Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 17

Week 9, Day 41

TODAY THE STUDENT WILL:

Read a fiction story

Extend vocabulary

Proverb of the Week

Two heads are better than one.

Task 1: Getting Ready to Read


To get the student ready to read, start by asking him the following
question:

Have you ever eaten a Clementine?


Clementines are small forms of the orange. A Clementine is a type of
citrus fruit. Visit the following site with the student for more
information on Clementines:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clementine

It is important to review what an actual Clementine is with the student


because the story is about a girl named Clementine, not the actual
fruit. Clearing this up in the beginning will help with comprehension
during and after reading.

Task 2: Learn vocabulary in context


There are five new vocabulary words to introduce to the student before
reading the story. They are listed below used in a sentence.

popular

You are pretty popular at you school, you should use that for the
greater good.
talented

I think that the other kids are starting to understand how nice and
talented he his.

errand

He told me that after his parents had just gotten married, his father
was at work on an errand for the Air Force.

characteristics

He was hoping to pass along to his son some of the characteristics

that had made Clementine so special.”

Military

Two years later when the military man and his wife had their first son,

the decided to name him Clementine for the woman who saved his life

when she could just had easily called for help.

Task 3: Time to Read- Clementine

Task 4: Responding to Reading: You Speak!


1. Why didn’t Sam and Heather see each other very often?

___Sam and Heather were good friends since kindergarten. When


they were in fourth grade Sam’s dad wanted to have more land, so
they moved out of the suburbs. They had been apart for one year.

2. Why did Sam think that Heather’s new friend was a girl?

__Sam thought Heather’s new friend was a boy because he had a


girl’s name,
Clementine.___________________________________________________

3. What did Clementine tell the class that he enjoyed doing?


__Clementine told the class he liked sports especially baseball. He
told them his dad was his best friend, and they moved around a lot
because of his dad’s job.

4. What special talents does Clementine have?

__Clementine is extremely talented in baseball, but is considered a


child genius at
music._________________________________________________________

5. How does Sam try to help Heather?

__Sam tells Heather that since she is so popular that she should
help Clementine make new friends._________________________________

6. How did Clementine get his name?

__Clementine’s parents had just gotten married, and his dad was on
an errand for the Air Force. He was hit head on in a car accident.
Both cars caught on fire and a woman who was walking by on the
sidewalk rescued both drivers. The woman’s name was
Clementine. His father thought that she was the bravest person he
had every met. Two years later they decided they would use that
name, so that their son would have some of the characteristics that
Clementine
had.____________________________________________________________

7. Why were Sam and Heather together?

___Sam and Heather were together to celebrate Heather’s birthday at


a party at her
house.________________________________________________________

Task 5: Reading Response Log


The student will need to ask a parent how his name was chosen, or will have
to reflect on someone’s name that is unusual to him.

Do you know someone who has an unusual name? In your reading response
log write about that person’s name and how they received that name.
If you don’t know anyone with an unusual name, write about how you
received your name in your reading response log.

Week 9, Day 42
TODAY THE STUDENT WILL:

Read a fiction story

Use a visual aid

Contrast two characters

Extend vocabulary

Identify figurative language

Task 1: Reading Skill- Figurative Language


Figurative Language is the use of words in a way that is not literal.
Figurative language makes the reader think about the deep meaning of
what is being said. There are many kinds of figurative language.
Below are the major types of figurative language and some examples
of each.

ALLITERATION

With alliteration the words in the sentence all start with the same
letter. There needs to be at least 3 words in the sentence that start
with the same letter sound. Here are a few examples of alliteration:

Terrific Tom trudged through the tall trees.

Nanny is never negative, neither is Nick.

The blue blueberries burst through the big basket.

METAPHOR

Metaphors are comparisons. They compare two or more things using


the words “is” or “are.” Here are some metaphors:

My little brother is a monkey. (Comparing the energy of a little kid to


how a monkey moves.)

That tree is a giraffe! (Comparing the height of a tree to the height of a


giraffe.)

This dessert is heaven. (Comparing a tasty dessert to pure bliss, or


heaven.)

SIMILE

A simile is a comparison using the words like or as. Here are a few
examples:

Going outside is like an oven. (Comparing the heat outside to the


inside of an oven.)

The faucet releases water like a waterfall. (Comparing faucet water to


a waterfall.)

This skin is as soft as my kitten. (Comparing smoothness of skin to the


smoothness of a kitten.)

This candy is as sour as a lemon! (Comparing the sourness of candy to


a lemon.)

HYPERBOLE

Hyperbole is used when the author wants to exaggerate something.


This is one tool often used in creative writing. Here are some examples
of hyperbole and the actual meanings of the phrases.

It is raining cats and dogs! (Meaning that it is raining very heavily


outside.)

I am going to eat a mile-high ice cream cone! (Meaning he is very


hungry and feels as though he can eat ice cream scoops that total one
mile high.)

IDIOM

An idiom is commonly used as a saying. It says something without


using literal language. Here is a link showing many examples of
idioms:
http://www.idiomsite.com/

Here are a few idioms from this website:

A picture paints a thousand words

Dropping like flies

It’s in the bag

PERSONIFICATION

Personification occurs when the writer makes things have human-like


qualities. Here are a few examples of personification:

The tree scratched the house’s back during the storm.

The cat talked to the dog about the situation.

The whale met the fish at the rock for lunch

Here is a website which contains more practice for the student with the
topic of personification:

http://www.imschools.org/cms/Units/Poetry/student2.htm

In the student text, the student will need to read through a few
examples of figurative language. Here is one example with an
explanation:

As you know already, the school is small and anyone who is new becomes

quickly recognized, the talk of it alone was enough to stir everyone’s

imagination.”

One is actually not taking a spoon and stirring the imagination of someone

else. This really means to start someone’s imagination up about something.

(symbol for reteaching / extensions) RETEACHING /


EXTENSIONS:

THE STUDENT NEEDS / WANTS MORE INFORMATION ABOUT


FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE
1. Challenge: Visit this site that focuses on Robert Frost’s work. It
shows a challenging list of examples that Robert Frost has used in his
work.

http://www.frostfriends.org/figurative.html

2. Basic: Visit this site which shows the basic overview of different
types of figurative language:

http://www.orangeusd.k12.ca.us/yorba/figurative_language.htm

3. More Examples: Visit this site to see more examples of different


types of figurative language:

http://missspott.com/figurativelanguage.html

Task 2: Re-read “Clementine” looking for


figurative language
When the student rereads Clementine today, encourage him to find
examples of figurative language.

Task 3: Thinking Skills


When the student is done reading the story for the second time, he will
need to answer some critical thinking questions.
Answers will vary.

1. Do you think Heather and Sam miss seeing each other? Use
examples from the story to support your answer.

2. Do you think Clementine felt comfortable talking in front of the


class? Use examples from the story to support your answer.

3. Do you think Clementine is having a hard time adjusting to his


new school? Use examples from the story to support your
answer.

4. Do you think Heather will follow Sam’s advice?


5. How do you think Sam will treat Clementine?

Task 4: Vocabulary
The student will practice his vocabulary words in a sentence for each.
When the student writes the sentences, make sure that the sentences
make clear that the student understands the meaning of the word. For
example, don’t accept the sentence, “He is popular” for the word
popular. It doesn’t clearly show what the meaning of popular is. Here
are the vocabulary words the student will use:

popular, talented, errand, characteristics, military

Task 5: Imagine
The student has two choices for the imagine exercise today. Read the
following choices out loud to the student and allow him to choose one
of them. Both involve the student in writing a letter.

Choose one of the two options.

Option 1: Have you ever been the new student in class or in a group?
Then you can imagine how Clementine feels. Write a letter to
Clementine giving him advice on how he can adjust to a new school.

Option 2: Have you ever met someone new to your school or group?
What did you do to make them feel more welcome? Write a letter to
Heather giving her advice on how she can help Clementine adjust to a
new school.

Task 6: Activity
For this reading activity the student will make a sketch of the three
main characters. He will then write some basic details about each
character under the drawing of each. The student should use clues
from the story to draw the characters and also depend on imagination.
Here is the task:

In the story “Clementine” there were three main characters. In each


square put the name of one of the characters. Then draw a picture of
each character. Around the picture draw their interests and other
important details you learned about the characters. You may need to
refer to the story to be certain you found all the details.

Task 7: Reading Response Log


The student will write in the reading response log at this time. Here is
the prompt:

In your reading response log contrast how Heather and Clementine


are different in a paragraph. Use examples from the story to
support your writing.

Week 9, Day 43
TODAY THE STUDENT WILL:

Read a non-fiction article

Use visual aids to comprehend

Task 1 : Get Ready to Read


To get the student ready to read today, take him outside and ask him
to look up. The story that he is about to read is on the topic of clouds.
Here are some questions you can ask the student as you look out the
window or are outside viewing the clouds:

You see clouds in the sky every day, but what do you really
know about clouds?

What are clouds made of?

Are there different kinds of clouds? If so, what are they?

Task 2: Vocabulary Skill


There are three vocabulary words to review with the student before
reading:
Stratus - means layer. “ On a gray day when it rains or snows
constantly but not violently, and a blanket of cloud hides the sun,
those clouds are nimbostratus.” Draw a nimbostratus –

Cumulus are lumpy, low clouds. The cumulonimbus cloud may look
like it’s “boiling “because parts of the cloud begin to roll like boiling
water does. Draw a cumulonimbus cloud.

Cirrus means “lock of hair”. Cirrus clouds are high, wispy clouds.
Draw a cirrus cloud.

Task 3: Reading Skill: Use Visual Aids


One advantage of nonfiction text is that it usually contains vivid visual
aids. Visual aids are pictures or paintings, maps and charts, which all
help the reader better understand what they are reading. Visual aids
are great tools for all learners because they put the image right in front
of the reader rather than leaving the image up to the reader’s
imagination.

Here are some visual aids showing pictures of clouds before reading
the text:

http://www.capetownskies.com/clouds.htm

http://www.carlwozniak.com/clouds/cloudpix.html

http://physics.uwstout.edu/wx/U4/img012.htm

Task 4: Read the article “Clouds”


This is a nonfiction story, so it is advised that for this first exposure the
student will read this with the guide or a partner.

Task 5: Responding to Reading 


You Speak!

1. Under the subheading “cloud groups” name the three groups of clouds
listed. Stratus, cumulus, cirrus
2. What word part is added to stratus and cumulus to make them into
words that mean storm clouds.

nimbo

3. Which cloud type usually occurs in fair weather?

cirrus

4. Who is the man responsible for creating the three main cloud groups?

an English scientist named Luke Howard

Task 6: Reading Response Log


In your reading log compare a stratus cloud to a nimbostratus cloud.
What makes them alike and different?

Week 9, Day 44
TODAY THE STUDENT WILL:

Re-read the non-fiction article “Clouds”

Identify figurative language

Compare two characters

Task 1: Re-read the article “Clouds”


The student should be able to reread the article independently. Have
the student look for facts he had not remembered from the first
reading of the story.

Task 2: Reading Skill: Study Figurative


Language
1. Why didn’t Sam and Heather see each other very often?

___Sam and Heather were good friends since kindergarten. When the wer
in fourth grade Sam’s dad wanted to have more land, so they moved out
of the suburbs. They had been apart for one year.

2. Why did Sam think that Heather’s new friend was a girl?

__Sam though Heather’s new friend was a boy because he had a girl’s name,
Clementine.__________________________________________________

3. What did Clementine tell the class that he enjoyed doing?

__Clementine told the class he liked sports especially baseball. He told


them his dad was his best friend, and they moved around a lot because of
his dad’s job.

4. What special talents does Clementine have?

__Clementine is extremely talented in baseball, but is considered a child


genius at music._________________________________________________________

5. How does Sam try to help Heather?

__Sam tells Heather that since she is so popular that she should help
Clementine make new friends._________________________________

6. How did Clementine get his name?

__Clementine’s parents had just gotten married, and his dad was on an
errand for the Air Force. He was hit head on in a car accident. Both cars
caught on fire and a woman who was walking by on the sidewalk rescued
both drivers. The woman’s name was Clementine. His father thought
that she was the bravest person he had every met. Two years later they
decided they would use that name, so that their son would have some of
the characteristics that Clementine
had.____________________________________________________________

7. Why were Sam and Heather together?

___Sam and Heather were together to celebrate Heather’s birthday at a party


at her house.________________________________________________________

Task 3: Thinking Skills


Here are the thinking skills questions with sample answers. The
responses will vary.
1. Do you think Heather and Sam miss seeing each other? Use
examples from the story to support your answer.

_I do think that Heather and Sam miss seeing each other because
they have been very close since kindergarten and are still good
friends.

2. Do you think Clementine felt comfortable talking in front of the


class? Use examples from the story to support your answer.

No, I do not think Clementine felt comfortable talking in front of the


class. He was a new student, no one knew him, and he was really
thin for his age. He probably felt pretty awkward.

3. Do you think Clementine is having a hard time adjusting to his


new school? Use examples from the story to support your
answer.

_I do think that Clementine had a hard time adjusting to the new


school because he would sit by himself at lunch all the time.

4. Do you think Heather will follow Sam’s advice?

5. How do you think Sam will treat Clementine?

__I think that Sam will be a good friend to Clementine.

Task 4: Imagine
Allow the student to choose one of the following for the Imagine
Activity.

Choose one of the two options.

Option 1: Have you ever been the new student in class or in a group?
Then you can imagine how Clementine feels. Write a letter to
Clementine giving him advice on how he can adjust to a new school.

Option 2: Have you ever met someone new to your school or group?
What did you do to make them feel more welcome? Write a letter to
Heather giving her advice on how she can help Clementine adjust to a
new school.
Task 5: Vocabulary
The student will be writing the vocabulary words in a sentence for
practice. Here are sample sentences. Answers will vary.

popular
_Clementine was not popular at first because he didn’t have many
friends.

talented
_Clementine was talented at playing baseball and playing the guitar.

errand
__Sam did an errand for his mother by going to the post office and
picking up stamps.

characteristics
_Good characteristics about Heather include being friendly and also
being welcoming to new students.

military
__Heather might join a branch in the military someday called the Air
Force.

Task 6: Response Activity


The student will now work on a Response Activity to the story. He will
be making a character sketch of each of the main characters. The
main characters are:

Heather, Sam, Clementine


In the story “Clementine” there were three main characters. In each
square put the name of one of the characters. Then draw a picture of
each character. Around the picture draw their interests and other
important details you learned about the characters. You may need to
refer to the story to be certain you found all the details.

Task 7: Reading Response Log


In you reading response log contrast how Heather and Clementine
are different in a paragraph. Use examples from the story to
support your writing.

Week 9, Day 45
TODAY THE STUDENT WILL:

Read and interpret poetry

Task 1: Read the following two poems. Then


answer the questions that follow.
1. Who is “speaking” in the first poem, “My Place”?

A. mom

B. dad

C. baby birdI

D. worm

2. In “My Place”, how does the “speaker” feel?

A. afraid

B. excited

C. lonely
D. safe

3. Who is “speaking” in the second poem, “His Place”?

A. mouse

B. cat

C. bird

D. worm

4. In “His Place”, how does the “speaker” feel

A. hungry

B. afraid

C. restless

D. content

5. Which poem describes the predator or hunter?

A. “My Place”

B. “His Place”

6. Which poem describes the prey?

A. “My Place”

C. “His Place”

7. What line does each poem have in common?

A. This is my place; this is my habitat

B. There is a place that I like to be


C. It is a safe and cozy place for me

D. Or a little baby bird up in a tree

8. Notice the end rhyme of the poem. Which rhyme has the pattern
that the first two lines of each stanza rhyme and the last two
lines of each stanza rhyme throughout the whole poem?

A. “My Place”

B. “His Place”

9. Which two stanzas from the other poem follow the same end
rhyme pattern in question number 8?

A. Stanzas 1 and 4

B. Stanzas 2 and 4

C. Stanzas 2 and 3

D. Stanzas 1 and 3

Task 2: Review the Proverb of the Week

Two heads are better than one.

Task 3: Reading Response Log


Think of one incident where you found that working with someone to
solve something was better than working alone. Write about this in
your reading response log. Tell how you came to work with that person.