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NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F.

Stevens page 1 of 27 pages

Stevens Jury Says One Member Had `Violent


Outbursts' (Update1)
By Nadine Elsibai and Cary O'Reilly

Oct. 23 (Bloomberg) -- The judge in Alaska Senator Ted Stevens's criminal trial
warned jurors to be civil to each other after the panel sought the dismissal of one
woman who the foreman said had ``violent outbursts'' and was rude and
disrespectful.

``We the jury request that juror No. 9 be removed from the jury. She is being rude, disrespectful and
unreasonable,'' the jury said today in a note to the judge signed by the foreman. ``She's had violent
outbursts,'' isn't following the rules and the ``jurors are getting off course,'' the note said.

Instead of dismissing the juror, U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan in Washington called the panel
members into the courtroom and admonished them to be civil.

``It's been a long trial,'' Sullivan told the panel of eight women and four men. ``In discharging your
responsibilities as the judges of the facts, you should encourage civility and mutual respect among
yourselves. You should promote a full and fair consideration of the evidence. Keep those thoughts in
mind and continue with your deliberations.''

He then sent them back to the jury room to resume talks. The panel began discussions at midday
yesterday and had deliberated for about seven hours in all before sending the note to the judge.

Stevens, 84, the longest-serving Republican in the Senate, is charged with failing to report more than
$250,000 in home improvements and other gifts from Veco Corp., an Alaska oil- services company;
Bill Allen, the company's founder, and other friends. Indicted in July, the senator demanded a speedy
trial in a bid to clear his name before Election Day Nov. 4.

`Kind of Stressful'

Yesterday the panel sought permission to go home early, telling the judge in a note that the discussions
were ``kind of stressful right now.''

``We need a minute of clarity for all,'' yesterday's jury note said.

Sullivan said earlier today the panel was ``being very attentive'' in sending four notes in their first two
days of deliberations.

In addition to the note on the juror, the panel today asked for a page of the indictment that the jurors
said they didn't have, and requested clarification of Senate disclosure rules on the reporting of debts.

NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 1 of 27 pages


NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 2 of 27 pages
Before calling the panel to the courtroom, the judge expressed concern about the note on the juror,
telling lawyers in the courtroom, ``I have to at least ensure there are no violent outbursts'' and make
sure all the jurors are safe. ``If there is indeed a threat of violence, I need to take action,'' Sullivan said.

Juror Not Dismissed

He decided against dismissing the juror immediately or calling the foreman to the courtroom to explain
what he meant by ``violent outbursts.''

Sullivan said he observed the foreman's response to his instructions on civility.

``His response to my instruction as observed by the court was appropriate,'' the judge said. ``He wasn't
unduly excited. He wasn't shaking his head. He didn't show any emotion one way or another. He didn't
seem concerned about the court's response.''

Lawyers for Stevens say he and his wife Catherine paid every bill they received for the renovation of
their home in Girdwood, Alaska -- more than $160,000 -- and that the senator believed his Senate
financial disclosure forms filed from 2001 to 2006 were accurate.

Prosecutors say Stevens knew that Allen paid for tens of thousands of dollars of work that went
beyond the scope of the renovation project, and failed to report it. They say he also didn't disclose
other gifts from Allen and others, including a Viking gas range, an Alaska sled dog and a statue of
migrating salmon.

The case is U.S. v. Stevens, 08cr231, U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

To contact the reporters on this story: Nadine Elsibai in Washington at nelsibai@bloomberg.net; Cary
O'Reilly in Washington at caryoreilly@bloomberg.net

Last Updated: October 23, 2008 14:47 EDT

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=aewL.zXGmcX8&refer=us

http://edition.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/10/23/stevens.trial/

Juror may be dismissed in Sen. Ted Stevens'


corruption trial
 Story Highlights
 NEW: Other jurors accuse one juror of rudeness, "violent outbursts"
 Deliberations began Wednesday in the trial of Sen. Ted Stevens of Alaska
 He is accused of false statements on financial disclosures
 Prosecutors: Stevens got gifts from oil industry executive

NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 2 of 27 pages


NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 3 of 27 pages
From Paul Courson
CNN

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The judge in the corruption trial of U.S. Sen. Ted Stevens is considering
whether to dismiss one of the 12 jurors after other jurors Thursday accused her of violent outbursts and
other alleged misconduct.

The juror has failed to follow the rules governing deliberations by the jury that began just before noon
Wednesday, the other jurors said. In response, U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan called the jurors
into the courtroom for a lecture on civility.

The jury had sent a note to Sullivan saying, "We, the jury, requests that juror number nine be removed
from the jury. She is being rude, disrespectful and unreasonable. She has had violent outbursts with
other jurors, and jurors are getting off course. She is not following the laws and rules as stipulated in
the instructions."

Sullivan told the jurors, "I have an obligation to ensure that there are no violent outbursts in the jury
room."

There was no indication how much progress the panel has made in the deliberations, which began just
before noon on Wednesday.

Stevens, 84, is awaiting a verdict on a seven-count indictment accusing him of filing false statements
on annual Senate financial disclosure forms. He pleaded not guilty in late July.

The trial took about four weeks, expedited at Stevens' request in the hope he can be exonerated in time
for voters to decide whether to re-elect him to a seventh term.

In the annual Senate financial forms, senators are not only required to list gifts above a certain value,
but they also are to reveal any liabilities greater than $10,000 for themselves, their spouses and
dependent children. The judge said he would explain the requirement to jurors when they return from
lunch.

After deliberating three hours on Wednesday, the jury of eight women and four men asked Sullivan if
they could be excused early because of "stress." The judge granted the request about a half hour before
their expected daily departure at 4:45 p.m.

Stevens is charged with seven felony counts of making false statements by filing false financial forms
related to more than $250,000 in renovations to his family's Alaska home. The alleged offenses
occurred roughly between 2000 and 2007.

All AboutTed Stevens • Alaska • Bill Allen

Links referenced within this article

Stevens
NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 3 of 27 pages
NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 4 of 27 pages
http://topics.edition.cnn.com/topics/Ted_Stevens
Ted Stevens
http://topics.edition.cnn.com/topics/Ted_Stevens
Alaska
http://topics.edition.cnn.com/topics/Alaska
Bill Allen
http://topics.edition.cnn.com/topics/Bill_Allen

Find this article at:


http://edition.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/10/23/stevens.trial

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Stevens juror called violent, but judge won't dismiss her


Associated Press - October 23, 2008 3:03 PM ET

WASHINGTON (AP) - Chaos in the jury room appears to be threatening the trial of Alaska Senator Ted Stevens.

Jurors have sent a note to federal Judge Emmet Sullivan asking that a female member of the panel be dismissed. The note
describes a hostile deliberation room. It says the female juror is rude, disrespectful and unreasonable, and has had "violent
outbursts with other jurors."

The judge refused to excuse the juror, fearing that it would interfere with the deliberations. Instead, he spoke with the
jurors, told them how important their job was, and told them to be civil. He then sent them back to continue deliberating.

The note was delivered on the second day of deliberations. Stevens is charged with lying on his Senate financial disclosure
documents about a quarter of a million dollars in home renovations and other gifts from a friend.

Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or
redistributed.

http://www.kswt.com/Global/story.asp?S=9228527

Arrogance of power
Sacramento Bee, USA - 1 hour ago
In Ted Stevens' trial on charges of failing to report years' worth of gifts from convicted lobbyist Bill Allen, his wife
Catherine plays a critical role in ...

http://www.sacbee.com/846/story/1337901.html

Arrogance of power
NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 4 of 27 pages
NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 5 of 27 pages
McClatchy Newspapers
Published: Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008

The following editorial appeared in the Anchorage Daily News on Oct. 22.

"Senate staff are compensated for the purpose of assisting Senators in their official legislative and
representational duties, and not for the purpose of performing personal or other non-official activities
for themselves or on behalf of others."

-U.S. Senate ethics manual

In Ted Stevens' trial on charges of failing to report years' worth of gifts from convicted lobbyist Bill
Allen, his wife Catherine plays a critical role in his defense. She was in charge of the teepee, as Sen.
Stevens put it. She handled all the bills. Sen. Stevens had no idea Bill Allen supplied home
improvements they hadn't paid for.

Pointing the finger at his wife may help Sen. Stevens fight the charges in the trial, but evidence about
his wife's conduct has created new ethical and legal problems for the senator.

Undisputed evidence shows that Sen. Stevens allowed his wife, a highly-paid Washington, D.C.,
lawyer, to use his government-paid Senate staff as a personal errand service.

Catherine Stevens used her husband's Senate staff to keep the family checkbook. She used the senator's
staff to pay her credit card bills from luxury stores like Saks Fifth Avenue. Catherine Stevens had the
senator's staff make runs to an ATM to fetch cash for her. The senator's staff wrapped Christmas gifts
for the Stevens, walked the family dog, fed the family cat, cut the family lawn, paid personal parking
tickets and handled overdue personal video rental bills.

Much of that help came from someone who reportedly cost U.S. taxpayers $126,000 a year,
supposedly to perform official U.S. government business.

Using Senate staff as a household helper is a clear violation of Senate ethics rules, as stated in the
Senate Ethics Manual.

If Sen. Stevens wins re-election, he will almost certainly face an inquiry by the Senate Ethics
Committee. If he loses the election, the violation of Senate ethics rules is moot, but he could face new
legal charges for misappropriation of federal funds.

Because whether or not the jury convicts Sen. Stevens of filing


false reports about gifts, one thing is clear. In letting his wife use
his Senate staff as a concierge service, he abused the privileges
of his office.

NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 5 of 27 pages


NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 6 of 27 pages

Bottom line: There's trouble ahead for Ted Stevens, now that
it's clear his wife repeatedly used Senate staff for personal
business.
http://www.sacbee.com/846/story/1337901.html

http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5je6Pw1sViz24JRo9F0PNhoqMtzTwD940AR880

Photo 1 of 2

As a jury deliberates the corruption case of Alaska


Sen. Ted Stevens, his staff and others who
accompanied him to court stand in wait outside the
U.S. District Court in Washington where Stevens
returned late Wednesday, Oct.
22, 2008. (AP Photo/J. Scott
Applewhite)

Note suggests Stevens jury could lose member


By MATT APUZZO and JESSE J. HOLLAND – 2 hours ago

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jurors deliberating the fate of Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens passed the judge
three notes Thursday, including one that could result in a juror leaving the panel.

The contents of the note involving the juror were not disclosed. U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan
sent the jury to lunch early and told attorneys to return to court Thursday afternoon with suggestions
on how to resolve the question.

"I want to proceed very carefully with that," Sullivan said, ordering attorneys not to discuss the
contents of the note. "I'm going to need the benefit of some research on how to act. This is a request by
the jury."

Prosecutor Brenda Morris questioned whether the alternate jurors should be contacted but Sullivan said
that was premature. Just hours into their deliberations Wednesday, the jury of eight women and four
men told the judge things had become "stressful" and asked to go home early.

NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 6 of 27 pages


NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 7 of 27 pages
In the other two notes, jurors asked for a clarification of Senate rules and a page that had been
inadvertently omitted from their copy of the senator's corruption indictment.

"They are being very attentive," Sullivan said in the second day of jury deliberations.

Stevens, the longest-serving Senate Republican, is charged with lying for years on Senate financial
disclosure documents to conceal $250,000 in home renovations and other gifts he received from his
friend, millionaire oil contractor Bill Allen.

The verdict could have serious implications for the upcoming election. Stevens has held his Senate seat
for 40 years but faces a tight race with Democrat Mark Begich. Democrats are hoping to win a
filibuster-proof Senate majority and sense an opportunity to capture Stevens' once-untouchable seat.

Stevens has said he paid every bill he received for his home renovations and had no idea he was
getting anything for free.

http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5je6Pw1sViz24JRo9F0PNhoqMtzTwD940AR880

Jury in Sen. Stevens' trial seeks to oust a member


Reuters - 6 minutes ago
Ted Stevens' corruption trial on Thursday told jurors to keep their deliberations civil after they asked him to remove one
member for engaging in "violent ...

Judge Declines to Dismiss Juror


Roll Call (subscription), DC - 12 minutes ago
Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) called the jury back into the courtroom Thursday afternoon to remind them of their obligation to
deliberate with “civility and mutual ...

Stevens juror accused of violent outbursts


United Press International - 21 minutes ago
Ted Stevens interrupted their second day of deliberations Thursday because of "violent outbursts" by one juror. The jurors
asked US District Judge Emmet ...

NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 7 of 27 pages


NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 8 of 27 pages
http://www.alaskastar.com/stories/102308/let_20081023027.shtml

Story Last modified at 10:53 a.m. on Thursday, October 23, 2008

Stevens has earned my respect


As a retired Navy chief, I have known and worked with Sen. Ted Stevens more years than I can
remember.

When I was executive director of the Armed Services YMCA of Alaska, through Stevens' efforts
and valuable contacts, we were able to expand programs that served the military and their
families. With his help and many others, we were able to see the Armed Services YMCA airport
lounges in Anchorage and Fairbanks become a reality.

In my service as president and member of various military support volunteer agencies, Sen.
Stevens was always available to hear the concerns of military members and their families.

In addition to this, I knew his affinity for helping cut through red tape that stymies most every
day citizens. So when it was determined that I had a severe medical condition and the 3rd wing
Medical Facility was having a little problem in getting turn-around answers on test result, who do
you think I called? You bet, Sen. Stevens' office.

As Sen. Stevens' ad says, the cost of replacing him would be just too high. Alaskans cannot afford
on-the-job training for candidates.

Sen. Stevens, you have earned my respect and I'm proud to provide my support.

� Tom Morgan

Eagle River

This article published in The Alaska Star on Thursday, October 23, 2008.

http://www.alaskastar.com/stories/102308/let_20081023027.shtml

NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 8 of 27 pages


NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 9 of 27 pages

http://alaskacorruption.blogspot.com/search?updated-min=2008-01-
01T00%3A00%3A00-08%3A00&updated-max=2009-01-01T00%3A00%3A00-08%3A00&max-
results=20

Judge Emmet Sullivan—who has shown a humane sensitivity to the jurors


throughout this trial—complied with the request.

Initial speculation about this note centered on the possibility of conflict among
factions on the jury, and later speculation focused on the possibility that the
split is between those who want to convict immediately and those who want to
go through the evidence piece-by-piece and deliberate on each of the seven
counts.

After talking with numerous people who have watched and not watched this
trial, my own take is a little different. Consider the human factors at work. For a
month, the jurors have been told what to do, where to go, and what not to talk
about. Now—suddenly—they’re in charge, and they may be a little freaked out
by the task.

http://alaskacorruption.blogspot.com/search?updated-min=2008-01-
01T00%3A00%3A00-08%3A00&updated-max=2009-01-01T00%3A00%3A00-08%3A00&max-
results=20

NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 9 of 27 pages


NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 10 of 27 pages

Closing arguments draw sharp contrast at


Stevens trial
 Story Highlights
 NEW: Prosecutor rebuttal: "The evidence I saw was totally different"
 NEW: Defense: Stevens tried repeatedly to get a bill for work done on his house
 Prosecution begins closing arguments with phone call recorded by FBI
 Sen. Ted Stevens is accused of false statements on Senate financial disclosures

 Next Article in Politics »

From Paul Courson


CNN

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Sen. Ted Stevens repeatedly asked for invoices to cover home renovations
and otherwise complied with Senate rules on accepting and reporting gifts of value, his defense
attorney said in closing arguments Tuesday.

Sen. Ted Stevens leaves the federal courthouse Tuesday evening with his daughter Beth Stevens.

Stevens, 84, has been fighting a seven-count indictment accusing him of filing false statements on
mandatory financial disclosure forms. The jury is scheduled to begin deliberating Wednesday.

In closing arguments, prosecutors said Stevens engaged in an elaborate scheme to accept thousands of
dollars in gifts from Alaskan oil industry executive Bill Allen, who has admitted he tried to bribe state
legislators, including the senator's son.

Stevens is not accused of bribery, but one prosecutor suggested he accepted gifts, concealed them from
the public, and "took care of Bill" -- referring to Allen, the founder of oil services contractor Veco
Corp.
NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 10 of 27 pages
NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 11 of 27 pages
The trial has revolved around a construction project at the Stevens family chalet in Girdwood, Alaska,
about 40 miles from Anchorage at the foot of a ski resort. Allen, starting in 2000, helped organize
labor, materials and subcontractors that doubled the size of the home.

In his closing arguments, defense attorney Brendan Sullivan said the government failed to prove its
case beyond a reasonable doubt, and that the jury should acquit Stevens on all counts.

He noted Allen had testified that Stevens would have paid whatever bills were sent, but that he decided
not to tell Stevens the full cost "because I like Ted."

Don't Miss

 Prosecutors grill Stevens as trial comes to a close


 Stevens insists family paid for all chalet renovations
 Sen. Stevens takes stand in his corruption trial
 Neighbor disputes star witness

Allen also testified an Alaskan neighbor overseeing the home renovation said Stevens was "just trying
to cover his ass" in requesting invoices for the project. Prosecutors have said none of the evidence
shows Stevens ever paid Allen or Veco, and that neither is named on the disclosure forms.

The neighbor, Bob Persons, testified during the trial that he never made that remark.

On Tuesday, the defense highlighted the contradiction against the testimony of the prosecution's star
witness, making it a theme throughout a series of correspondence in which Stevens continued to ask
for a full accounting.

"If you're covering your ass," Sullivan told the jury, "why, a month later, are you asking for the bill
again?"

Prosecutors played a recorded phone call between Persons and Allen.

"Ted gets hysterical when he has to spend his own money," Bob Persons told a mutual friend in the
recording, which was played for jurors by Joe Bottini, the assistant U.S. attorney for Alaska.

Stevens, who spends most of his time in Washington, gave Persons power of attorney so he could get
the required building permit to work on the chalet Stevens has owned since 1983.

Persons also confided to Allen that he didn't believe Stevens had enough money to do the remodeling.

Later Tuesday, the government made its final case.

"Wow!" shouted prosecutor Brenda Morris as she stood to address the jury, "Were we at the same
trial? Because the evidence I saw was totally different."

She urged the jury to find the senator guilty on all counts, saying the evidence shows "Ted Stevens
knowingly and repeatedly violated the law because he thought he was above the law."

NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 11 of 27 pages


NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 12 of 27 pages
The judge will remind the jury that Allen's testimony against Stevens is part of a deal with prosecutors
that could reduce his jail time when sentenced for attempted bribery. Morris, the lead prosecutor in the
Stevens case, tried to bolster Allen's standing as the jury prepared to deliberate.

"The only thing he's guilty of with regard to this defendant is standing up and telling the truth" about
materials and labor he arranged on the home improvement project, Morris said of Allen. "It was the
defendant who is responsible for reporting it."

If convicted on all counts, Stevens would face a maximum sentence of 35 years. Legal experts note the
judge has the discretion to give Stevens as little as no jail time and probation.

Former federal prosecutors and criminal defense lawyers have told CNN that if convicted on some or
all of the counts, the senator probably would face between a year to more than two years in jail

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/10/21/stevens.trial/index.html#cnnSTCText?iref=werecommend

Indicted Alaska senator 'a wonderful man,'


colleague says
 Story Highlights
 NEW: Sen. Orrin Hatch calls Sen. Ted Stevens "one of the great lions of the Senate"
 Stevens is accused of not disclosing cost of home renovations
 Defense has portrayed senator's wife as being lead person on home renovations
 Character witnesses have taken the stand in trial's defense phase

 Next Article in Politics »

From Paul Courson


CNN

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch heaped praise Tuesday afternoon on indicted
Sen. Ted Stevens, calling him "decent" and "honorable" in testimony at Stevens' trial.

NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 12 of 27 pages


NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 13 of 27 pages

Sen. Ted Stevens is running for re-election and hopes to clear his name in the few weeks before the
vote.

Hatch, of Utah, said he met Stevens when Hatch ran for the Senate for the first time in in 1976.
Stevens, also a Republican, represents Alaska.

"I've seen a lot of senators come and go. I'd rate him at the very top -- one of the great lions of the
Senate. If he gives you his word, he will keep it. He fights for his state like you can't believe," Hatch
said under questioning by defense attorney Brendan Sullivan.

Asked whether he had had frequent contact with Stevens, Hatch replied: "I love the guy, just a
wonderful man."

Hatch, the ninth-most senior Senate member, called Stevens and Democratic Sen. Daniel Inouye
"legends in the U.S. Senate," and said they did an excellent job when they ran the Senate
Appropriations Committee.

Inouye was a character witness for Stevens last week.

Stevens "always tried to get at the truth. One of the things about Ted Stevens is that he's
straightforward," Hatch said.

Stevens, 84, is running for re-election and hopes to clear his name in the few weeks remaining before
voters cast their ballots.

Don't Miss

 Colin Powell testifies Stevens' word is 'sterling'


 Judge denies motions to end Stevens trial
 Jury hears Stevens curse on wiretapped call
 Witness: Request for bill mere window-dressing

NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 13 of 27 pages


NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 14 of 27 pages
Stevens was indicted in July on seven counts of making false statements in failing to report the
monetary benefits of his relationship with longtime friend Bill Allen, founder of Veco Corp., one of
the largest private employers in Alaska. Allen acknowledged on the witness stand he did not send an
invoice to Stevens for some of the goods and services that went into the house.

Veco, an oil industry contractor, has since been purchased by a company in Denver, Colorado, and
Allen is awaiting sentencing after pleading guilty to bribing Alaska state lawmakers, one of whom is
the senator's son.

The defense team strategy is to try to convince the jury that Stevens was unaware that he may not have
paid the entire cost of renovations, and would have done so if Allen had sent him a complete bill.

Stevens' lawyers plan to call his wife to the witness stand this week. Catherine Stevens is an attorney
and has been portrayed by the defense as the person most responsible for keeping track of renovations
to the couple's chalet, which is a block from an Alaska ski slope in the town of Girdwood, southeast of
Anchorage.

His wife's role in the project is another aspect that the defense hopes may shift some of the burden
away from the senator. Evidence is expected to include e-mails between her and a neighbor in Alaska
in which they discussed construction progress.

The name of the neighbor, Bob Persons, is also on Tuesday's witness list.

Several character witnesses testified after the trial moved to the defense phase. Former Secretary of
State Colin Powell testified last week as to the integrity and honesty of Stevens, who has been an
Alaska senator since 1968.

Prosecutors hope jurors will be convinced by recordings of wiretapped phone calls between Allen and
Stevens, and between Allen and the neighbor, which have included conversations questioning how to
document the bills to satisfy the Senate reporting requirements.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/10/14/stevens.trial/index.html#cnnSTCText?iref=werecommend

Don't Miss

 Colin Powell testifies Stevens' word is 'sterling'


 Judge denies motions to end Stevens trial
 Jury hears Stevens curse on wiretapped call
 Witness: Request for bill mere window-dressing

udge denies motions to end Stevens trial


 Story Highlights
 NEW: Judge: Corruption trial can proceed, but some evidence will be stricken
NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 14 of 27 pages
NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 15 of 27 pages
 Sen. Ted Stevens' defense had accused prosecution of withholding evidence
 Stevens is accused of failing to report renovations to his home as gifts
 Car trade was also spotlighted in trial

 Next Article in Politics »

From Paul Courson


CNN

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A federal judge again declined to declare a mistrial or throw out charges in
the corruption case against Sen. Ted Stevens on Wednesday, despite the defense's claims of
prosecutorial misconduct.

Sen. Ted Stevens did not disclose to the U.S. Senate work done on his Alaska home, prosecutors say.

However, U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan said some evidence will be stricken from the record and
jurors will not be allowed to consider it.

Lawyers for Stevens, R-Alaska, alleged that prosecutors concealed information that would have helped
them defend the senator. Stevens is accused of failing to disclose in Senate finance reports more than
$250,000 in gifts, most of which involved renovations to his Alaska chalet.

Sullivan began hearing arguments on the defense's motions seeking the mistrial declaration or charge
dismissals on Wednesday afternoon, after the prosecution wound down its case.

But Sullivan ruled that the trial will proceed. Stevens' attorneys say they plan to call former Secretary
of State Colin Powell as a witness on the first day of their case.
NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 15 of 27 pages
NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 16 of 27 pages
The 84-year-old Stevens, the longest-serving senator in Congress, is seeking a seventh full term in
November.

Some of the defense's allegations of prosecutorial misconduct relate to documentation of a swap of two
vehicles between Stevens and Bill Allen, owner of Veco Corp.

Don't Miss

 Judge accuses lawyer of signaling to client


 Jury hears Stevens curse on wiretapped call
 Judge declines to dismiss charges against Stevens
 Star witness takes stand in Stevens trial

Prosecutors call the swap a "sweetheart deal." It was already known that Allen agreed to swap his new
1999 Land Rover for Stevens' collectible 1964½ Mustang convertible. Stevens gave Allen the car plus
$5,000 to seal the deal, according to the indictment.

Prosecutors have disputed the value of the Mustang, portraying the difference as among the "gifts"
Stevens was required to report.

But defense attorneys, cross-examining Allen over the past two days, came up with dealer and factory
materials suggesting that the invoice price of the Land Rover was $37,500, far less than the $44,000
prosecutors claimed was paid.

Allen said that he couldn't remember what he paid for the Land Rover but that "they probably stuck it
to me."

When prosecutors followed up, they produced a bank check with Allen's signature for $44,339.51.

Stevens' defense attorneys say prosecutors were required to disclose that check before the trial began.

"We did not produce a copy of the check as we never intended to introduce it," federal Prosecutor Joe
Bottini wrote in an e-mail the defense filed with other documents early Wednesday. "We were
surprised by the introduction of the Land Rover corporate exhibits that you introduced."

Stevens attorney Rob Cary wrote, "The government's failure to disclose this piece of evidence is
especially offensive."

Cary cited what he called "a pattern of failing to abide by the orders of this court, constitutional
mandates and the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure."

The defense also filed motions to dismiss the charges last week, alleging that the prosecution withheld
evidence relating to renovations of Stevens' chalet in Girdwood, Alaska. Allen's company did most of
the renovations.

The information included an FBI investigator's report that Allen said showed Stevens would have paid
his bills had he known about them.

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NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 17 of 27 pages
"We were entitled to that information before we started the case," Cary said last week.

Sullivan rejected the defense's motions last week, as he did Wednesday, and allowed the trial to
proceed. However, he said he suspected that the prosecutions' late disclosure may have been deliberate,
describing it as an apparent attempt to "hide the ball."

Allen has been the government's star witness as part of a deal for his guilty plea in a case involving
attempted bribery of Alaska state lawmakers.

But Allen, when cross-examined by defense attorneys, testified that he didn't bill Stevens for some of
the work done on the senator's home.

Lead defense attorney Brendan Sullivan, who is not related to the judge, told the jury during opening
statements that Stevens could not report a gift he didn't know about.

When Brendan Sullivan asked Allen why he failed to bill for all of the work, Allen testified that he
thought his Veco workers had overcharged for the job and that he could not come up with a fair price.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/10/08/stevens.trial/index.html

Neighbor disputes star witness in Stevens


corruption trial
 Story Highlights
 NEW: Neighbor denies saying Stevens was "covering his ass" by requesting bills
 Augie Paone did work on chalet of Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens
 Paone says he was pressured by Bill Allen, who led project, to "eat" $13,000
 Stevens indicted on charges of filing false financial disclosure forms

 Next Article in Politics »

From Paul Courson


CNN

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A neighbor who helped oversee renovations to the home of Alaska Sen.
Ted Stevens denied allegations that he said Stevens was "just covering his ass" when he requested to
be billed for some of the costs associated with the construction.

NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 17 of 27 pages


NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 18 of 27 pages

Sen. Ted Stevens is running for re-election and hopes to clear his name in the few weeks before the
vote.

Bob Persons' testimony on Wednesday, in the final days of Stevens' corruption trial, contradicted
testimony from the prosecution's star witness concerning whether the 84-year-old senator knowingly
failed to report gifts of value on mandatory disclosure forms.

Bill Allen, founder of Veco Corp., earlier testified that Persons told him to ignore requests from
Stevens for a full invoice of the costs Allen and others were running up during construction on the
home, which began in 2000.

Stevens is fighting a seven-count indictment that accuses him of lying on Senate financial disclosure
forms about more than $250,000 in renovations and other gifts from Allen and Veco, an oil industry
services company that was Alaska's largest employer.

Stevens' lawyers have told the jury Stevens paid all the bills he knew about. Prosecutors have said
Stevens accepted other gifts that should have been listed on the disclosure forms.

Veco has since been sold and Allen has pleaded guilty to trying to bribe Alaska state lawmakers in a
separate case. The Washington jury is aware that Allen, when sentenced for the Alaska crime, may get
less jail time for his cooperation with prosecutors against Stevens.

Stevens is not accused of accepting bribes.

Allen, the prosecution's star witness, commissioned most of the work on the Stevens chalet in the ski
town of Girdwood, Alaska. He acknowledged on the witness stand that he sent Veco employees and
construction materials to the Stevens project and had additional work done by others unrelated to his
company.

A building contractor also testified Wednesday that Allen, who reviewed invoices before sending them
to the senator and his wife for payment, once refused to pay a bill for more than $13,000 for work on
the home.

NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 18 of 27 pages


NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 19 of 27 pages
Don't Miss

 Stevens called 'wonderful man'


 Colin Powell testifies Stevens' word is 'sterling'
 Judge denies motions to end Stevens trial
 Witness: Request for bill mere window-dressing

Augie Paone, an independent contractor who worked on Stevens' home, testified that Allen hired him
to get a handle on a project that was expanding beyond the abilities of Veco's workers. Paone said
Allen gave him the impression he was "to cover all our bases, so that if any of his enemies could see
the invoices, it would be no problem."

Allen insisted on reviewing monthly bills from Paone's company before they were sent to the senator
and his wife, Catherine, who is expected to testify for the defense later Wednesday.

Five of six invoices were paid by checks signed by Catherine Stevens, but Paone testified that Allen
intercepted and refused to pay a final bill for nearly $13,400.

Allen, who testified that he wished he could have given the whole project as a gift to his friend the
senator, also said he felt that the job was costing too much.

According to him, he was unable to come up with a bill he considered fair, and he concealed some
additional costs from the Stevenses "because I like Ted."

Paone testified that Allen's refusal to pay his final invoice meant he would probably just lose $13,000.

"I thought about sending it over to the senator," Paone testified, "but I knew it would be a business
suicide on my side if I did that."

When asked to explain, Paone said his company was "dealing with a corporation that Bill owns that
has 5,000 employees, and he's dealing with a company that has five employees, so the matchup wasn't
even."

But when cross-examined by prosecutors, Paone acknowledged that Allen eventually paid that final
invoice for his work -- by applying that cost to unrelated work Allen had him do on his own residence.

Paone testified that when he initially presented the $13,000 bill to Allen, Allen advised him to "maybe
... eat this bill or look at it as a political contribution."

Stevens, 84, is running for re-election and hopes to clear his name in the few weeks remaining before
voters cast their ballots.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/10/15/stevens.trial/index.html#cnnSTCText?iref=werecommend

NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 19 of 27 pages


NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 20 of 27 pages

“Judge Emmet Sullivan has scheduled a call 5 p.m.


Sunday with the juror to see if they are able to return
Monday morning. A hearing is scheduled for 6 p.m.
Sunday night.” -- CBS

NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 20 of 27 pages


NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 21 of 27 pages
http://www.abcnews.go.com/TheLaw/story?id=6104578&page=1

Stevens Verdict Pushed Closer to Election


Juror Absence Puts Deliberations on Hold Until Next Week

By JASON RYAN

Oct. 24, 2008 —

Deliberations in the corruption trial of Sen. Ted Stevens came to a sudden halt this morning, pushing a
possible verdict in the case closer to Election Day.

The father of a female juror, identified only as juror No. 4, died suddenly and she is on her way to
California to be with family. U.S. District Court Judge Emmet Sullivan delayed the trial until next
week to accommodate the missing juror and to allow time to determine the next step in the case.

Sullivan could put deliberations on hold until the juror returns to Washington or allow an alternate to
step in, which would require jurors to go back to square one with their deliberations.

The Alaska Republican, 84, is on trial for allegedly concealing $250,000 in gifts, including the value of
a massive home renovation project, primarily paid for by a former oil services firm executive and his
company, according to prosecutors. Stevens has denied the charges.

Stevens, the longest-serving Republican in the Senate, has held his seat since 1968 but is in a tight race
with Democrat Mark Begich.

Sullivan said that he spoke with the juror Thursday night by phone and wished her "Godspeed" on her
return home. He said that he would speak with her again Sunday night to see when she might be able
to return to Washington.

Sullivan will hold an open public session in his Washington, D.C., courtroom Sunday at 6 p.m. ET, to
announce how jury deliberations will proceed.

The court summoned an alternate juror this morning. The judge briefly questioned her to determine
whether she could serve on the jury if needed. Sullivan asked her whether she had seen any media
reports or spoken with anyone about the case since he dismissed her Tuesday.

She responded that people in her office said they knew why she was away and wanted to talk to her,
but she said she had declined their requests to discuss the case.

If Sullivan brings in an alternate, the jury will have to restart its deliberations, which have so far been
fraught with issues such as another juror's "violent outburst" Thursday and a deliberations process that
became "kind of stressful" Wednesday.

"These folks probably need a break -- we started on Sept. 22. These folks have not missed a day,"
Sullivan said when he announced the halt to deliberations.
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NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 22 of 27 pages
"I'll speak with her Sunday, to see if she has the desire to participate and the ability to participate," he
said of the absent juror.

Sullivan seems inclined to wait to speak to the absent juror Sunday night to see what her plans are and
possibly resume deliberations Tuesday or Wednesday, one week before Election Day.

The 11 other jurors were dismissed for the day. Sullivan and the court will contact them Sunday
evening to let them know whether they will need to be back Monday or Tuesday. He stressed the
importance of avoiding media reports and said that they should not speculate about what happened to
their fellow juror.

Copyright © 2008 ABC News Internet Ventures

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/10/24/stevens.trial/?iref=hpmostpop

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NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 23 of 27 pages

Death of juror's father delays senator's


corruption trial
 Story Highlights
 NEW: Judge schedules Sunday conference to determine when trial proceeds
 Jury sent home Friday after one juror leaves Washington
 Juror heads to California after receiving word of father's death
 Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens charged with giving false financial disclosures

From Paul Courson CNN

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The judge in the federal corruption trial of U.S. Sen. Ted Stevens
dismissed the jury Friday morning after a female juror left for California to deal with the death of her
father.

Sen. Ted Stevens leaves the federal courthouse Thursday with his
daughter Beth Stevens.

U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan asked attorneys in


the case to join him in a telephone conversation with
juror No. 4 at 5 p.m. Sunday in his chambers to find out
when she plans to return to Washington.

If she comes back after Tuesday, Sullivan indicated he


might support replacing her with an alternate juror, but
acknowledged that would cause an unwanted delay.
Each time someone is added to the jury, deliberations
have to begin anew. The jury began deliberations at
noon Wednesday.

The judge may decide to allow the remaining 11 jurors to resume deliberations where they left off.

To deal with either contingency, the judge brought the first alternate to the courtroom after the regular
jurors had departed. The alternate, a woman in her 20s who does the Web site at her church, answered
a series of questions and indicated she has not been exposed to media coverage and could be impartial.

Stevens asked for a speedy trial in the hope he is cleared of the seven felony counts against him,
thereby improving his chances for re-election to a seventh term. He is in a tight race against the
Democratic mayor of Anchorage.

The senator is accused of falsifying Senate financial disclosure forms over several years related to
extensive renovations at the family home in Girdwood, Alaska. The remodeling was done by his
longtime friend, Bill Allen, and Allen's oil industry services company Veco Corp.

NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 23 of 27 pages


NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 24 of 27 pages
"Senator Stevens respectfully requests that the jury not deliberate on Friday," defense attorneys wrote
in a court document filed late Thursday. They said Sullivan "should order deliberations to continue
with 11 jurors if it determines that juror No. 4 cannot continue to serve."

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/10/24/stevens.trial/?iref=hpmostpop

Stress, outbursts, now illness grips Stevens jury


By MATT APUZZO and JESSE J. HOLLAND – 9 hours ago

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prosecutors and defense attorneys are headed to court to try to keep Sen. Ted
Stevens' corruption trial on track, despite jury deliberations that have been beset by problems.

U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan has to decide how jury deliberations should proceed now that one
juror has apparently rushed out of state to attend to a sick family member. It's just the latest problem
for a jury that has reported a stressful environment and another juror who made violent outbursts to her
colleagues.

The Senate's longest-serving Republican, Stevens is hoping for a verdict before Election Day. He's
fighting to keep a seat he's held for 40 years.

But if Sullivan orders an alternate juror, it would set deliberations back to the beginning.
NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 24 of 27 pages
NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 25 of 27 pages
http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5je6Pw1sViz24JRo9F0PNhoqMtzTwD940QU9G0

With his fate in the hands of a jury, Sen. Ted Stevens, R-Alaska, returns to the U.S. District Court in
Washington, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008. He is accompanied by his scheduler, DeLynn Henry. (AP
Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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NEWS CLIPPINGS Oct 24 – 26 US v. Theodore F. Stevens page 26 of 27 pages

(The Politico) The jury drama continues in the Ted Stevens trial.

The jury has been sent home for the weekend due to a death in one of the juror's families, and this
comes one day after the jury complained about erratic behavior and threats from another juror.

It's not clear how this affects the deliberations, but with the decision on Stevens' legal future stretching
into next week, it will be harder to reach a verdict before his election in Alaska Nov. 4.

Judge Emmet Sullivan has scheduled a call 5 p.m. Sunday with the juror to see if they are able to
return Monday morning. A hearing is scheduled for 6 p.m. Sunday night.

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Prosecutors had asked for an alternate juror to be brought in so deliberations could continue on Friday,
however Sullivan denied the request. There has been no shortage of drama in the jury room, after
jurors complained Thursday of "violent outbursts" from one juror.

Stevens is charged with seven counts of failing to disclose more than $250,000 in gifts and services on
his Senate financial disclosure forms. His trial has stretched on for more than a month, and Stevens is
in the closest race of his 40-year Senate career.

Conventional wisdom has been that if Stevens wins his legal case, he may win re-election. But if the
trial stretches past Nov. 4, it's not clear yet how that will affect his political future.

Traditionally, chaos in the jury room tends to benefit the defendant because it means the jury may have
trouble reaching a unanimous verdict. Judge Sullivan at this point seems to believe the jury would
benefit from a weekend away from the courthouse.

Copyright 2008 POLITICO

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/10/24/politics/politico/thecrypt/main4543032.shtml

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