunic; L.
,

L. ob^tlnare), to n'ubstiver, to bo olisti(et.

obtenir,
obtain, to
obtint,

v.
(fet,
;

a.

L.
;

obtinerei,

to

initnieni

nutriiious.
v.

benluained
h.
L,

to procure s'v, tenir, to obUfni, \\n\, sing'. prs, ind.;

nourrir,

a.

(et.

nutrhe),

to

;{rd, si'ig.

prt def.
t.

iourish, to feed, to .^nuport.

occasion,
oi'iasion
,

n.

(er.

L.
L.

occasioneni),

nourriture,
nous,
V<-;S.

".

f.

(et,

miiritura),

opportunity.
n.
>.

nouriHliiaent, fnod.
in-o.

occident,

(et.

occiilentem

oeoidont, west.
(et. L.
no.i),

we, us,
(et.

cidental
Oirlih niai,

e, adj. (t. L. occidentalis),


terii.

nouveau, nouvel,
iiiA'elli
i),

le,

aiij.

L.

new, novel.

culte, 9ccyv

'Klj.

(et. L.

oroiiltus), oceult

VoCABtJLARY.
L. L. novetlita-

163
now.

ocoupy

066tip6r. V, a. ociyupi,
,

fot.

L.

ocour)are), to

or, con.j. (et. L. hor), or, n.

bu.-ty in.

m.

(et. L.
(et.

aunim), gold.
L. L. auraticum, from

and
,

plu.,

news,

ocan,

n.

m. (et

L. c>ceanu8), ocan. L. october), Oct'>br.


L. oculariu), ocular;

orage, n.m.

octobre, nni.
L.
noveii)bi;r),

(et.
(et.

L. aura), storni, tenipest.

oculaire, adj.

orageux, euse.
orange,
n.
f.

"dj.

(et.

'ira/;)8tormy.
naranjii),

timnn oculaire,
;.

five
(e^,

witneas.
L.

L. necaro)i to

(et.

SpanlHh

odeur,
8<.'<:nt.

n.

f.

odorein),
(et.

odor,

.Che,
18),

to Kwiiii

orange.

iii.

nakeil, bare,

odieux, euse.
odious, dtestable.

adj.

L.
L.

odioaus),

oranger,
tree.

n.

(et.

orange), orange-

ibem), clond.
litatcni),

il.
eye.

n.

m., piu. yeux

(et.

oculus),

nalied-

ordonnateur, n. m. (et. toreni), ordainer. orderor.


ordonner,
v.
a.

L.

ordina-

teiu),

Di^ht

la

uf, ". m. (et. nounce the f, but


not].

L. ovum), eg;?. [Proin tlie plural ufi do

(et.

L.

ordimiro), to

'

nigbt
nuUus), nons,

uvre,
Wi.rk
;

n-

i-

and m. (et

ordcr, to arrange ; ordonner ri yut'l'/utin de faire qiielffiie chose, to ordcr souie one to do soiuething.

L.

opra),

l'uvre, at work.

j.

office, n.

m.
f.

(et.

ordre, n. o.jnini;)d.
offloe.

m. (et
f.

L.

ordinern), order,

offlc'iuni)

officier, n.

m.

(et. offl-w),

orticer.

oreille, n.

(et L. auricula), eir.


n.
f.

offre, n.
ri),

(et. offrir), ofter,

proposai.
;

organisation,

(et organiier, L.
O. H. O.
if it

organiiiu). organisation.

oasis.

[Pro-

iirc),

to obey.

offrir. V. a. (et. L. offcrre), to offer offrait, 3rd, sing. imp. ind ; offre, 3rd, \ng. prs, ind.; offrit. .?rd, sing. pret.def.; g'offr'r, to coeur (to the mind).

org
pnd.!.
eost.

:eil, ".

m.

(et.

urguol),
eu).

[ue pronounced as
n-

were

orient,

m.

(et. L.

orientem), orient,
orientalis), ori-

Wir), obdience.
bir),

oiseau,

n.
t.

m.

(et.

L. L. avicellus), bird.
o'.iv
),

obedi
<

nt,

olive, n.

(et.

L.

olive,

oriental, orienter,

e, adj.

(et L.

)jectus),

bjeet
to

olivier, n.

m.
v.

enta!, euMt'jm.
v. a.

(et. olive), olive-tree.

(et.

ombrager,
ol)li!,'are),

orient), to set to(sail.s).

a.

(et.

ombra:/e, L. L.

ward.M tho east, to trim, to set

uinbraticuni), to shade.
L- umbra), shade, shadow, outline, indistintt objcct l'ombre de, in the sliade of, sheltured by.

ombre,

"-

f.

(ef.

origine, be^inning,
ornanit;nt.

n.

t.

(et.

L. originom), origln,

obsourus), obobscuritatcin),

ornement,
orner,

n.

m. (et

L.

omamentum),

on, pfo.
eto.
;

(t't

L.

hoino), one, wo, you,

on

dit, it is Baid. n.
'.

v. a. (et. L.

ornare), to adorn.
(et.

oli8ervaie\ to

onde,

(t. L.

unda), wave,
(et.

orthodoxe,
orthodox.

adj.

Or. "opfliofo),

ondoyant,

e. adj.

ondoyer, from
onduler, L. L.

j.

obstaouluni),
L.

onde), undulatinff, waviiig,

oscillation, n.
08ci4lation.

f.

(at L. oscillationem)
L. ausare,

ondulation,
.

n.

f.

(et.

obsitiatio-

undulare), undnlation.
adj. (et. L. onrrosus), oniTOUB, burdf iisome.

oser,

V.

n.

(et.

L.

from

L.

a'isuni), to dare.

onreux, euse.

olistitiatua),
fiwt, lient.
atiiiatt ly.

mentuui,
bodie.

ossements, from
ou, conj.
(et.

n.

m. plu. (et L. L. ossaL. ossa), bones of dead


;

ont. 8rd, plu. prs. ind. of avoir,

oprer,
opinion.

v.a. (et. L. operari),

toopcrate.

L. aut', or

01*

ru,
in

(b^tiiiare), to
>r,

opinion,

n.

t.

(et.

L.

oplnionem),

either

...
;

or.

to bo olisti(ibtinere), Co g'o itrnir, to

o. adv. (ot.
(et. op,

L
(et.

ubi), where,

when,

0~"H)8er, v.a.
.

poger), to oppose;
;

which

d'oii, wheuct-.

e'ih.pvser, to

atand in the way of


l'-m.

o^jpos,

oubli, n.m.

biier), forgetfuness.

opposite.

sing'. pre. iiid.;

oublier,
(et L. op|>rcssoreni),
L. opprimore), to L. opprobrium),
li.

v. a. let. L.

L. oblitare, from
(t.

oppresseur,

obi

i t.

s),

to forget.
etise,

oppresflor, tyrant.
i.

occasionein),
occiiluiitvin

oublieux,
forgctfui,

adj

oublier),

opprimer,
oppres!
;

v. a. (et.

opyiiini', oppres.sed.
". ni. (et.

..

Ouesti n.

ni. (et.

Qer. west),

wust

opprobre,
oocidentali),
l'.nltus),

opprobriuu

dlugra'e.
e,

opulent,
ocuult

ad),

(t.

i^

opuleutua),

opulent, rioh.

m. (et Spanish huracaa), hurri<.ne, stonn. outil, . tn. (et. L. L. uiitellnm, from L. usitareX tool. [The 1 is iluut].

ouragan,

n.

154
outrage,
n,

VoCABULAttY,
m.
(et.

L. L. ultratlcum,

froin L. ultra), outrajfe, iiibult

outrager, va. (et outrage), to outratre,


to affront, to
iiisult.

paratre, v. n. (et. L. L. parescer*, from L. parre), to appear parasait, 3r(i, sinif. imp. ind.; parait. 3rd, e\n%.
;

pren.

iiid.

parcelle, ". t
open,

(et.

L.

L,

partlce"\
be-

ouvert,
fraiik.

e, adj. (part, of imvrir),

dini. of L. pai tem), partiole.

pa
n. ni. (et.

ce que,

t-onj. (et.

par,

ce, que),

ouvrage,
ouvrier,

ouvrer, trom L.

cause.

operari), work,
n.tn. (et. L. operarius), maii, iiiurhanic.

parchemin,
work-

u.

m. (et L.
(et.

L.

perga-

mena), parohuieut.

parcimonie,
parcourir,
exprience.

n.

f.

L. parcimonia),

ouvrir,
to
;

v. a.

(et.

perhaps L. aperire),
to
opei
;

parsiinoiiy, stinyiiiess.
v. a. (et. L.

o{)en Couvrir, prs, pai't.

ouvrant,

percurrere), to

ovale, n. m. (et L.

ovalis), oval.

travel over, to

run over, to traverse, to


prep.,

ovation,
ovation.

n.

f.

(et.

L.

cvationem),

par-dei30U8,
neath, bolow.

under,

under-

p, n.

m.

par-dessus, over, above. pardon, i>. m. (et pardonner), pardon.

eni), pai ittur,

pacificateur, n. m. (et. L. paciflcatorpencc-maker.


(.

pardonner,
to

v. a.

(et L. L. purdouare),
L. parentoui, rela-

pardon, to forgive.

pacification, n. em), )iiicifleatioii.


pacifier,
jMicify.
v. a.

(ut. L. pacification-

parent,

n.

m. (et
f.

tion, parent.

(et.

L.

pacifitavb),

to

parent,
latives.

n.

(et parent), kindred, reL. parare), to

pacifique, adj.(et. L. imcificiisX padfic,


peaoeable.

parer,

v. a. (et.

adorn

se parer, to
n.

adorn oneself.
ad], (et. paregae, L.

page, page,
bock).

11-

(et

7),

page, attendant.
paj?iiia),

II. f.

(et L.
(et.

page

paresseux, euse,
a

(of

piffritiu), lazy, slothfui,

eluggiab, slow,

pain, n. m.
pair,
n.

L.
I-.

panem), bread.
pari, peer, equal.

parfum,
fiinie.

n.

m.

(et.

parfinner), per-

m. (et
t.

paire,
Civlni.

n.

(et.

pair), pair, couple.


(et.

parler, v. n. (jt. L. L. j>arabolare), to speak parlant, prs, part, f-peaking.


;

paisbile, adj,

pake),

peaoeable

parmi,
aiuongst
parole,

prep.

(et.

L.

per,

mdium),

paix. II. f- (et. L paceni), pea. . palais, n. m. (et. L. pulatiaiii\ pal'


plir,
jfrow
V.

"
f.

(et L. parabola), word.

ne.

part,
part,

n.

(et. L.

partem), share, part

n. (et. ple, L.

pallidub;, to

part, apart,
'rd,

alorie, separate.

p;ile.
f.

sing. prea. ind. of partir.


y.
a.
(et.

pialissade, n.
palsa<le.

(et

rt

palizzata),

partager,

partaye from

partir), to harc, to sbare in.


u,
t.

palme,

(et.

L. palma),

palm.

partant, prs pan,


parti,

of partir,

palmier, n. n. (et. palm-), palrn-trce. palpitation, n. f. (et palinter, from


L. i>alpitare), palpit-ition,

n. ni- (et. partir),


pa!*t part, of

party, faction.

parti,

partir.

niovement.
iravi.i(6v\

panique,
pape, papier,
papr.
n.

n.

t.

(et Gr.
t.
i.

panic.

partial, e, adj. (et L. L. partiaiis, from L. partem), partial, [l'ronounce t


like
].

m
n.

L. pappa), pope.

(et L. L.
per),
;

papyriu),

participer,
artie,
n.
f.

v.

n.

(et L. participare),

to partioipate, to bave a share in.


(et. L.

par, prep.

by, ont

of,

on

(et.

partir), part, portion;

fecuount of, in, over

par an, a ycar.


L.

paradis,
fii*c,

n- >

(et

paradiuu),

en partir, partir,
\>.vr%-

in part.

hoavcn.
n-

to

j;<>,

ont; parti.,

n. (et L. partir!), to set ont, to ilepart y'a'rt' /ariir, tri fnt\u\ partirent, 3rd, sioy, uni
;

parage,

m- (et

?),

latitude, (juaiter.

plu. pi et. def.

VoOABULi
li.

at.
pdestre, adj. and

165
n.

p&reBeei-6,

partOat adv, (et par,


where.

tout), bvery-

(et L. pedeatris),

ir

paraUsait,
8rd, sing.

at. L.
B.

pedcstrian.

partlce"\
be-

para, past. part, of paratre ; parut, parurent, 3rd, Bing. ami plu. prt. def.
parvenir,
v. n.
(et.

peindre, v. a (et L. pingere), paint; peitU, past part,


peine,
n.
f.

to

L.

parvenlre), to
;

(et.

L.
;

pna^, pain, t"r-

r,

oe, que),

arrive, to reach, to Bucceed paroenu, past. part.; parvint, 3rd, niny;. prt. def.

ment,

punishment
n.

pevne,

hanlly,

scarcely,

L.

L.

perga-

parcimonia),

paSt n. m. (et. L. passus), step, pace ; pas, negativaadverb, no, not, noue, not any.

plerin,
pilgriu).

m. (et L.
n.

L. peregrinu^),

plerinage,
gria)age.

m. (et piUrin),
(et.

pil-

passage,
)ercurrere), to
to traverse, to

n.

m. (et passer), passage,


re,
adj.

way.

penchant,
(et
passage),
ne-ss,

u.

m.

pencher),
(prs.

proneof

passager,
pass,
n.

inclination,
e,

passiiig, transient,

inder,

under-

penchant,
Cencher, from
eniiing.
n.

adj.

part,

m.
..

(et. passer), paat.

L. L. pcndicare), leaning,

passer,
nner), pardon.
L. purdouare),

v.

and

(et L. L. passare,

froDi L. paBsum), to paas, to go, to pro-

pendant, prep.
dre), durlng, whilat

(et.
;

pendre, L. poneonj.,

ceed, to spend (time).

pendant qxu,

passereau,
diin. of paaaer
,

n.

m. (et

whilst
L.

passerellug,

sparrow.
(et L. paasionem), pas-

pntrant,
pntr,
e,

e, adj. (et. pntrer),

pn-

rentoui', rela-

trt! ng, impressive.

passion,

n. f.

sion, di!8ire.
'.),

adj.

(et pntrer), pne(et L. penetra'-o), to


flll.

kindred, reto adorn

trated, filled.

passioner,
sioi:,

v.a. (t. ^1"), to

impas-

e),

to iiiflanie ; se passioner, to become enanjored, to become very fond of, to becotne wariiily jntireste.i in.

pntrer,

v. a.

penetrate, to go, to
oua.

pnible, adj. 'et peine), hard, labori-

t.

paresse, L.

paternel,
patience,

le, adj. (et. L. L. patemalis),

rgisb, bIow.

paternal, fatherly.

pniblement,
culty.
f.

adv., hardly, with

ditfl-

rfumer), perirabolarel, to
,

(et L. patientia), patience, forbearance, waiting.


n.

pninsule,
peiiinsula.

n.

t (et

L.

peninsul),

patient,
iike s].

e,

adj.

f-peakiiig'.

patient, enduring.

pationtem), [l'ronounce t befara i


(et.

L.

pense, n.
penser,
think.

f.

(et.

penser), thought.
n.

er,

mdium),
Word.
;

v. a.

and

(et L. pensare), to
penser), pensive,

patriarche, n.m.
lola),
I,

(et.

Or. irarpiapx^s),

patriarch.

[l'ronounce nglish shall].


f.

ch

Iike

s/i

in

pensif, ive, adj.


thoujrhf.ful.

(et.

Bhare, part of partir,

e.

patrie, n. country.

(et L. patria), native


n.

pension,
sion.

n.

f.

(et L. pensionem), pen-

patrimoine,
patllotique,

m.

(et.

L.

patrimo-

lartaije
I.

from

pente,
cil

n.

f. (et.

pendre), declidty, in-

niuni), pa,r,rimony, iiiheritanco.


adj. (et. patriote,

nation.
n.

(rom

xrtir.

pnurie,
dearth.

(et L. penuria), penury,


sharp.

Qr. rrarpiwTij,), patijntic.

)arty, faction.

pauvre,

adj.

(et L. pauper), poor.


adv., poorly.

perant,
[ercer,

e, adj., piercing,

pauvrement,
L.

partialis,
t

pavillon,
pavillon, fiag,

n.

m,

(et.

L.

impilionem),

[l'ronounce

(et ), to pierce, to penotrato, to bore, to perforate, to tunnel. perdre, v. a. (et L. perdero), to lose ;
v. a.

participare), re in.
)art, portion;
i),

payer, v. a. (et pays n. m. (et.


pagiia),

L. pacare), to

pay.
[Pro-

te perdre, to lose or.csclf, to disappear.

L. L. pagensis, froni L.
re^fion,

pre,

n.

(.jt.

L. patretn), father.
n.
f.

country,
if

home,

prgrination,
perfection,
perfoi'tinri.
').

(et h. peregri-

nounce as pche,

writteti p-i],
f.

nationein', perejfrination.
f.

to set ont,
sioy.

n.

(et.

pcher, from L. pisL.

(et.

L. porfectionom),

irtir, to seiid

cari), flshing.

d,

aud

pcheur,
fishec.

a.

m. (et

plscAtorem)

peiflde, dious.

adj.

(et. L.

perfidveX Pril-

156
perfidie, n.
pril, n. m.
t.

VoOABULABT.
(ot. L. perfida),

perfldy.

peu, adv.

(et.

L. paucus), Uttte,

itm

',

(et.

L. poriculum), pril,

peu

fieu,

by

dei^rees.
n.
f.

peuplade,
prir,
v. n. (et. L. perire), to perish.
'.

(et, peuple), tribe.

peuple,
L.

n.

m.

(et.

L. populua), people,

perle, n.

(et.

L. L.

pirula,

Irom

nation.

pirurn), iwarl.

permettre,

v.

a.
;

(et.

L.

pennittere),
8rd, sing.

peupler, v. a. (et. peupU), to people peu /li, populouB.


peur,
n.
f.

to permit, to allow permet, prs, iiid.; perm, past part.

(et.

L. pavorem), fear
;

de

peur

permission,
perini.ssiiiii.

n.t. (et.

L. permissionem),

de, for fear o( iwith sub.), lest.

de peur que
(et.

... ne

peut-tre, adv.,
le. <idj. (et. L. perpetualis),

peut, tre), po
plu.,

perptuel,
perptuai.

haps.

peut, peuvent. 8rd, sing. and


prs. ind. of pouvoir,

perptuit,

n.

f.

(et.

L.

perpetuita-

tein), iierjietuity.

perroquet,
par rot.

u. ni. (et. It. perrochetto),

phare, n. m. (et. L. pharus, an island where there waa a iight-house), lighlhouse.

perscuter,
perscute.

v. a.

(et.

perscuteur), to

phase
aspect.

n.

t.

(et Or.
(et.

4><Tit),

phase

perscuteur,
ejn),

n.

m.
f.

(et. L.

persecutor-

phnomne, n.m.
phenomonon.
philosophei
philosopher.
n.

Or. <l>aiv6ntvov),

persecutor.
n.
(et.

m. (et philosophit),
'

perscution,

L. perscution-

em

perscution, tyranny.
n.
f.

persvrance,

(et.

persvrer, L.

philosophie,
philosophy.

n-

(et.

Or. ^iKoiro(t>ia.\

perse verare), persvrance.

personnage,
80Ma)re, peison.

n.

m.

(et.

personne), per-

phosphorescence,
phosphorescence.

n.f- (et.

phosphore),
tfivcrioyfu-

personne, n.f. (et. L. persona), person as iiiaMCuliie protioun, no oiie, nobody.


personnel,
Personal.
le,

physionomie,
;

luioi'a),

'i. ^ (et. Or. physiognomy, look.

adj.

(et.

personne),

physique,
cal,

adj. (et. Gr.

<.u<rtitTi),
f.,

physi-

natural

physique, n.

phjsics.

personnifier,
person. fy.

v. a.

(et.

pers nm), to

pic. n,

m.
;

(et. Qaslic pic),

peak.

perspective,

n.f. (et.

L. pcrspectivua),

pied. n.m. (et. L. pedern), foot, footing, standing pied, on (oot.


pierre, n.
atones.
f.

perspective, prospect, view.

(et. L.

petra), stone.

persuader,

v.

a.

(et.

h. persuadere),

pierreries,
pit, n.
'

n. t

plu., jewels, precious

to persuade; persuader quelqu'un de faire, to jiersuade some one to do.

(et h. pietatem), piety.


dv., piousiy.

persuasion,
persue^ion.

n.

'

(et.

L.

persuasionemX

pieusement,

perte,

n.

f. (et.

L. perdita), loas, ruln.


t.

pieux, euse, adj. (et. L. piup), piouB. pilote, n. m. (et It pilota), pilot,
steersnian.

perversit,
pcrversity.

n.

(et.

L. perversitatem),

pirouetter,
v. a, (et. L.

v.

n.

(et,

pirouette),

to

pervertir,

pcrvertere), to

pirouette, to turn on one's legs.

pervert, to corrupt.

piti, n.
(et.

f.

(et. L.

pieiatom), plty.
ine,
vert),

pesanteur,

n.

f.

pesant,

from

pes'r), weik'ht, gravitation.

jivert. pecker.

n.

m.
f.

(et.

woodplace,

peser, v. a. and n. (et. L. penaare), to woih, to hang upon, to bear heavy.


petit,
e, adj. (et. ?), little,

place,
square.

n.

(et.

L.

platea),

small.
littleness.

placer, v.
locate.

a.

(et place), to plac

to

petitesse,
ptrifier,

"
v.

*
a.

(et. petit),
(et.

L. L. petrificare,

plage,

n*

t-

(et L. piaga), seask

L. petra), to petrify.

beach, bore.

VOOABULAIY.
,

157
f.

llttt,

ttw

',

plaine,
plain.

n.

t.

(et.

plain,
L.

L.

planus),

polioe, n.
police

(et L. politia),

policy,

!),

tribe.

plaire,
pleaiie.

(),

v.

a.

(et.

placere), to

polir,

V. a. (et. L. polire),

to polish.
polittcue),

ulus), peoplo,

politique.
(et. L. placere),

adJ.

(et

L.

plaisir. m.
faiicy.
I),

pleasure,

political,prulent, cunnin^.wise; as n.m., politioiaii ; as n. f., politics, poiicy, pru-

to people

plan, oheuio.
board.

n.

m.
n.
f.

(et.

L.

planu),

plan,

dence, tact.

Bm), fear

de

rque ... ne
it,

planche,

(et. L.

planca), plank,

pomme, n. pompeux,
pompoua,
pont.
deck.

f.

(et. L.

poma), apple.
adj.

euse.

(et

pompe),
bridge,

htately.

tre), poi

plancher,
Oeiling-.

n.

m.

(et.

planche), floor,

m. (et

lu pontem),

ig.

and
ail

plu.,

plante,
plante,

n.
f.

f.

(et. L.

planeta), planet.

pont,

e, a>lj.,
v.

deckod.
(et.

n.

(et. L. a.

planta), plant.
L.

ponter.
with derks.
to

a.

pont),

to

proride

us,

island
lighl-

planter.
placlUe.

(et.

plantare),

house),
orit),

plant, to set, to set up.


n.f. (et.

pontife, n.m. (et L. pontifex), pontilt.

Flemish plucke), plato,


Ger. platt),
(et. L.
flat.

populace,
populaire,

n.

f.

(et
(et

It.

populazzo),

phase

slab.

populace, niob.
adj.

plat,
.

e, adj. (et.

L.

poprlarisX

^atviuei'ov),

plein,
filled.

e,

adj.

plcnua),

popular, Milirar.
full,

popularit,

n.(.

(et L. popularitatem),
(et L. populationem),

t>hilo8ophie),

pleurer,
pliert bend.

n. (et. L. plorare), to

weep.

popuarity.

V. A. (et.

L. plicare), to fold, to

population,
population.

n.f.

r.

<fn\oiroi}>ia.\

plonger,
t.

v. a.

and

n. (et. L. L. pluinbi;

port.

n-in. (et. L. portus), uort,


n.
f.

harbor.

phouphore),

Tare, L. to dive.

plumbuni), to plunge
n.
t.

te plonger,

porte,

(et.

L. porta),

door, gte.

porter,

v. a. (et. L.

portaro), to carry,

plamage<
plume,
uffi/tT)),
,,

m.
(et.

n.

plume), i>lumage. L. pluma), feather.


(et.
;

to bear, to induce.

portique,
tlco, ]>orch.

n.

m. (et

L. porticus), por-

physi-

ph)8ic9.

plue. ady. (et. L. plus), more le plus, the iiiost, the urroatest part; de plus en
plus,

pose,

n.

f.

(et. poser),

posture, bearing.

peak.
toot, footing,

more and more


;

longer than.

/te jdii, no plus d (before numrale), more


;
.
.

poser, V. a. (et. L. L. pausare for L, ponere) to place, to set.

stone.

plusieurf. aij. many, sevcra


.

possder
('t. !..

v.

a.

(et

L.

L. pluriores),
rather.

possidere), to

po>se!is, to

own.
n.

srels,

precioua

plutt, ad^

possesseur,
.

m.
f.

(et.

L. possessorem),

(et,.

l'tt, tt),

posscssor, owiier.

poine, n. m,
tn),
ly.

(et.

L iwema), poem.
;

plety.

p ssesaion.
po3.ie8.sioi;.

n.

^et L. possession em),


(et. L.

posie, D.
plu.,

t.

(et L. poesis), poetry


(et. L,

poems.
n.

piuf?),

pious.
pilot,

possibilit, n.f.

possibilltatem),

pote,

m.

poeta), ^oet

po8.<iliility

[>Uota),

oirouctte),
es8.

to

potique.adj. (et. L. poeticus), poeticul. poids, n. m. (et. L. pei-sum), weight, buiden, gravitation.

poste,

n.

111.

(fit.
f.

It posto), post.
(et L, posteritatem),
L.

postrit,
after-ages.

n.

poigne,
woodplace,

n. f.

(et.

poKvg, L, pugnu8),

m), pity.
vert),

poupe,
poop.

n.

f.

(et

puppis),

stern,

haiidfiil, haiidle.

point,

n.

m.

(et.

L.

pun

,-tuni),

point

pour.
oo;ij.

atea),

as ngative adverb, none.

no, noi, not at al!,

pr<!p. (et. L. pro), for; iJur que, (with ub.), in order that.

pourpre,
puncta), point.
to point, to

n.

m. and

f.

(et L. purpura),

pointe,
I,

n.

f.

(et. L.

purplc.

to p1ac

to

pointer, mark.
ple, n.

v. %. (et. pointe),

pourquoi, adv. (et


n'est

iMiur, quoi),

why

pourquoi, theiefore.
Srd,
sing.

j^),

seask

poisson, n.m.

(et.

L. L. piscionem), flah.

pourrait.
pouvoir.

prw, oond. o(

m. (et L.

polus), ix<le.

168
poursuite,
n.
f.

VOCABULART.
(et.

poursuivre), pur-

prendre,
tako, to
(fet

v. a. (et.
;

tuit, huntini;, chotie.

L. prehendere), to prenant, prs. part.


v. a. (et.

poursuivre, v. a. (et. L. L. prosequere, immequi), tn j)ursue, to prosecute, to follow; lournuivi, past part.; pounuiviL.

proccu-er,
to
prepossessi,

L. prsBocoupare),
;

to preoccupy
n.

proccup

de, exorcised about.

rent, 3rd, plu. prt. def.

pourtant, adv.
ever,
iio\

(et.

pour, tant), how-

prparatif
paration.

m.

(et.

jvparer), pr-

erthelesB, yet.
v.

(et L. pulHare), to piish, to carry on, to shoot, to grow.


n.

pousser,

a and

prparer, v. a. (et. L. prpararo), te prpare; se prparer, to getonoself ready.


prs. dv. (et. L. pressuH), near ; de pr, near, close ; de pluit pr, nearer ; amnez pr de, rather near.
prr'sage, n. m. (ut. L. prsage, ign, oinen.
priesagiuni),

poussire,
cot),

n.
f.

f, (et.

L. pulvisX dust.

poutre, n. beam.

(et. L.

L.

pullatrunn, a

pouvoir,

V. n. (et. L. L. potere, froni

L. po>8e), to b(! able, niay, oan; pouvaient, 3rd, plu. imp. ind.; pouvant, prs, part.; aa 11. m., power.

prsager
prsence,
ence.

v,

a. (et.

prtant), to pr-

sage, to foretell.
n.
f.

(et. L.

pnosentia), prs-

prairie,

n.

(.

(et

L.

L.

prataria),

mcadow, prairie. pralablement, adv.


all<r)

(et. L,

pr, and

prsent

previously, in advance.
v, a,

prsent, e. adj. (ot. L. prsentem), prsent, at prsent. prsent, n. m, (et. L. piaesentem),


;

prcder
prcde.

(et.

L. prccdero), to

prsent,

gitt.

prsenter,
n.

v.

a.

(et.

prisent),
;

te

prcepteur,
reiii),

m. (et L. prseoeptoadj. (et. L. prcliosus),

preceptor, tntor.

prsent, tooffer, tointroduce ter, to corne, to appear.

te prsen-

prcieux, euse.
preoioua, costly.

prserver,

v. a. (et. L. prsoservare), to

prserve, to keep.
(et L. prajcipitare),
;

prcipiter,

v. a.

prsidence,
dencj'.

n.

f.

(et.

prsident), presi-

to preeipitate, to hurry throw cneself, to rush.

se prcipiter, to

prciSi Cl adj.
cise.

(et.

L.

prcisns), pr-

prsider, v.a and n. to prcsido, to nianage.

(et.

L. preosidere),

presque, adv.
e.

(et.

prs, que), aliuost,

prdestin,

adj. (et. L.

prasdesti-

nnarly.

nare), predestiticd, eleet,

prdilection,

n-

(et L. pr,

dileo-

in

press, e, adj., (et presser), in hastc, a hurry.

iloneni), prdilection, prfrence.

pressentiment,
to

n.

m. (et

pressentir),

prdire,
foretell, to

v. a. (et L. prophesy.
v.

prjedicere),

presentinient, foreboding.

prfrer,
prefer.

a.

(et

L.

praeferre),

to

foresee, to

pressentir, v. a. (et. h. prsentlre/, to hve apreaentiment of.


presser,
v.a.

and

n. (et. L. L. pressare),
;

prjug, n. m. (et. prjuger, L. pr, w\ juoer), prjudice, prepoases.sion. prluder, v. n. (et. L. praeludere), to
prlude, to fore3ha,<iow.

to prcss, to crowd, to hasten to be in haste, to flock.

se presser,

prestige
prestige.

n.

m.

(et.

L.

prstigium),

prmaturment,
tu rus), prematuroly.

adv.

(et, L.

prasma-

prestigieux, euse,
p. et,
e, idj.

adj. (et L. prsesti-

giosus), enchantinp, fascinating.


f,

prmditation,
tationeiii),

n.

(et.

L, praernedl-

(et
e.

L. L. priBstus), ready.
(et.

prmditation.
v.a. (et. L. priemeditari),

prtendu,

adj.

prmditer,
to premeiiitate.

prajtendere), pretended, alleged,

prHendre, L. sham, supponed,

prmices,
first fruits.

n.

f.

plu. (et L. prlmitiae",

prter,

v. a. (et.

L. pinestaro), to land.
(et.

prtexte,
adj. (et. L. primarius),

n.

m.

L.

praetextus),

premier, re,
flrgt

pretext, pretence.

prtre,

n. ni

(et L. presbyter), pries,

VoCABULARY.
preuve,
n.
(.

159
v. a,

(et. L. L.

proha, (roin L.

procurer,
ptv eurc.

(et.

L.

procuraro), to

proharo), proof,

prvaloiTi
prcviiil
;

V. n. (et.

L. pratvttU riO, to

prodige,

n.

m.

(et.

L.

prodigiuui^.

prcalut,
v.

lrd, sirij;.

pvtt.

tlc(.

prodit;v, wondor.

prvenir,

a.

(et.

L. preevenirt-), to

prodigue,
prodiguer.
iavisl),

(de), a<lj. (et. L. prodi.'us),

prjudice, to preposae-'.

proditfal, |iiofiise, lavish,

vcry

rie

in.

prvention,
prvision,
.

"
'

(et.

L.

praiventiovisioiiom),

niiu), prjudice, prcpo.ssei*si(ni.


(et. L. piai,

^.

a.

(et

prodijue), to

to ({ive lil)crally.
v. a.
;

fiiieseeinjf, atitlcip.ition.

produire,

(et.

L.

proiluecre)

te

prvenu.
jiuticed.

I>a8t part, ot proc.nir, pre-

prodiice, to yield prs. ind.

pnditiHent. Uni, p!a


(et.

prier, v. a. (ot. L. precari), to piay, to boK. to boseech.

produit,

n.

m.

productiis).

produce, product.

prire,
!

n.f. (et. L.
n-

I,. 11.

i>rucaria), prayer.

rieur,
\j.

m.

(et.

iiriorom), prior.

profaner, v.a. ict. L. pr fanaie), to profane, to pollute, to deflle, to abuse.


profrer,
uttor.
v. a.
(et.

primaut,
froiii

n.f. (et. L. L. pi-luialit^itcin,

L.

proferre),

to

prinius), priority,

prminence.

primitif ive,
priiiiitive.

adj. (et. L. primltivus),

professer,

v. a.

(et.

L. professus), to

profcs.s, to teacii, to lecture on.

primitivement,
oripiiially.

adv., (et. yrimitif),

professeur,
profes.sor.

n.

m.

(et. L.

professorem),

prince, n.m.
pr.Jncesse, n-

(et. L. priiic'ipom),
'.

prince.

(et. j-ricrt),
(et.

princes.

profcssionem), f rofession, n. f. (et. profession, Ijiisine.'iS, i'>caicm.


profit,
n.

m.
v.

(et. L.

principal,
principal.

profectus), profit,

e,

adJ

L. priiicipalis),

advanta^e.
profiter,
n.
(et.

principe,
principle.

n.

m.
n.

(et.

L.

principium),
L.

vroii), to profit
L.

profiter de, to profit

l<y.

printemps,
teinpus), Bpring'.

m.

(et

prlmum,

profond, progrs,
projet,
n.

e,

adj.

(et.

profundus),
progressus),

profouiid, di/ep.
".

pris, e, past part, of prendre.

m.
(ot.

(et.

L.

progrcsa, (urtheranee.

prise,
prison.

I).

f.

(et.
f.

prendre), taking.
(et.

prison,

n.

m.

L.

prciisionem),

projectus), Pro-

ject, 8chenie.

prisonnier, n.m.
prit, 3nl,
siiiff.

(et.

pris n), prisoner.


of pri^ndre.

prolongement, n. m. (et. prolomjer), prolongation, contitniation, e.vtension


prolonger, v. a. (et. L. prolongare), to prolon){, to continue; ne prvlin;rer, to
extend.

iiret. dcl'.

privilge,
prix,
vaiii'.',

n-

m.
(et.

(et.

L. privilegium),

privilge, rijht.
n.

m.

L.

pretium), prie,
L. probabilita-

promener,
Icad ab ait
;

v. a.

(et L. prominare), to

prize.
n.
f.

ne

promener, to walk, to prof.

probabilit,

(et.

menade.

tem\ prohabilitv. problmatique,


doubKfitl.

promesse,
adj.,

n.

(et.

L.

promissa), pro-

problematical,
Qr. irp^X-qua),

mise.

promettre,
.

problme.
problcm.
procs,
Buiii.

m.
(et.

(et.

to promise
st'lf
;

.se

jrromifi,

v. a. (et. L. pr 'mittere), promettre, to pronii-.e onepast part.

n.

m.

L. processus), law-

action, trial, case, procecdings.


(ofc

prompt, inompt
ipiickly.

e,

dj.

(et.

L.

promptus),

processionnerem nt. adv. proaessi')nem), in procession.


prochain,
e.
ailj-

L.

promptoment,
prononcer,
v. a.
(et.

adv.,

promptly,

(t.

proche, L. L,
L. proolamo-

L. pronuntlare),

propiiis), nextj near.

<o pronouni:e, to utter.

proclamation, n. f. ^Quem), ^iroclamatioo.

(et.

pronostic, n.m.

(et.

Gr. npQyvuarUcy),

prognostlc, prognosticatiou,

160
prophte,
proplut.
i>.

VoCAnULARY.
m.
(et.

L.

paophcta),

provision,

n.

(.

(et.

proviNionem),

provisions, store, suppiy.


"

prophtiOi

' (et
{t

I.

prophctia) proL. prophoticu),

provisoirement, dv. (et


visoriii,), iirnvi.sionally,

L.

L, pro-

lit'cy, |.ri.'ili(;tion.

pionoiuictid liko!.

prophtique
proph>:iio.

ailj. (ot.

provocation,
tioni.-m),

n.

f.

(et L.

prooia-

provoeation.
n.

prophctiser.
ziirt), lo

v. a. (ot. L.

propheti-

prophosy, to (oretell.
e.

psaume,
pu, past
public,

m.

(et. L.

psaliuus), paaliii.

IProiio ncu tho p].


))art.

propl

adj.

(et.

L.

propitius, pro-

pitiouM, favorablo.

of pouvoir.
<ulj.

proportion.
propos,
course
;

i>.f>

(et. L.

proportionom),

que,
V.

(et.

L. publicua),

priipoition, ratio.
n.

public, ("ominoii.

m.

(et. L. propONitiini), disfit.

publir,
publish.

a.

(et

L.

pub'.lonre),

to

<l

propog,

proposer,
propose
Bolf,
;

v. a. (et. pro-, poser), to pr'poKer, to propose to oneto purpo e, to intcrid.


Hi

pudeur,
puril,
childish.

n.

f.

(et.

L.

pudorem), mod-

osty, shanio, naisednesM.


e,

adj. (ot L. puorills;, purile,


L. poat), then, after-

proposit on,
eui),

n.

f.

(et

L. proposition-

propoMition, proposai.
adj.
(et.

propre,
clenn,
fit,

L. propriu.'), i)roper,

puis. adv. (et wariU,

adapted, own.

proprit, n. f. (et. L. proprietatein), ownership, propert>, propriotv.


proscrire, v. a. (et. L. pro.stribere), to prosoribe, to outlaw proncrit, past part., outlawed proscrivait, Srd, s'nxs. iinp.
; ;

puisque, conj. (et puia, que), since. puissance, n. f. (et. puissant), power,
authority.

puissant,
powerful.

e, adj. (et. L. L.

possent^m),

puisse,
pouvoir.

l8t

and

Srd, sing. prs. sub. of

iiid,

proslyte,

n.

m.

(et. L. '

pvoselytus),

proslyte, convert.

pulvriser,

v. a.

(et L. pulverlaare),

to pulvrise, to crush.
n.

proslytisme,
prospre,
prons.

m.
L.

(ot.

proHl',te),

proselytii-in, proselvtising'.

adj. (et

prospor), pros-

punir. V. a. (et. punition, n. f.


putiishnient.

L.

(et.

punire\ to punish, L. pnnitionem),

prospit,
prospiTity.

n.f. (et. L.

prosperitatcm),
L.

pur.

e. adj. (et. L.
n.f.

punis), pure,

puret,
purenessv. a.

(et L. puritatein), purity,

prosterner,
to prostrafe.

(et.

prosternere),

put,
".
l

Srd,

sing.

prt def. ot pouvoir

pt, Srd, slng. imp. sub.


(et

prostration,
eni), prostration.

L. prostration q, n.

m.
n.
f.

protecteur, trice.
tictinp, protective.

m. and

f.

and

adj. (et. L. protectorem), protector, pro-

qualit,
ipiivlity.

(et.

L.

qualitatem),

protection,

n.

'

(et. L.

protectionem),

protection, support.

quand, qiarante,
forty.

conj. (et. L. quando),


adj.

when.

(et L. quadraginta),

protg,

ii.m.

(et-,

pratjer), protg, a L. prote^rere), to

person protejted by another.

protger,

v.

a.

(et.

quart, n- '"- (et L. quartus), quarter. quatorze, adj. (et. L. qnatuordouim),


fourt,on.

protect, o dfend.

proue, n. f. (et. Spanish proa), prow. providence, n. f. (et. L, prnvi.lontia),


Providence.

quatorzime,

adj., fourteenth.
L,

quatre, adj. (et quatre-vingts,

quatuor), four.

adj., cighty.

providentiel,
providential.

le, adj- (et. providence),

quatrim
q
ne
.

.idj..

fourth.
(ot. L. rpiod),
'

e. pi,

fobjuct of verbi

provinceprO'incfly

n.

f.

(et.

L.

prodncia),

that, vvhieli,
.
.

whom

mte, only,

ascouj., that, tlio: '

VOOABULABY.
quel, quelle, what.
o^lj.

161
(et.

pro. (ot. L. qualia),

rame, n. f. ramener,
take
biick.

rmii),
(et.

oftr.

v. a.

re-,

amener), to

quelque,
aiiy.

adj.

(et.

qwJ,

que),

ncint,

briiig bacK, to brinjf, to briiig again, to

quelquefois, adv.
oniftiiui.'ri.

rameur,
(t. quelqtie,

n.

m.
(et.

(et.

raine>, rower.
(}.

/o),

rang,
rarilv.

n.

m.

0. H.

hririg,

rinjc),

quelqu'un, une,
oniebody.

pro., soine,

some one,

ranger,
set
'\n

v. a.
;

(et.

rann), to ranime, to
pl.-vcu

oriler

se ranger, to
v. a.
(et.

onuBclf.
ro-

question,
quttstion.

n.

(.

(et.

L.

queHtionem),

ranimer,
aiiiiiiute, to

re-,

animer), to
ravldua),

revive.
(t.

qui, pro, (et L. qui and quia),

who

he

rapide, adj.
ewift.

L.

rapid,

who.
quille, n'(et.

quinze,
quitter.

*''!

Spanish (luilla), keel. (<-'* t, quindediu), fifteen,


fifteuuth.
L.

rappeler,

v.a. (et. re-, appeler), to eall


call.

back, to recall, to

quinzime,
\.

a*lj.,

rapport.

". > (t- rapporte,-), account,

a. (ot.

L. quietare), to

report, relation, relatioiishii), m-atm.

quH,

to Icavo.
.

rapporter,
in.
;

v.

(ot.

re-,

apporter), to

quoi, pro. (et. L. quid), what; de. quoi, the ineaiis, the wheruithal il n'a pas de quoi maitijer, he haa nothin^ to cat.

bririg back, to bring

along with, to brlng


n.

rapprochement,
cher),

m.

(et.

rappro-

quoique, conj.
(with 8ub.)
r, n.,m., orf.

(et.

quoi, que), thou(fh

drawing ncarer.

rapprocher, v. a. (et. re , approcher), to britig iiearer, to draw closely tofifether, to bring in coiitm.'t se rapprocher, to
;

rabattre,
race.
redeeni.
n.
f.

v.

a.

(et.

re-,

abattre),

to

conie liuarer rare. adJ.

rapyri-'-h de, iiear to.

kbatc, to lower.
(et. It. razza), race,

(et. L. raus), rare.

breed.

racheteri

v.

a.

(et.

re

acheter), to

rarement, adv. ramly rassembler, v. a. (et.

re-,

assembler,

racine, n. ' (et. L. L. radlcina, froni L. radicem), root.

L. ad, nimiilare), to rcassemljle, to gather, to collect, to asueinble ; se rassembler, to mect, to asHctnble.

raconte
rade.

v.

a.

(tt.

re-, , oonter),

to

rassrner,
mtJke

v. a.

(et

re-, , serein), to

relate, to narrate.
n.f. (et. It. nnJa),

sereiie, to calin.
v. a.

roadstcad, bay.

rassurer,
assure.

(et re-, assurer), to rn.


f.

radeau,

"

m.

(et. L.

L. radoUus,
re,

from

L. rutis), raft.

ratification,
v. a.
refit,
(et.

(et L. L.

ratiflca-

radouber,
Enjf. dub), to

O, F. doub,
,

tioiieiii;, ratitlcation.

to repair.

ration,
ferme), to

n-

'.

(et. L.
(rt.

rationem), ration,
ravir), ravage, d-

raffermir,
strenj^theti
;

v. a. (et. re-,

ravage,
vastation.
1

n. u.

raffrrmi,

firni.

rafrachir, v. a. (et. re-, , frais), to refresh; .se rafrachir, to refresh oneself ; rafraichis^ant. rofreshing, coolirig.
raillerie, ' (t. railler, L. L. radicularo, L. radere), raillery, baiitoring', je.st.

avager,

v. a.

(et ravage), to ravage,

to waate.

ravaler, v. a. (et re avaler, L. ad, vallwn), to swallow again, to bring lower, to pull down, to disparage.
,

raison.

>

'

(et- l.

rationcm), reasoii.
ni.

ravir,

v.a. (et. L. rapere), to


;

raisonnement.
from raisdu),
ralentir,

(et.

raisonner,

reasoriiiig.

chann, to deliglit ravi overjoyed, delighted at


ray
;

de,

ravish.to charnied,

v. a. (et. lent),

to slacken, to
to rally, to

lessen, to retard.

rallier, v.a.
Joii).

(et. re-, ail et),

rayon, n. m. (et. rais, from L. radius), rayon de miel, honeycomb. te, or r, insparable prefix, meaning back or again.
ralit,
reality.
n.
f.

rallumer,
fjHdd),

v. a.

(et.

re-,

allumer), to

(et
1-

L.

L.

realltatem),

light agaiii.

ramasser,

v. a. (et. re-,

amasser, (rom

rbellion,
rpbeUion.

n-

(et h.

rebellionem),

rpasse), to pick up.

162
recevoir,
a.
(et.

VOOABDLART.
L.
raolpera), tn

rei'elvi), to acci'pt.

redouter, va. (et. rduire, v. a. (et


dure.

re-,

dmttt

),

to foar.

rt-ducere), to ro-

recherche,

la rt'ckerehe,

n-'. 'et.
(/<, in

recheraher), guarch;

nient o(.

refermer,
^ain.
;

v. a. (et. re

fermer), to Hhut

v. a. (et. rf-, chercher), fo to H(!ok, to court reeliercM, in ^rout rei|ut't, iimch mnujfht aftcr.

*eohercher.
*j{uiii.

iwek

refleurir, v. n. (et re-, fleurir, L. florcro), to ))lo88om ajfairi, to fl'.uriHh ai;ain.

rciC
let.

u.

111.

(et.

Portu^oieso,
rciter,
h.

reci(o),

rflexion,
rettfotiori.

n.

(.

(et
(et.

(..

rctlexioMom;,

rooiti n. m. (et
rei'itiil,

rociture),

nccoiint, rep'irt.
(ot. U.

rforme.
forui.

".

t.

L.

reforumre), re-

reclus, n.in.

reclusus), rccluso.
".
t.

refouler,
ba<^k.

v. a.

(et re-, fouler), to drive

recommandation.

(et.

recom-

riMudii), iticniiiiiiundatioii.

recommander,
dei),
t'i

v. a. (et. re-,

eommancumvien-

ref Oidir, v. a. (.t. re-, froid), to cool, to dainp, to chcck.

rcc iniiieiul.
y. a.

refuge,
(ot
(et. re-,
refuis'i;.

n.

m. (et
v. r.

L. rofusrluin), refuge,

recommencer,
cet
),

to icoi .1111 nonce.


n.
f.

se r fugier,
refus,
refuse
;

(et re/u

le),

to take

rcompense,

rcompenner),
II.

to ri'coiiipeiiso, to roward.

m.

(et.

refuser), refuHol.

rcompenser,

v.a. (ot. rc-.coTn/viwer),

refuser,
ne

v. n. (ut 1<. L. refutiare), to refuner d, to objuct.

rewartl, comiioriHatc.

regagner,
n.
f.

v. a.

(et. re-,

gat/ner), to

reconnaissance,

(et recminattre),
(et reconnaL.
recoi.'no8-

rcognition, (gratitude.

rei?uin,

to rcturn to.
n.

reconnaissanti
tre), >{raiuHil.

e, adj.

regard,

m. (et regarder), look,


(et. re

as-

pect, notii;c, view.

reconnatre,
cere),

v.

a.

(et.

regarder, va.
at, to considor.

garder), tolook

to

obsurvc,
part.

to ackiiowledjffi, to to reuoniioitro lyxnuiiu, past


recoiiiiife,
;

rgion,
rgir,

n.

f.

(et L. reKionem), reirion.


rejfere),

v, a. (et. L.

to rulo, to

re' enqurir,
to reccitiijuer.

v. a. (et. re-,

cmqudrir),

a<lminlater, to jfovtjrn.

recours,
cover

m.

(et.

recourir), recourse.
re-,
;

rgne. ". ni. (et. rgner, v. n. (et


to rulo, to preva
1.

L.

regnum),

relgii.

L. rejjnare), to rei^fn,

reCOiVrir,
iigaiii,

v. a. (et to eover

couorir), to

recvuvirrt,

past

part
(et re-, crier), exi faim, to cry out, to clamer.

regret,
v.
r.

n.

(et.

regretter),

re(,'ret;

se rcriei',

to
re-

reijrej de,

regret for; reyret,


n.
f.

with

re-

luftanci'.

recruter, v. a. (et crittrt), to recruit.


rectifier, v. a.
rectily, to oorrect.
(ut.

recrue,

from

rgularit,
gularity.

(et L.
a<1v.

reijfularis),

re-

L. rectiftcare), to

rgulirement.
reine.

reifularly.

"

f.

(^'f-

'

refina\ (luccn.
(rX. rejaillir, re-,

(et. recueillir), recueillement, '> rL'tinnuoiit, iiicdiLatiiii, dcvotioii, pit'ty,

rejaillissement.r-.m.

and

!..

L. jacularj^, flashin^, retketion.


v. a.
(et.

recueillir, v. a. (ot. L. recolligoro), to gatliui, to collcft, to takc, to pick up.

rejeter,

L.

L. rojcctare), to

throw back, to cast ont,


ject, to bring.

to refuse, \o re-

recul, e,
rsinotc.

at^j.

<et '> cwi), distant,


v. n.

redescendre,
rodoscend.

and

a.

(et

re-,

de/<cendri), to corne or taUe

down

aj;ain,to

rejoindre, v. a. (et re.-, joindre), to join iig.n.to rejoin; se rejoindre), to meet again.
rjouir, v.a. (et
to delJKlit
;

redevenir, become again.

v. n.

(et

re-,

devenir), to

re-, jouir, L. fraudere;,

se rjouir, to rejoicc.

redire, wa (ut. re-, dire), tosayagain, to tell, to iclute, to report ref'.oubler, v. a. lot re-, douhe), to , to iiK'rcase. reit rfcuoutable, adj. (et. redouter), tt1

relche, n. m. (et, nlcher), tion, ic-tpite, Btoppage, stay.


relate",
lati'.

relaxa-

v. a.

(et It relatare;, to

ro-

relatif, ive, adj. (et L. relativus), rlativi;s, rotatiii)<.

midable.

VOCABULARY.
relation,
lAtiiin
n. f, (t.

163
v< >

L.

relatlonem), ro-

renonvelsr,
to rcne.

(et L. rtndvl1ar),

rflg^uer. v.a. (et. L. relcgare), to rleijatc, to hut un ' j coiisi)^ ii.

rentrer, v. n. and a. (ot. r-, entrer), to re enter, fo rutiirn.

relevtr. y- . (et. L. mlovaro, to raine au un, to rollevo, to lift np, to critintso reli-ver de, to dojwnd on, to act uridor the
;

renverser, v. a. (et. r-, enver), reverHC, to overthrow, to overturn.

ta

ordors of
relier,

te relever, to
v. a.

rist

ayain.

renvoyer,
Heiul

v. a.

(et.

re-,

envoyer), to
to refcr, to

L. re-, ligai-e), to tie auaiii, to hind ti^^cther.


(et.

aKain, to send baok,


v. a. atid n.

aacribe.

r()li){iouii

religieux, eu>e, adj. (et.L. reliKosus), as n. m. and f., inotik, riun.


;

repatre,
L.
II.

(et. re-, patre,

patioore), to teed, to

nourigh; repaisre-,

religion,
lijfioii.

n.

(.

(ot.

L. rtliifionem), re.

sant, prs, part

rpandre,
dj.
(ot.

v.a.

(oi. I.

expandereX

remarquable,
reiuarkiiblo.

remarqu-r),

tosiu^ii, to diffiiM',

tospiead; nerpandre, to prend, to liiuruh ont, to burst out.

remarquer,

v. a.

(et

re-,

marquer), to

reparatre,
roappear.

v, n. (et. r-, i>araitre),

to

roiiiark, to observe.

..embarquer,
to ri'-einbark.

v.a. (et re-,

embarqwr),

repartir, v. n. (et. re-, partir), to set out aKain, to jfo b.nk.

v. a (ot L. remitt'^re), to baok, to rostore, to ive, to haiid over ; remis, paat part

remettre,

repas,

n.

m.

(ot.

L.

I^.

repastus, frotn

giv.'

L. paatu.s), repast, nnal.

repasser,
to repasf.

v.a.

and

n. (et. re-, panser),

remonter,

v.a.

and

n. (ot. nt-,

monter),

to rea-souiid, to get to re-einbark.

up

a^aiii, to reraoutit,

repentir,
fro-n
Ij.

n.

m.
a.

lot.

re-,

O, F. pontlr,
repetore),

prenitere^, repentauce.
v.
(et.

remords,

n.

m. (et m.

re-,

mordre, h.

nionl(:i(!), reraorse.

rempart,
pa
t.

n.

(et. re-,

emparer), ramto

rpter, repeat
rptition.

L.

to

rp! tition,
re-, en-, placer},

n.

f.

(et.

L. repotitlonem),

remplacer, v.a. (et


remplir,
flil

replace, to take the place of.


v. a. (et.
fill

repeupler,
to
ropt^ople.

v. a. (et.

re-,

peuplr), to
to fold

L.

re-, Iniplere),

Rii&in, to

up, to

fl',1.

replier,
emp-rter), to
victorj).
L.

v.

a.

(et.

re-, plier),

remporter,
ciirry

v. a. (et. r-^-,

ajiain, to force

batk.
v. a.

away atfain, to win (a rmunration, n. f. (et.


renaissant,
(et.

rpliquer,
rcply.

(ot L. replicare), to
rcsponfere), to

remuneraronasci),

tioiiein), remuneiatii.iii,

roward,
L.

repondre,

v. a. (et. L.

e, adJ. reviviiig, returniiig'.

answer, to reply, to correspond.; r/ondre d'', to bo surety for.

ren entre,

n.

f.

(et rencontrer), meetre-,

rponse,
reply.

n.

f.

(et rpondre), anawer,

rencontrer, v.a. (et


tneet, tu
liiid.

en-, contre), to L.

rendre,
red
leri.:).

v.

to

L. L. rendere, rentier, to ^ivo baok,


a.
;
;

^et

reporter, v. a. (et. re-, porter), to carry back, to turn asain se report<t , to tfo back aj^ain to, to revert to.
;

to

restore, to retnrii, to snrromler rendre oi/mpt< ,to cive au accoimt rendre tjrnes, to give thaiiks ; e rendre, to yi'uld, to repair, to ko.

repose. repos, reposer, v. a. and n. (et. re-, poser), to put to rest, to lie, to refresh se reposer,
n.
rii.
;

(et. reposer), rcst,

to rest.

rne,

>.

'

(et L, L. retina, froin L.


v. a.

repousser,
re!)ol. to

v.

a, (et.

re-,

pousser), to

rotiiiere), rein.

rupulse, to |)ush back, to rejeot

renfermer,

(et

re-,

en ermer

to

hut up, to encloBe.

renomme,
renoncer

n.f. (et.

renommer, togive
L, renuntlare),

reputoi, fume, reiiown.


(),
v. n. (et.

reprendre, v. a. (et. re-, prendre), to overtako, to take aKain, to take baok, to renow, to rsume to got again, to reply ; nprit, 8rd, -.ing-. prt def.
reprsenter,
to represent
;

v.a. (et. L. reprsesentare),

to rcuouuce, to ifive up.

se reprsenter, to fanoy.

164
reprOfihSi a. m. prooch, blme.
(et.

VOOABULARY.
reprocher), re-

ressort, n.m.
spriri^, iiieans.

(et. rettortir,

see

*
our>>,

reprocher,

v. &.

(et.

L. L. repropiare,

ressource,

n.

f.

(et.

re-,

(roin L. prope), to rei)roach, to upbraiJ ; repr cher quelque ch'inc queiifu'wi, to

resource, iiieans.

reproanh
repul)iiu.

uome

reste, n.ia. (et.rester), reiuaiiider, rest

oii
n.

with soinethin^.
f.

rpublique)
raet vOi n.
t,

(et

L. respublica),

rester,
to stay.

v. u.

(et L. restare), ta remaiii,


n.f. (et. L.

(et.
a.

rserver), reserve.
(et. L.

restitution,
restitution.

restitutioDom),
resuit.

rserver,
to rencr

reatrvare), to
;

reserve, to set apart, to

keep

."i;

f'iirue.r,

rsultat,
rsulter,
re.sult,

n.

m.

(et. rsulter),

to oiioself
h. u?.

rserv, reserved,

v. n.

(et

L.

reaultare),

to to

privttte, spcial.

to follow.

rservoiri
voir.

(et.

rserver), rser-

rtablir, v. a. (et. re-, tablir), re-establish, to restore (in health).

rssideaoein.f.
eat.

(et. rsident), robiileiioe,

retarder,
delay.

v. a.

(et.

retardare), to

rsider,
rsilie,

v.

n.

(et.

L.

rosidere),

to

to dwell.
n.
f.

rsignation,
rtistance,
n.

(et.

L. L. resigna-

tetenir, v. a. (ot. re-, tenir), to keep, to hold, to detai, to reetrairi ; retenu, past part; retinrent, 3rd, plu. prt def.

tionni/, resi<.iation.
t.

retentir,
(et.

v. n. (et.

L. tinnitare), to rotirer),

sounii, to ling.
rsister), rsist-

ance, opposition.
^0

retirer,

v. a.
;

(et

re-,

to retire,

rsister (a), v. r. (et. L. resistere), to resist, to oppose, to witlislaiid.


rsolu, past part, of risnudre.

withdraw retirer d, to tako away from; se retirer, to retire, to go away, to


retreat.

retomber,
fa'i

v,

n.

(et

re-,

tomber), to

rsolution, em), rsolu 'itn.


rsoiidre,
solve,

u.

f.

(et.

L. L. resolation-

again.
(et.
re-,

r^^tour, n. m.

tour), return,
;

v, a. (et. L. reaolvere),

to r-

r^qiiital

en retour de, in return for


n.
(et. re-,

au

retour,

respect,
iwct.

m. (et. L. resp.ctus), re[Pronounceas if wntten res-p],


n.

on returinng. retourner, v. a. and

iour-

nrr), to

tum

again, to roturn.
n.
t. f

respecter, v. a. (et. respect), to spect sr 9V.S rter, to respect otiesclf.


;

re-

(et retraire, retraite, tr?here), retieat, retireraent

roni L. re-

respectueusement, aiiv.,respe2tfiiily.
respectueux, euse, adj. (et. L. L. respect us\i.si, {rotd L. respei tus', re.speetful.
respirer,
brc'.'.e.

retrouver,
fliiil

v.

a.

^et re,- trouver), lo

agaiit, tu tiiid.
n.
f.

runion,
runir,

(et. -,

union), runion,

assenibly, a:eeting.
v.

n. (ot.

L.

respirare),

to
v. a.

tounito, to join
e,
'^'ij-

(et re-, unir), to rcunite, se runir, to mco;.. ;

resplendipoant
L. rjspiendeo;, bright

fX.

resplendir,
glitriiring,

russir,

v. n. (et. r-,

O. F. aasir,

froi:i

re9i)lendoTit,

L. pxire>, to succeed.

tesponsabilito,
ve
iimibility.

n-

t.

(et resporisaUe),
to seixe

rve,

n.

m.

(et.
v. a.

'!),

dream, fancy.
re-,

rveiller,

(et

veiller),

to

twaiien, lo rouan.

tvesaisir,
aguiii.

v. a. (et. re-, saisir),

ressemblanos,
reseiiibianc!.

rvlateur, trice, aiij. and noun (et L. revelatc.reni), nnealer, re^cillng.


rvlation,
n.
f.

d,

f,

(et.

ressembler),
(et. L.

revelationenv),
revelai-e),

ressenibU"'.
reieiuble.

revjlatior, discovery.
v. n. (ot. re-, seinblrr),

to

rvler,
n.

'.

a.
;

(et.

L.

to

reisentiment,
resetitiiiont.

m. (et
.'-,

ressentir);

revital,

to disi'lose

se receler, to

be aeon.
vindl-

revendiquer,
a.

v. a.

(et l-

re-,

ressentir, v. to exporicnoe.

(et
n.

sentir), to feei,
(et.

care), to

Imu), to deniand.
'.n. (et.
'

resseiTement,
biiuiing tojrether.
v.

m.

resserrer),

revenir,
sin^'.

reveni.-i),
;

tooooie

back, to ret.irn, 'o accrue


pi\^t
ief.

revint, 8rd,

(re , serrer, L. L. a. resserrer, serrare, to Xok up), to !>uid togethcr, to

revenu,
luuome.

n.

m. (et revenir), revenue,

^ontracv.

VoCABULARt,
tever, v. n. (et rveX te dream, to musc, to think.

165
m, (et, Gothie raiis. a sacre, sugar-iaiie.
reed).

roseau,
reed
;

n. r(.iseau

rverbrer,
in, to

v. a. anci n.
;

(et. Ij.

rever-

rossignol, u m. (et L. L. lusoiniolus),


iiightingale.

berare), to reflect

se ruethrer, to shiiie

be refleefced, to be inirrored.
n.f. (et.

rverie,

rbm),

rverie, fancy.

rotondit,
rotunciity.

n.

f.

(et L. rotundi' tem),


n. 'et. rr^tge, L. L.

revers, n. m. (et. L revereu), reverse, back Htroke, inisfortune.


"Vovtir, V. a. 'et. re-, v&tir), to clothe, to put on ; ge revtir, to clotho oneself, to put on ; revtu, past part, clothed.

rougir,

v, a,

and

rubeu.s', to redJun, to blush.

rouleau,
rouler,
to
roll,

n- i".

(et

<!'*'

ot rle, L.

rotuluH), roll.
v. a.

revoir, v. again revit,


;

a.

(et.

'ira,

L. revldere), sing. prt. de(.


It.

to see
revoit,

and

n. (et. L. L. rotularc),

to flow, to bear.
(et.

rvolte, n. f. (et. reVjellion, niutiny, rvolt,


n.

rivolta),

roulis, n. m. waves or ship).

rouler),

rolling (of

m. and

adj. (et. rvolter),

rebel, iriutinous.

route, n. f. (et. L. faire roiUe, to sail.

rupta), road, way;

rvolter, v. a. and n. (et. rvolte), to cause a 'ebellion, to rebel e rvolter, to


;

routine,
cusconi.

"

'

(ot route), routine, rote,

revolt, to rebel.

rouvrir,
n.*.

v. a. (et. re-, ouvrir), to

open

rvolution
rvolution.

(et L. revolutionem),

again.

riant,

e, adj. (et. L.

ridentem), smiling,

cheerful, plcasant.

royal, o, adj. (et. L. regalis), royal, maguiflcent royaume, n. m. (et. L. L. regalimen),


reahn, kinj.(doni.

riche, adj.

(et, Ger. reich), rich.


atlv.. rlehly.
(.

richement,
richesse, n.
ness, wealth.

ruche,
riches, rich-

n.

'

(et Breton, rusken), bee-

(et. ric'^),

hive.

rideau,
rien, nothing.
Bevurity.
n.

n-

m.
(et.

(et.

dim.
rem),

of ride,

rude, adj. (et L. rudis), rough, hard, BCvere, labortouu.


rue,
n.
f.

wrinklei, c,."^ain.

(et h, L. ruga, a turrow),


f.

m.
n.

L.

anything,

Street.

ruine, n.
!.

(et L. ruina), ruln,

rigueur,
risquer,

(et.

L. rifrorem), rigor,

ruiner, v. ruisseau,

a. (et. rtiine), to ruin.

n.

v. a. (et.

risque, from Spanish

from

L. rivuf-'),

m. (et L. L. rivicellut, brook.


(et L. rumorera), rumor.

rioo), to risk, to

vcnture,
(et.

mmeur.
L.

f.

rivage,
rival,
conipete.
n,

n.

m.

L.

ripwticum,

fro^a L. ripa), shore, bank.

adj. (et. ruser, sare), cutuiing, deceitful.

rus,

e,

ro L. reu-

m.

(ot. L. rivalis), rival.

rivaliser,
rivalits
rival ry.

v. n. (et. riwil),

to rivaj, to

g, n.

m. or

f.

sable, n. m. (et L. Babulura), sand,


n"

('t-

Ij,

rivalitatemX

griwel.

rive,

n.

'.

<it. L"

'
i

''.

bank, shore.

sabl, e, a<ij. (et. tabler), sprinkled (with sand), scattered, strown.

rivire,

n. f. (et.

l...

^. riparia), river,
,

sacerdotal,

e, adj.

(et

sacenlcUalis),

robuste, adj. (et. L. iobustus robuat. rooher. n. m. (et roche, L, L. rupiia),


rock.
roi, n. m. (et L. ragem), kingr, soverelgn, monarch.

sacerdotal, priestly.

sacre, e. adj. (.et L. aaoratasX sacred,

holy
sacrifice,
sacrlBue.
Sicrifieir, . a- (etsatriflce.
l^-

n.

m.

(et.

L. saorifloiumX
WMjriflcare), to

Ifc

roidir, or raidir. ^ w (et. roide, from (Prorigittus), to Btiflon, to rouse.


.

nounce

ridir}.
a.
(et.

sacrilge,
off, tt>

n.

m.

(t-t

L.

sacrllegium),

rampre, v
break, to break

h. nvmpere), deatroy. I*

to

sacrileife,

profanation.

liage- adj. (et L. uaplua), wiae.

ronger,

(.t.

rumigare, (or

sagesse,
sain,

".

t.

(et

aaiie),

wiadom.

nuaiaare) to gnaw, te ta!

e, adj.

(et h. aanu>X aound.

166
saint,
e, iv^j. (et. L.

VoOABlTLAKt.
anctus), taiatj,
L.

bily, pioux.

scientifiquement,
sculpter,
V. a. (et.

ad., sdentiflcallu
L. L. sculpta re), to
is silent].

saintet, n. f. hclinesi), t*anctity.


sais.

(et.

saui.ttUtemX

eut, to carve.

[The

1^ and

2ii(l Hirig.

prs. ind.

saisir, v. a. (et. L. L. sarire, frorn O. H. (i. sazjan, tn set), to seize, to njov ; euisir t, to seize,

se, roflxive pronoun (et. L. bo), oneself, hinnelf, herself, itself, themselvts, one aufither.

saisOQi
fit

II.

(,

(et. L.

sationem), aeaaon

tiinc.
Cet. L. 8.a1ar!uiii),

dinate. tives e

second, e. adj. (et. L. secundus), second; aa noun, second, assistant, subor[In this woni and ail ita deritais

pronouuced
v.

like g],

salaire, a. m. ieunl,
salle, u.
hall.
t.

salary,

seconder,

a.

(et.

L. eecundare), to
L.

second, to assiat

(et.

L. L. gala,

a dwalling-),

secours, n. m. (et. secourir, curerf), succor, help, relief.

suc-

saluer,
salut,

t. . (it. L. salutare), to salute,

to walcuiiie.

secret, te, adj. ler.. seeretus), secret privare ; as noun, secret

"m.
11.

(et. L. salutein), salutation,

secrtement
sdentaire,
stdentary.

adv., secretly.

afety, salvatioii.

adj.

(et L. aedentarius),

salve,

f.

(et. L. ealve), salute, salvo.

sanctuaire. -m. (et


Banctuary.

L. sanctuarium),

s Utieux, euse. ivdj.(et L. seditiosus), aeditious, nmtinous.


sdition,
tion, revoit.
n.
f.

sang.
oooliiess

i>

ni.

(et. L.

saug-froid,

n. m.,

sanKninem^, blood. prsence of niind,


mntjloter, L.

(et L. aeditionem), sedi

sduction, n f. (et L. seducttoneml sduction, charm, attr;u tion.


sduire, v. a. (et. L. setlucere), tr seduu'e, to bribe, to beguile, to enchar,;, siiuant, prs, part. ;

sanglot,
ult'iro), sob.

n,

m.

(et.

aing-

sans, prep. (et L. ene), mii-n que. (with .sub.), without.

without
tioalth.

to attraut
;

seigneur, u.m. (et


noblemaii. sein,
n.

L. seniorem), lord

sant, sapin,
8aic;wiiii

n.
n.

f.

(et L. sanitatoin),

sarcasme,

n, tuuiit.

m. (et L sapirms), flr. m. (et L. sarcasmua),

m.

(et. L.

ainus),

bosom.

Sfiizft, adj.

(et L.

sedeiTini), sixteen.

sati8facti:<n, n. f. (et. L. satisfactionem), satisfaction, reward.

pjour. n. m. (et sjo mer, froni suji posod L. subdiurnare), snjoam, st-u, abodo, place.
S 11 or, gaddle.
V. a.

satisfaire,
satisfy
;

v. a. (et. L.

mlimait,
adj.

HaliSji', 3rd, Bing.

sauvage,
Kvva^'e, wild,

past part prt dut and n. (et L.

satisfaoere), to Butisfled ;
silvaticus),

(et
(et.

selle,

L.

sella),

t.

selon,

prep.
aa.

h.

L.
;

snblongum,
scion
<;(;,,

"alc>nf5-of '),

accordir g to

a .savuge.
L. salvare), to bave,

according

sauver,

v. a. (et.

to prserve.
e. adj. learned, a scholar.

semaine, n.f. let L. septimana), week, semblable, adj. and u. let. xeml)lei),
ainula!
secui,
like
;

savant,

and

n.

(et.

aavoir).

fellow, fellovi -crature.


v.

sembler,

n.

(et

I*.

simulare),

te

savoir,

v. a. (ut.

mvaU,

:^id, 8in.!?.

L. sapere), to -up, ind.

know

t'>

ap|>ear.
n.
t.

semence,
se d.

(et L. L.

Beme.itia),

savOTUeux, euse,
saporuni), ^avory.

adj. (et. aaveur, L. L. Sttxuiu),

Sflmer, v. a. (et L. semlnaroX to aow,


(et.

saxillaire, adj. ing on rook.s.

grow-

to Hpi'.tad.

snat,
BixilJuna), seal.
tuo.ask),

n.

m.

(et. L.

aenatus), senate.

sceau, scce.
sceniry.

u.
r-

m. (et L
'

sens,
ir-'j',

(et L.

acene, plao,

sonsus), sens, niean intell iience, sens. [Many peopU


11.

m.

(et. L.

pronounce the the cnstom].


sens,
Bible.
e.

final f,

butLittroondeinns
L. L. sensatus), aen-

ci
iiOa.

noe.

n.

f. (et.

L.

fcientia), science,

learnin^',

knowledge.

^J. (et

eltitiflque, adJ. (et tenet),

^.'w

sensible, adj. (et Ingi SeriaiUe.

wnaibilla), (eel-

VOCABULAIIY.
Rentment.
Daeiit, fceliii
n.

167
n.

m. (et Mutir), senti-

signal,

m. (et
v.a. (et.

L.

I,

signale, for L.

gilTtiiiiiO, '<ignal.

sentir. v.a.(et,L.senrire,tofeel,toknow; s<: xtiuir, to tutl oiieself, to Coel in oneself;


sing. sing. prt. def.
gitntait, 8rd,

signaler,
to
HiKiial.

signal

to si^nalize,
sign.

imp.

ind,; sent,t, Sni,

signe,

n.
',

m.

(et. L. signuni),

signe

V. a. (et.

L. signaro), to sign.
(et.

sparer,
septi adj.

v.a, (et. L. separare), to sepa-

rate; spar, separate, distinct.


(et. L.

signifier,

v. a.

L.

Mgniflcaro\ to
L.

signify, to donote, to

septem)^ eeven. [Prosi


i

cxpros.
(et

nounce

gt].

silenco,
once.

n.

m.
e

Bilentiuni),

septembre,
September.

n.

m.

(et.
is

L. september),
ir this

[Tlie

p
f.

silencieux,

pronounced
L.

'se,

adj.

(et

L.

L.

silentiosil.s), nilent.

Word

].

spulture,
sequin,
n.

n,

(et

seputlura),

sillage, n. m. (et of a i<liip), speed.

?),

hcadw.iy,

wake

bdv'al, burial-place.

simple,
Ifc.

m.

adj. (et L. einiplicem), simple,

(et.

zocchino), sequin

plain.

(a gold coin).

simplicit,
(et.

n. f. (et. L.

simpllcitateni),

sera. 3rd, sing. fut. of tre.

aimplicity, plainncss.

serein, e, adj.
'jlear, calin.

L.

S'

renus), serene,
serenitatein),

simuler,
feij^n.

v.

a.

(-t.

L.

toshuni;

ni.min,'.,

simulare), to feigned, siiaui.

srnit

n.

f.

(et.

serciiity, cairnness.

srieux, euse, adj.


froiii L. Hcirius),

(et. L. L. seriosus, serions, sober, earnest. (et, L.

sincre, adj. (et L. nuv-arua), .sincre. singulijr, re, adj. (et L. singularis),
singular, st. ange.

Berment,
oaih.

n.

m.

sacramentum),

sinistre, adj. (et. L. slnister), sinlster, inans|.iriou.s, uniucky, unbappy.

servicdt n. m.
vice.

(et.

L. servitium), ser-

sinon, ad\. (et


save.

si-,

non),

if

net

else.

servir, v. a, (et. L. servire), to sorve, to heip ; servir , to be of use to ; s^rvir (t qui'Uiu'un tic, to serve one as se servir
;

situation,
ation.

n.

f.

(et

rite. L. aitus) situ-

de, to eiiipioy, t<i inake iiKe of ; sert, 8rd, sing. prs. ind. seroe, 3rd, sing. prs. 8ub. ; servi, past pat.
;

six, adj. (et. L. sex), six. [x is mute beiore a consonant, suiuided as z before a vovvel, and as s whoii final j.

socit,

n.f.
f.

(etL. societatoin), socicty.

serviteur,
servant, valet.

a.

m. (et L. servitorem),
l.

sur.

n.

(et L. sorori, sister.

servitude,
seuil, n. m. old, gte.

n.

(et. L.

servitudinem),

Blavery, bciidagf, aiithority


(et.

soi, roflexive pronoun, (et L. sibi) oncself. himself, itsclf Hoi-mim, one;

8( f,

hinistlf.
f.

L. L. soleura), thresh-

soif. ".

(et L. sitim}, thirst


(et.
,

soin, n. m.
soir, n. m.

care, attention.

seul,

e,

adj. (et. L. .soIuh), alone, sole,


idv.,

ioleiy, inere.

\vt. L.
f.

semni), evening.

seulement,
sve,
strict.
n.
f.

only, merely.

soire, n.

(et swr), eviniing.


;

("et.

L. sapa), sap, juice.


(et.

svre, adj.

soit. 3rd, sing. prs. sub. of tre aa conj., whether mit .... itait, wbcther
;

L. Boverus),

severc,

....
like

or

noit

que, whethcr

it l>e

that.

soixante,
svir, v.n. (et. L. HSvire). to rage ; titir contre, to be scvere against, to piinish.
i, conj. (et. L. si),
if,

ailj. (ot.

L. soxa'/inta), .Ixty;

KdixaiUe
k].

et

du, seventy.

[rrononnce'j!

whethi'r, so.

[*

beforo

il

and
Il

,ls].
f.

m. (et L. 3o!uni), soil. SO-(iat, n. m. (et. It. soldato),


sol, n.

sibylle, ".
sicle,
.'ge.

(et L. sybilla), sybll.


(et.

soldier.

m.

L. wbou'.uih), century,
L. L. sedium), sige,

soleil, n. beat, (lay.

li).

(et. L. L. solicuius),

8Un,

si ge, n.
oeat.

m. (et

solennel,
solcinn, in

le. adj.

(et L. L. solennalisX

due form.

sien, ne, posa, pro, (et O. F. sen, doublet of son), his, herd, its les siem,
;

bis

saeii.

n.f. (et L. Tj. solennititera), oleninit>, poinp. solitaire, adj. (et L. sclilerius), bolilar> , louely.

solennit,

168
BOlit'Jde.
n.
f.

VoOABULARt.
(et.

L. solitudo), boU-

soumission,
em), aubuiission.

n.

f.

(et.

L. gubmisslon-

tu do.
solive, n.
f.

(et.?, joisl, beain.


n.
f.

souponner,
soupir,
n.

v. a. (et.

soupon, L. su-

sollicitation,
sni), solicitation.

(ot. L. aollicitation-

pic<onem), to Buspect.

m.

(et.

L. suspirium), siirh,

SoUiciteri
to
solii-'it,

v. a.

(et.

L. L. aoUioitare),
snUiciter), pcr-

breatb, gasp,

to roquest.

Mu

solliciteur,

souple, adj.
(et.

(et.

L. supplex), siipple, L. sur^'ere), source,


L.

m.
(ot.

pliant, soft.

aolkiting, petitioner.
oUj.

source,

n.

f.

(et.

sombre,
sombrer,
to /ouiuter.

Spanish, sombra),

spriny, oiig'in.

dark, gloomy.
v. n. (et. L. L.

sourd,
subambrare),
sutiuii.

e,

adj.
v.

(et.

surdus), deaf,

somme,
from

n.

f-

(et. L.

sumnia), suni.
L. somniculus,

sommeil,

n. m. (et. L. L. 80iunus), sieep.

subridere), to aniilc; owriri^ i/f, tosniiluat: sourire , to sniilu on, to bo pleaaod witii ; as n, ni.
n.
(et.
Ij,

sourire,

sniilu.

sommer,
sommes, sommet,
niit, top.

v.a. (et. L. L.

summare, from

sous, prep.
low.

(et,

L. subtus), under, bta.

L. suiiima), to sumiuon.
lat, plu. prs. ind. of tre,

SOilStrair",

v.

(et.

sous, traire, L.

"

m-

tralifici, to subtta.^t, to
ait, 3rd, siriK. inip. ind.

Ueduct; soustray-

(et.

L. siinimum),

Bum-

son,

n.

m.

(et,

Ij.

sonus), aound.
(et.

son, sa, ses, pronominal adj.

L.

soutenu,

Buumi,
Sound.

his, ber, it).


v. a,
(et.

soutenir, v. a. (et, L. sustinere , to sustain, to 8up|iort, to as-iist, to ba<;k past part., scutiiU, 3rd, sing. prt. dut.
;

ftonder,

L.

suit,

unda), to
L, sora-

souterrain, e, adj. (et. L. subterraneus], Bubterraneous, luuleritfround.


soutien,
prop.
n.

and n. (et songe, songer, nium), to dream, to think.


v. a.

m.

(et. noulentr),

support,

sonore, adj.

(efc.

L. sonorus), sonorous.

se souvenir,
renieniber.

v. r.

(ut L. subvenire), to
souvenir,
reniein-

sont. 3>d, phi. prs, ind, of lre. sort, n.m. (et. L. sortem), fate, destiny.
sorte, n. f. (et. tem), sort, kind.
It.

souvenir,
bratice.

n.

sorta,

from

L. sor-

sortir, v. n. (et. I,. sortiri), to go or oome out, to get out;/atre sortir, to briug out.
SOtici, n. m. (et. soucier, L. sollicitare), carc, aiixiety,

souvent, adj. (et. L. subinde^ often. souverain, e, adj. and n. (et. L, L,


superanus), soveiui^ri, monarch.

souverainet?,
8overeij,'nty.

n.

f.

(et.

souoerain),

spcieux,
specioiis.

eus"?, adj. (et. L, speciosus),

soudain, e, atij- and adv. (et. L. Bubitanus), sudden, unexpected.


S0.iffle,

L.

spectacle,

n.

m.

(et.

L. spectawuluni),

n,

m.
X.

(et,

goufl'r),
n. (et.

blowing,

sptietacle, sitfht.

blast, wind.

spectateur,

n.

m.

(et. L.

spectatorem),

souffler, V.

and

L. sufflare),

speetator.

to blow,

spectre,
n.f (et. gouffrir), sufifei Ing

n.

m.
(et.

(et.

L.

speotrum),

souffrance,

epeofre.

L. L. sulesouffrir, rere, L. sutTerre), to suflor, to bear ; souffrant, prs. i.iart. souiller, v. a. (et. L. suillus) to soil, to hiain, to deflle. soulagement, n. m. (et. soulayer, h.
v. a.

and

n. (et.

sphre,
glotic.

n.

L. sphaara), spliere,

spirituelle,

adj. (et. L. L. spiritualig),

spiritual, intelligent.

ubleviaru),

splendeur,
splendide,
splendid.

n.

f.

(ot.

L.

splcndorem),
splendidus),

relibf, oa^e.
v. a.

sublevare), to Sift, to ralse, ta stir up, to arouse, to rouse to rbellion SO.imectre, v. a. (et. L. submittere), to HUbiuit se soumettre, to siibrait, to yield ; soumit, paat part., nubiuiiwive,

soulever,

(et

L.

splendor, brightness,
adj.
(et.

L.

spontanment,
Stipendier,
to bire
;

adj. (et. Sj'mtati, L,


v.

spontaneus), spuntaneor.sly,
v. a.

jintarilv.

(et.

L.

stipendiutnX

ubjeet

stij>iuii,

bired, a hirelbig.

i,-\

BubmisBionion,

U sut*

riuui), 8ii;h,

BX), supple,

ire),

source,

rdus), deaf,
bridere),

fco

sourire , to an n. m. ;

under, bttraire, L. souitraj,'

(,

t;

t,

stinere', to to ba<;k 3rd, sing.


;

A
r),

stibtcrra-

ronnd.

support,

ibvenire), to
lir,

reaiciii-

d'j'i,

often.
L.

.(et. ch.

L.

soiioerain),

I,

speciosus),

>ectaouluiii},

)ectatort'iu),

spectruin),

ira),

sphre,

spiritualifl),

plendorem),
splendidus),

l'mtan, L,
'l'Uintarily.

itii>eiidiutaX

irel]g.

ftRllftlllFilf3i9

TOOABULART.
stipoler,
tipuiat.
r. a.
(t.

169

L.

stlpulari),

to

suivre, r. a. (et L. L. sequore, l'oin tuiu'int, prs, part, L. Bequi), to follow nuivi, piv^t part. foUowiiig, iiext
; ;

Studieux, euse,
tudious.

adj. (t, L. itudiosus),

sujet, n m. (et L. subjectus), subjcct

Btyle> n. m. (et L. stylus), style.

superbe,
sweet,

ai'J.

(et L. 8upei'')U8), oroud,

8U

put

part, ot uavoir.
iwlj.

hiuxbty, superb.
suavis),

suave,

(et.

L.

suprieur,

e, adj.

and

n.

(et L. superi-

fragraiit, mild.

oreini, superior. adj. and n. (et. L. sub, eubordiiiate, Hubaltrn.

subalterne,
ait
r), iiifori jr,

supriorit. "' (et L. L. suparioritatein), su|ieriority.

subiri
to sutfur.

V. a. (et. L. subira),

to

undcrm

superstition,

n.

t.

(et L. suporoti-

tioneni), superstition.

subitemeut. adr. (et


denly.

L. subitus), 8Ud>

suppler,

v.a.

and
of,

n. (et. L.

supplereX

to tal<e the pince


V. a.

to supply.
(et. L.

subjuguer,
sublime,
linjf.

(et L. subju^-are), to
L. sublimis),

supplment,
suppliant,
supplice,
punittliiiient,

"

m-

supplenien-

Bubju(^ate, to Bubdu(!.
adj.
(et.

tum), supplment
sube. adj.

and

n. (et.

tuppUer),

submerger,

t. a. (et. L.

to submerge, to tnerged.

drown
v. a.

submergere), suhmtrg, sub-

suppliant, supplicant.
n. m. (et excution. v, a.

L.

aupplicium),

subordonner,
ordonner ), to
subordinate.

suborciiiiate

(et L. sub., and gub.rrdunn


;

supplier,

(et L. supplic^re). to

entreat, to beseech.

supposer,
ij. (et. L. subsequeu-

v.a. (et L. sub, pausare), to

subsquent, e,
tein),

suppose.

subsquent.
n.

subside,
gubsidy.

m.

(et L.

subsidium),

suprme, adj. (et L. Bupri^me, monientons, last

supremus),

substituer,

v. a. (et. L. substituerc),

sr, e, adj. (et L. securus), sure, certain, trusty.


sur, prep.
(et.

to Kiibniitute, to appoint.

L. super), on, upon, over.


L. securitatem), seou-

subvenir,
succder,
to sueceed.

(), v, n.
(d). v. n.

(et L. subvenire),

to assist, to provide.

sret,

n-

t (et
n,
t.

rity, safety.

(et L. succderez,

surface,
surface.

(et L. super, facies>,

succs, n. m. (et L. suciesaus), aucced.s.

surhumain,

e, adj.

(et L. gui^r, huinten-

successeur,
iwccesaor.

n.

m. (et

manus), siiinr human.


L. sucoessorem),

surintendant.
succe.'ssivus),

".

m. (et mjr,

dint), superintenilent.

successif, ivo, adJ. (et L.


Bucuessive.

surmonter,
surnaturel,
suponiatural.

v. a. (et.

mir, numter), to

surmount, to overoome.
siiccessively,
le, adj, (et

successivement, adv.,
in successiou.

mr,

naturel),

sacre,

n.

m.
lo-

et niost

likely

Spauish

aziksir), sugar.

sud.

n-

(et.

A. S. sudh), south.

[Pionof.iicc the d],

surprendre, v. a. (et t/r, prendre), to surprise, to cheat, to ffct by untair means surpris, past part.
;

sud-ouest, n. m., south- west sueur, n. '. (et L. sudoreta), sweat,


poispiration.

surtout, adv., above ail, especially. surveiller, v. a, (et. sur, veiller), to Bupt.Tuitend, to inspect, to watch, to watch ovt;r.

suffire

(4).

V.

n.

(et L. sufflcere), to
;

sutflce, to be suSlcienC part, suffloieiit

sujlant, prs.

survivre, (l v. n, (ot. L. super, vlvere), to survive, to outlive.


susciter,
v.

fluioide, suicide.

n.

m. (t

L. sul,

cdtrb),

a.

(t.

L.

suscitare), to

stir up, to arouse.

suis,

Ist, slng. prs. ind. o( tre.


'. fc

suite.

<*. fuiore),

suite, retinue,

what

follonn^

MKoession

i la

sttite de,

(Uwiu)riiknr.

(et L. suspendere), suspendre, to suspfi'd, Ui hpnsr up. symbole, ". m., (et Qr. ervupoKov), symbol, mblein.
'.

a.

170
aynitrlqua,
adj. (et.

VOOABULART.
symMH'., L. L.
L.

tempte,

n.

f.

(et

L.

Byinmetria), Hyiiimetritail.

tempestatem)

teinj)e(ii, ntorni.

symptme,

n.

m. (et

symptomaX

syniptoin, iiidioatlon,

temptueux, euse,
ten)pe.stuous.

adj. (et

tempHe\

systmatique,
teiriatic.

adj. (et, gyattne), sya-

temple,
church.

ii.in. (et.

L. templuni), temple,

systme,
systuiii.

n.

m.

(et.

Gr.

aiixTtina),

temps,
weathor
to time.
;

n. m. (et. L. terr.pus), t'me, de temps en tempu, ttom tlme

t, n.

m.
n.

tabac,
toliaao.

m.

(et.

Spanish

tabaoo).

tendance, n. f. (et tendre), tendency. tendre, adj. (et L. teuerum;, tender,


Boft.

[Pronouiice (iibu].
n. n.
t.
f.

table,

(et. L.

tabula), tiiblo.
stain, spot.

tendre,

v.a. (et. L. lendore), to


;

tache,
tai
le,

(et.

out
size,

tu hold ont

tend

',

?),

stretcb past part. intent.


,

n.

f.

(et.

tailler,

to

ten'lresse,
affection.

".f.

(et

<e;nire),

i:iit),

tenderness,

fljfure, l)uiliJ.

talent,
abiiitv.

n. n. (et. L.

talentum), talent.

tnbres,
darkiie.'48.

n.

t.

plu. (et L, tonebraj),

talon, n.ni. (et. L. L. taloneiii, talus), heol.

ttom

L.

tenir, v. a. and n. (et L, tenore), to hold, to keep, to perfonii, to rcinain, to stand, to belong to ; se tenir,to hold oneuelf, lo stiii'l.

tant, adv.

(ot. L.

tantua), so

many,

much, 80

so long.

t3atative,
attompt.

n.

t.

(et L.

tentativu),

tantt, adv. (et. tant, tt, L. tostus), preseiuly, a little whiloago; tantt . . . tantt, now .... iiow.

tentOi
tent.

n,

t.

(et L. ter\ta, from tend)), '


to temut,

tard adv. (et. L. tardas), late;Zu,i tard, latiT, afterwards.


tarder,
loi ter. v.

tenter,

v. a. (et, L. tenlare),

to try, to attempt, to entice.

n.

(et.

tard), to delay, to

terme,

n.

m.

(et.

L,

terminus), tenn,

limit, poriod.

taxer,
taxer
d',

taxare), to rate to char),'e with, to call.


(et.

v. a.

L.

ternir, v. a. (et. terne, from O. Ir. G. tarnan, to obscure), to tarnish, to obse re.
(et terrain, n. m. ground, pice of ground.
L.

teindre,

v. a. (et,

L. tin^jere), to dye,
titii,'ed
;

terrenu.i),
to

totiriire; se teindre, to be

(v/-

naient, 3rd, plu. imp. in

I.

terrasser,

v. a. (et. terrasse),

knik

tel. le, adj. fet, L. talls),

sua

tel

que,

down,
terre, n.
f.

8uch as

un

tel,

such a
n.ra.(et.ar. r^Ae, ypi^en-),
in

(t.

g.

terra), earth, laud,


ter.va

tlgraphe,
telcKraph,

country nent
;

terre ferme,
acij,

Arma, colti-

terre, ashoro,
(et.

tellement, adv., tmraire, adj.


raeh, bold.

auch a aianner,
L.

so.

terrestre,
restriai.

L. terrestria), t*r-

(et.

temerariu),

terreur,
adv,, rr.*hly, hoidly.
L.
fear.

n.

f.

(et.

L. terrorem), terror,

tm rairement,
tmrit,
tunii.aity.
nt.

(et.

taaieiitatem),

terrible, adj. awful.


terri tiry.

(et. L. terrlbilis), terrible,

tmoignage,
tmoigner.v.a.

n.

m.

(et.

t^now/ner),

territoire; n. m. (et L. territorium),

testiinony, proof, witness,


(et, L, L.

testament, n.m. (et


tnstimonlare),

L. testamentuin),
vn

testament,
tte,
n.

will.
f.
;

to testily, to show.

(et L. test*,

tmoin, n. m. (et. L, testimonium), testimony, v/itness, vidence.

earthtn

dishy, head

tempe, n. f. (et. L. tcaipora), temple. temprature, n. f. (et. L. L. tempora.


tura),

en tte de, at the head of. te^te, n. m. (ot li. textus), text thologique, adj. (et. thologie, ttom
n.
f.

Gr. floAoyt'a), theologieal.

temprature.
v, .
(et.

thorie,
L. temperare) to

(et.

temprer,
temper.

Gr. Oeoipia), theory. tepidus), tpid. luke*

tide, adj. wwm, mild.

(et. L.

YoC.iBULAItt.
tideur,
n.
f.

171

(et.

tUde), tepiciity, lukoInd. of tenii:

tracer,

a. (et.

L. h. tmctiarc,
(t.

from
.

waniinuss, inildt.cHS.

L. traotus). to tratc, tn lay ont, (n m\i

tient. 8rd,

din^f. prs.

tradition.
tradition,

"

'.

L.

trailitionoui),

tiers, n. m.

(et. L. tcrtiua),

thini part.

timide,

ik'J- 'tt. h.

timidus), timid.

trafic, n. m. (et.

?),

trafflc, tra<le.

timidement,

afl'-,

timidly.

trahir, to be fal:;e

v. a. (ot. L. tratlere),

to betray,

to,

to doi;vi\e.
".
'

tirer, v. a. (et. Nith. toruri), to drive, to shoot, to fire.


tisi'Ut',

todiaw,

trahison,
trt:a<:liery,

(t.

r,.

traditionem),
trae,

treaaon.
n.

tissu, texture, eloth.


'I.

'11.

(t. tiiitre,

from

L. texere),

trait, featuro.
tibi),

m. m.

(et.

L.

tractu),

titre,

11.

111.

(Pt. L. titiilus), title.

tci, Personal pro. (et. L.

thee, to

trait, n. agieenient.
traiter, to ney:otiate

(et. L. traotatus), treaty,

thee, thou.
toit,
infr.
!

v. a. (et. L.

tractare\ to tnat,
;

m-

(et. L. tectuin), roof,

dwolltole-

trai'er (U, to call ; en, C'iinme, to treat like.

traiter

tolrant,

e,

ivlj.

(et.

tolrer,

L.

tramer,

v. a. (et.

trame, L. tramu), to
proh-

rare^ tolrant, iiidulytrit.

weave, to plot, to plan.


tumba),

tombe,
grave.

n-

'

(et.

L.

tomb,
j

tranchant,
ably froin
tran()uil,
!..

e, adj. (ot. Iraneh<'r,

truncare), sharp, cuttiii;^.


aiij.

tombeau, n. dini. of tuiuba),


tomber,
fall),

m.

(et. L, L. tumbellus, tomb, niominieiit.

tranquille,
fahn.

(et.

L. tranqulllus),

v.

n.

(et.

Seand. tumba, to
adj. (et.

transformateur,
mer, from
J..

ftdj.

(et.

transfor-

to

fall.

tiansfoiiiian^), transforininjf.
n.
f.

ton. ta, tes


tuUMi), thy.

pronominal
(ot. L.

L.

transformation,
mcr), transfrmauoii,

(et.

tramjor-

torrent, n m.
rent, stream.

torrentem), tortortus),

transmettre,
to transmit,
to
part.

^.a. (t. L.

convey
n.
f.

transmittere), truiismis, pas*

tort,

n-

m-

(et-

L.
;

wrongr

aooii tort, to b. wroniif orroiieously.

tort,

vvrongly,

transparence,
transii.irtiH'y.

(et.

transparent),
L,
trans,

tCUClier, V. a. and n. (et. O. II. G. zuohn, to draw), to touch, to bo very touchant, prca. near, to oall (at a jwrt)
;

transparent,
transpirer,

e,

adj

(et.

pareo), trnniparent, vident.


v.n. (ot. L. tran.s, spirare),

part, touchintf, affuctinur.

touffe, n.
tuft, b.inch.

'.

(et.

Low

Oer. topp, a tuft),


toup-).

to transiiire, to per?pire, ghow, to be aeen.

to exhale, to

touifu,
busliy.

e,

adv.
afiv.,

(et.

tufted,
i.oiitinu-

transport,

n.

m.

(et.

transporter),

transport, eista.sy, burst.

toujours,
tour,
n.
f.

always, ever,

transporter,

v.a. (et. L. transportare),

ally, n< fssautly.


(et. L. turrini),

to tranijport, to remove, to convey.

tower.

trappe,

n.

'.

(et.

O.

H. G. trapo,

tour, n. m, (et. tourner), turn, round, faire le taur de, to go drcuniference around tour tour, by turns, succs il non tour, in his turn, also. Bively
;

snare', trap, trap-door.

tourbilloner, v. a. (et. toiu-biUo7i, from L. turbo), to whirl. tourner, v. a. and n. (et. L. tomare),
to turn.
totus), aU, any, every; iouf. mas. i>Ui.; as ti. ni ,>vll, evuryadv., whully, entirniy, (|uiio. as thiiif

t'.avail, II, m- (<t. L. L. trabaculum, L. trabonO, work, labor, trouble, anxiety, t^'availler, v. . an<l n. (et. travail), to ,\'orli, o tonnent, to trouble, to exer-

from

cise.

e,

travers, prep.
n.
f.

{at.

tout,
;

adj. (et.

L.

throuj^h, across,

aloii;:,

L. transvereuB), anionu;.
traverser),
pass-

traverse,
age, voya^'e.

(et.

toute- puissance, n. f., Omnipotence. tout-puissant, n. m., Almighty.


toutefois,
nevertiieless.

traverser,

v. a. (et. travers),

to cross,

adv.

(et

tout, fois).

yt,

trace,
fOO(ttip.

u.

(ei Irar),

ii-ace,

track,

trempe, n- t. (et. tremper, from L. temiwraro), (emper, constitution, trente, adj. (et. L. triginta), thirty. trsor, n. m. (et. L. thsaurus), trea
sure, piirse.

\n
tTPSOrl^T, n. m.
tresgaillir,
t' (et. trtor),

VoCAHULARY.
\

kreasuror.
Malire),

v. n. (et.

L.

tmm,

tyran, n. m. (et. tyrannie, > '


cruulty.

L. tyrannu),
(et.

tynnt.

tyran),

tyranny,

to leap, to Htart

.^ngulairOi
n.
f.

adJ.Oit. L. trianitularis)

tyranniser,
niuu.

7. a. (et.

tyran), to tyran-

(riantrular.

tribu,
eiii),

(et.

L. tribui), tribo.
f.

tribulatior,
tribulation.

n.

(et.

L.

tribulation-

a. n. m,

un,

e,

adJ.

(et. L.

unus), one,

a,

an

tribut, n.m.

(et. L. tribiitum), tribute.


iwlj.

un

(i

un. one by one.

tributaire,

imd

n. (et. L. tribu-

tarin), tribu ary, 8iibj!Ct.

union, n. f. (et. L. unionem), union. unique, adj. (et. L. unioum), unique,


only.

triomphal,
triiini)>bal.

e, adj. (ot. L. trluinphaliH),

uniquement,
e,
a<lj

iwl^-. solely, entirely.

triomphant,
triuni|ihant.

(et.

triompher),

unir,
Joln
;

L. unire), s'unir, 10 be united.


(ut. n.
f.

V. a.

to unit<!, to

triomphateur, n.m.
triomphe,
triompher,
triuiiipli
;

(et. L.

triumpha-

unit,

(ot. L.

uniUitem), unity.
L. univer^um), uni

toroni), triuiiipher, victor.


n.

univers,
L.

n.

m.

(et.

m.
n.

(et.

triumphu),

verse, world.

triumpb, victory.
triomphe), to triomphrr de, to triuinph ovor.
v.
(et.

universel,
universal.

le. adj. (et. L. universalis),

urgent,
usage,
user,
n.

e,

adj.

(et.

L.

uritentem),

t iste, adJ.
fui.

lot. L. tristis), Hiul,

aorrow-

urgent, prcHsing.

m.

(et. user),

usage, use.
\isare,
iia-',

tristesse, n. f. (ot L. trlstitia), grief, Ha<lneH.i, soriow, saJ lotiditiori.


trois, adJ.
(et. L. trs), tiiree.

V. a.

(et.

L.

L.
;

U8UH), to use, to c ar ont

from L. worri out.


to

usuel,
iience,

le, adj. (et. L. usualis), nsual.


v.

troisime, adJ.,

thinl.
(et.

usurper,
trompe,
uaurp.
V, n. m.

a.

(et.

L.

usurire),

tromper,
literally,

v.

a.

ti) blow the tnimpet to one), to doive, tocheat, to disappc.jiit.

tronc,

f".

trne, n. trop. adv.


iri'ioh,

m. m.

(ot. L.
(et. L.

truncua), trunk. thronus), throne. troppus), toc, too

va, 3rd, slng.

prs. Ind. of aller.


(et.

vague,
billow.

II.

f.

H, G. wc), wave,

(et. L. L.

too maiiy, too well, much, iiiany, very much.


.

vague,
vain,
;

adj. (et. L. vag;us\ \-ague.

trophe,
trop h >

n.

m. m.
(et.

(et.

I,.

tropsBum),
tropieuni),

iiny:

en

e, adj. (et. L. vaiii, in vain.

vanus), vain,

trif-

tropique,
tro}>ie.

n.

(et.

L.

qiiish,

vaincre, v. a. (et. L. vincere), to vanto subdiie. te eoriquer ; vaincu, pastpart., vaiKiui.shod, coriquered.

troquer,
tron,
n.

v, a.

Spaniai trocar), to
iiole.
[>.

vainqueur,
quoror.

n.

m.

(et,

vaincre),

con-

truck, to barter.

m.
n.

(et.

f),

vaisseau, vas), (rom


I.,.

n. m. (et. L. vessol, ship.


f.

L. vascellnni,

trouble,

m.

(et.

L. turbnla,

from

L. turba), trouble, anxiety, uneasiness.

valeur,
valle,

n.

(et.

L. valortMn), value,

worsli, valor.
n.
f.

troubler,

v. . (et, L.

disturb, to diin ; tu rbed, to falter.

L. turbulare) to se troubler, to be dis-

(et. L.

vallem), valley.
\anity,
steain.

vanit,
troppus), troop;

n.f, (et. L. vanitateni),


r..

troupe,

n.

f.

(et. L. h.

vapeur,

f.

(et.

L.

vaporcm\

pl\i. troop.s,

soldiera.
v. a. (et. L.

trouver,
be.

turliare), to flnd,
fiiid orieaelf,

to discover; se trouver, to

to

variation, n, f. (et variet), variation. varier, v. a. and n. (ot. L varLiro), to vary, to change vari, varied, diNursi;

lleil.

tu,
hip.

Ier9.

pro. (et. L. tu), thon.


11.

tutelle,

f.

(et. L.

tutela), jcuanilan-

vassalit, n. f. (et. vassal, from Celtlo gwas, a youth), vaHsaiage, fealty.

vaste,
11.

adj.

(et.

L.

voatus),

vaut,

t;pe,

m. (et

L. typus), type, iiiooeL

gpacious, large.

^<.

<

IMAGE EVALUATION TEST TARGET (MT-3)

1.0
li

iiii

iiiiM

tm. '"
12.0

1.1

1.8

M IIM

1.6

v:
(^ /}

^^
A
/^
^q\'

^
4N^

.%*
"c^

;\ \

v^

<^^

%^'%'"

^\
4^
v^ -^

oV

^'^'^^^^J^i^

d?

Photographie Sciences Corporation

23 WEST MAIN STREET

WEBSTER, N. Y. 14580 (716) 872-4503

c^^

L* ip
i^

<-

S'

ToOABtJLARt.
vgtation,
rogetation.
n.f. (et.

17S
lat tAng. prs. Ind. of vouloir.
n.

L. Tesretatlonem),

veux,
vice,

m. (et L.
n.

vitiuin), vice.

veille, mchiiiif,

n.
\

'

(et.

L.

vigrilia),

watch,

igll,

eve,

day

before.

vice-roi,

m. (et
n.

L. vice, in the plac<


(et.

cf, rci), viceroy.

veiller. *"

(et. L. viotilare),

to watch.

vice-royaut,
vici,
tiated.

(.

L, vice,

and L.

vnal, e, adj. (et. venali), vcnai, base. vendre, v. a. (et. L. vendeie), to seU. vendredi, n. m. (et L. veneris dios),
Friday.

L. regalitiitem), viceroyalty.
0, adj. (et. oinier, L. vitiare), vi-

vicissitude,
*dj(^t^'-

n.

f.

(et L. viciaaitudo),
L. victlma), vlctim.

vnrable,
Tenerable.

venemb..

;\

vicissitude, chaiiffe.

^;;time, ".

f.
f.

(t't

VOngiancei n.f. (et venger), venieance. venger, v. a. (et. L. v-ndicare), to


hveage.

<Jtoire, n.

(et. L. viotcria), victory.

victorieux, euse, adj. (et L.


08US), victorious.

victori-

venir, v. n. (et. L. venire), to corne ; venir de, Just to hve Vfnir mourir, to happen to die les hommes vfnir, the mon of the future ; venu, past part. venait, ord aing. inip. ind.
; ; ;

vide, adj. and n. m. (et. L. viduua), empty, ernptinesa, vacuuni, void,


vie,
mail.
n.
f.

(et L. vitam), hfe, food.


n.

vieillard,

m.
f,

(et.

vieux, vieil),

oU

vnitien, ne, adj., Venetian. vent, n. m. (et. L. ventua), '^vind


de
terre,

vieillesse, n.
;

(et. vieil),

old ge.

vent

land breeze.
(et. L, verrais),

vieillir, v. n. (et

vieil),

to

grow

old.

ver, n. m,

woroi.
veracifcatem^

viendrait, 3rd, sing. wnir.

prea.

sond. f

vracit,
veraeity.

n.

t.

(et.

L.

verbe,
rerb.

n.

m.
n. n.

(et. L.

verbum), the Word,

vient, 3rd, aing. prs, ind, of venir. vierge, n. f. and adj. (et L. vlrgo),
virtriii,

uiaicieu, fresh.

verdure, verger,
orchard.

f.

(et verb), verdure,


(et.

vieux,
vif, ve, briuiit

vieil,
adj.

vieille,

dj.

(et

L,

u.

L.

viridiarium),

Vfctulus), old.

(et L.

Tlvual

livs r,

vergue,
verify.

n.

f.

(et.

L. virga), yard.
L.

vrifier, v. a.

(et. L.

Vigil
sentry.

n.f.

(et L. vigiliaX
n.
(et.

veriflcare), to

lookout,

vritable.
vrit,

adJ. (et. vrit), fcrue,

real.

vigilance,

f.

vigilant,

from L.

vritablement,
vers, prop. vers,
killed.

vigilantem), vigilance.

adv., truly, really.

u.t. (et. L.
(et. L.

veritaem), truth.
versus), towanis.

vigne, n. vigueur,
strength.

f.

(et L. vinea), vine.


f.

n.

(et L. vigoreui), vigor,


vilis),

e, adj. (et. L. versatus), vertied,

vil, e, adj. (et L.

meaii, low.

v. a. (et L. to slied (teara).

verser,

versare), to pour,

village,
village.

n.

m. (et

L. L. villaticum),

verset, n. m. (et
vert,
e,

ryers,

verse),

erte.

ville, n.

f.

(et L.

villa),

town,

city.

adj. (et. robuNt, vitoroua.

L.

viridis),

green,

vingt, adj. (et L. vi-^nti), twenly (Prononnce as if written vin].


vint, 3rd sing. prt
def. of venir.

vertige,
dizziiieasi,

n.

m. (et

L. vertigo), vertigo,

utisteadiness.
t.

violation,
profanation.

n.

f.

(et violer), violation,


vio-

vertu, n. vestige,
tijre,

(et L. virtutem), virtne.

m.
;

(et.

vesrigium),

e--

vio ent,
violer,

e, adj. (et. L. violentas),

ri'iiiainB

les

vestiges,

niaiks, vi-

lent, furiouM, tierce.


v. a.

dence.

(et L. violarc), to violate,


def. of voir.

vtement,

"

m. (et

L. vestimentum),

to

aliiiHC.

faruieiit raiment,

clothiiiK-.
;

virent, 3rd, plu. prt

vtir, V. a. (et. L, vestire), to clothe 9tu, paet part, clad, olothed.

virer, v.n. (et L. viria, a ring), to virer de bord, to put about

tum;

veuf, ve, ". m. aud widower, widow.

f.

(et L. viduua),

visage,
L. visuiu)

ni.

lace,

(et L.I.,. visatiCTim, fro couatenaucs, visag*.

174
visible,
a<ij.

VoCABULAfit.
(ot.

L. viaiWlls), visible,

vident, inanifost.

voler,

V. n,

(t L. volare), to
adj. (et
L.

fly.

yision

n.

(.

(et. L. visionetn), vision. (et. visiter), visit.

volontaire,
volont,
n.
f.

voluntariui^
will,

vohititary, willing.

Tisite, n.

t.

(et L. voluntatoni),

visiter v.

a. (et. L. visitare),

to

visit.

pleaMure.

vit, 3rd sing. prt. dcf. o( voir.

voltiger,

v. n. (et. It.

volteggiare), to

vite, adj. and adv. (et


quleki.v.

?),

qulck, swift,

flutter about, to hover.

vont,
truni),

3rd, plu. prs. ind. of aller,


,

vivre, v. n. (et. L. vivere), to live, to exist vivres, n. m. plu., provisions, food; vivant, prs, part., living.
;

votre, vos your.

pronominal
8rd,
sing.

adj. (et. L. vo-

vu, n. m. (et. L. votuni), vow ; plu., wishcs, jjood wishea, requests, vows.
voguer,
voir,
Y. n. (et. It. (et.

voudrait,
vouloir.

prs,

cond. of

vouer,
to vow.

v.a. (et L.

r,,

vofare), to sali.

votare), to dvote,

voici, prep.
atid et
is,

voi(s),

from
f.

ici),

imperative of h^te is, hre are,


via),

this

there are.
n.
(et.

vouloir, v.a. (et. L. L. volere), to wish, to will, to be wiliinjf; voulant, prs, part; voulu, past part.

voie,
tneariH.

L.

way, road,

vous,

pers. pro. (et. L. vos), you.


i.

voil, prep. (et. voi(s) and l, there), that Ks, those are, there is, chero are.
voile,
to
sali.

voyage,

m.

(et.

L.

viaticum),

voy-

age, journey.

n.f.

et

L. vela), sail

/are voiU,

voyager, . n. (et. voyage), to travel. voyageur, n. f. (et. voyage), traveller.


vrai,
real.
0, adj. (et. L,

voiler,
to c'over
;

v. a.

(et voile, a veil), to veil, te voi'er, to veil oneself.


n.
f.

L.

veragus),

true,

voilure,

(et wife), set of

ails.

vue,

n.

f.

(et voir), ight, view; en vut

ru, past part.

voir, V. a. (et. L. videre), to aee ; se voir, to flnd oneself ; voyant, prs, part. ;

de), VI sigiit of

vulgaire,

garis), vulgar,

(et L. vicinus), neighboring', contig-uous, near.


e, adJ.

voisin,

and

n.

mon

acij. and n. m. (et L. ra\oommon ; the vulgar, compeople ordinary people.

voisinage,
proxiniity.

n.

m.

(et. voisin),

vicinity,

y, n.

m.
ibi),

voix. n. t. (et. L. vocem), voioe haute voix, in a loud voiee ; voix basse, in a low voioe, vol, n. m. (et, vuler), flight
;

y, adv. (et L. it, thither.

there, to

it,

it,

la

yeux,
l, u.

plural of il.

m.
iseal,

VOlcaUi n.m.
VOlce,
n.
f.

(ot. h.

vulcanus), volcano.

zle, n. m. (et V, zelus),

warmtl^

(et

voler), flight, flock.

zone.

n.

f.

(e''

^ zona), aone.

--=>4^^^^.

-u

Vous aimerez peut-être aussi