Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 102

Course Glossary 221

Course
Descriptions
Early Childhood Education .................. ECE
Glossary Economics ............................................... ECON

Courses
Education ................................................ EDUC
This section lists undergraduate courses Education - Middle Grades................... EDMG
offered by the university and available for Education-Secondary/Middle
credit. Courses are listed in alphabetical order. Grades.................................................... EDSM
The subject code for courses and the program English ..................................................... ENGL
offering the courses are listed below: English as a Second Language ............. ESL
English Education .................................. ENED
Accounting.............................................. ACCT Exceptional Children Education .......... EXC
Anthropology ......................................... ANTH Finance..................................................... FIN
Art............................................................. ART Fine Arts Education ............................... FAED
Art Education ......................................... ARED Foreign Language .................................. FL
Art History .............................................. ARH Foreign Language Education ............... FLED
Astronomy .............................................. ASTR French ...................................................... FREN
Biology ..................................................... BIOL Geography............................................... GEOG
Business Administration ....................... BUSA German .................................................... GRMN
Business Information Systems Mgt ..... BISM Health and Human Services................. HHS
Business Law .......................................... BLAW Health, Physical Ed. & Sport Science .. HPS
Chemistry ................................................ CHEM History ..................................................... HIST
Communication...................................... COM Honors ..................................................... HON
Computer Science/Information Human Services ..................................... HS
Systems................................................ CSIS Information Technology........................ IT
Criminal Justice ...................................... CJ Insurance ................................................. INS
e-Business................................................ EBIZ Italian ....................................................... ITAL
222 Course Descriptions

Japanese ................................................... JPN take credit courses before completing their


Kennesaw State University................... KSU LSP requirements, they may not take any
Latin ......................................................... LATN course which has those requirements as a
Management ........................................... MGT prerequisite. LSP students, therefore, may
Marketing ................................................ MKTG take no 3000- or 4000-level courses, and
Mathematics............................................ MATH should very carefully check the prerequisites
Mathematics Education......................... MAED for other courses.
Military Science ...................................... MILS
Music........................................................ MUSI
Applied Music Performance................. MUAP
Music Education..................................... MUED Courses
Nursing.................................................... NURS
Philosophy .............................................. PHIL • ACCOUNTING (ACCT) •
Physics ..................................................... PHYS ACCT 2100. Introduction to Financial
Political Science & Int’l Affairs............. POLS Accounting. 3-0-3.
Psychology .............................................. PSYC Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 and MATH 1101.
Reading.................................................... READ An introduction to the language of business.
Real Estate ............................................... RE Focuses on financial statements and their use in
decision making. Designed for non business and
Russian..................................................... RUSS
business majors.
Science...................................................... SCI
Science Education .................................. SCED ACCT 2200. Introduction to Managerial
Secondary Education............................. SED Accounting. 3-0-3.
Social Science Education ....................... SSED Prerequisite: ACCT 2100 and MATH 1106.
An introduction to how accounting information
Sociology ................................................. SOCI
is used to manage a business. Includes mana-
Spanish .................................................... SPAN gerial problem-solving techniques and current
Theater ..................................................... THTR trends in managerial decision-making.

Classification of Courses ACCT 3100. Intermediate Financial


Accounting & Auditing. 3-0-3.
Non-degree courses are numbered below
Courses

Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA


1000. In general, freshman courses are those Requirement; Non business Majors: ACCT 2100
numbered 1000 to 1999, sophomore level 2000 and ACCT 2200.
to 2999, junior level 3000 to 3999, senior level Focuses on problems and issues related to the
4000-4999, and graduate level 5000 and above. collection, analysis, and reporting of external
and internal information. Includes theory and
The figures shown below the course number applications in financial accounting and auditing
and the title of the course, in general, signify within the framework of accounting as an infor-
the number of class hours per week, the mation system.
number of laboratory hours per week and the
ACCT 3200. Intermediate Managerial
semester hours of credit for the completed
Accounting & Tax. 3-0-3.
course. Thus, the entry 3-0-3 denotes three Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
hours of class, zero hours of laboratory and Requirement and ACCT 3100; Non business
three hours of degree credit. The courses are Majors: ACCT 3100.
listed alphabetically. Focuses on problems and issues related to the
collection, analysis, and reporting of external and
Learning Support Restrictions internal information. Includes theory and appli-
All learning support students must be cations in managerial accounting and taxation
enrolled in their required learning support within the framework of accounting as an infor-
program (LSP) classes before they are eligible mation system.
for any regular credit courses. If they do
Accounting (ACCT) 223

ACCT 3300. Accounting Information ACCT 4200. Advanced Managerial


Systems. 3-0-3. Accounting. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Requirement and ACCT 3100; Non business Requirement and ACCT 3200; Non business
Majors: ACCT 3100. Majors: ACCT 3200.
A continuation of accounting transaction pro- A continuation of intermediate managerial
cessing concepts; internal controls and systems accounting theory and applications.
analysis and design.
ACCT 4250. Advanced Taxation. 3-0-3.
ACCT 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-3. Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Requirement and ACCT 3200; Non business
Requirement and approval of the Coordinator of Majors: ACCT 3200.
cooperative education/internships (KSU Career A continuation of income tax concepts, types
Services) and ACCT 3100; Non business Majors: of taxpayers, decision making strategies, tax
Not available to non business majors. research and planning, professional standards
A supervised work experience program for a and ethics, and the relationship and differences
minimum of two semesters at a site in business, between financial and tax accounting.
industry or government. For sophomore, junior
or senior level students who wish to obtain suc- ACCT 4300. International Accounting.
3-0-3.
cessive on-the-job experience in conjunction with
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
their academic training. Credit is allowed only in
Requirement and 6 semester hours of 4000- level
elective area.
accounting courses; Non business Majors: 60
ACCT 3398. Internship. 1-9. semester hours including 6 semester hours of
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA 4000-level accounting courses.
Requirement and approval of the Coordinator of Survey of accounting and tax issues in interna-
cooperative education/ internships (KSU Career Ser- tional commerce.
vices) and ACCT 3100 and ACCT 3200; Non business
ACCT 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 hours.
Majors: Not available to non business majors.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
A supervised credit-earning work experience
Requirement and approval of instructor and
of one academic semester with a previously
department chair prior to registration; Non busi-
approved business firm, private agency or gov-
ness Majors: Approval of instructor and depart-
ernment agency. A research paper is required to

Courses
ment chair prior to registration and ACCT 3200.
receive credit. For junior or senior students who Special topics of an advanced nature not in the
wish to participate in an on-the-job experience in regular course offerings.
which they may apply their academic training.
The work experience may not be with a current ACCT 4490. Special Topics in Account-
employer. The course will be graded on an S/U ing. 3-0-3.
basis. Credit is allowed only in electives area. Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Requirement and approval of instructor and
ACCT 4100. Advanced Financial department chair; Non business Majors: 60 semes-
Accounting. 3-0-3. ter hours and approval of department chair.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Selected special topics of interest to faculty and
Requirement and ACCT 3100; Non business students.
Majors: ACCT 3100.
A continuation of intermediate financial accounting ACCT 4600. Governmental and Non-
theory and applications, with a focus on detailed profit Accounting. 3-0-3.
technical topics and specialized problems. Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Requirement and ACCT 3100; Non business
ACCT 4150. Auditing and Assurance. Majors: ACCT 3100.
3-0-3. Study of fund accounting and reporting practices
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA for state/local governments and other nonprofit
Requirement and ACCT 3300; Non business organizations.
Majors: ACCT 3300.
A continuation of audit theory with a focus on ACCT 4700. Business Valuation. 3-0-3.
specific applications to financial reporting. Also Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
covers other types of attestation and assurance Requirement and ACCT 3200 and FIN 3100; Non
services with a focus on the concepts of risk, business Majors: ACCT 3200 and FIN 3100.
control, evidence, and ethics. Study of business valuation techniques and their uses.
224 Course Descriptions

• ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH) • ANTH 3321. Indians of North America.


3-0-3.
ANTH 2105. Social Issues: Perspec- Prerequisite: ANTH 2105 or ANTH 2201.
tives in Anthropology. 2-0-2. The study of contemporary issues affecting
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099. Native American peoples through a survey of
One of the four disciplinary options (Anthro- traditional cultures and culture change.
pology 2105, Geography 2105, Psychology 2105,
Sociology 2105) that can be taken to satisfy the ANTH 3350. Cultures and Societies of
Social Issues requirement in the general edu- the World. 3-0-3.
cation curriculum. A common set of world Prerequisite: ANTH 2105 or 2201 or SOCI 2105
social issues is critically examined from one of or 2201.
four social science perspectives. The discipline A comparative survey of culture and social orga-
of anthropology examines the effects of cultural nization in various regions of the world with a
behavior on contemporary issues and problems focus on contemporary social problems, cultural
confronting people around the world. change and adaptation.

ANTH 2201. Introduction to Anthropol- ANTH 3370. The Culture and Society of
ogy. 3-0-3. Japan. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Read 0099 if required. Prerequisite: ANTH 2105 or ANTH 2201 or per-
Introduction to anthropology’s four major sub- mission of instructor.
fields: biological anthropology, archaeology, cul- This course examines the development of Jap-
tural anthropology, and linguistics. anese culture and society and the culture of
modern Japan.
ANTH 3301. Human Origins. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ANTH 2105 or ANTH 2201. ANTH 4400. Directed Study in Anthro-
An examination of the biological, behavioral, pology. 1-3 Credit Hours.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
and cultural evolution of humans from earliest
ment chair.
origins to prehistoric state-level societies.
Covers special topics and seminars external to
ANTH 3305. Principles of Archaeology. regular course offerings. May include original
3-0-3. research projects and practicum experiences.
Prerequisite: ANTH 2105 or ANTH 2201 or per-
mission of instructor. ANTH 4410. Cultural Anthropology: A
Global Perspective. 3-0-3.
Courses

Archaeology is the subfield of anthropology


Prerequisite: ANTH 2105 or ANTH 2201 or SOCI
that has as its goal the understanding of the
2105 or SOCI 2201.
human past by studying the material remains
The comparative study of human cultures and
that people leave. This course will cover the his-
societies through use of cross-cultural analysis of
tory, goals, methods, and theoretical base of cur-
human behavior and case studies. Major foci are
rent technology. Cultural resource management
comparisons between universal and culturally
will be introduced as well.
relative aspects of human behavior, comparative
ANTH 3310. Cultural Diversity in the social organization, cultural change and adapta-
U.S. 3-0-3. tion, and contemporary global cultural problems.
Prerequisite: ANTH 2105 or ANTH 2201 or SOCI
2105 or SOCI 2201. ANTH 4421. North American Archaeol-
The interrelated issues of culture, race, ethnicity, ogy. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ANTH 2105 or ANTH 2201.
identity, gender, and social stratification in Amer-
An introduction to archaeological goals, methods,
ican society are examined through a holistic and
and interpretation of the prehistory of North America.
comparative perspective with an emphasis on
the examination of case studies. ANTH 4425. Historical Archaeology.
3-0-3.
ANTH 3315. The Southeastern Indians.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
3-0-3.
The course introduces students to methods and
Prerequisite: ANTH 2105 or ANTH 2201 or per-
mission of instructor. issues in American historical archaeology. Par-
An examination of the culture of the prehistoric, ticular emphasis is placed upon archaeological
historic and contemporary Native Americans methods and documentary research, changing
of the Southeastern U.S. including the Mound gender roles, ethnicity, and technological innova-
Builders, Cherokees, Creeks, Choctaws, and tions. Case studies will focus on the South but
Seminoles. other regional contexts may also be included.
Anthropology (ANTH)—ART (ART) 225

ANTH 4450. Research Methods in organization as well as form and space relation-
Anthropology. 3-0-3. ships using a variety of media.
Prerequisite: ANTH 2105 or ANTH 2201.
ART 2150. Drawing II. 3-3-3.
Major theoretical ideas and methods used in
Prerequisite: ART 1150.
anthropological research will be examined with a
Pictorial composition with studies in use of line,
focus on applying them in research and practice.
form, value and texture, including work from
ANTH 4490. Special Topics in Anthro- nature, the life model and setups.
pology. 3-0-3.
ART 2260. Painting and Color Theory.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
3-3-3.
ment chair.
Prerequisite: ART 1150.
Selected topics of interest to faculty and students.
Painting with various media emphasizing orga-
nizational structure, technical considerations,
• ART (ART) • abstract relationships and basic color theory.
ART 3000. Professional Practices and
ART 1100. Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio Review. 3-0-3.
and Digital Imaging. 3-3-3. Prerequisite: ART 1100, 1150, 1200, 2150, and
Prerequisite: None. 2260.
Elements of art and the principles of two-dimen- A seminar to assess student direction and profes-
sional design, with emphasis on line, shape, tex- sional development in the visual arts. A portfo-
ture, space, value and color executed through lio review and faculty critique will assess student
conventional methods and specialized computer progress, strengths and areas of development.
applications. Guest lectures by professional artists will aug-
ment class discussions and presentations exam-
ART 1107. Arts in Society: Visual Arts.
ining current issues, values and protocols in the
3-0-3.
visual arts.
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099 if
required. ART 3010. Computer Applications in
Through an examination of the role of arts Art. 3-3-3.
in society, and an in-depth study of visual Prerequisite: ART 3000.
works of art, this interactive course provides The study of computer technology employed
an understanding of the creative process and

Courses
by professional artists. Digital presentation
develops skills in creativity and critical analysis. and documentation techniques covered. Limited
Heightened perceptual abilities will be devel- work with art production software.
oped through class experiences and field visits
to a variety of arts events in dance, music and ART 3120. Ceramics I. 3-3-3.
theater as well as in visual arts. (Attendance at Prerequisite: ART 3000.
some events requires paid admission.) Basic processes in ceramics, including pinch pot,
coil and slab method of building, and an intro-
ART 1150. Drawing I. 3-3-3. duction to ceramic decoration with engobes and
Prerequisite: None. textures.
Drawing, using a variety of media and tech-
niques, including work from figure, still-life and ART 3150. Drawing III - Life Drawing.
landscape. Some drawing with digital media. 3-3-3.
Prerequisite: ART 3000.
For art majors or students seeking an in-depth
Intensive study of the human figure; action,
art study.
structure, volume, design and expressive poten-
ART 1200.Three-Dimensional Design. tialities from a variety of models, using a variety
3-3-3. of media. Some portraiture.
Prerequisite: ART 1150 and ART 1100.
An introductory course in exploring, evaluating ART 3260. Painting II. 3-3-3.
and resolving concepts related to basic three- Prerequisite: ART 3000.
dimensional design problems. Exercises include Painting with acrylics and/or oils emphasizing
three-dimensional drawing techniques and organizational structure, abstract relationships
model building. Emphasis is placed on the appli- and technical considerations.
cation of elements and design and principles of
226 Course Descriptions

ART 3300. Sculpture I. 3-3-3. experimental printmaking techniques including


Prerequisite: ART 3000. but not limited to the relief, intaglio and stencil
An introduction to selected sculptural processes processes.
using a variety of media.
ART 3650. Theory and Criticism of the
ART 3310. Sculpture II. 0-3-3. Visual Arts. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ART 3300. Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 and 45 credit hours.
In-depth exploration of selected sculpture pro- A study of the basic aesthetic theories and criti-
cesses, creative and aesthetic concepts related to cal methods employed by artists, teachers, critics
the 3 dimensional form. and art historians. Emphasis on artistic styles
and aesthetic philosophies in historical, cultural
ART 3360. Ceramics II. 0-3-3. and creative contexts.
Prerequisite: ART 3120.
Experiences with hand-built and wheel-thrown ART 3690. Basic Graphic Design and
methods with emphasis on form, surface treat- Computer Applications. 3-3-3.
ment, glazing and firing. Prerequisite: ART 3000.
This course is designed to introduce students to
ART 3396. Cooperative Study. 1 - 2. the history of graphic design as well as a thor-
Prerequisite: Approval of coordinator of cooper- ough understanding of type usage and its explo-
ative educational internships (Career Services). ration of visual imagery as it relates to headline
A supervised work experience program for a and body copy. Emphasis is on student’s ability
minimum of two academic semesters at a site to make sound electronic choices as it relates to
in business, industry or government. For sopho- imagery developed on a microcomputer.
more, junior or senior level students who wish
to obtain successive on-the-job experience in con- ART 3700. Graphic Communications
junction with their academic training. I. 3-3-3.
Prerequisite: ART 3690.
ART 3398. Art Internship. 1 - 9. This course deals with type as an element of
Prerequisite: Permission of department chair. design. A brief history of type with an emphasis
A supervised, credit-earning work experience on structure, using typography as design solu-
of one academic quarter with a previously tions in a wide range of applications.
approved business firm, private agency or gov-
ernment agency. ART 3710. Graphic Communications
II. 3-3-3.
Courses

ART 3400. Photography I. 3-3-3. Prerequisite: ART 3700.


Prerequisite: ART 3000 (non-art majors ART This course is designed to introduce students
1100). to the use of good typography and other
Basic introduction to developing visual skills and visual imagery to design basic publications. The
photographic techniques using black and white emphasis will be on print and web development
film. Emphasis on exposure, development, print skills. Industry standard software will be incor-
and aesthetics. porated where necessary.
ART 3410. Photography II. 3-3-3. ART 3720. Electronic Image Manipula-
Prerequisite: ART 3400. tion. 3-3-3.
A refinement of techniques and visual skills with Prerequisite: ART 1150.
emphasis on aesthetics using different types of Course is designed to introduce students to
film and cameras. Includes an introduction to image editing and image manipulation using
digital photographic imaging. industry standard digital imaging software. Stu-
ART 3500. Printmaking I. 3-3-3. dents will also be trained in a high level of mas-
Prerequisite: ART 3000 (non-art majors ART tery in scanning, as well as image file formats
1100). using a variety of applications. A good under-
Basic printmaking processes including but not standing of four-color process will be taught.
limited to relief (wood block), intaglio (etching, ART 4150. Advanced Study in Drawing.
engraving) and stencil (silk-screen). 0-3-3.
ART 3510.Printmaking II. 3-3-3. Prerequisite: ART 3150.
Prerequisite: ART 3500. Selected topics in drawing of an advanced
Advanced exploration of conventional and nature which may include independent student
research. Can be taken three times, for three
Art (ART) 227

credit hours each, for a total of 9 credit hours Selected special topics and seminars of interest
toward the major. to faculty and upper-level students interested in
art.
ART 4260. Painting III - Watercolor.
3-3-3. ART 4510. Advanced Study in Printmak-
Prerequisite: ART 3000. ing. 3-3-3.
Painting in transparent and opaque watercolor Prerequisite: ART 3510.
with emphasis on technical aspects of watercolor Selected topics in printmaking of an advanced
painting. Experimental and traditional nature which may include independent student
approaches will be presented. research. Can be taken three times, for three
credit hours each, for a total of 9 credit hours
ART 4265. Advanced Study in Painting.
toward the major.
0-3-3.
Prerequisite: ART 3260 or ART 4260. ART 4730. Design Strategy and Presen-
Selected topics in painting of an advanced tation. 3-3-3.
nature which may include independent student Prerequisite: ART 3720.
research. Can be taken three times, for three Using graphic design coupled with computer
credit hours each, for a total of 9 credit hours skills to implement business solutions. Empha-
toward the major. sis on strategy, research and presentation skills.
ART 4310. Advanced Study in Sculpture. ART 4740. Electronic Illustration.
0-3-3. 3-3-3.
Prerequisite: ART 3310. Prerequisite: ART 3000.
Selected topics in sculpture of an advanced The integration of painting and drawing skills
nature which may include independent student with computer technology. Illustration based on
research. Can be taken three times, for three strong problem solving skills, research, strategy
credit hours each, for a total of 9 credit hours and implementation. Can be taken three times,
toward the major. for three credit hours each, for a total of 9 credit
hours toward the major.
ART 4360. Advanced Study in Ceramics.
0-3-3. ART 4750. Advertising and Packaging.
Prerequisite: ART 3360. 3-3-3.
Selected topics in ceramics of an advanced Prerequisite: ART 4740.

Courses
nature which may include independent student Focus on problem solving strategies successfully
research. Can be taken three times, for three implemented through advertising and packag-
credit hours each, for a total of 9 credit hours ing directives. Strong emphasis on design,
toward the major. research and computer skills. Advertising cam-
paigns and packaging solutions targeted to com-
ART 4400. Directed Study in Art. 1 - 3.
munity needs.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
ment chair. ART 4760. Advanced Study in Digital
Selected topics of an advanced nature, which Imaging. 0-3-3.
may include original research projects. Can be Prerequisite: ART 4740.
used in upper-level course requirements only Selected topics in digital imaging of an advanced
twice with no more than 3 hours credit given nature, which will include independent student
each time. research. Exercise in creative problem solving
which will build upon skills in digital illus-
ART 4410. Advanced Study in Photogra-
tration using traditional methods and industry
phy. 0-3-3.
standard digital illustration tools. Can be taken
Prerequisite: ART 3410.
three times, for three credit hours each, for a total
Selected topics in photography of an advanced
of 9 credit hours toward the major.
nature which may include independent student
research. Can be taken three times, for three ART 4980. Senior Portfolio and Applied
credit hours each, for a total of 9 credit hours Project. 3-0-3.
toward the major. Prerequisite: Senior status with a minimum of 18
hours of graphic communication course work at
ART 4490. Special Topics and Art the 3000 and 4000 level.
Seminar. 1 - 3. Selected topics dealing with graphic design and pro-
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
fessional practices, culminating with a critique of
ment chair.
228 Course Descriptions

a final design project and portfolio of work. The A supervised, credit-earning work experience of
work will be evaluated by a panel of practicing one academic semester with an approved school,
graphic designers. Selected work may be included museum or educational organization involved in
in the senior exhibition. Required of all art majors the visual arts.
concentrating in graphic communications.
ARED 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit
ART 4990. Senior Art Seminar and hours.
Exhibition. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
Prerequisite: Senior status with a minimum of 18 ment chair.
hours in art at the 3000 and 4000 level. Selected topics of an advanced nature, which
Selected topics dealing with professional artists may include original research projects. The con-
and exhibition practices, culminating with the tent of the directed study will be determined
exhibition of participants’ work. jointly by the instructor and the student.
ARED 4410. Curriculum Models and
• ART EDUCATION (ARED) • Assessment in Art. 2-2-3.
Prerequisite: ARED 3306.
ARED 3302. Teaching, Learning and
This course is designed to prepare prospective
Development in Visual Arts. 3-0-3.
art teachers to be able to plan and organize effec-
Prerequisite: ART 3000.
tive art programs and curricula, to explore inno-
This course is designed to help students gain an
vative and exemplary art programs and
understanding of the current teaching issues in
materials, to assess art learning, and to develop
the field of art education and understand devel-
a rationale and strategy for articulating and pro-
opment and learning in the P-12 art room. Cre-
moting a quality art program. In addition, this
ative, artistic, and perceptual development will
course is designed to identify and understand art
be presented through an examination of the
instruction which meets the required
characteristics of diverse learners and an empha-
Visual Arts Quality Core curriculum for the state
sis on the physical, psychosocial-emotional, and
of Georgia. Students also participate in a clinical
cognitive development of P-12 learners.
practice activity in a partner school, involving
ARED 3304. Teaching Art History, Criti- the cooperative creation and delivery of an origi-
cism and Aesthetics. 3-0-3. nal art curriculum unit.
Prerequisite: ART 3000 and ART 3650.
This course is designed to prepare students to ARED 4425. Art Instructional Design
Courses

develop strategies for teaching art history, art and Application (P-12). 0-6-3.
Prerequisite: ARED 3306, ARED 4410.
criticism, and aesthetics in the P-12 art class-
A discipline based course combining curriculum
room. Students will develop materials appropri-
design and instructional methods with in-depth
ate for classroom instruction that stimulate and
field experience in the public schools. Students
assess art learning. In addition, this course meets
will both observe and teach in a classroom set-
the required learning for Visual Arts Quality
ting. Campus seminars will relate the field expe-
Core Curriculum of Georgia and National Stan-
riences to current instructional theory. Proof of
dards for Visual Arts.
liability insurance required prior to receiving a
ARED 3306. Materials, Methods and school placement.
Management for Teaching Art (P-12).
3-3-3. ARED 4470. Student Teaching. 12
Prerequisite: ARED 3302. credit hours.
An intensive laboratory experience using the Prerequisite: admission to student teaching.
media and materials for teaching art. Intended Full-time teaching experience under the supervi-
for prospective art specialists teaching grades P sion of a public school supervising teacher and
through 12. Methods and strategies for teaching a college supervisor. Proof of liability insurance
various art media and processes will be covered. required prior to receiving a school placement.
Classroom management strategies are integrated ARED 4490. Special Topics in Art Edu-
into teaching methods. cation. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
ARED 3398. Internship. 1-12 credit
ment chair.
hours.
Selected special topics and seminars of interest to
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
ment chair. faculty and upper-level students interested in art
education.
Art (ART)—Art History (ARH) 229

• ART HISTORY (ARH) • develop an understanding of the wealth of con-


tributions made by people of African descent to
ARH 2750. Art History Survey I. 3-0-3. the development of American art and culture.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101. ARH 2750 recommended.
This is a lecture/discussion course in which stu-
dents study the art of Paleolithic cultures and ARH 3950. History of American Art.
major world civilizations to the 14th century B.E. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 and 45 credit hours of
Prehistoric art, the art of Egypt and the Ancient
credit.
Near East, classical Greece and Rome, introduc-
Study of the art styles and movements in the
tion to the traditional art of Asia, Sub-Saharan
United States from colonial times to present.
Africa and early Christian, Byzantine and Islamic
ARH 2750 recommended.
art, and the art of the European Middle ages are
covered. The survey includes art of the Americas ARH 4400. Directed Study. 1 - 3.
before the arrival of the Spanish. Museum visits Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and
are required. department chair.
Selected topics of an advanced nature, which
ARH 2850. Art History Survey II. 3-0-3.
may include original research projects. Can be
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101.
used in upper-level course requirements only
This is a lecture/discussion course in which
twice with no more than 3 hours credit given
students study major developments and trends
each time.
from the 14th century C.E. to the end of the 19th
century in art of the western world and of major ARH 4450. Renaissance Art. 3-0-3.
world cultures during the same period. Museum Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 and 45 credit hours.
visits are required. A survey of art in Europe from the early 14th
century to the mid 16th century. The veneration
ARH 2950. Art History Survey III. 3-0-3.
for classical antiquity and the development of
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101.
realistic representation are examined. Besides a
This is a lecture/discussion course in which stu-
chronological study, the painters, sculptors and
dents study major developments and trends in
architects in Italy and in Northern Europe are
2 and 3 dimensional art since 1900 (with a brief
covered. The issues of patronage, artist training
overview of the roots of modern art). Postmod-
and technology are also addressed. ARH 2750
ern theories open the study to indigenous, tra-
recommended.

Courses
ditional, colonial, and post-colonial cultures in
world art. Museum visits are required. ARH 4490. Special Topics in Art His-
tory. 1 - 3.
ARH 3398. Internship. 1-9.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
Prerequisite: Permission of department chair.
ment chair.
A supervised work experience of one academic
Selected special topics and seminars of interest
semester with a previously approved gallery,
to faculty and upper-level students interested in
museum, or private government agency.
art history.
ARH 3550. Latin American Art. 3-0-3.
ARH 4550. Baroque Art. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 and 45 credit hours.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 and 45 credit hours.
A study of Latin-American art from pre-Columbian
A survey of major movements, artists and
times to the present. ARH 2750 recommended.
themes in the 17th and 18th century western art
ARH 3570. African Art. 3-0-3. and architecture. The mutual awareness and cul-
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 and 45 credit hours. tural interchange with the traditions of Africa,
A history and survey of African art, from prehis- Asia, the Americas and Oceania are also empha-
tory to the present. ARH 2750 recommended. sized. ARH 2750 recommended.

ARH 3800. African American Art. 3-0-3. ARH 4650. 19th Century Art. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 and 45 credit hours. Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 and 45 credit hours.
An introduction to African American art Study of major developments and trends in 19th
designed to explore the diverse aesthetic expres- century painting, sculpture, graphic design and
sions of African American artists from colonial architecture. Review of major aesthetic theories
times to the present. Through an examination of and non-western art forms that shape 19th cen-
aspects of the religious, social, cultural and cre- tury art. ARH 2750 recommended.
ative history of Black Americans, students will
230 Course Descriptions

ARH 4870. History of Photography. centrifugation to examine enzyme kinetics, quan-


3-0-3. tification of protein and subcellular fractionation.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 and 45 credit hours. For science majors. (Formerly BIOL 2201/2201L).
A selective survey of 19th and 20th century
BIOL 2108. Biological Principles II.
photography, primarily in Europe and America. 3-3-4.
Emphasis on photography’s development as an Prerequisite: All learning support courses if
artistic medium. Focus on major practitioners of required.
the medium, and on photography’s relationship An organismal approach to biology. Topics
to historical events, psychology, sociology and include population genetics, evolution, ecology,
the development of art and architecture. ART behavior and structure/function relationships. In
2750 recommended. the laboratory, emphasis is on the collection and
analysis of data from exercises dealing with pop-
ARH 4990. Applied Project in Art His-
ulation genetics and ecology. Fetal pig dissection
tory. 1 - 3.
is included. For science majors. (Formerly BIOL
Prerequisite: Senior status with a minimum of 19
2200/2200L).
hours in art history and approval of instructor
and department chair. BIOL 2221. Human Anatomy & Physiol-
Primarily for students concentrating in art his- ogy I. 3-0-3.
tory, this capstone experience is a combined tuto- Corequisite: CHEM 1151 and CHEM 1151L or
rial and/or seminar in which students research, SCI 1101.
write and present a senior thesis paper. The course begins with cellular chemistry and
function and continues through the nervous,
• ASTRONOMY (ASTR) • endocrine, skeletal and muscular systems.
Homeostasis and structural and functional rela-
ASTR 3320. Astronomy and Cosmology. tionships will be emphasized. Primarily rec-
3-0-3. ommended for students interested in nursing,
Prerequisite: Any core lab science sequence. physical therapy and health, physical education
An introduction to stellar Astronomy and Cos- and sports science. Cannot be used for credit
mology. Topics include stellar structure and evo- toward a degree in Biology.
lution, end states of stars such as white dwarfs
BIOL 2221L. Human Anatomy & Physiol-
and black holes, active galaxies and quasars, the
ogy I Laboratory. 0-2-1.
large-scale structure of the universe, and theories Corequisite: BIOL 2221.
Courses

for the origin and evolution of the Universe. Basic anatomy and physiology of the skeletal,
This course will emphasize physical principles nervous, endocrine, and muscular systems.
and conceptual understanding. Structural and functional relationships will be
ASTR 3321. Solar System Astronomy. emphasized.
3-0-3.
BIOL 2222. Human Anatomy & Physiol-
Prerequisite: Any core lab science sequence.
ogy II. 3-0-3.
An introduction to Solar System Astronomy. Prerequisite: BIOL 2221.
Topics include planetary motion and its role in A continuation of Biology 2221. Emphasizes
the scientific revolution, theories for the origin homeostasis and structural and functional rela-
of the solar system, the history and evolution tionships in the study of cardiovascular, respi-
of the Earth, comparative planetology and the ratory, urinary, digestive, and reproductive
origin of life. This course will emphasize physi- systems. Primarily recommended for students
cal principles and conceptual understanding. interested in nursing, physical therapy and
health, physical education, and sports science.
• BIOLOGY (BIOL) • Cannot be used for credit toward a degree in
Biology.
BIOL 2107. Biological Principles I.
3-3-4. BIOL 2222L. Human Anatomy & Physiol-
Prerequisite: CHEM 1211/1211L. ogy II Laboratory. 0-2-1.
A cellular approach to biology. Topics include Prerequisite: BIOL 2221/2221L; Corequisite:
cell chemistry, cell structure and function, energy BIOL 2222.
metabolism and cell differentiation, and tech- Basic anatomy and physiology of the cardiovas-
niques used to study them. Laboratories employ cular, respiratory, digestive, urinary and repro-
principles of spectrophotometry and differential ductive systems. Structural and functional
relationships will be emphasized.
Art History (ARH)—Biology (BIOL) 231

BIOL 2261. Fundamental Microbiology. BIOL 3315L. Vertebrate Zoology Labo-


3-0-3. ratory. 0-2-1.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2221/2221L; Corequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. Corequisite: BIOL
BIOL 2261L. 3315.
Basic principles and techniques of microbiology Laboratories will emphasize the identification of
emphasizing the various types of microbes, their North American vertebrates as well as examine the
morphology, metabolic processes and their rela- relationships between morphology and taxonomy.
tionships to humans. Primarily for nursing
BIOL 3317. Pathophysiology. 3-0-3.
majors. Cannot be used for credit toward a
Prerequisite: BIOL 2222/2222L or 4431/4431L.
degree in Biology.
Examines the biological basis of common, clini-
BIOL 2261L. Fundamental Microbiology cal disease states. Pathophysiology is treated as
Laboratory. 0-2-1. a disruption of normal homeostatic mechanisms
Prerequisite: BIOL 2221/2221L; Corequisite: that progresses beyond the normal compensa-
BIOL 2261. tory capabilities of the human body.
The application of basic principles and tech-
niques of microbiology emphasizing funda- BIOL 3320. Plant Morphology. 3-0-3.
mental isolation, identification, and culture Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. Corequisite: BIOL
3320L.
techniques.
Evolutionary trends and relationships of major
BIOL 3300. Genetics. 3-2-4. groups of non-vascular and vascular plants as
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. seen in vegetative and reproductive morphology,
Principles of genetics including classical, molecu- life cycles and paleobotany.
lar, population genetics and cytogenetics. Impor-
BIOL 3320L. Plant Morphology Labora-
tance of genetics as a foundation for other
tory. 0-2-1.
divisions of biology is stressed. The laboratories
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. Corequisite: BIOL
will explore concepts in both transmission and
3320.
molecular genetics. Laboratory exercises will
Students will observe and dissect selected groups
demonstrate the principles of segregation and
of non-vascular and vascular plants, with empha-
independent assortment. Sex linkage, epistatic
sis on evolutionary trends and relationships.
relationships, and the principles of human
karyotyping will also be examined. Exercises BIOL 3327. Medical Genetics. 3-0-3.

Courses
in molecular genetics will introduce students Prerequisite: BIOL 3300 or consent of instructor.
to the process of recombinant DNA technology An introduction to the principles of medical
and will demonstrate the principles involved in genetics and the application of these principles
molecular separation techniques. to human genetic disorders. Topics include
inborn errors of metabolism, cytogenetic anom-
BIOL 3310. Invertebrate Zoology. 3-0-3.
alies, neural tube defects, and application of
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. Corequisite: BIOL
molecular genetics to the diagnosis of specific
3310L.
disorders. Genetic counseling procedures, pre-
An examination of environmental influences on
natal options and the ethical dilemmas generated
the evolution of the invertebrates including anat-
as a result of these options will also be discussed.
omy, physiology and phylogeny of invertebrates.
BIOL 3335. Natural History of Georgia.
BIOL 3310L. Invertebrate Zoology
1-6-4.
Laboratory. 0-2-1.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. Corequisite: BIOL
This course examines the flora, fauna, geology
3310.Students will observe and dissect a selected
and environments of selected Georgia ecosystems.
group of invertebrate organisms as well as The historical and geological development of the
design and conduct studies of invertebrate phys- state’s major habitats and landforms are examined
iology, diversity, distribution, and behavior. A by way of a series of weekend field trips.
term project is required.
BIOL 3338. Histology. 3-0-3.
BIOL 3315. Vertebrate Zoology. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. Corequisite: BIOL
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. Corequisite: BIOL 3338L.
3315L. An investigation of structural and functional
An examination of the phylogenetic relation- relationships in animal tissues.
ships, evolutionary origins and life history traits
of the vertebrates.
232 Course Descriptions

BIOL 3338L. Histology Laboratory. BIOL 3371. Limnology. 2-4-4.


0-2-1. Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. Corequisite: BIOL This course will develop a comprehensive and
3338. integrated understanding of physical, chemical
Laboratory studies of cells, tissues, and organs and biological processes occurring in lakes,
to understand their structural organization from streams and estuaries. The approach will use
normal animal specimens. the scientific method to investigate and contrast
basic ecological processes operating in various
BIOL 3340. Microbiology. 3-0-3.
systems. Students will generate hypotheses from
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. Corequisite: BIOL
an initial collection of data and from lectures on
3340L.
various limnologic parameters (e.g. light, nutri-
A study of prokaryotic and unicellular
ents, productivity, community structure, pollut-
eukaryotic organisms emphasizing morphology,
ants.) Students will test specific hypotheses by
physiology, control, identification, symbiotic
developing and implementing field surveys and
relationships and practical applications. Immu-
experimental manipulations.
nology is studied as a response of vertebrates to
microbial infection. BIOL 3372. Aquatic Biodiversity. 1-6-4.
Prerequisite: BIOL 3370.
BIOL 3340L. Microbiology Laboratory.
An introduction to major plant and animal taxa
0-3-1.
found in aquatic ecosystems. Students will
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. Corequisite: BIOL
3340. develop field and laboratory identification and
This course emphasizes basic microbiology collection skills. Major ecological and biogeo-
methods, focusing on the culturing and identifi- graphical factors influencing distribution and
cation of bacteria and other organisms. The role abundance of aquatic organisms will be exam-
of microbes in the environment and in medicine ined. A series of three weekend field trips are
is also investigated. required. Prerequisites: BIOL 3370 or permission
of instructor.
BIOL 3350. Comparative Vertebrate
Anatomy. 3-0-3. BIOL 3375. Behavioral Biology. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. Corequisite: BIOL Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108 or comparable
3350L. research methods course. See Biology/Physics
A survey of representative vertebrates and Department Chair for approval of other courses.
Courses

Corequisite: BIOL 3375L.


related chordates emphasizing phylogeny and
A survey of the major concepts of neurophysiol-
anatomical adaptations. Evolutionary trends are
ogy, ethology and behavioral ecology, including
examined in the context of large-scale environ-
the behavior of social organisms.
mental changes that have occurred over geologi-
cal time. BIOL 3375L. Behavioral Biology Labora-
tory. 0-2-1.
BIOL 3350L. Comparative Vertebrate
Prerequisite: 2107,2108 or comparable research
Anatomy Laboratory. 0-3-1.
methods course. See Biology/Physics Depart-
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. Corequisite: BIOL
ment Chair for approval of other courses; Coreq-
3350.
uisite: BIOL 3375.
Students will dissect a selected group of verte-
Laboratory and field activities emphasize a
brate organisms.
quantitative, hypothesis testing approach to
BIOL 3370. Ecology. 3-0-3. observing the behavior of animals.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. Corequisite: BIOL
BIOL 3380. Evolutionary Biology.
3370L.
3-0-3.
Relationships among living organisms and their
Prerequisite: BIOL 3300.
environments at the individual, population, com-
Principles of evolutionary biology including dis-
munity and biosphere levels.
cussions of natural selection, adaptation, pop-
BIOL 3370L. Ecology Laboratory. 0-3-1. ulation genetics, speciation, and phylogeny
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. Corequisite: BIOL reconstruction. The applications of evolutionary
3370. biology to areas such as conservation biology,
Laboratory and field activities will emphasize medicine, and agriculture are discussed.
environmental sampling procedures and statisti-
cal analysis of sampling data.
Biology (BIOL) 233

BIOL 3390. Developmental Biology. BIOL 4400. Directed Study. 1-4.


3-0-3. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor, major area
Prerequisite: BIOL 3300. Corequisite: BIOL committee and Biology/Physics Department
3390L. Chair prior to registration.
Developmental process of animals and plants Selected topics of an advanced nature, which
from formation of gametes through the embry- may include original research projects. Up to
onic stages, birth, maturation and aging. Empha- four hours may be applied to the major area.
sis on anatomical development, experimental
BIOL 4410. Cell and Molecular Biology.
embryology and molecular mechanisms of cel-
3-0-3.
lular differentiation.
Prerequisite: BIOL 3300, CHEM 3361.
BIOL 3390L. Developmental Biology Cellular function and genetic principles from an
Laboratory. 0-3-1. experimental point of view. Emphasis on func-
Prerequisite: BIOL 3300. Corequisite: BIOL 3390. tional interactions among cellular substructures,
Laboratory studies in developmental biology regulation of cellular biosynthetic activity, molec-
techniques, including plant and animal cell and ular genetics, and evaluation of experimental
tissue cultures. data.
BIOL 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-2. BIOL 4415. DNA Technology. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Approval of Biology/Physics Prerequisite: BIOL 3300.
Department Chair and Coordinator of Coopera- This course will explore the scientific revolution
tive Education/ Internships (Career Services).A fostered by the myriad of technologies involving
supervised work experience program for a mini- DNA. The course will present the basic concepts
mum of two academic semesters at a previously and methodologies employed in various aspects
approved site in business, industry or govern- of DNA technology followed by a range of appli-
ment or a private agency. For sophomore, junior cations. The applications will include investiga-
or senior level students who wish to obtain suc- tions of population dynamics and evolutionary
cessive on-the-job experience in conjunction with relationships, the production of pharmaceutical
their academic training. products and vaccines, diagnosis of infectious
diseases and genetic disorders, gene therapy,
BIOL 3398. Internship. 1-12. forensic investigation, and the production of
Prerequisite: Approval of major area committee
genetically engineered organisms. The various
and Biology/Physics Department Chair prior to

Courses
aspects of DNA technology will be examined
registration.
using extensive classroom activities such as mod-
A supervised, credit-earning work experience
eling, discussion of case studies, and examina-
of one academic semester with a previously
tion of data sets from the current literature. Case
approved business firm, private agency or gov-
studies will also be used to examine the social
ernment agency. Credit is allowed only in elec-
implications and ethical considerations involved
tive areas.
in the utilization of these technologies.
BIOL 3399. Seminar. 1-0-1.
BIOL 4420. Plant Physiology. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108 or permission of
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108. Corequisite: BIOL
instructor.
4420L.
Selected topics of current interest, to be
Metabolic and physical processes of plants,
announced. May be taken only two times for
emphasizing photosynthesis, respiration, water
credit.
relationships, mineral utilization and hormonal
BIOL 4000. Service Learning in Biology. reactions.
1-3.
BIOL 4420L. Plant Physiology Labora-
Prerequisite: 60 hours and permission of instruc-
tory. 0-3-1.
tor and department chair/program director.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108; CHEM
A community activity which links learning to
3361/3361L. Corequisite: BIOL 4420.
life by connecting meaningful community ser-
Both classical and current approaches will be
vice activities with academic learning, personal
used to examine nutrition, transport, photosyn-
growth, and civic responsibility. Activity will be
thesis, and development in plants.
designed with the instructor and approved by
the chair/program director.
234 Course Descriptions

BIOL 4427. Chromosome Preparation & BIOL 4460. Medical Microbiology.


Analysis. 2-3-3. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: BIOL 3300. Corequisite: BIOL 3327. Prerequisite: BIOL 3340.
An extensive preparatory course designed to This course will explore the disease process of,
give students hands-on experience with the the immune response to, and the prevention and
methods used in the preparation of human chro- treatment of the medically important Monera,
mosomes. Collection techniques, culture proce- Viruses, Fungi and some microscopic protista
dures, harvesting protocol and slide preparation with emphasis on emerging infections. This is a
will be followed by analysis and interpretation of non-laboratory course for science majors.
karyotypes. Laboratory will emphasize proper
BIOL 4465. Immunology. 3-0-3.
use of the microscope, as well as processing of
Prerequisite: BIOL 3300; BIOL 3340 recom-
film and prints.
mended. Immunology will explore current con-
BIOL 4431. Human Physiology. 3-0-3. cepts of the immune system. Emphasis will be
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, BIOL 2108, CHEM 3361. placed on the induction of the immune response,
Corequisite: BIOL 4431L. on the mechanism(s) of those responses, and on
A course in human systems physiology in which the mechanism(s) by which the immune system
the principle of homeostasis will be used to protects against disease. The development and
understand how function is integrated from the the role of each of the components involved in
cellular to the organismal level. The course will the immune response as well as immunological
focus on the nervous, endocrine, muscular and applications will be discussed.
cardiovascular systems. Critical thinking and BIOL 4475. Virology. 3-0-3.
quantitative methods will be emphasized. Prerequisite: BIOL 3300; BIOL 3340 recom-
mended. This course will explore current con-
BIOL 4431L. Human Physiology Labora-
cepts associated with the field of virology. The
tory. 0-3-1.
structure and genetic composition of viruses as
Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108; CHEM
well as strategies for replication and expression
3361/3361L; Corequisite: BIOL 4431.
of viral genetic material will be explored. Mech-
Laboratory application of modern techniques in
anisms of viral pathogenesis will be presented.
cell and animal physiology with emphasis on
In addition, current methods for viral diagnos-
quantitative data acquisition and analysis.
tics, prevention of viral infection and treatment
BIOL 4445. Molecular Methods in of infected individuals will be presented within
Courses

Genetics. 1-4-3. the context of viruses of historical significance as


Prerequisite: BIOL 3300. Corequisite: One of well as newly emergent viruses of current medi-
the following: BIOL 4410, 4415, 4465, 4475. cal concern. Novel infectious agents such as sat-
This laboratory intensive course will provide stu- ellites, viroids and prions will also be discussed.
dents with direct “hands-on” experience in the BIOL 4486. Bioethics. 3-0-3.
field of molecular genetics. Students will partici- Prerequisite: BIOL 2107, 2108, senior standing
pate in the planning and implementation of a (90 credit hours) or consent of instructor.
project that employs various methods currently This course will enable the student to think more
being used in the field of molecular biology. critically about some of the difficult moral prob-
Such methods may include, but will not be lim- lems which arise in the practice of science and
ited to, recombinant DNA technology and the from our contemporary understanding of living
polymerase chain reaction (PCR). systems. Readings and discussion will focus on
BIOL 4450. Team Research. 1-4. issues of personal decision making and public
Prerequisite: BIOL 3300 and permission of policy regarding both biomedical and environ-
instructor. mental issues.
This course is a group experience in biological BIOL 4490. Special Topics in Biology.
research in which class members form a research 1-4.
team to design, perform, analyze and write up Prerequisite: Varies as to topic.
for publication a single project or group of Selected special or current topics of interest to
related projects under the supervision and direc- faculty and students. See semester schedule.
tion of a faculty member.
Biology (BIOL)—Business Information Systems Management (BISM) 235

BIOL 4610. Advanced Topics in Anat- BUSA 3398. Internship. 1-9 credit
omy & Physiology. 1-4. hours.
Prerequisite: One course from Anatomy & Physi- Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
ology area. Requirement and approval of the Coordinator of
Advanced topic in physiology that may fit the cooperative education/internships (KSU Career
needs and interests of students and faculty. Such Services); Non business Majors: Not available to
topics might include advances in laboratory tech- non business majors.
niques, microbial physiology and cellular physi- A supervised, credit-earning work experience
ology. Can be taken only once for credit toward of one academic semester with a previously
degree. approved business firm or government agency. A
research paper is required to receive credit. For
BIOL 4620. Advanced Topics in Ecology junior or senior students who wish to participate
& Evolution. 1-4. in an on-the-job experience in which they may
Prerequisite: BIOL 3370 or BIOL 3380. apply their academic training. The work experi-
Advanced topics in ecology and evolution that ence may not be with a current employer. The
may fit the needs and interests of students and course will be graded on an S-U basis. Credit is
faculty. Such topics might include advanced lab allowed only in elective area.
and field techniques, microbial ecology, evolu-
tion of specific taxa, biology of gender. Can be BUSA 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit
taken only once for credit toward degree. hours.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
BIOL 4630. Advanced Topics in Cell & Requirement and permission of instructor, and
Molecular Biology. 1-4. department chair prior to registration; Non
Prerequisite: One course from cell biology area. business Majors: Permission of instructor, and
Advanced topics in cell or molecular biology department chair prior to registration.
that may fit the needs and interests of students Special topics of an advanced nature not in the
and faculty. Such topics might include advanced regular course offerings.
genetics, microbial genetics, biology of cancer or
biotechnology. Can be taken only once for credit BUSA 4490. Special Topics in Business
toward degree. Administration. 1-3 credit hours.
Prerequisite: Sophomore GPA Requirement and
approval of instructor and department chair;
• BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Non business Majors: Approval of instructor

Courses
(BUSA) • and department chair.
BUSA 1000. Introduction to Business. Selected special topics of interest to faculty and
3-0-3. students.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Freshman or
sophomore standing; Non business Majors: •BUSINESS INFORMATION
None. SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT•
Broad spectrum analysis of business enterprise, its
nature, environment, organization, management, BISM 3100. Information Systems Man-
operation and control procedures. agement. 3-0-3.
BUSA 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-3 Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
credit hours. Requirement and MGT 3100; Non business
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Majors: MGT 3100.
Requirement and approval of the Coordinator of Illustrates the variety of applications for, and
cooperative education/internships (KSU Career benefits from, computer-based information sys-
Services); Non business Majors: Not available to tems in business. Examines technical, people,
non business majors. and organizational issues in information systems
A supervised work-experience program for a planning, development, operation and control.
minimum of two academic semesters at a site Provides hands-on experience in developing a
in business, industry or government. For sopho- decision support system.
more, junior or senior level students who wish
to obtain successive on-the-job experience in con-
junction with their academic training.
236 Course Descriptions

BISM 3200. Advanced Business Appli- An examination of the theory and practice of
cation Systems. 3-0-3. negotiation. In addition to reviewing readings,
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA students will participate in simulations and dis-
Requirement and MGT 3100; Non business cuss negotiation cases to broaden their negotiat-
Majors: 60 credit hours. ing techniques.
The course surveys management-related issues
BLAW 4100. Advanced Business Law.
regarding end-used computing. Incorporates
3-0-3.
advanced use of PC software packages to include
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
electronic spreadsheets and database manage-
Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 semester
ment systems. hours; BLAW 2200 recommended.
BISM 4100. Business Systems Analysis A study of legislation regulating business
and Design. 3-0-3. partnerships, corporations, commercial paper,
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA secured transactions, sales, consumer credit and
Requirement, BISM 3100 & BISM 3200; Non bankruptcy.
business Majors: BISM 3100 & BISM 3200.
BLAW 4200. Employment Law. 3-0-3.
A study of the tools, techniques and documenta-
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
tion methods for analyzing and designing busi-
Requirement; Non business Majors; 60 semester
ness information systems. Students will propose
hours; BLAW 2200 recommended.
and develop an information system for an orga- A study of the influence of law on the personnel
nizational unit. function, with special emphasis on discrimina-
BISM 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 Semes- tion laws and affirmative action issues. Provides
ter Hours. an overview of various federal laws such as the
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA National Labor Relations Act, The Fair Labor
Requirement and approval of instructor, and Standards Act and ERISA.
department chair prior to registration; Non busi- BLAW 4300. Real Estate Law. 3-0-3.
ness Majors: Approval of instructor and depart- Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
ment chair prior to registration. Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 semester
This is a special topics course of an advanced hours; BLAW 2200 recommended.
nature which focuses on information systems Designed to provide the business student with
subject areas not covered in regular business an understanding of the nature, sources and
course offerings. principles of real estate law, and its importance
Courses

in the business environment. Topics include: real


BISM 4490. Special Topics in Business property; contracts involving real estate deeds
Information Systems. 1-3 Semester and titles; transfer of real estate, mortgages, liens,
Hours. zoning and land use controls, condemnation,
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA realty agents and landlord-tenant law.
Requirement and approval of instructor and
department chair; Non business Majors: 60 BLAW 4400. Directed Study. 1 -3
semester hours and approval of instructor and semester hours.
department chair. Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Selected topics of interest to faculty and students. Requirement and approval of instructor and
department chair prior to registration; Non busi-
ness Majors: Approval of instructor and depart-
• BUSINESS LAW (BLAW) • ment chair prior to registration.
BLAW 2200. Legal and Ethical Environ- Special topics of an advanced nature not in the
ment of Business. 3-0-3. regular course offerings.
Prerequisite: All developmental studies courses
BLAW 4490. Special Topics In Business
if required.
Law. 1-3 semester hours.
Covers torts, contracts, government regulation of
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
business and the legal system. Also addresses
Requirement and approval of instructor and
ethical issues arising in a business’s internal and
department chair; Non business Majors: 60
external relationships. semester hours and approval of instructor and
BLAW 3400. Negotiation. 3-0-3. department chair.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Selected topics of interest to faculty and students.
Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 semester hours.
Business Information Systems Management (BISM)—Chemistry (CHEM) 237

BLAW 4500. Franchise Law. 3-0-3. CHEM 1151L. Survey of Chemistry I


Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Laboratory. 0-3-1.
Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 semester Corequisite: CHEM 1151.
hours. Laboratory course to study and apply topics and
Designed to provide the business student with concepts covered in CHEM 1151.
an understanding of the nature, sources and
principles of franchise law and its importance in CHEM 1152. Survey of Chemistry II.
the business environment. Topics include: fun- 3-0-3.
damentals of franchising, intellectual property, Prerequisites: CHEM 1151. Corequisite: CHEM
FTC Rules and disclosure, requirements of fran- 1152L.
chise registration and business opportunity law A study of the classes of organic molecules includ-
and earnings claims. ing their common uses and physical and chemical
properties. An introductory look at the structure
BLAW 4600. International Law: Busi- and function of biological macromolecules.
ness Applications. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA CHEM 1152L. Survey of Chemistry II
Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 semester Laboratory. 0-3-1.
hours; BLAW 2200 recommended. Prerequisite: CHEM 1151L. Corequisite: CHEM
Examines the international legal system and alter- 1152.
native means of international dispute resolution. Laboratory course to study and apply the topics
Covers laws that determine when and under what and concepts covered in CHEM 1152.
conditions companies are allowed to do business CHEM 1211. General Chemistry I. 3-0-3.
abroad. Cases used to explore choosing the most Prerequisite: High school chemistry or CHEM
appropriate business relationship and entering 1151. Corequisite: Chem 1211L, MATH 1113.
the most advantageous agreement. First course in a two-semester sequence covering
BLAW 4960. Current Issues in Business the fundamental principles and applications of
Ethics and Law. 3-0-3. chemistry for science majors. Course content
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA includes electronic structure of atoms and mol-
Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 semester ecules, bonding fundamentals, fundamentals of
hours. chemical reactions, and gas laws.
An examination of contemporary issues in legal CHEM 1211L. General Chemistry I Labo-
and ethical behavior in organizations. Stresses

Courses
ratory. 0-3-1.
the application of ethical principles to business. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: CHEM 1211,
MATH 1113.
• CHEMISTRY (CHEM) • First laboratory course in general chemistry.
Designed to introduce the student to the applica-
CHEM 1110. Chemistry Career Semi-
tion of cognitive skills utilizing chemical knowl-
nar. 1-0-1.
edge in the laboratory.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1211.
Speakers from various chemistry-related areas CHEM 1212. General Chemistry II.
will describe their work and typical workday. 3-0-3.
Students will research careers of special interest Prerequisite: CHEM 1211. Corequisite: CHEM
to them in terms of type of work, training 1212L.
required, and salary. Field trips may also be Second course in a two-semester sequence cover-
included where appropriate. ing the fundamental principles and applications
of chemistry for science majors. Course content
CHEM 1151. Survey of Chemistry I.
includes chemical kinetics, chemical thermody-
3-0-3.
namics, liquids and solids, properties of solu-
Prerequisite: MATH 0099 and READ 0099 (if
tions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases,
required). Corequisite: CHEM 1151L.
electrochemistry, and qualitative analysis.
General principles of atomic structure, bonding,
reaction, solutions, equilibria as required for a CHEM 1212L. General Chemistry II
basic understanding of physiological applica- Laboratory. 0-3-1.
tions. A brief introduction to organic compounds Prerequisite: CHEM 1211, CHEM 1211L. Coreq-
which are of particular importance in pharmaco- uisite: CHEM 1212.
logical applications. Second laboratory course in general chemistry.
Designed to continue the application of cognitive
238 Course Descriptions

skills utilizing chemical knowledge in the labora- CHEM 3105L. Inorganic Synthesis.
tory including qualitative analysis techniques. 0-3-1.
Corequisite: CHEM 3100 or CHEM 3110.
CHEM 2800. Quantitative Analytical
Laboratory course to introduce concepts of inor-
Chemistry. 2-0-2.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1212. Corequisite: CHEM ganic synthetic chemistry. Emphasis is on the
2800L. synthesis, characterization, reactivity, structure,
Introduction to statistics. The use of spread- and other properties of the inorganic compounds
sheets. Principles of gravimetric and volumetric and complexes. The course introduces standard
analysis. Concepts of chemical equilibria as methodology for the synthesis and character-
applied to acid-base, precipitation, and complex ization of known compounds. Team research
ion reactions. Electrochemistry and potentiom- projects then incorporate the same methods for
etry. Ultraviolet - visible spectroscopy. the synthesis and characterization of new com-
pounds yet to be reported in the literature.
CHEM 2800L. Quantitative Analytical
Chemistry Laboratory. 0-6-2. CHEM 3110. Biological Inorganic Chem-
Corequisite: CHEM 2800. istry. 3-0-3.
Laboratory experiments include: gravimetric Prerequisite: CHEM 3050. Corequisite: CHEM
analysis, precipitation, complexiometric, and 3105L.
reduction-oxidation titrations; potentiometric General aspects of inorganic chemistry including
applications; calibration techniques using ultra- bond theory, periodicity, acid-base chemistry,
violet - visible spectroscopy. Tutorials on the energetics, reaction mechanisms, model systems,
application of spreadsheets. kinetics, redox chemistry, and descriptive chem-
istry of the elements with primary focus demon-
CHEM 3000. Chemical Literature. 2-0-2. strating relationship of inorganic substances to
Prerequisite: CHEM 3362 and CHEM 3362L. biological systems from the cellular to the global
An exploration of the process and practice level.
of chemical research that leads to publication.
An introduction to resources and methods for CHEM 3361. Modern Organic Chemistry
searching the chemical literature. I. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1212. Corequisite: CHEM
CHEM 3010. Pharmacological Chemis- 3361L.
try. 3-0-3. The first of a two-semester course sequence in
Prerequisite: CHEM 3501. modern organic chemistry designed for students
Courses

This course is intended primarily for chemistry or majoring in chemistry as well as premed, pre-
biology majors. The focus will be on the effects of dental, pre-pharmacy and biology majors. The
naturally occurring and synthetic pharmacologi- course involves a study of structure, properties,
cally active compounds at the molecular level. synthesis and reactions of basic organic com-
General principles of drug action as well as specif- pounds using modern structural and mechanical
ics of drugs targeting the cardiovascular system theories.
and central nervous system will be discussed.
CHEM 3361L. Modern Organic Chemis-
CHEM 3050. Basic Physical Chemistry. try Lab I. 0-3-1.
3-0-3. Prerequisite: CHEM 1212L. Corequisite: CHEM
Prerequisite: MATH 1190. Corequisite: CHEM 3361.
3362, CHEM 3362L. Laboratory experiments designed to introduce the
Thermodynamic, chemical equilibria, electro- students to modern experimental method used
lytes, kinetics and redox reactions as applied to in organic chemistry for separation of mixture,
biological systems. purification of compounds, and reactions illustrat-
ing single functional group transformation.
CHEM 3100. Inorganic Chemistry.
3-0-3. CHEM 3362. Modern Organic Chemistry
Prerequisite: CHEM 3000 and CHEM 3602; II. 3-0-3.
Corequisite: CHEM 3105L. Prerequisite: CHEM 3361. Corequisite: CHEM
Introduction to inorganic chemistry for the pro- 3362L.
fessional degree. Topics include atomic structure, The second of a two-semester course sequence
bonding, coordination chemistry, nomenclature, in modern organic chemistry designed for stu-
reaction mechanisms, symmetry, structure, and a dents majoring in chemistry as well as premed,
general survey of descriptive inorganic chemistry. pre-dental, pre-vet, pre-pharmacy and biology
Chemistry (CHEM) 239

majors. The course involves a study of structure, CHEM 3501. Biochemistry I. 3-0-3.
properties, synthesis and reactions of basic Prerequisite: CHEM 3362. Corequisite: CHEM
organic compounds using modern structural and 3501L.
mechanical theories. Chemistry and biochemistry of macromolecules:
proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids.
CHEM 3362L. Modern Organic Chemis-
Introduction to enzymes.
try Lab II. 0-3-1.
Prerequisite: CHEM 3361L. Corequisite: CHEM CHEM 3501L. Biochemistry I Labora-
3362. tory. 0-3-1.
Laboratory experiments designed to introduce Prerequisite: CHEM 3362L. Corequisite: CHEM
the students to modern experimental methods 3501.
used in organic chemistry synthesis, character- Introduction to biochemistry laboratory tech-
ization of compounds, and multistep synthesis of niques including centrifugation, chroma-
useful target-compounds from readily available tography, electrophoresis, spectroscopy, and
starting material. exploration of bimolecular structure using com-
puter graphics.
CHEM 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-3
credit hours. CHEM 3502. Biochemistry II. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Approval of coordinator of coop- Prerequisite: CHEM 3501.
erative education/internship. A detailed study of enzyme mechanisms, ther-
A supervised, credit-earning work experience modynamics, and major metabolic pathways,
of one academic semester with a previously including carbohydrate, lipid, and amino acid
approved business firm, private agency or gov- metabolism.
ernment agency. Credit is allowed only in elec-
tive areas. CHEM 3540L. Advanced Biochemistry
Laboratory. 0-6-2.
CHEM 3398. Internship. 1-10 credit Prerequisite: CHEM 3501L.
hours. Laboratory course intended for students who
Prerequisite: Approval of internship coordinator plan to work in an industrial setting or attend
and chair. graduate school in one of the biosciences. This
A supervised, credit-earning work experience laboratory combines the techniques from Bio-
of one academic semester with a previously chemistry I Laboratory (CHEM 3501L) in a real-
approved business firm, private agency or gov- istic, applied way to solve multistep problems.

Courses
ernment agency. Credit is allowed only in elec-
tive areas. CHEM 3601. Physical Chemistry I.
3-0-3.
CHEM 3420. Intermediate Organic Prerequisite: PHYS 2211 and CHEM 3362. Coreq-
Chemistry. 2-0-2. uisite: CHEM 3601L.
Prerequisite: CHEM 3362. Corequisite: CHEM A study of macromolecular phenomena in terms
3420L. of micro molecular concepts including the gas
Extension of the principles of organic chemistry state and thermodynamic.
to more complex systems including compre-
hensive treatment of nomenclature, structural CHEM 3601L. Physical Chemistry Lab
theory, and modern synthetic methods. Exten- I. 0-3-1.
sive use of primary literature source is Corequisite: CHEM 3601 and CHEM 3000.
emphasized throughout the course. The syn- Laboratory methods in physical chemistry.
thesis of some useful heterocyclic and complex CHEM 3602. Physical Chemistry II.
aromatic compounds are discussed. 3-0-3.
CHEM 3420L. Intermediate Organic Prerequisite: CHEM 3601. Corequisite: CHEM
Chemistry Lab. 0-6-2. 3602L.
Prerequisite: CHEM 3362L. Corequisite: CHEM A continuation of CHEM 3601 including liquid
3420. and solid state, kinetics, and equilibria.
Laboratory experiments designed to teach students CHEM 3602L. Physical Chemistry Lab
the process of design, planning, and implementa- II. 0-3-1.
tion of organic synthesis and the characterization Prerequisite: CHEM 3601L. Corequisite: CHEM
of compounds using classic analytic methods and 3602.
modern spectroscopic techniques. Continuation of CHEM 3601L.
240 Course Descriptions

CHEM 3620. Intermediate Physical CHEM 4110. Advanced Topics in Inor-


Chemistry. 3-0-3. ganic Chemistry. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: CHEM 3602. Prerequisite: CHEM 3100 and CHEM 3602.
Principles of quantum chemistry, group theory, Survey of modern inorganic chemistry and
chemical bonding, and molecular spectroscopy. current theories concerning atomic structure,
bonding, coordination chemistry, spectroscopy
CHEM 3700. Environmental Chemistry.
including a discussion of symmetry and group
3-0-3.
theory as they apply to the characterization of
Prerequisite: CHEM 3501 or CHEM 2800 and
inorganic compounds, ligant field theory and
CHEM 3362.
other topics.
This course will cover the environmental chem-
istry involving the transport, distribution, reac- CHEM 4300. Instrumental Analytical
tions, and speciation of inorganic, organometallic Chemistry. 2-0-2.
and organic chemicals occurring in the air, soil Prerequisite: CHEM 2800 and CHEM 3601.
and water environments at the local, national Corequisite: CHEM 4300L.
and global scale. Environmental transformations Introduction to chemometrics. Theoretical prin-
and degradation processes, toxicology, pollution ciples and uses of modern instrumental methods
and hazardous substances will be discussed. covering: spectroscopy, electroanalysis, and chro-
matographic separations.
CHEM 3710L. Environmental Chemistry
Lab. 0-6-2. CHEM 4300L. Instrumental Analytical
Prerequisite: CHEM 3501 or CHEM 2800 and Chemistry Laboratory. 0-6-2.
CHEM 3362. Corequisite: CHEM 4300.
This laboratory course is designed to teach sam- Laboratory experiments include: calibration
pling, environmental analysis, data handling, techniques for analyzing single-component and
systems modeling, specialized instrumental tech- multicomponent systems, application of spec-
niques, and field techniques related to atmo- troscopy (UV-VIS, AAS), electroanalysis (dif-
spheric, geologic, and freshwater environmental ferent forms of voltammetry), chromatographic
chemistry. Additionally, team research projects separations (LC, GC) in quantitative and qualita-
will be designed to address a specific question tive analysis.
related to the topics mentioned above.
CHEM 4310. Advanced Topics in Ana-
CHEM 3990. Seminar. 1-0-1. lytical Chemistry. 3-0-3.
Courses

Prerequisite: CHEM 3000. Prerequisite: CHEM 3602.


An exploration of the process and process and Advanced theories and methods in analytical
practice of chemical research that leads to publi- chemistry emphasizing newer analytical meth-
cation. An introduction to resources and meth- ods in practice in modern laboratories.
ods for searching the chemical literature.
CHEM 4400. Directed Study. 1-5 credit
CHEM 4000. Service Learning in Chem- hours.
istry. 1-3. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor, major area
Prerequisite: 60 hours and permission of instruc- committee and department chair prior to regis-
tor and department chair/program director. tration.
A community activity which links learning to Up to five hours may be applied to the major
life by connecting meaningful community ser- area. Special topics of an advanced nature that
vice activities with academic learning, personal are not in the regular course offerings.
growth, and civic responsibility. Activity will be
CHEM 4430. Advanced Topics in
designed with the instructor and approved by
Organic Chemistry. 3-0-3.
the chair/program director.
Prerequisite: CHEM 3362.
CHEM 4100. Directed Applied Advanced topics in organic chemistry as may
Research. 1-5 credit hours. fit the needs and interest of the students and fac-
Prerequisite: Junior level status; consent of ulty. Such topics might include stereochemistry,
instructor and chair. physical organic chemistry, heterocycles.
Applied research project directed by a faculty
CHEM 4440. Polymer Chemistry. 3-0-3.
member.
Prerequisite: CHEM 3362.
Topics in modern polymer chemistry including
synthesis, kinetics, characterization, and uses.
Chemistry (CHEM)—Communication (COM) 241

CHEM 4510. Advanced Topics in Bio- such as books, magazines, newspapers, radio,
chemistry. 3-0-3. television, film and others. Examines the develop-
Prerequisite: CHEM 3501. ment, roles, functions, problems and criticisms of
Topics relating to the chemistry of metabolic pro- specific media from within the American culture.
cesses in living organisms.
COM 2235. Survey of Communication
CHEM 4620. Advanced Topics in Physi- Theory and Research. 3-0-3.
cal Chemistry. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
Prerequisite: CHEM 3602. An introduction to (a) the nature of academic
Advanced topics in physical chemistry with inquiry in communication, (b) the basic structure
emphasis in such areas as statistical mechanics, and methodology of professional and academic
quantum mechanics of kinetics, and molecular research, (c) the resources available for access to
spectroscopy. published research, and (d) the major theories
that have evolved within the communication dis-
• COMMUNICATION (COM) • cipline as a result of research.
COM 3310. Concepts in New Media.
COM 1109. Human Communication. 3-0-3.
3-0-3. Prerequisite: COM 2230 or permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099, READ 0099, if required. An analysis of the content, process and dis-
An introduction to the fundamental components tribution of new media, including Web-based,
of the human communication process, emphasiz- network-based. and CD-ROM based products.
ing selected concepts, methods, and practice in Students will examine, evaluate and prepare
dyadic, small group, and presentational settings. material for informational, educational, and/or
Covers such areas as information gathering, mes- entertainment new media as well as explore the
sage design, audience considerations, verbal/ process of computer-assisted communication.
nonverbal approaches, discussion/delivery strat-
egies, critical analysis, and related media tech- COM 3315. Interviewing. 3-0-3.
nology support resources. Includes student Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
speaking assignments. Methods and practice in situational interviewing,
including selection, sales, journalistic and media
COM 1129. Public Speaking. 3-0-3. interviews. Examines roles and functions of both
Prerequisite: All developmental studies courses interviewee and interviewer.

Courses
if required.
Methods and practice in effective oral communi- COM 3324. Contemporary Issues in
cation with an emphasis on speech preparation Mass Media. 3-0-3.
and presentation. Prerequisite: COM 2230.
Exploration and analysis of evolving and emerg-
COM 1135. Writing for Public Communi- ing issues in mass media, including economic,
cation. 3-0-3. regulatory and technological developments and
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 and 1102. trends.
Application and practice of writing form and
style particular to communication industry COM 3325. Intercultural Communica-
careers, such as journalism, public relations and tion. 3-0-3.
human resource areas. Includes weekly writing Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
assignments. A study of cultural and communication variables
that impact the interaction process between
COM 2205. Introduction to Communica- peoples. Intercultural communication is exam-
tion Organizations. 3-0-3. ined during the time communication partici-
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102. pants share ideas, information, persuasion and
An introduction to methods and applications of emotions.
basic theories, interactive structures, and direc-
tions within various organizational environments. COM 3330. News Reporting and Writing.
COM 2230. Introduction to Mass Com- 3-0-3.
munication. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: COM 1135.
Prerequisite: All developmental studies courses, An introduction to the ways and means of devel-
if required. oping, gathering, writing and editing factual and
A survey of the various genres of mass media
242 Course Descriptions

editorial copy. Examines news personnel func- without the use of words. Examines the research
tions, reporting and interviewing techniques, on body movement, territory, and environmental
ethical and legal considerations, along with design, touch, eye behavior, vocal attractiveness,
news-writing practice surrounding the above. time use, deception, and body alterations such as
attire.
COM 3333. Visual Communication in
Mass Media. 3-0-3. COM 3375. Public Relations Writing.
Prerequisite: COM 2230. 3-0-3.
Analysis and evaluation of mass-mediated visual Prerequisite: COM 1135 and COM 3335.
content and processes by which such visual con- Practice in writing public relations applications,
tent is presented and utilized. Analysis will be including news releases, public service
situated in a variety of contexts, including eco- announcements, and newsletter articles. Stu-
nomic, educational, entertainment, and political. dents will create a portfolio of writing samples.
Relevant ethical considerations within each will
COM 3376. Interpersonal Communica-
be explored.
tion. 3-0-3.
COM 3335. Public Relations Principles. Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
3-0-3. Theory and application of communication con-
Prerequisite: COM 2205 or COM 2230 or permis- cepts involving interpersonal relationships and
sion of instructor. contexts.
An introduction to the history, role, and func-
COM 3385. Organizational Presenta-
tions of public relations, including public rela-
tions. 3-0-3.
tions theory, ethics, and industry and career
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
issues.
An advanced course in professional communi-
COM 3344. Communication Training in cation focusing upon the structure and meth-
Organizations. 3-0-3. odology of formal presentations for business,
Prerequisite: COM 2205 or permission of instructor. political., educational, and/or ceremonial events
Methods and practice in communication training and environments. Covers such areas as event
and development for organizations including and listener analysis; motivational considerations;
pre-assessment, writing objectives, training message purpose, structure, and development;
techniques, post-training evaluation, feedback, use of audiovisual/computerized support tech-
implementation. Emphasis is on communication nologies; individual v. team presentation factors;
Courses

processes and outcomes for the trainer and results/effectiveness assessment. Includes in-class
trainee plus communication skill development individual and team presentation activities.
within training modules.
COM 3396. Cooperative Study in Com-
COM 3345. Discussion Methods. 3-0-3. munication. 1-9 credit hours.
Prerequisite: COM 2205 or permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Approval of director of cooperative
A study of input, process and output variables in education/internships (Career Services).
small group discussion. Emphasis on participa- A supervised work experience for a minimum
tion, observation and evaluation of various dis- of two semesters at a site in business, industry,
cussion methods. or government. For sophomore, junior, or senior
level students who wish to obtain successive on-
COM 3355. Public Relations Cases. the-job experience in conjunction with their aca-
3-0-3.
demic training. May be repeated for a maximum
Prerequisite: COM 1135 and COM 3335.
of nine credit hours.
Examines basic roles and functions of messaging
strategy in promoting organizational goals. A COM 3398. Internship in Communica-
case study approach will emphasis theory tion. 1-9 credit hours.
and methods for effective communication with Prerequisite: Approval of departmental intern-
diverse organizational publics, including the ship advisor and junior standing (60 credit
mass media, employees, consumers, financial hours) and 2.5 GPA.
stakeholders and special interest groups. A supervised, credit-earning work experience of
approximately one semester with a previously
COM 3366. Nonverbal Communication. approved business firm, private agency, or gov-
3-0-3. ernment agency. May be repeated for a maxi-
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102. mum of nine credit hours.
A comprehensive review of communication
Communication (COM) 243

COM 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit COM 4426. Rhetorical Criticism. 3-0-3.
hours. Prerequisite: COM 2235 or permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours. Parameters of contemporary rhetorical criticism
Specific topics of an advanced nature not in the are examined from the perspective of the context,
regular course offerings. message and rhetoric.
COM 4405. Organizational Publications. COM 4429. Persuasion Methods and
3-0-3. Strategy. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: COM 1135. Prerequisite: COM 2235.
Explores the nature and role of organizational A study of the theories, methods, applications
publications; the analysis of their form and func- and implications of persuasion from the days
tion; writing and editing news and feature mate- of Aristotle to today's political and commercial
rial for such publications; and the selection and arenas. Explores the practice of changing atti-
coordination of graphic support and production tudes and opinions via non-coercive means.
of resources.
COM 4430. Media Management. 3-0-3.
COM 4416. Rhetorical Theory. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: COM 2230 or permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: COM 2235 or permission of instructor. A comprehensive examination and analysis of
Rhetorical theory’s historical development will the structure, personnel, planning, operations,
be traced from the ancient Greeks through the economics and editorial broadcast, production,
contemporary rhetorical theorists. Included will advertising. and public relations companies as
be the Western, Eastern, and Afrocentric perspec- well as new media.
tive. Rhetorical theories will be examined for
COM 4444. Film and Video Structure
their implication for shaping human communi-
and Process. 3-0-3.
cation and human realities.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours.
COM 4420. Advanced Media Writing. An examination of the television and motion pic-
3-0-3. ture industries, covering such factors as devel-
Prerequisite: COM 3330 or permission of instructor. opment, pre-production, the production process,
Methods and practice in the research and writing post-production and distribution. Emphasis will
of feature length stories, including coverage of be placed on the managerial aspects of the
topics such as lead types, story development and process and will include the institutional/
researching, news features, human interest fea- instructional video market.

Courses
tures, seasonal stories, personal profiles, enter-
COM 4455. Contemporary Issues in
prise stories, brights, sidebars and others.
Organizational Communication. 3-0-3.
COM 4424. Uses and Effects of Mass Prerequisite: COM 2205 or consent of instructor.
Media. 3-0-3. Exploration and analysis of current issues
Prerequisites: COM 2230 and COM 3324. within the field of organizational communica-
Examines research findings and commentary tion. Emphasis will be on an interdisciplinary
about mass media impact and use in the United perspective of: rhetorical issues; internal and
States. An exploration of what mass media “do” external environments; structural patterns of
to users and what users “do” with the mass organizational relationships; and the processes
media, and why these effects and uses are of enacting change and development within the
thought to occur. Useful for students interested organizations we serve and vice versa.
in graduate work in mass media, professional
COM 4459. Conflict Management in
media careers, media literacy, or more conscien-
Organizations. 3-0-3.
tious use of mass media and awareness of pos-
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
sible effects on themselves or others.
A model of effective conflict management in
COM 4425. Gender, Race and Media. organizations via appropriate communicative
3-0-3. strategies introduces this course. The model
Prerequisites: COM 2230 or permission of the proposes that our perspective of dealing with
instructor. conflict determines our approach to conflict situ-
An examination of mass media portrayals of ations. This course will provide students with
gender and race, from years past to present. practical knowledge for understanding the ben-
Students will analyze media artifacts, identify efits of conflict, recognizing its evolution, and
recurring themes, and explore research about the applying various strategies for dealing with dif-
societal effects of stereotypical media portrayals. ferent people in a variety of contexts.
244 Course Descriptions

COM 4465. Public Relations Cam- COM 4499. Senior Thesis. 3-0-3.
paigns. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: COM 2235 and 90 credit hours.
Prerequisites: COM 3335 and COM 3375 or per- The senior thesis is designed to allow students
mission of instructor. to apply course work to professional issues. The
The study and application of the campaign plan- course culminates in the student's preparation
ning process from inception to evaluation. The and presentation of an undergraduate thesis or
class functions as an agency, and student groups creative project.
develop a strategic communication campaign
plan for a campus or community organization. • COMPUTER SCIENCE AND
COM 4470. Media Law. 3-0-3. INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CSIS) •
Prerequisite: COM 2230 and POLS 1101.
CSIS 1020. Introduction To Program-
An in-depth examination of the existing legal
ming Principles: Visual Basic. 3-0-3.
structure within which the media operates, and
Prerequisite: Credit level mathematics course.
the antecedent statutory and case law through
Introduction to computers and programming as
which this structure has evolved. Also addresses
tools to aid problem solving. Implementation
ethical concepts and considerations surrounding
will be in Visual Basic.
the media.
CSIS 2300. Principles of Computing.
COM 4475. Decision Making and Prob- 3-0-3.
lem Solving. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: credit level mathematics course.
Prerequisite: COM 2205 or permission of instructor.
Principles of computing is the first course a
Professionals make decision alone, in groups, on
student should take to prepare for a career in
behalf of diverse organizations and within mul-
computer science or information systems. Topics
ticultural settings. Procedural perspective rather
include information systems in organizations,
than decisional outcome is the theoretical focus of
hardware, software, database concepts, telecom-
the course. The communicational structure of deci-
munications and networks, the Internet, systems
sion making and problem solving is examined.
development, security, privacy, ethics, program-
COM 4479. History of Communication ming logic, algorithms, abstraction, and data
Studies. 3-0-3. structures.
Prerequisite: COM 2235 or permission of instructor.
CSIS 2301. Programming Principles I.
The historical derivative nature of the communi-
Courses

3-0-3.
cation discipline is traced from both ancient and
Prerequisite: CSIS 2300 and any credit level
modern theory. A succinct connection between Mathematics course.
the emergence and evolution of the discipline An introduction to problem-solving methods
during the twentieth century and the impact of that lead to the development of correct, well-
the ancient western, Afrocentric and eastern cul- structured programs. Topics also include the fun-
tures is examined. damentals of computer systems.
COM 4480. Seminar in Communication CSIS 2302. Programming Principles II.
Theory. 3-0-3. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: COM 2235 and 60 credit hours. Prerequisite: CSIS 2301.
An in-depth and diversified examination of A continuation of programming principles
various theories analyzing and describing the begun in CSIS 2301 with emphasis on object-
human communication process from different oriented methods and data modeling. Topics
perspectives, including interpersonal, organiza- include analysis of algorithms and important
tional, and mass communication. Students are examples of data structures such as strings and
expected to select theories upon which they will lists.
base their senior thesis.
CSIS 2520. Introduction To Data Com-
COM 4490. Special Topics in Communi- munications. 3-0-3.
cation. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: CSIS 2301.
Prerequisite: 45 credit hours. An introduction to the theory and applications
Selected special topics of interest to faculty and of data communications. Topics include commu-
students. nication media, encoding systems, data security
and integrity, network topologies, network pro-
tocol concepts, Internet protocols, and routing.
Communication ( COM)—Computer Science & Information Systems (CSIS) 245

CSIS 3150. Programming Languages. modeling. Building on the foundation provided


3-0-3. by CSIS 2302, topics include files and important
Prerequisite: CSIS 2302. data structures such as trees.
The primary objective of this course is to intro-
CSIS 3402. Advanced Data Structures
duce the basic principles and concepts of pro-
and Algorithms. 3-0-3.
gramming languages, with an emphasis on Prerequisite: CSIS 3401.
object-oriented aspects. The course will intro- Data structures and their applications to pro-
duce the programming languages used in the gramming. Topics include arrays, records, files,
subsequent upper division courses. The libraries lists, stacks, trees, and graphs, together with
used in the construction of GUIs and the support their specification, representations, and analysis
for concurrency will be covered. of efficient algorithms for implementation and
CSIS 3210. Project Management. 3-0-3. manipulation.
Prerequisite: CSIS 2301 or ACCT 3100.
CSIS 3510. Computer Organization and
Introduction to the principles and application of Architecture. 3-0-3.
project management techniques with an empha- Prerequisite: CSIS 2302.
sis on the design and management of computer An introduction to hardware and software
information systems projects. Topics include components of computer systems. Topics
project planning, work team design, project esti- include machine organization, assembly lan-
mation techniques, project reporting, identifying guage and comparative machine architecture.
and controlling project risks, budgets, and qual- Hands-on work with modern computer systems
ity assurance. is included.
CSIS 3310. Introduction to Database CSIS 3530. Operating Systems. 3-0-3.
Systems. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: CSIS 2520 and CSIS 3510.
Prerequisite: CSIS 2301. An introduction to fundamental operating sys-
Introduction to the database management sys- tems concepts. Emphasis will be on the
tems, database processing, data modeling, data- interfaces supplied by operating systems. Topics
base design, development, and implementation. include job scheduling, memory management,
Contrasts alternative modeling approaches. and process interactions.
Includes implementation of current DBMS tools
and SQL. CSIS 3600. System Analysis and

Courses
Design. 3-0-3.
CSIS 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-3 Prerequisite: CSIS 3310.
credit hours. Software systems development including elici-
Prerequisite: Approval of coordinator of coop- tation and specification of user requirements,
erative education/internships (Career Services
graphical modeling of objects, data, and pro-
Center).
cesses, and design of data structures, user inter-
A supervised work experience program for a
faces, and system behaviors. A team project is
minimum of two semesters at a site in business,
required.
industry or government. For sophomore, junior
or senior level students who wish to obtain suc- CSIS 3650. Object-Oriented Software
cessive on-the-job experience in conjunction with Development. 3-0-3.
their academic training. Prerequisite: CSIS 3150, CSIS 3401, CSIS 3600.
CSIS 3398. Internship. 1-9 credit hours. The primary objective of the course is to
Prerequisite: Approval of coordinator of coop- study an object-oriented approach to software
erative education (Career Services Center). development that systematically uses a set of
A supervised work experience program for one object-oriented principles, methods, and tools to
semester at a site in business, industry or govern- build high-quality software. Topics include object-
ment. For sophomore, junior or senior level stu- oriented analysis, design, and implementation.
dents who wish to obtain on-the-job experience Object-oriented techniques are studied from an
in conjunction with their academic training. advanced viewpoint, and illustrated using pro-
gramming languages such as Eiffel, C++, and Ada
CSIS 3401. Introduction to Data Struc- 95. Case studies are presented, some to be com-
tures. 3-0-3. pleted by the students using a team approach.
Prerequisite: CSIS 2302.
An introduction to data structures, with an
emphasis on object-oriented methods and data
246 Course Descriptions

CSIS 4010. Decision Support Systems. Special topics of an advanced nature that are not
3-0-3. in the regular course offerings.
Prerequisite: CSIS 3600.
CSIS 4420. Local Area Networks. 3-0-3.
The design and implementation of computer-
Prerequisite: CSIS 2520.
based systems that provide quantitative informa-
A presentation of Local Area Networks (LAN)
tion derived from databases, or that generate,
including LAN hardware, LAN system software,
store, and organize qualitative information, to
LAN applications software, LAN installation,
support the individual and group decision-mak-
LAN administration. LAN administration topics
ing process within organizations. Includes deci-
include users, groups, security, printing, backup
sion-making, modeling, simulation, information
and recovery, and reactive and proactive man-
retrieval, executive information systems, group
agement. Concepts studied in class will be
support systems, and expert systems.
implemented by the students.
CSIS 4130. Parallel and Distributed
CSIS 4490. Special Topics. 1-3 credit
Architectures and Algorithms. 3-0-3.
hours.
Prerequisite: CSIS 3530 and CSIS 3401.
Prerequisite: Varies by topic.
A study of parallel computer architectures,
Selected special or current topics of interest to
algorithms, and programming. Topics include
faculty and students.
parallelism at multiple levels, theoretical limita-
tions of parallel speedup, parallel architectures CSIS 4500. Data Communications Pro-
including multiprocessors, multicomputers and tocols. 3-0-3.
distributed systems, parallel algorithms and an Prerequisite: CSIS 2520 and CSIS 3510.
introduction to parallel programming. A study of protocol suites and how they are used
in data communications on the Internet. Topics
CSIS 4210. EDP Audit And Control. include protocol layering, Internet addressing,
3-0-3. routing, connection establishment and termina-
Prerequisite: CSIS 3600 or ACCT 3100.
tion, management of data flow, and error han-
Emphasis on IT controls, operational audits, and
dling. A specific protocol suite will be examined
techniques used in the design, implementation
in detail.
and evaluation of controls. Additional topics
include computer data security and quality assur- CSIS 4510. Computer Law. 3-0-3.
ance in the systems development process. Prerequisite: CSIS 3600.
Courses

Covers broad areas of law pertaining to the


CSIS 4250. End-User Systems. 3-0-3. computer industry, including Intellectual Prop-
Prerequisite: CSIS 3600 or ACCT 3100.
erty (Copyright, Patent, Trademark, and Trade
Detailed study of the application of information
Secret), Contract, and the U.S. Constitution.
technologies to the end-user environment.
Class will discuss computer crime, privacy, and
Topics include the classification evaluation and
professional ethics.
integration of end-user technologies, methodolo-
gies for small-scale system development, Infor- CSIS 4515. Computer Ethics. 3-0-3.
mation Center operations, end-user training, and Prerequisite: CSIS 3310 and ENGL 3140.
Office Automation. Computer Ethics addresses a definition of
ethics, provides a framework for making ethical
CSIS 4310. Database Implementation decisions, and analyzes in detail several areas
Applications. 3-0-3. of ethical issues that computer professionals
Prerequisite: CSIS 3310. are likely to encounter in business. Each area
As a second course in database concepts, the focus includes information regarding U.S. Law. Topics
is on database implementation issues. Topics may include philosophical, business, and professional
include relational DBMS, object-oriented DBMS, ethics, privacy, criminal conduct,
graphical user interface design in a database envi- property rights, speech, and reliability.
ronment, database administration, client-server,
and distributed database applications. CSIS 4540. Network Programming.
3-0-3.
CSIS 4400. Directed Study. 1 to 3 credit Prerequisite: CSIS 4500.
hours. A presentation of networks, UNIX and pro-
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor, major area gramming for the computing professional,
committee, and department chair. Up to three
hours may be applied to the major area.
Computer Science & Information Systems (CSIS) 247

including interprocess communication, commu- CSIS 4680. Software Specification and


nication protocols, OSI model, security, file trans- Verification. 3-0-3.
fer protocols, printer spoolers, remote command Prerequisite: CSIS 3200 and CSIS 3650 and CSIS
execution, remote login/access, performance and 4580.
procedure calls. This course is an introduction to formal software
specification and verification which is based on
CSIS 4555. Electronic Business Sys-
classical first order predicate logic. The course
tems. 3-0-3.
will also introduce students to at least one
Prerequisite: CSIS 3210.
formal specification language (e.g. VDM, B, Z,
Information systems that enable electronic trans-
RAISE,...). Students will also be introduced to
actions and communication have redefined the
various program language semantics together
ways that firms compete, interact with
with corresponding logics.
value chain partners, and relate to customers. In
the near future, all business will be e-business, CSIS 4730. Real-Time Systems and
and every organization will be required to effec- Simulation. 3-0-3.
tively implement e-business solutions. This course Prerequisite: CSIS 3530.
explores enterprise e-business applications and General structure of real-time systems;
the issues organizations encounter as they lever- software and hardware; the basic requirements
age Internet technologies to enhance communica- for software development; and in particular their
tion and transactions with stakeholders. modeling and simulation. A specific method is
studied in detail, including its modeling lan-
CSIS 4560. Distributed Object Technol-
guage and process. This involves using RT-UML
ogy. 3-0-3.
and the process interaction approach to simula-
Prerequisite: CSIS 4500.
tion. This study includes practical work using
This course studies the technological founda-
a development environment that supports the
tions for software systems running on multiple
method and its notation and process. Case stud-
hosts communicating of data communications
ies are presented, some to be completed by the
networks. The focus will be on the architecture
students using a team approach. The course also
of such systems, including middle-ware and thin
includes a survey and comparison of some real-
clients. Practical application will include such
time development methods currently in wide-
technologies as CORBA.
spread use. An overview of the most common
CSIS 4620. Object-Oriented Methods. real-time operating systems is included as the

Courses
3-0-3. last part of the course.
Prerequisite: CSIS 3600 and CSIS 3401.
A study of object-oriented methods used CSIS 4800. Advanced Topics In Data
in software development including modeling Communications. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: CSIS 4420 or CSIS 4500.
language and process. This study involves prac-
This course will introduce the student to the
tical work using a development environment
latest developments in the field of data com-
that supports the method and its notation and
munications and provide the student with the
process. Object-oriented methods currently in
research tools required to remain abreast of
widespread use are compared. Software devel-
this fast-developing field. Students will work in
opment aspects of user interfaces are covered.
small groups. Each group will select a topic from
CSIS 4650. Advanced Object-Oriented a list of emerging technologies in data communi-
Software Development. 3-0-3. cations. Each group will research their topic and
Prerequisite: CSIS 3650 or approval of the report their findings to the class.
instructor.
The primary objective of the course is to intro- CSIS 4830. IS Integrated Project. 3-0-3.
duce the student to advanced topics in object- Prerequisite: CSIS 3600.
oriented software development, such as patterns, Implementation of a comprehensive information
frameworks, and software architecture. Object- system utilizing database and programming
oriented techniques are illustrated using pro- technologies. This course follows the systems
gramming languages such as Eiffel, C++, and analysis and design course closely by integrating
Ada 95. Case studies are presented, some to key concepts from core IS courses.
be completed by the students using a team This is intended to be a capstone project expe-
approach. rience for IS majors, weaving critical content
from programming principles, database systems,
248 Course Descriptions

object-oriented (OO) analysis and design, and CJ 3310. Police in America. 3-0-3.
web technologies into a fully-implemented sub- Prerequisite: CJ 2205 or HS 2233.
stantive IS project. Students will participate in An overview of the role of the police in American
a team project focusing on the design and imple- society, examining such issues as the police role
mentation of an information system. Applica- in a democracy, ethnic tensions, unionization and
tions may be built with professionalism, civil disturbances, law enforce-
visual, web-based technologies such as Visual ment, and police misconduct.
Basic, Oracle, ActiveX, HTML, and DHTML.
CJ 3311. Police Administration. 3-0-3.
CSIS 4840. Information Resource Man- Prerequisite: CJ 2205 & CJ 3310.
agement And Policy. 2-0-2. This course familiarizes students with the princi-
Prerequisite: CSIS 3600; corequisite CSIS 4841. pal issues facing contemporary American police
Intended as a senior capstone course. Focus is on administration. Students will gain an appreci-
management of information systems resources, ation of the complex responsibilities associated
technologies and people. Covers strategic plan- with administering a police organization in a free
ning and control of IS; management of the society.
systems development process, operations, and
maintenance; management of end-user comput- CJ 3315. Criminal Procedure. 3-0-3.
ing; IS functional organization and the CIO. Prerequisite: CJ 2205.
Requires research papers and presentations on This course addresses the following stages of
current topics. criminal procedure and evidence; (1) methods
and rules of police investigation and arrest;
CSIS 4841. Information Technology (2) pretrial screening of complaints; (3) formal
Connections Lectures. 1-0-1. charging of the accused; (4) adjudication - evi-
Prerequisite: CSIS 3600; corequisite CSIS 4840. dentiary requirements; (5) sentencing; and (6)
Lecture series that illustrates how Information appellate review by higher courts.
Technologies connect and facilitate the inter-
change of information between professions and CJ 3320. Criminal Investigation. 3-0-3.
disciplines. Prerequisite: CJ 2205.
This course examines the historical, theoretical,
CSIS 4850. Senior Project. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: CSIS 3600. and technological aspects of the investigation of
The primary objective of the course is to provide crime. The topic areas include crime scene exam-
Courses

a capstone experience for the student, and in inations, the collection and preservation of
particular to promote a successful transition to evidence, forensic and behavioral sciences,
the work place or further academic study. A interviews/interrogations, and the use of tech-
proposal for a senior project is designed by one nology by law enforcement agencies.
or more students and a faculty member, and
submitted to the department chair for approval. CJ 3332. Corrections. 3-0-3.
Details on the guidelines for approval are avail- Prerequisite: CJ 2205 or HS 2233.
able from the department chair. A formal presen- A review of the historical and philosophical
tation of the results of the senior project is given backgrounds of corrections. Special emphasis is
by the student(s) to the department faculty. placed on the role of corrections in the criminal
justice system.
• CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CJ)•
CJ 3400. Ideological/Group Violence
and Law Enforcement. 3-0-3.
CJ 2205. Foundations of Criminal Jus-
Prerequisite: CJ 2205.
tice. 3-0-3.
The course will examine law enforcement
Prerequisite: None.
response to domestic and international terror-
This course provides an overview of the criminal
ism. Topics will include threat analysis, intelli-
justice system. Emphasis will be on crime
gence processing, proactive measures, reactive
in America, the criminal justice process, adju-
measures, development of modern terrorism and
dication, punishment, corrections, and prisons.
specific terrorist groups.
Other special issues to be addressed include
AIDS, changing roles of women, and criminal
justice systems in other countries.
Computer Science & Info Systems (CSIS)—Early Childhood Education (ECE) 249

CJ 3500. Community Policing. 3-0-3. •e-Business (EBIZ)•


Prerequisite: CJ 2205.
The course is designed to provide students an EBIZ 2100. Business Information Sys-
understanding of the concepts, issues, and prin- tems & Communication. 3-0-3.
ciples of community oriented policing in the Prerequisite: All developmental studies courses
United States and other countries. It will provide if required. This course assumes a basic profi-
thorough exposure to a proactive approach to ciency in MS Office products (Word, Excel, and
crime reduction and prevention. PowerPoint.
Business information course to: (1) improve
CJ 4100. Ethics in Criminal Justice. communications skills appropriate to the busi-
3-0-3. ness setting; (2) expand proficiency in the use
Prerequisite: CJ 2205. of business application software; and (3) intro-
This course prepares students to think critically duce information technology concepts relevant
about ethical issues they will encounter in the crim- to doing business in an electronic environment.
inal justice profession. These relate to such topics as
uses of force, increasing cultural diversity, and the • EARLY CHILDHOOD
balance between freedom and security.
EDUCATION (ECE) •
CJ 4200. Alcohol, Drugs, and Crime.
ECE 2205. Introduction to Pre-School
3-0-3.
Education. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: CJ 2205.
Prerequisite: EDUC 2204.
The course examines the various problems
This course addresses planning for child care
caused by drugs, including alcohol, and their
facilities including staffing, licensing, organizing
impact on the criminal justice system. Issues
space and equipment, nutrition and health poli-
addressed include corruption, societal, and other
cies, and parent and community relations. The
costs to family, employers, communities, and
purpose of this course is to provide the teacher/
individuals. Abuse of both legal and illegal drugs
facilitator with an opportunity to understand
will be considered.
the importance and application of developmen-
CJ 4300. Organized Crime. 3-0-3. tally appropriate practices and examine the
Prerequisite: CJ 2205. role and responsibilities of the early childhood
This course examines the origins of organized administrator and teacher in a preschool setting.
crime, including the Mafia, Dixie Mafia, Mexican Observations in preschools will be required. Ver-

Courses
Mafia, Nigerian Mafia, Gypsies, and motorcycle ification of professional liability insurance is
and organized crime. It also explores the meth- required before placement in observation.
ods which legitimate businesses use in maintain-
ECE 2220. Practicum. 3 credit hours.
ing illegal, organized religion.
Prerequisite: Approval of director of Educational
CJ 4430. Victimology. 3-0-3. Field Experiences and adviser.
Prerequisite: SOCI 2201 or CJ 2205. A practicum in a classroom during which the
An overview of the basic concepts of criminal student will be actively involved in the teaching-
victimization, including society’s response to vic- learning process under the guidance of a profes-
tims and their problems. sional teacher.

CJ 4490. Special Topics in Criminal ECE 2303. Instructional Technology in


Justice. 3-0-3. Schools. 1-3-3.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart- Prerequisite: EDUC 2201.
ment chair. Develops skill in selecting and using technology
Selected topics of interest to faculty and students. to enhance instruction in the early childhood
classroom. Includes a laboratory experience with
computers, educational software and multimedia
•DRAMA: See THEATER presentations.
(THTR)•
ECE 3313. The Preschool Curriculum.
2-3-3.
Prerequisite: ECE 2205, EDUC 3302.
Prerequisites/Corequisites: ECE 2205.
The course is designed to assist students in
developing knowledge and understanding of
250 Course Descriptions

the principles, components and development of diagnosis and instructional activities for the pre-
preschool curricula, and strategies of learning service elementary and early childhood class-
for preschool children. The field experience in room teacher. It includes both formal and
a pre-kindergarten setting, a requirement of informal diagnosis, interpretation of formal and
this course, is designed to assist the teacher/ informal test results, planning and implemen-
facilitator in the application of developmentally tation of instructional actions, application of
appropriate practices with preschool children literacy diagnosis across the curriculum, and
with and without disabilities. Verification of pro- diagnosis of the classroom literacy environment
fessional liability insurance is required prior to and instruction. This course includes an exten-
placement in the field experience. sive field experience. Verification of professional
liability insurance is required prior to placement
ECE 3320. Teaching Reading in the
in the field. 20 hours of field experience is
Early Grades. 3-0-3.
required.
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education.
Corerequisite: ECE 3330. ECE 3360. Teaching Reading and Writ-
Examines theories and principles that guide ing. 3-0-3.
emergent literacy instruction. Focus is on the Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education
cognitive development of the emergent reader program.
and how it relates to brain-based research. An introduction to the reading and writing pro-
Strong emphasis is placed on phonemic aware- cesses and strategies for teaching reading and
ness. Assessment tools and approaches to read- writing within the broader framework of the
ing instruction, including ability grouping, are language arts. Language development, emergent
examined and applied. Strategies for teaching literacy, word identification skills including
reading and writing skills are contextualized phonics, comprehension processes and strate-
in children's literature. Multicultural perspec- gies, balanced reading instruction, the process
tives and technology are used to facilitate and approach to writing and factors that contribute
reinforce instruction. Includes extensive field to literacy development will be emphasized. Stu-
experience. Verification of professional liability dents will be involved in public school and other
insurance is required prior to placement in the learning environments used to teach reading.
field. Twenty (20) hours field experience. Verification of professional liability insurance is
required for classroom observation.
ECE 3330. Teaching Reading in the Ele-
mentary Grades 3-5. 3-0-3.
Courses

ECE 3364. Children’s Literature. 3-0-3.


Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education, Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education
and EDUC 3302. Corerequisite: ECE 3320 with program.
permission of advisor and/or department chair. A survey of literature appropriate for kindergar-
The relationship among reading, writing, speak- ten and early grade readers. Reviews both cur-
ing, and listening is studied in the context of the rent and traditional works in several genres and
elementary classroom, grades 3 - 5. Content area considers various approaches for teaching such
reading, study strategies, comprehension strate- literature.
gies, use of non-fiction and fiction literature, and
various strategies for teaching spelling, gram- ECE 3398. Internship. 1-12 credit hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of Director of Educa-
mar, and vocabulary are included. Emphasis is
tional Field Experiences and Advisor.
placed on examining diagnostic tools to assess,
A supervised teaching experience for teachers
remediate, and group a diverse student popula-
seeking certification renewal credit.
tion for instruction, and on the use of technology
to extend and support reading and the language ECE 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit
arts. Verification of professional liability insur- hours.
ance is required prior to placement in the field. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
20 hours field experience. ment chair prior to registration.
A concentrated investigation of a particular
ECE 3340. Diagnosis and Application of
aspect of education as a topic within a teaching
Literacy Instruction in the Early Child-
field concentration or degree major. The content
hood Classroom. 3-0-3.
of the directed study will be determined jointly
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education,
by the instructor and the student.
ECE 3330.
This course includes the study and application of
Early Childhood Education ( ECE)—Economics (ECON) 251

ECE 4401. Teaching Mathematics in ECE 4405. Teaching Language Arts and
Early Childhood Education. 2-5-3. Social Studies in Early Childhood. 2-5-3.
Prerequisite: EDUC 3302, MATH 3342. Prerequisite: Admission to TOSS, ECE 3340.
Study of integrating mathematics concepts, Includes the study and application of social stud-
principles and processes into the teaching of ies and language arts as integrative elements
mathematics in preschool through fifth grade. of the elementary curriculum. Candidates will
Emphasis will be placed upon developmentally focus on the nature, theory, and order to prepare
appropriate practices in planning, implementing students to become citizens actors, adopt prob-
and evaluating instruction in the mathematics lem solving dispositions and achieve excellence
curriculum. Includes an extensive field experi- in the application of oral and written communi-
ence as well as media use. Verification of pro- cation skills. Verification of professional liability
fessional liability insurance is required prior to insurance is required prior to placement in the
placement in the field. field.

ECE 4402. Teaching Science in Early ECE 4410. Reading Across the Curricu-
Childhood Education. 2-5-3. lum. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: EDUC 3302, SCI 2201. Prerequisite: Admission to TOSS and ECE 3340.
Study of integrating science processes, principles An examination of the reading and writing pro-
and concepts into the teaching of science in pre- cesses in the content areas with a transition from
school through fifth grade. Emphasis will be learning to read and write to reading and writ-
placed on the process-oriented inquiry method ing to learn. Includes methods, strategies, and
of teaching science, curriculum goals, design techniques for teaching reading and writing in
and planning and implementing and evaluating all content areas to diverse populations with an
instruction in science. Includes an extensive field emphasis on actual application of knowledge in
experience as well as the use of educational tech- the TOSS integrated unit and field experience.
nology. Verification of professional liability insur- The selection and use of technology, including
ance is required before placement in the field. electronic texts, is explored. To be taken concur-
rently with ECE 4401, ECE 4402, and ECE 4405.
ECE 4403. Teaching Social Studies in Verification of professional liability insurance is
Early Childhood Education. 2-5-3.
required prior to placement in the field.
Prerequisite: EDUC 3302, HIST 2111.
Focuses on the curriculum goals and content for ECE 4473. Student Teaching: Early

Courses
social studies in the early grades. Emphasis will Childhood (P-5). 12 credit hours.
be placed on developing an integrated approach Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
to social studies and on developing inquiry pro- Full-time teaching experience under the supervi-
cesses appropriate to the age and developmental sion of a public school cooperating teacher and
levels of students in preschool through fifth college supervisor. Verification of professional
grade. Includes an extensive field experience as liability insurance is required before placement
well as media use. Verification of professional in student teaching.
liability insurance is required before placement
ECE 4490. Special Topics in Education.
in the field.
1-3 credit hours.
ECE 4404. Teaching Language Arts in Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
Early Childhood Education. 2-5-3. ment chair.
Prerequisite: EDUC 3302, ECE 3360. Selected special topics of interest to faculty and
Study of the integration of language arts across students.
the curriculum and effective strategies for plan-
ning, implementing and evaluating instruction • ECONOMICS (ECON) •
in reading, writing, listening and speaking in
preschool through fifth grade. Emphasis on ECON 1100. Global Economics. 3-0-3.
assessment techniques and approaches to con- Prerequisite: ENGL 0099, MATH 0099, READ
0099, if required.
ducting guided lessons in reading and writing
Analysis of economic decision-making in a
that are culturally and developmentally appro-
global setting. Examines the fundamental ques-
priate. Includes an extensive field experience and
tions of economics as they relate to individuals,
media use. Verification of professional liability
firms, and governments operating in an open
insurance is required before placement in the
economy. Topics covered include: a comparison
field.
252 Course Descriptions

of economic systems, how a market system ECON 3398. Internship. 1-9 credit
works, the role of government in the economy, hours.
the basis for international trade, the dynamics Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
of the global monetary system, and the impact Requirement and approval of the Coordinator of
of technology on economic growth. For non busi- cooperative education/internships (KSU Career
ness majors. Services); Non business Majors: Not available to
non business majors.
ECON 2100. Principles of Microeconom- A supervised, credit-earning work experience
ics. 3-0-3.
of one academic semester with a previously
Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of MATH numbered
approved business firm, private agency, or gov-
1101 or higher.
ernment agency. A research paper is required to
Analysis of price and output determination
receive credit. For junior or senior students who
under various market structures, income distri-
wish to participate in an on-the-job experience in
bution, resource allocation, domestic problems
which they may apply their academic education.
and international trade. For business majors and
The work experience may not be with a current
International Affairs majors.
employer. This course will be graded on an S/U
ECON 2200. Principles of Macroeconom- basis. Credit is allowed only in elective areas.
ics. 3-0-3.
ECON 4210. Money and Financial Mar-
Prerequisite: ECON 2100 and 6 credit hours of
kets. 3-0-3.
MATH numbered 1101 or higher.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Analysis of socioeconomic goals, money and
Requirement and FIN 3100; Non business
credit systems, theories of national income,
Majors: 60 credit hours including ECON 2200
employment and economic growth.
and FIN 3100.
ECON 3100. Business Statistics. 3-0-3. Analyzes the operation, structure, regulation,
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA and control of financial markets emphasizing
Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 credit the effects on the level and term structure of
hours including ACCT 2100, ACCT 2200, ECON interest rates, economic activity, and business
2100, and ECON 2200. decisions. Focuses on monetary theory, mon-
An introduction to descriptive and inferential etary and fiscal policies, the Federal Reserve
statistics with an emphasis on business applica- System, and financial institutions, markets, and
tions. Topics covered include summary instruments.
Courses

statistics, probability and probability distribu-


ECON 4310. Economic Development in
tions, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, and
Global Perspective. 3-0-3.
linear regression. Small case studies are used to
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
illustrate statistical applications within
Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 credit
business settings. Since many of the statistical
hours including ECON 2200.
techniques covered in the course will be imple-
An analysis of key development issues both as
mented using spreadsheet software, students are
they relate to individual countries and to factors
expected to be experienced in the use of spread-
linking countries, such as international trade and
sheets.
capital flows. Topics addressed include savings,
ECON 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-3 investment, technology, demographics, human
credit hours. resources, and economic institutions. Inves-
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA tigates these topics for third world countries
Requirement and approval of the Coordinator of and those that are more economically advanced.
cooperative education/internships (KSU Career
Services); Non business Majors: Not available to ECON 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit
non business majors. hours.
A supervised work experience program for a Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
minimum of two academic semesters at a site Requirement and approval of instructor and
in business, industry, or government. For sopho- department chair prior to registration; Non busi-
more, junior, or senior level students who wish ness Majors: Approval of instructor and depart-
to obtain successive on-the-job experience in con- ment chair prior to registration.
junction with their academic training Credit is Special topics of an advanced nature not in the
allowed only in elective areas. regular course offerings.
Economics (ECON) 253

ECON 4410. International Trade and boundaries of the firm, the nature of competitive
Finance. 3-0-3. markets and competitive interactions among
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA firms, how the firm positions itself to compete,
Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 credit and how the firm designs its organizational
hours including ECON 2200. architecture to support its competitive goals.
Principles of international trade and finance. Man-
ECON 4610. Macroeconomics. 3-0-3.
agement of foreign operations of the firm within
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
constraints of the international environment. Study
Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 credit
of international currency flows, exchange rates and
hours including ECON 2200.
international banking practices.
Analysis of the determination of output, employ-
ECON 4490. Special Topics in Eco- ment, interest rates, and income with emphasis
nomics and Quantitative Analysis. 1-3 on the influence of fiscal and monetary policy.
credit hours.
ECON 4710. Econometrics and Fore-
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
casting. 3-0-3.
Requirement and approval of instructor and
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
department chair; Non business Majors:
Requirement and ECON 3100; Non business
Approval of instructor and department chair.
Majors: 60 credit hours including ECON 2200
Selected special topics of interest to faculty and
and ECON 3100 or MATH 1107.
students. This course may be taken more than
Study of the tools used for estimating and fore-
once. Up to 9 credit hours are permitted.
casting demand, revenue and cost, as well as
ECON 4510. Microeconomics. 3-0-3. demographic characteristics of importance to an
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA individual in a business decision making position.
Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 credit
ECON 4750. Multivariate Data Analysis.
hours including ECON 2200.
3-0-3.
Theory of the determination of price and output
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
in both partial and general equilibrium. Topics
Requirement and ECON 3100; Non business
include the theory of the firm, consumer behav-
Majors: 60 credit hours including ECON 2200
ior, analysis of market structures, welfare eco- and ECON 3100 or MATH 1107.
nomics, social choice, the theory of games, and The theory and application of quantitative methods
asymmetric information. of data analysis. Emphasis is on the application of

Courses
ECON 4530. Public and Urban Econom- statistical principles to empirical model building in
ics. 3-0-3. business and economics. Topics include regression
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA analysis, analysis of variance, factor analysis, dis-
Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 credit criminant analysis, parametric and nonparametric
hours including ECON 2200. tests, sampling techniques, and experimental design.
This course considers the application of eco-
ECON 4810. Quantitative Decision
nomic models to analyze the role of government
Models. 3-0-3.
in correcting market failures, the effects of taxa-
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
tion and expenditure policies on the allocation of
Requirement and ECON 3100; Non business
resources, and the distribution of income. There Majors: 60 credit hours including ECON 2200
is an emphasis on the optimal provision of public and ECON 3100 or MATH 1107.
goods, the incidence and behavioral effects of The theory and application of quantitative deci-
taxes, regulation of externalities, public choice sion models. Emphasis is on the formulation,
and the spatial organization of the economy solution, and interpretation of models with
ECON 4550. The Economics of Strat- application to a variety of business problems.
egy. 3-0-3. Topics include linear, integer, nonlinear, and
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA dynamic programming, network analysis, dual-
Requirement and ECON 3100; Non business ity, and postoptimality analysis.
Majors: 60 credit hours including ECON 2200.
ECON 4850. Decision Analysis and Sim-
An economic analysis of the fundamental issues
ulation. 3-0-3.
that underpin the firm’s strategic pricing, pro-
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
duction, and resource allocation decisions in Requirement and ECON 3100; Non business
alternative competitive environments. Topics Majors: 60 credit hours including ECON 2200
include the horizontal, vertical and corporate and ECON 3100 or MATH 1107.
254 Course Descriptions

The theory and application of stochastic decision decision-making. Technology will be integrated
models. Emphasis is on the application of for enhancing and assisting instruction.
probability and simulation techniques to struc-
EDUC 3308. Learning, Motivation, and
ture decision problems in business and eco-
Classroom Management. 3-0-3.
nomics. Topics include measurement of risk,
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education
decision processes, decision analysis, and static
Program.
and dynamic simulation models.
Examines theories, models, and principles of
learning, motivation, and classroom manage-
• EDUCATION (EDUC) • ment in schools. In level-specific modules, par-
ticular emphasis is placed on the application
EDUC 2201. Teaching and Schools in a of theoretical principles to early childhood,
Changing Society. 2-2-3. middle grades, or secondary classroom settings.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102. Addresses learning theories, motivational theo-
An introductory study of current issues and ries, learning styles and individual differences,
problems in American education from historical, and models and strategies for implementing
political, economic, social, philosophical, multi- effective systems of time, material, environment
cultural, and global perspectives. Focuses on and behavior management in diverse classroom
efforts of schools to adapt to a changing society, settings. Various technological applications,
the role of the teacher as a professional educator including the World Wide Web, e-mail, and pre-
and professional ethics. Includes the use of cur- sentation software, will be utilized.
rent technologies which are directly related to
effective teaching and 30 hours of observation EDUC 3310. Multicultural Perspectives
and participation in a classroom setting appro- in Teaching and Learning. 2-0-2.
priate to the students’ professional interests in Prerequisite: EDUC 2201.
elementary/early childhood, middle grades, sec- A study of the influence of diversity on teaching
ondary, or P-12 education. Verification of pro- and learning in a pluralistic, democratic society.
fessional liability insurance is required prior to Examines theories and models of instruction for
enrolling in this course. diversities in race, class, gender, religion, lan-
guage and exceptionality found in multicultural
EDUC 2204. Human Growth, Develop- classrooms.
ment and Learning. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
•EDUCATION - MIDDLE GRADES
Courses

A study of human development through the life


span with emphasis on social, moral, emotional, (EDMG)•
physical, cognitive and psychological develop-
ment as these relate to learning and instruction. EDMG 2200. Practicum. 1 to 3.
Includes discussing learning styles, developmen- Prerequisite: Permission of advisor and depart-
tal and cultural differences, wide range of abil- ment chair.
ities and exceptionalities, and health. Current An assigned practicum in a classroom during
use of technology will be integrated as com- which the student will be actively involved in
munication and instructional tools. Students will the teaching-learning process under the guid-
observe children in naturalistic settings, such as ance of a professional teacher. Proof of profes-
schools and day care centers. sional liability insurance is required prior to
receiving a school placement.
EDUC 3302. Curriculum and Assess-
ment. 3-0-3. EDMG 3398. Internship. 1 to 12.
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Prerequisite: Permission of advisor and depart-
Program. ment chair.
Examines theories and principles of curriculum A supervised work experience with an approved
and assessment. Focus will be placed on the business firm, private agency or government
identification and construction of learning out- agency. Credit is allowed only in the elective
comes and the development and selection of areas.
culturally responsive units and lesson plans. EDMG 4400. Directed Study. 1 to 3.
Focus will also be placed on standardized and Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
teacher constructed assessment tools consistent ment chair prior to registration.
with these objectives. Emphasis will be placed A concentrated investigation of a particular
on the use of assessment tools for instructional aspect of education as a topic within a teaching
Education ( EDUC)—Secondary and Middle Grades (EDSM) 255

field concentration or degree major. The content EDMG 4404. Teaching Language Arts in
of the directed study will be determined jointly Middle Grades Education. 2-3-3.
by the instructor and the student. Prerequisite: EDUC 3308, at least 9 hrs of
required teaching field LA courses.
EDMG 4401. Teaching Mathematics in
This course is a segment of a 9-hour block
Middle Grades Education. 2-3-3.
designed to develop appropriate teaching strate-
Prerequisite: EDUC 3308, at least 9 hrs of
required teaching field Math courses. gies in language arts. Students apply learning
This course is a segment of a 9-hour block theories, teaching techniques, questioning strate-
designed to develop appropriate teaching strate- gies, instructional materials, and assessment pro-
gies in mathematics. Students apply learning cedures for middle grades learners. Students
theories, teaching techniques, questioning strate- will develop and implement plans for teaching
gies, instructional materials, and assessment pro- language arts in an interdisciplinary team set-
cedures for middle grades learners. Students will ting. In an extensive field experience, students
develop and implement plans for teaching math- will teach middle grades learners. Proof of pro-
ematics in an interdisciplinary team setting. In fessional liability insurance is required prior to
an extensive field experience, students will teach receiving a school placement.
middle grades learners. Proof of professional EDMG 4405. Team Teaching in Middle
liability insurance is required prior to receiving a Grades Education. 2-2-3.
school placement. Prerequisite: EDUC 3308.
This collaboratively taught course is a segment
EDMG 4402. Teaching Science in
of a 9-hour block designed to develop appropri-
Middle Grades Education. 2-3-3.
Prerequisite: EDUC 3308, at least 9 hrs of ate teaming skills for middle grades teachers.
required teaching field Science courses. The teaching team models instructional strate-
This course is a segment of a 9-hour block gies that exemplify the philosophy of middle
designed to develop appropriate teaching strat- school education. Students become part of an
egies in science. Students apply learning theo- instructional team to develop effective strategies
ries, teaching techniques, questioning strategies, for interdisciplinary settings. Student teams are
instructional materials, and assessment proce- paired with school instructional teams during an
dures for middle grades learners. Students will extensive field experience. Proof of professional
develop and implement plans for teaching sci- liability insurance is required prior to receiving a
school placement.

Courses
ence in an interdisciplinary team setting. In an
extensive field experience, students will teach EDMG 4475. Student Teaching in MGE.
middle grades learners. Proof of professional lia- 12 credit hours.
bility insurance is required prior to receiving a Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching.
school placement. Full-time teaching experience under the supervi-
sion of a public school cooperating teacher and
EDMG 4403. Teaching Social Studies in
Middle Grades Education. 2-3-3. college supervisor in an upper elementary school
Prerequisite: EDUC 3308, at least 9 hrs of classroom or in a middle school. Includes regu-
required teaching field Social Studies courses. larly scheduled professional seminars. Proof of
This course is a segment of a 9-hour block professional liability insurance is required prior
designed to develop appropriate teaching strate- to receiving a school placement.
gies in social studies. Students apply learning EDMG 4490. Special Topics in Educa-
theories, teaching techniques, questioning strate- tion. 1 to 3.
gies, instructional materials, and assessment pro- Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and
cedures for middle grades learners. Students department chair.
will develop and implement plans for teaching Selected special topics of interest to faculty and
social studies in an interdisciplinary team set- students.
ting. In an extensive field experience, students
will teach middle grades learners. Proof of pro- EDMG 4498. Classroom Internship. 1 to
fessional liability insurance is required prior to 12.
receiving a school placement. Prerequisite: Permission of director of education field
experiences and advisor.
A supervised teaching experience for teachers
seeking certification or renewal credit. Proof of
professional liability insurance is required prior
to receiving a school placement.
256 Course Descriptions

•EDUCATION - SECONDARY tion, analysis, and argumentation. Also includes


introductory use of a variety of research skills.
AND MIDDLE GRADES (EDSM)•
ENGL 1102. Composition II. 3-0-3.
EDSM 4409. Instructional Strategies
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 (with C or better).
in Reading and Adolescent Literature.
3-0-3. Develops writing skills beyond the levels of profi-
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. ciency required by ENGL 1101. Interpretation and
This course provides instruction in reading evaluation are emphasized, and a variety of more
theory and methodology and will provide an advanced research methods are incorporated.
understanding for selecting and using adolescent ENGL 2110. World Literature. 3-0-3.
literature for the middle grades and secondary Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 (with C or better).
classroom. This course will acquaint the student A study of world literature which explores
with a reading experience using literary works human experience by examining diverse aes-
for adolescents and will also introduce the stu- thetic and cultural perspectives from ancient to
dent to book selection aids and electronic data- modern times.
base media resources for middle grades and
secondary environments. ENGL 2140. Introduction to Literary
Genres. 3-0-3.
EDSM 4410. Reading to Learn in the Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
Content Areas. 3-0-3. A study of the literary genres of fiction, non-
Prerequisite: EDUC 3308. fiction, drama, and poetry. Texts include works
An introduction to the process and problems of from various cultures.
reading instruction in middle grades and second-
ary classrooms with an emphasis on content area ENGL 2150. Colloquium in English.
reading. The course explores the introductory com- 3-0-3.
ponents of the reading process and organizational Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
and management aspects of reading instruction. Introduction to the field of English studies.
Study of formal and informal diagnostic proce- Readings, discussion and written work empha-
dures and techniques to determine individual read- size the interpretive frameworks (including lit-
ing needs and abilities of the adolescent. erature, theory, literacy, and language studies)
that currently guide study in the field and orga-
nize the major at Kennesaw State.
• ENGLISH (ENGL) •
Courses

ENGL 2160. American Literature Survey


ENGL 0020. Principles of Writing for the to 1914. 3-0-3.
Regents’ Test. 3-0-0. Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
Prerequisite: None. A survey of American Literature from its begin-
Instruction and review for the Regents’ Test with nings to 1914.
emphasis on principles and patterns of academic
writing. Required of students who have failed ENGL 2170. British Literature Survey to
the essay portion of the test. 1914. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
ENGL 0099. Writing for Academic Pur- A survey of British Literature from its beginnings
poses. 3-0-0. to 1914.
Prerequisite: Placement by COMPASS Examina-
tion by the Admissions Office, or by the Depart- ENGL 2180. World Literature Survey
ment of Learning Support Programs. from 1914. 3-0-3.
A Learning Support Programs course that pre- Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
pares students for credit courses in English. A survey of world literature from 1914 to the
Emphasizes principles of good writing, particu- present.
larly in clear and logically written essays. ENGL 2270. Language and Usage. 3-0-3.
ENGL 1101. Composition I. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: none.
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099 if Study of the elements of language and of usage
required. in formal writing and speaking; a review of gram-
Focuses on skills required for effective writing mar rules and their application in a variety of aca-
in a variety of contexts with emphasis on exposi- demic and profession contexts (no prerequisite).
Secondary and Middle Grades Education (EDSM)—English (ENGL) 257

*ENGL 3030. Studies in Grammar and *ENGL 3220. Studies in Film. 3-0-3.
Linguistics. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2110. Analysis of film from such perspectives as genre,
A study of the theories and methods of linguis- literary and film aesthetics, and literary adapta-
tics as applied to language acquisition, advanced tion. May include screening of selected films.
grammar, or the historical development of Amer-
*ENGL 3230. Literary Genre. 3-0-3.
ican English.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
ENGL 3040. History of the English Lan- A study of the development and history of a par-
guage. 3-0-3. ticular literary form, such as narrative, poetry, or
Prerequisite: ENGL 2110. drama, through the exploration of representative
A study of the development of English, with works. Particular attention given to the evolution
attention to influential historical events and of of new strategies for the creation and reception
the evolving structure of the language. Black of the genre and to the aesthetic, historical, and
English and other influences on American Eng- cultural conditions that shape those strategies.
lish may be included.
*ENGL 3240. Studies in Workplace Doc-
*ENGL 3120. Creative Writing. 3-0-3. uments. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2110. Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
A workshop approach that emphasizes original Analysis of content, structure, format, and style
writing, analysis and response from classmates, of business, technical, and other professional
and revision. Some attention to the work of documents designed for various audiences, pur-
established writers for models. poses, and disciplines.
*ENGL 3130. Literary Nonfiction. 3-0-3. ENGL 3260. Grammar for Teachers.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2110. 3-0-3.
The study and practice of selected genres of lit- Prerequisite: ENGL 2270 (with a “B” or better).
erary nonfiction. The course features extensive A study of sentence structure, emphasizing ter-
nonfiction writing and revision, workshop dis- minology, punctuation, syntax and usage in
cussion, and readings in major authors of literary traditional grammar; includes an overview of
nonfiction. modern grammars and examines how the meth-
ods of these grammars can help students to
*ENGL 3140. Professional Writing in the
understand language and implement its correct

Courses
Disciplines. 3-0-3.
use in both oral and written communication.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
Also includes approaches for teaching grammar,
Analysis of and practice in writing documents used
such as integrating instruction with writing.
in specific professional areas such as the informa-
tion sciences, natural sciences, and social sciences. ENGL 3309. Principles of Teaching Writ-
ing. 3-0-3.
*ENGL 3150. Computers and Writing.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2270.
3-0-3.
An exploration of current theories of compo-
Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
sition pedagogy and assessment in practice,
An experiential study of the developing rela-
including a variety of strategies for teaching
tionship between writing and computers. This
writing while dealing with institutional policies,
course explores the earliest influences computers
such as standardized testing. Students will write
have had on writing. This study includes writing
for a variety of purposes and audiences.
in a network environment and publishing in
hypertextual formats. *ENGL 3320. Scriptural Literature.
3-0-3.
*ENGL 3160. Argumentative Writing.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
3-0-3.
Study of authors, themes, genres, and composi-
Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
tion of scriptural writings.
The study and practice of argumentative writing.
The course includes the study of current models *ENGL 3330. Gender Studies. 3-0-3.
of effective arguments and the process of form- Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
ing written arguments. The course features A study of literature using gender as the primary
extensive writing and revision, workshop discus- category of analysis. Viewing gender as a social
sion, and readings of classical and contemporary construction, it will consider literature’s explora-
arguments. tion of such issues as gendered roles in society,
258 Course Descriptions

interactions between private and public life, gen- A supervised work experience program for a mini-
der’s relation to canon formation, and the ways mum of two semesters at a site in business, indus-
in which individuals may struggle to define their try or government. For sophomore, junior, or senior
place in culture in the face of gendered expec- level students who wish to obtain on-the-job expe-
tations. Texts studied might include published rience in conjunction with their academic training.
literature, primary sources such as letters and
ENGL 3398. Internship. 1-9 credit
diaries, public documents, non-print texts such
hours.
as films, and material culture objects. A particu-
Prerequisite: Approval of departmental intern-
lar offering might focus on a region or nation, a
ship adviser.
time period, a theme, a representative individual,
Supervised, credit-earning work experience of
or some combination.
one semester with a previously approved busi-
*ENGL 3340. Ethnic Literatures. 3-0-3. ness firm, private agency, or government agency.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2110. Credit is allowed only in related studies or free
A study of literature using ethnicity as the pri- elective areas.
mary category of analysis. Individual offerings
ENGL 4120. Advanced Creative Writing.
of the course might survey a range of ethnic lit-
3-0-3.
eratures (e.g., Asian American, Chicano, Native Prerequisite: ENGL 3120, or permission of
American, Jewish) or explore one such body of instructor.
texts (e.g., Caribbean literatures). Open only to students with experience in writing
*ENGL 3350. Regional Literature. 3-0-3. in the particular genre, this workshop stresses
Prerequisite: ENGL 2110. development and integration of all technical and
A study of literature using region as the primary artistic elements. Some readings from the work
category of analysis. Texts might include of established writers.
fiction and nonfiction, performance texts (such ENGL 4220. Critical Theory. 3-0-3.
as drama and folktale from the oral tradition), Prerequisite: ENGL 2150.
and examples of material culture (e.g., archi- An advanced course in interpretive theoretical
tecture, home furnishings, and clothing). The paradigms as applied to the study of literature
class might focus on a specific geographic region and culture, focusing on critical models such
(e.g., the American South, the Caribbean); a com- as Marxism, Structuralism, Poststructuralism,
parative study of regional culture (Faulkner’s Deconstruction, Psychoanalytic criticism, and
Courses

Yoknapatawpa vs. Hardy’s Wessex, Hawthorne’s Gender, Ethnic, and Cultural studies.
and Melville’s New England vs. Sedgwick’s and
Jewett’s New England); or author or theme *ENGL 4230. Theory-Based Studies in
closely associated with a region (e.g., Cather’s Literature. 3-0-3.
West, Race and Religion in the South). Prerequisite: ENGL 2150.
Concentration on the interpretive strategies and
*ENGL 3360. African American Litera- conceptual framework of one of the major par-
ture. 3-0-3. adigms of contemporary literary theory, with
Prerequisite: ENGL 2110. attention to the ways in which those paradigms
A survey of representative African American enable the study of a select group of texts, both
authors in their historical and cultural contexts literary and nonliterary. Topics may include
from the Colonial period to the present. Feminist theory, Marxism, Post-Colonialism,
ENGL 3391. Literature in the Middle Psychoanalytic Criticism, Cultural Materialism,
Grades. 3-0-3. Ethnic studies, Gender studies, New-Histori-
Prerequisite: ENGL 2140. cism, and Reader Response theories.
Using narrative as a central genre, this course
ENGL 4340. Shakespeare. 3-0-3.
introduces current English teaching philosophy Prerequisite: ENGL 2150.
and practice in grades 4 through 8. This course A study of selected comedies, histories, and
models current ways of integrating technology tragedies, covering the range of Shakespeare’s
into the curriculum and identifies a variety of dramatic art. May include dramatic form and
multicultural teaching texts. poetic composition as commentaries on the dra-
ENGL 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-3 matic genres and an examination of performance
credit hours. theory and practice.
Prerequisite: Approval of coordinator of coop-
erative education/internships (Career Services).
English (ENGL)—English As A Second Language (ESL) 259

*ENGL 4360. American Literature Before *ENGL 4480. 19th-Century World Litera-
1800. 3-0-3. ture. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2150. Prerequisite: ENGL 2150.
Literary studies of colonial and early United A study of representative texts, major themes,
States literature. Prior to 1800 in the Americas, or literary movements of the nineteenth century,
complex and diverse encounters of Old and New emphasizing aesthetic and social understanding.
World cultures resulted in the Constitution of the The course may examine Western and non-West-
United States of America and the emergence of ern cultures.
its wide range of literatures.
ENGL 4490. Special Topics in English.
*ENGL 4370. British Literature Before 3-0-3.
1800. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2150. A study of selected topics of special interest to
Studies in the literature of Britain from its earliest faculty and students.
days to the Romantic period. It may include
ENGL 4491. Major Figures in World Lit-
poetry, prose, and drama and investigate such
erature. 3-0-3.
topics as intellectual and social history as repre-
Prerequisite: ENGL 2150.
sented in the various literatures of the period.
A study concentrating on a significant author
*ENGL 4380. World Literature Before from world literature.
1800. 3-0-3.
*ENGL 4560. 20th-Century American
Prerequisite: ENGL 2150.
Literature. 3-0-3.
A study of representative texts, major themes, or
Prerequisite: ENGL 2150.
literary movements of the period, emphasizing
A study of representative texts, major themes, or
aesthetic and social understanding. The course
literary movements in twentieth-century Amer-
may examine Western and non-Western cultures.
ica, emphasizing aesthetic and social under-
ENGL 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit standing.
hours.
*ENGL 4570. 20th-Century British Lit-
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor, curriculum
erature. 3-0-3.
committee, and department chair required prior
Prerequisite: ENGL 2150.
to registration.
A study of representative twentieth-century Brit-
Selected topics of an advanced nature that may

Courses
ish literature.
include original research for superior students.
Normally for projects not served through prees- *ENGL 4580. 20th-Century World Litera-
tablished curriculum. ture. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2150.
*ENGL 4460. 19th-Century American
A study of representative texts, major themes,
Literature. 3-0-3.
or literary movements of twentieth-century lit-
Prerequisite: Colloquium.
erature, emphasizing aesthetic and social under-
A study of representative writers in American
standing.
literature in the nineteenth century.
*ENGL 4620. Senior Seminar. 3-0-3.
*ENGL 4470. 19th-Century British Lit-
Prerequisite: Completion of 90 hours.
erature. 3-0-3.
Detailed study of a literary, artistic, or cultural
Prerequisite: ENGL 2150.
movement, theme, trend, or philosophy with lit-
Studies in Romantic and Victorian literature,
erary texts as the focal point but exploring works
from the 1780s to the end of the nineteenth
in related fields, culminating in the preparation
century, examining such aesthetic and social
of an original, substantial, and researched semi-
themes as the nature and role of the artist, the
nar paper, which is to be presented orally and
impulse toward gothicism, the rise of the auto-
formally. The course will be open to English and
biography, responses to industrialization, and
other majors.
the conflict between tradition and change, as
these are expressed in representative texts of the *These courses can be taken more than once pro-
period. vided the course content differs entirely from the
previous offering.
260 Course Descriptions

• ENGLISH AS A SECOND Language Arts. Includes a secondary school field


experience in English teaching and concurrent
LANGUAGE (ESL) • seminars. Proof of professional liability insur-
ance is required prior to school placement.
ESL 1101. Grammar Seminar for Inter-
national Students. 3-0-3. ENED 4475. Student Teaching: English
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099, if (7-12). 12 credit hours.
required. Prerequisite: ENED 4414 and Approval of Field
This course is an individualized and small group Experience Application.
seminar open to all Kennesaw State University Full-time teaching experience in English under
students for whom English is a second language. the supervision of a secondary school cooper-
International students will discuss North Ameri- ating teacher and a college English education
can English (NAE) grammar and its academic supervisor. Includes regularly scheduled semi-
applications, focusing on those features of the nars. Proof of professional liability insurance is
language that are most problematic for second required prior to school placement.
language writers and speakers, including arti-
cles, verb tenses, verb forms, preposition combi-
• EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
nations, question and statement syntax, clauses,
negatives, and conditional sentences. The devel- (EXC) •
opment of editing skills is emphasized.
EXC 3304. Education of Exceptional
ESL 1102. Pronunciation Seminar for Students. 3-0-3.
International Students. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099, if Program.
required. Prepares students to serve as contributing mem-
This course is an individualized and small group bers of pre-referral teams. Emphasizes the charac-
seminar open to all Kennesaw State University teristics of exceptional students as they function
students for whom English is a second language. in today’s schools. This course places special
The course is designed to assist intermediate to focus on the identification of intellectual, emo-
advanced ESL students in pronunciation, focusing tional and social needs of exceptional students.
on North American English (NAE), including con- This course requires an observational experience
sonant and vowel sounds, stress, rhythm, and in an assigned school placement. Verification of
intonation. Emphasis will be placed on communi- professional liability insurance is required prior to
Courses

cating effectively in authentic situations, self- and placement in the field experience.
peer-monitoring, connecting listening with speak-
EXC 4000. Service Learning in Special
ing, and eliminating distracting speech elements.
Education. 1-3.
Prerequisite: 60 hours and permission of instruc-
• ENGLISH EDUCATION (ENED) • tor and department chair/program coordinator.
ENED 4000. Service Learning in English A community activity which links learning to
Education. 1-3. life by connecting meaningful community ser-
Prerequisite: 60 hours and permission of instruc- vice activities with academic learning, personal
tor and department chair/program director. growth, and civic responsibility. Activity will be
A community activity which links learning to designed with the instructor and approved by
life by connecting meaningful community ser- the chair/program coordinator.
vice activities with academic learning, personal
growth, and civic responsibility. Activity will be • FINANCE (FIN) •
designed with the instructor and approved by
the chair/program director. FIN 2500. Consumer Finance. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: All developmental studies courses
ENED 4414. Teaching of English/
if required.
Language Arts. 5-6-7.
Prerequisite: ENGL 3260, ENGL 3309, EDUC A nontechnical course designed to develop an
3308. understanding of the basic principles and tech-
An examination and application of curriculum niques as they apply to personal income, spend-
issues, learning theories, teaching strategies, ing and investing. Emphasis is placed upon
instructional materials and assessment proce- financial planning, budgeting, saving, home
dures for teaching secondary school English/ ownership, estate planning, and retirement.
English As A Second Language (ESL)—Finance (FIN) 261

FIN 3100. Principles of Finance. 3-0-3. FIN 4260. Treasury Management.


Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA 3-0-3.
Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 credit Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
hours including ACCT 2100, ACCT 2200, ECON Requirement and FIN 3100; Non business
2100, and ECON 2200. Majors: 60 credit hours including FIN 3100.
An introductory course designed to develop a Focuses on the structure and functioning of pay-
knowledge of the basic concepts, principles, and ment systems, the management of short-term
functions of managerial finance. Topics include the assets and short-term liabilities of the business
time value of money, valuation of bonds and stocks, firm, and the impact of computer and commu-
financial analysis, working capital management, nications technologies on financial management
capital budgeting, and capital structure strategies. systems.
FIN 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-3 credit FIN 4320. Financial Statement and
hours. Security Analysis. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Requirement, FIN 3100, and approval of the Requirement and FIN 3100; Non business
Coordinator of cooperative Majors: 60 credit hours including FIN 3100.
education/internships (KSU Career Services); This course allows students to develop an under-
Non business Majors: Not available to non busi- standing of how the economic characteristics
ness majors. of the firm, current business conditions, particu-
A supervised work experience program for a lar competitive strategies, financial policies, and
minimum of two academic semesters at a site accounting principles and procedures impact a
in business, industry, or government. For sopho- firm’s financial statements and the performance
more, junior, or senior level students who wish of its securities. It requires students to analyze
to obtain successive on-the-job experience in con- the financial statements of a firm and to analyze
junction with their academic training. Credit is and value its securities, including both debt and
allowed only in elective area. equity issues. Students will analyze the range of
variables, from macroeconomic to security-spe-
FIN 3398. Internship. 1-9 credit hours.
cific, that affect security values.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Requirement, FIN 3100, and approval of the FIN 4360. Investment Analysis and
Coordinator of cooperative education intern- Portfolio Management. 3-0-3.
ships (KSU Career Services); Non business

Courses
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Majors: Not available to non business majors. Requirement and FIN 3100; Non business
A supervised, credit-earning work experience Majors: 60 credit hours including FIN 3100.
of one academic semester with a previously Application of the principles and concepts of
approved business firm, private agency, or gov- finance to the area of investments, including the
ernment agency. A research paper is required to organization and functioning of securities mar-
receive credit. For junior or senior students who kets, the analysis of individual securities, invest-
wish to participate in an on-the-job experience in ment strategies and the formation and analysis
which they may apply their academic education. of portfolios of securities from both the perspec-
The work experience may not be with a current tive of individuals and the institutional investor.
employer. This course will be graded on an S/U
basis. Credit is allowed only in elective areas.. FIN 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit
hours.
FIN 4220. Corporate Finance. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Requirement, FIN 3100, and approval of instruc-
Requirement and FIN 3100; Non business tor and department chair prior to registration;
Majors: 60 credit hours including FIN 3100. Non business Majors: FIN 3100 and approval
Application of the principles and concepts of of instructor and department chair prior to regis-
finance to the acquisition and management of tration.
corporate assets and financial resources, the Special topics of an advanced nature not in the
management of the firm’s capital structure, and regular course offerings.
development of dividend policy.
FIN 4420. International Financial Man-
agement. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Requirement and FIN 3100; Non business
Majors: 60 credit hours including FIN 3100.
262 Course Descriptions

Investigates the implications for financial deci- • FOREIGN LANGUAGE (FL) •


sion making rules and policies that result from
consideration of an international financial per- FL 1001. Introduction to Foreign Lan-
spective. guage and Culture I. 3-0-3.
FIN 4490. Special Topics in Finance. Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 or READ 0099 if
1-3 credit hours. required.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Introduction to a foreign language and culture,
Requirement, FIN 3100, and approval of instruc- stressing progressive acquisition of effective
tor and department chair; Non business Majors: communication skills in both the written and
FIN 3100 and approval of instructor and depart- spoken language and an understanding of the
ment chair. practices and products of the culture being stud-
Selected special topics of interest to faculty and ied. Not open to native speakers of the language.
students. This course may be taken more than
FL 1002. Introduction to Foreign Lan-
once. Up to 9 credit hours are permitted. guage and Culture II. 3-0-3.
FIN 4520. Financial Derivatives and Prerequisite: One year of foreign language in
Financial Engineering. 3-0-3. high school or FL 1001 or the equivalent.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Introduction to foreign language and culture,
Requirement and FIN 3100; Non business part II, stressing continued, progressive acqui-
Majors: 60 credit hours including FIN 3100. sition of effective communication skills in both
This course is designed to help students gain a the written and spoken language and an under-
thorough understanding of the roles of futures, standing of the practices and products of the
options, and other financial derivatives in allocat- culture being studied. Not open to native speak-
ing risk; the design of financial derivatives; the ers of the language.
valuation of financial derivatives; and their appli-
FL 2001. Intermediate Foreign Lan-
cations to financial risk management problems.
guage and Culture I. 3-0-3.
FIN 4620. Financial Management of Prerequisite: FL 1002 or permission of instructor.
Financial Institutions. 3-0-3. The student will continue to develop proficiency
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and
Requirement and FIN 3100; Non business learn to communicate in culturally appropriate
Majors: 60 credit hours including FIN 3100. ways. Not open to native speakers of foreign
Courses

Financial decision making concepts are applied language.


to the particular financial management issues
FL 2002. Intermediate Foreign Lan-
of financial institutions, including funds acquisi-
guage and Culture II. 3-0-3.
tion and management of operations and capital
Prerequisite: FL 2001 or permission of instructor.
investments.
Students continue to increase linguistic and cul-
tural proficiency through the use of a variety
• FINE ARTS EDUCATION of materials and activities. Not open to native
(FAED) • speakers of the language.
FL 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit
FAED 3340. Music and Art for the Ele- hours.
mentary School. 0-4-2. Prerequisite: FL 2002.
Prerequisite: 45 credit hours.
Covers special topics external to course offerings
A course designed for preparing elementary
in order to allow a student to work individually
school educators to integrate meaningful art and
with an instructor.
music experience into the classroom. Prospective
elementary classroom educators develop basic FL 4490. Special Topics in Foreign Lan-
concepts, skills, methods of instruction, and guage. 1-3 credit hours.
teaching compentencies in the specific areas of Prerequisite: FL 2002 or permission of instructor.
music and art. Selected topics of interest to faculty and students.
Finance (FIN)—French (FREN) 263

• FOREIGN LANGUAGE Bagwell College of Education to student teach.


Full-time teaching experience in foreign lan-
EDUCATION (FLED)• guage under the supervision of a public school
cooperating teacher and college supervisor.
FLED 3303. Second Language Acquisi-
Must have prior approval of College of Educa-
tion. 3-0-3.
tion to Student Teach.
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education
Program and FREN 2002 or SPAN 2002. FLED 4498. Internship in Foreign Lan-
An introduction to major learning theories with guage Education, P-12. 6-12 hours.
particular focus on those dealing with acquisi- Prerequisite: Provisional teaching license issued
tion of a second or foreign language. Course by state of Georgia; full-time employment teach-
also explores how language learning styles and ing foreign language; letter from county where
strategies relate to theories of language acqui- employed requesting that KSU work with indi-
sition and their implications in the classroom, vidual to complete certification; analysis of aca-
P-12. Field experience is required. Proof of lia- demic transcript(s); written program of study.
bility insurance is required for field experience. Supervised, credit-earning work experience of
one academic semester with a previously
FLED 4410. Methods, Materials, and approved school. Meant to substitute for student
Curriculum of Foreign Language Educa- teaching for provisionally licensed teachers.
tion, P-8. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: FLED 3303 and FREN 2002 or SPAN
2002. • FRENCH (FREN) •
An overview of methods, materials and curricu-
lum in foreign language instruction grades P-8. FREN 1001. Introduction to French
Language and Culture I. 3-0-3.
The field experience emphasizes principles of
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 AND READ 0099.
classroom and behavior management as well as
Introduction to French language and culture,
ways to put theory into practice. Field experi-
stressing progressive acquisition of effective
ence is required. Proof of liability insurance is
communication skills in both the written and
required for field experience.
spoken language and an understanding of the
FLED 4412. Methods, Materials, and practices and products of French and Franco-
Curriculum of Foreign Language Educa- phone cultures. Not open to native speakers of
tion, 9-12. 3-0-3. French.

Courses
Prerequisite: FLED 3303 and FREN 2002 or SPAN
2002. FREN 1002. Introduction to French Lan-
An overview of methods, materials and curricu- guage and Culture II. 3-0-3.
lum in foreign language instruction grades 9-12. Prerequisite: One year of high school French or
FREN 1001 or the equivalent.
The field experience emphasizes principles of
Introduction to French language and culture,
classroom and behavior management as well as
“Part II,” stressing continued, progressive acqui-
ways to put theory into practice. Field experi-
sition of effective communication skills in both
ence is required. Proof of liability insurance is
the written and spoken language and an under-
required for field experience.
standing of the practices and products of French
FLED 4413. Field Experiences in FLED, and Francophone cultures. Not open to native
P-12. 3-0-3. speakers of French.
Prerequisite: FLED 3303 and either FLED 4410 or
FLED 4412. FREN 2001. Intermediate French Lan-
This course is a field experience course with mul- guage and Culture I. 3-0-3.
tiple placements. Students will choose two field Prerequisite: Two years of high school French or
French 1002 or the equivalent.
placements from among elementary, middle and
The student will continue to develop proficiency
high school levels. During orientation prior to
in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and
beginning each field experience, students shall
learn to communicate in culturally appropriate
explore the relationship between theory and
ways. Not open to native speakers of French.
classroom practice in foreign language educa-
tion, across the P-12 spectrum. FREN 2002. Intermediate French Lan-
guage and Culture II. 3-0-3.
FLED 4480. Student Teaching in For-
Prerequisite: Three years of high school French or
eign Languages, P-12. 1-33-12.
FREN 2001 or the equivalent.
Prerequisite: FLED 4413 and Permission from
Students continue to increase linguistic and cul-
264 Course Descriptions

tural proficiency through the use of a variety of and social and historical movements in the
materials and activities. Course will serve as a French speaking world from the Middle Ages to
transition between intermediate and upper-level 1800. Readings and discussion in French and
courses in French. Not open to native speakers English. French majors must take this course
of French. concurrently with FREN 3300.
N.B. See FREN 3300.
FREN 2290. Special Topics. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair. FREN 3311. Survey of French and Fran-
Covers special topics and study abroad courses cophone Culture and Institutions II.
external to course offerings at the intermediate 3-0-3.
level. Prerequisite: FREN 2002.
Survey of major institutions, values, customs,
FREN 3300. Introduction to French and and social and historical movements in the
Francophone Literature I. 3-0-3. French speaking world from 1800 to the present.
Prerequisite: FREN 2002.
Reading and discussion in French and English.
An introduction to the study and analysis of
French majors must take this course concurrently
literary movements and representative works
with FREN 3301.
of French and Francophone literature to 1800.
N.B. See FREN 3301.
Readings and discussion in French. French
majors must take this course concurrently with FREN 3398. Internship. 1-9 credit hours.
FREN 3310. Prerequisite: FREN 3302 AND FREN 3303 or per-
N.B. The corequisite 3310 is only for French mission of instructor.
majors. Non-French majors do not have to take Supervised, credit-earning work experience of
the corequisite course. one semester requiring use of French in the
work place. Prior approval by department coor-
FREN 3301. Introduction to French and dinator and internship supervisor is required.
Francophone Literature II. 3-0-3. No more than three semester hours may be
Prerequisite: FREN 2002.
applied toward the major.
An introduction to the study and analysis of lit-
erary movements and representative works of FREN 4400. Directed Study. 1-3.
French and Francophone literature from 1800 to Prerequisite: FREN 3302 AND FREN 3303
the present. Readings and discussion in French. or permission of instructor.
French majors must take this course concurrently Covers special topics and seminars external to
Courses

with FREN 3311. course offerings that allow a student to work


N.B. The corequisite 3311 is only for French individually with an instructor. Requires prior
majors. Non-French majors do not have to take approval by instructor and department chair.
the corequisite course.
FREN 4404. Commercial French. 3-0-3.
FREN 3302. Practical Conversation. Prerequisite: FREN 3302 AND FREN 3303 or per-
3-0-3. mission of instructor.
Prerequisite: FREN 2002. An in-depth study of business practices and
Stresses expansion of effective listening compre- the language of business in the French-speaking
hension and speaking skills through culturally world. This course will prepare students for the
and linguistically appropriate activities. exam for the Certificat Pratique de Francais Com-
FREN 3303. Grammar and Composition. mercial given by the Paris Chamber of Commerce.
3-0-3. FREN 4410. French Linguistics. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: FREN 2002. Prerequisite: FREN 3302 AND FREN 3303.
General review of grammar through composi- A study of the basic concepts of phonology,
tion and other written activities, such as sum- syntax, semantics and stylistics of the French lan-
maries, correspondence, descriptions, narration, guage. This course also includes an introduction
literary analysis, and other rhetorical and cultur- to the study of linguistics as a science of lan-
ally appropriate forms. guage and to the most important concepts of
FREN 3310. Survey of French and Fran- French stylistics.
cophone Culture and Institutions I. FREN 4430. Topics in French and Fran-
3-0-3. cophone Literatures to 1800. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: FREN 2002. Prerequisite: FREN 3300 AND FREN 3301 AND
A survey of major institutions, values, customs, FREN 3303 or permission of instructor.
French (FREN)—Geography (GEOG) 265

An exploration of a specific literary period, Sociology 2105) that can be taken to satisfy the
movement, or genre in either French or Fran- Social Issues requirement in the general educa-
cophone literature prior to 1800. Readings and tion curriculum. A common set of world social
discussion in French. issues is critically examined from one of four
social science perspectives. The discipline of
FREN 4432. Topics in French and Fran-
geography examines the effects of the current
cophone Literatures Since 1800. 3-0-3.
social patterns on the cultural landscape from
Prerequisite: FREN 3302 and FREN 3303.
local, regional and global perspectives.
An exploration of a specific literary period,
movement, or genre in either French or Franco- GEOG 3300. Urban Geography. 3-0-3.
phone literature since 1800. Readings and dis- Prerequisite: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105.
cussion in French. An analysis of the location and distribution of
urban centers, urban land uses and the geo-
FREN 4455. Advanced Grammar and
graphical aspects of general urban issues.
Translation. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: FREN 3302 AND FREN 3303. GEOG 3305. Introduction to Carto-
An examination of French grammar and syntax graphic Processes. 3-0-3.
with special emphasis on the problems posed to Prerequisite: MATH 1107; CSIS 1100 or CSIS 2100
nonnative speakers of French and on techniques or BISM 2100; GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105.
of general translation. Lecture and discussion in This course is an introduction to the processes
French and English. and technology of cartography, the science and
art of map making. The foundations of map con-
FREN 4490. Special Topics in French.
struction and design will be presented from theo-
3-0-3.
retical and applied perspectives. Students will be
Prerequisite: French 3302 or permission of
introduced to hands-on and computerized map-
instructor.
ping, leading to a basic appreciation of the map
Special topics relevant to the study of French
as the integral component of geographic infor-
speaking societies.
mation systems data analysis.
FREN 4499. Senior Seminar. 3-0-3.
GEOG 3310. Historical Geography.
Prerequisite: FREN 3300 & FREN 3301 & FREN
3-0-3.
3303 & FREN 3310 & FREN 3311.
Prerequisite: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105.
A capstone course designed to synthesize and
A global approach to the study of the geographic

Courses
connect the student’s prior academic experiences
factors affecting historical events associated with
in the major and related fields of study. Students
the human exploration and settlement of the
will prepare a reflective essay and a research
planet. The influence of geography on economic
paper to present to the faculty. Papers and pre-
and political changes over time will be reviewed
sentation in French.
for selected historical phenomena.

• GEOGRAPHY (GEOG) • GEOG 3312. Geography of Europe.


3-0-3.
GEOG 1101. World Regional Geography. Prerequisite: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105.
3-0-3. A geographical survey of Europe and its envi-
Prerequisite: None. rons, with emphasis on the tremendous diversity
An introduction to world regions through the found in both the physical and human geog-
context of human geography. The course focuses raphy of the region. Economic, political and
on basic geographic concepts to analyze social, cultural geography are examined within the
economic and political issues at local, regional framework of the forces that are rapidly restruc-
and global scales. Elements of fundamental turing European landscapes of East and West.
physical geography will be discussed to illus- GEOG 3315. Introduction to Geographic
trate the spatial relationships between the physi- Information Systems. 3-0-3.
cal environment and human geography. Prerequisite: GEOG 3305 or permission of
instructor.
GEOG 2105. Social Issues: Perspec-
tives in Geography. 2-0-2. This course will acquaint students with the basic
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099. design of state-of-the-art GIS and its analytical
One of the four disciplinary options (Anthro- capabilities. Topics include: history of GIS tech-
pology 2105, Geography 2105, Psychology 2105, nology, applications in GIS, basic map projection
information, raster/vector GIS, introduction to
266 Course Descriptions

available data, and basic GIS functions. The GEOG 3700. Introduction to Enviromen-
course will use PC-based software to introduce tal Studies. 3-0-3.
these concepts in an easy-to-learn, hands-on Prerequisite: Any general education science lab
environment. sequence.
This course is designed to give students an
GEOG 3320. Political Geography. 3-0-3.
overview of the human dimensions of US envi-
Prerequisites: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105 or per-
ronmental issues and is a core course for the
mission of instructor.
environmental studies minor. From a geograph-
This course is intended to explore the following
ical perspective, the course explores how US
concepts and issues from a geographical perspec-
environmental laws, ethics, viewpoints and eco-
tive: territoriality, theories of the state, spatial
nomics interact, shape, and manifest themselves
expressions of ideology, boundary issues, impe-
across the landscape. Students will be introduced
rialism, geopolitics, nationalism, electoral geog-
to technologies, such as geographic information
raphy, national identity, religion and governing
systems and satellite images, used by geogra-
power in a spatial context, and cultural and/or
phers to study environmental issues. The course
economic hegemony.
will examine spatial patterns arising from the
GEOG 3330. Economic Geography. ways in which we manage our natural resources
3-0-3. and environment. Natural resources such as
Prerequisite: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105 or per- water, air, soil, energy and fossil fuels will be
mission of instructor. used as examples in the discussion of spatial pat-
A geographic analysis of global resources and terns arising from resource extraction, transpor-
economic growth. The underlying theme of tation and use.
the course is the impact of space (location, dis-
tance, area, boundaries) on economic decision GEOG 4405. Advanced Geographic
making. Topics to be discussed include pop- Information Systems. 3-0-3.
ulation, transportation, rural and urban land Prerequisite: GIS 3315.
use, industrial location, natural resource man- This course builds upon basic concepts
agement, and development/underdevelopment. addressed in the Introduction to Geographic
Differing spatial theories will be employed to Information Systems (GIS) course. The use of
explain the global economy in transition. topological data procedures and relational data-
base concepts within the GIS context will be
GEOG 3340. Cultural Geography. 3-0-3. investigated along with procedures relevant to
Courses

Prerequisite: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105 or per- building geographic databases, including map
mission of instructor. projections, coordinate systems, digitizing vec-
A thematic approach is applied to analyze tors, and transformations. Fundamental spatial
human cultures, to examine world cultural analysis operations are introduced, including
regions, to note the spread of cultural traits, to spatial query, address matching, spatial aggre-
interpret interactions between culture and envi- gations, buffering, polygon overlay, and point-
ronment, and to appreciate multiple traits of cul- in-polygon operations. More advanced topics
tures and cultural landscapes. The five themes of will be considered, such as automation through
region, diffusion, ecology, integration, and land- macros, development of custom user interfaces,
scape are used to explore historical and contem- triangulated irregular networks, digital elevation
porary issues of population, agriculture, politics, models and basic network analysis.
language, religion, ethnicity, popular culture,
and urban spaces. The philosophy of the course GEOG 4400. Directed Study. 1 - 3 credit
is based on the premise that the built environ- hours.
ment is a spatial expression of the beliefs, atti- Prerequisite: Approval of Advisor, Instructor,
Major Area Committee and Department Chair
tudes, and practices of a people.
prior to registration.
GEOG 3360. Geography of China. 3-0-3. Covers special topics and seminars external to
Prerequisite: GEOG 2105 or GEOG 1101 or per- regular course offerings.
mission of instructor.
This course provides an overview of the physical GEOG 4410. Introduction to Remote
Sensing. 3-0-3.
and cultural geography of China and explores
Prerequisite: GEOG 3305.
the ways in which the Chinese have made use
Remote sensing is the art and science of obtain-
of their natural and human resources in the past
ing information about an object, area, or phe-
and in the modern era.
nomenon by a device that is not in contact
Geography (GEOG)—German (GRMN) 267

with the study subject. Remote sensing methods GRMN 2001. Intermediate German Lan-
include the production and analyses of satellite guage and Culture I. 3-0-3.
imagery and aerial photography. This course is Prerequisite: Two years of high school German,
an introduction to remote sensing from space or GRMN 1002 or the equivalent.
and aircraft platforms and an introduction to The student will continue to develop proficiency
digital photogrammetry. in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and
learn to communicate in culturally appropriate
GEOG 4415. Practicum in Geographic
ways. Not open to native speakers of German.
Information Systems. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: GIS 4405 and permission of Pro- GRMN 2002. Intermediate German Lan-
gram Coordinator. guage and Culture II. 3-0-3.
A capstone course designed to complete the GIS Prerequisite: Three years of high school German
Certificate Program by integrating the students' or GRMN 2001 or the equivalent.
prior training in the application of computer- Students continue to increase linguistic and cul-
based manipulation and spatial analysis of data tural proficiency through the use of a variety
through the use of geographic information sys- of materials and activities. Course will serve as
tems programs in on-site applied work settings. a transition between intermediate and upper-
Students will be given applied experiences in level courses in the language. Not open to native
selected public or private organizations in the speakers of German.
community or in campus-related programs to
make use of their GIS training. This practicum GRMN 3300. Introduction to Literature.
3-0-3.
will be a coordinated effort involving both an
Prerequisite: GRMN 2002 or permission of
on-campus seminar classroom experience and an
instructor.
on-site work experience.
Reading and discussion of representative works
GEOG 4490. Special Topics in Geogra- of German literature to acquaint the student with
phy. 1-3 credit hours. a variety of genres and the basic techniques of
Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor and Depart- literary interpretation. Also includes discussion
ment Chair. of social and political background of works read.
Selected topics of interest to faculty and students. Class conducted in German.
GRMN 3302. Practical Conversation.
• GERMAN (GRMN) • 3-0-3.

Courses
Prerequisite: GRMN 2002 or permission of
GRMN 1001. Introduction to German instructor.
Language and Culture I. 3-0-3.
Students learn to express themselves verbally,
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099 if
using role-play, skits and extemporaneous speak-
required.
ing on a variety of topics including basic situa-
Introduction to German language and culture,
tions as well as discussions of professional areas.
stressing progressive acquisition of effective
Taught in German.
communication skills in both the written and
spoken language and an understanding of the GRMN 3303. Grammar and Composi-
practices and products of German culture. Not tion. 3-0-3.
open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GRMN 2002 or permission of
instructor.
GRMN 1002. Introduction to German Introduction to the more difficult points of
Language and Culture II. 3-0-3.
German grammar, syntax and style. In addition
Prerequisite: One year of high school German, or
to the development of writing skills, students
GRMN 1001, or the equivalent.
will concentrate on expanding their active vocab-
Introduction to German language and culture,
ulary. Taught in German.
part II, stressing continued, progressive acqui-
sition of effective communication skills in both GRMN 3310. Survey of German Culture
the written and spoken language and an under- and Institutions I. 5-0-5.
standing of the practices and products of Prerequisite: GRMN 2002 or permission of
German culture. Not open to native speakers of instructor.
German. A survey of the culture and civilization of Cen-
tral Europe from the early Middle Ages to the
Enlightenment. It is designed to provide an
268 Course Descriptions

overview of the major epochs in the cultural his- • HEALTH AND HUMAN
tory of the area on the basis of artistic and his-
torical development. Reading and discussion in
SERVICES (HHS) •
German and in English. HHS 3100. Culturally Competent. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
GRMN 3311. Survey of German Culture
This course provides students with skills needed
and Institutions II. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: GRMN 2002 or permission of by health and human service workers to provide
instructor. effective care to individuals from a variety of
A survey of the culture and civilization of Ger- ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Emphasis will
many and Central Europe from the Enlighten- be placed on working with immigrants and refu-
ment to the present. It is designed to provide gees from Hispanic cultures.
an overview of the major epochs in the cultural
history of the area on the basis of artistic and • HEALTH, PHYSICAL
historical development. Reading and discussion EDUCATION
in German and in English.
AND SPORT SCIENCE (HPS) •
GRMN 3398. Internship. 1-9 credit
hours. SECTION I: General Education
Prerequisite: GRMN 3302 or permission of Requirement.
instructor.
HPS 1000. Fitness for Living. 2-1-3.
Supervised, credit-earning work experience of
Prerequisite: None.
one semester requiring use of German in the
Emphasis on the importance of physical activity,
work place. Prior approval by department coor-
nutrition, stress and weight management, and
dinator and internship supervisor is required.
health-related fitness components. Topics will
GRMN 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit be developed with practical applications to
hours. one’s life-style including opportunities to assess
Prerequisite: GRMN 2202 or permission of selected fitness, nutritional and activity patterns,
instructor. and to develop and participate in a personalized
Covers special topics and seminars external to physical activity program.
course offerings that allow a student to work
individually with an instructor. Requires prior SECTION II: Physical Activity Program.
Courses

approval by instructor and department chair.


HPS 1030. Aerobic Conditioning/Weight
GRMN 4404. Commercial German. Training. 1-1-1.
3-0-3. Prerequisite: None.
Prerequisite: GRMN 2202 or permission of Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques
instructor. and knowledge appropriate for the successful par-
An in-depth study of business practices and ticipation in a variety of cardiovascular fitness
the language of business that focuses on verbal related activities and weight training principles.
and written communication as well as economic,
social and political factors that are important to HPS 1050. Archery/Badminton. 1-1-1.
Prerequisite: None.
the conduct of business in the German-speaking
Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques
world. Readings and discussion in German and
and knowledge appropriate for the successful
in English.
participation in target archery and badminton.
GRMN 4490. Special Topics in German.
3-0-3. HPS 1070. Basketball/Softball. 1-1-1.
Prerequisite: GRMN 2202 or permission of Prerequisite: None.
instructor. Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques
Selected topics of interest to students and faculty. and knowledge appropriate for the successful
participation in five player basketball and slow
pitch softball.
HPS 1090. Dance: Ballet. 1-1-1.
Prerequisite: None.
Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques
and knowledge appropriate for the successful
participation in classical ballet dance.
German (GRMN)—Health, Physical Education, and Sport Science (HPS) 269

HPS 1130. Dance: Jazz. 1-1-1. and knowledge appropriate for the successful
Prerequisite: None. participation in the development of stunts,
Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques tumbling and gymnastic skills. Additional fee
and knowledge appropriate for the successful required.
participation in basic jazz dance.
HPS 1310. Swimming: Beginning. 1-1-1.
HPS 1150. Dance: Modern. 1-1-1. Prerequisite: None.
Prerequisite: None. Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques
Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques and knowledge appropriate for the successful
and knowledge appropriate for the successful completion of the American Red Cross Begin-
participation in basic modern dance. ning through Intermediate swimming levels.
Course is designed for the nonswimmer or indi-
HPS 1170. Folk/Square/Social Dance. vidual with limited aquatic experience.
1-1-1.
Prerequisite: None. HPS 1330. Swimming: Intermediate.
Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques, 1-1-1.
and knowledge appropriate for participation Prerequisite: HPS 1310 or instructor’s consent.
in folk, square, and social dance. Will include Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques
selected folk dances representing different cul- and knowledge appropriate for swimming and
tures around the world. Circle, contra, and west- water safety. Successful completion of this course
ern style square dance will be emphasized. Social corresponds to standards for the American Red
dances shall include Fox Trot, Cha Cha Cha, Cross Swimmer level.
Tango, Waltz, Shag, and current popular dances.
HPS 1350. Swimming: Lifeguard Train-
HPS 1190. Soccer/Team Handball. ing. 1-1-1.
1-1-1. Prerequisite: HPS 1330 or instructor’s consent.
Prerequisite: None. Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques
Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques, and knowledge appropriate to become certified
and knowledge appropriate for the successful in American Red Cross Lifeguard Training.
participation in soccer/team handball.
HPS 1390. Tennis. 1-1-1.
HPS 1210. Golf. 1-1-1. Prerequisite: None.
Prerequisite: None. Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques

Courses
Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques and knowledge appropriate for the successful
and knowledge appropriate for the successful participation in tennis.
participation in golf. Additional fee required.
HPS 1430. Volleyball. 1-1-1.
HPS 1230. Martial Arts. 1-1-1. Prerequisite: None.
Prerequisite: None. Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques,
Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques and knowledge appropriate for
and knowledge appropriate for the successful successful participation in volleyball.
participation in the development of martial arts
HPS 1450. Scuba Diving. 1-1-1.
and self defense skills. Additional fee required. Prerequisite: HPS 1310 or instructor’s consent.
HPS 1250. Outdoor Recreational Pur- This course is designed to develop fundamental
suits. 1-1-1. concepts, principles, and techniques of sport
Prerequisite: HPS 131 or instructor’s consent. SCUBA diving. Course covers selection and
Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques maintenance of gear, snorkeling skills, physiol-
and knowledge appropriate for the successful ogy of diving, use of dive tables, diving environ-
participation and appreciation of outdoor recre- ment, and an emphasis on safe diving practices.
ation activities. Units represented may include PADI open water certification available but not
backpacking, camping, orienteering and canoe- required to fulfill HPS credit. Additional fee and
ing. Weekend trips, off campus field experiences mask, fins, and snorkel required.
and additional fee required.
HPS 1470. Self Defense. 1-1-1.
HPS 1290. Stunts & Tumbling/ Prerequisite: None.
Gymnastics. 1-1-1. This course develops self defense tactics and
Prerequisite: None. the knowledge of personal safety. Topics may
Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques include but are not limited to hand and leg
270 Course Descriptions

strikes, various escapes and releases, safety in HPS 1830. Swimming: Water Safety
the car and home, sexual harassment, date rape, Instructor. 1-2-2.
self defense and the law, and sexual abuse of Prerequisite: HPS 1330 or instructor’s consent.
children. Fundamental techniques, knowledge and methods
appropriate to become certified to teach all levels in
HPS 1510. Fitness Swimming. 1-1-1.
the American Red Cross swimming programs.
Prerequisite: HPS 1310 or instructor’s consent.
This course provides opportunities for students HPS 1850. Advanced Strength/Aerobic
with good swim skills to increase their fitness Training. 1-1-1.
level via the medium of water. Workouts will be Prerequisite: HPS majors only.
comprised of drills designed to increase stroke Motor skill acquisition, advanced techniques and
efficiency as they improve aerobic capacity, body knowledge appropriate for successful participa-
composition, and muscular endurance. This is a tion and instruction in strength training and aer-
vital opportunity for those students with physi- obic fitness activities.
cal limitations that prohibit typical land based
exercise. SECTION III. Health, Physical Educa-
tion, and Sport Science Major Courses.
HPS 1530. Water Aerobics. 1-1-1.
Prerequisite: None. HPS 2000. Contemporary and Historical
Perspectives of Health and Physical
This course is comprised of aerobic exercises
Education. 3-0-3.
and muscular strength/endurance exercises per-
Prerequisite: ENGL 099, READ 099, if required.
formed in the water. These exercises will
An overview of contemporary and historical
focus on increasing mobility, cardiovascular fit-
perspectives of health and physical education.
ness, muscle tone, and improving body compo-
Emphasis is on providing discussion of career
sition. This is a vital opportunity for students
options, major programs of study and profes-
with physical limitations prohibiting typical land
sional opportunities in the areas of health and
based exercise. No aquatic proficiency required.
physical education as well as a survey and study
HPS 1550. Developmental Movement of the historical and philosophical principles rel-
Experiences. 1-1-1. ative to physical education from a world and
Prerequisite: None. U.S. perspective. HPS majors should take this
Foundational framework for motor skill acqui- course prior to all 200-400 level major courses.
sition, fundamental techniques and knowledge
Courses

HPS 2090. Exercise Leadership. 2-2-3.


appropriate for children and early adolescents.
Prerequisite: HPS 1000 and Community First Aid
Developmental patterns and experiences will
and Safety (C.F.A.S.) Certification.
range from educational games, rhythms, and
This course is designed to provide students with
gymnastics to cooperative, cross cultural and cre-
leadership skills and experience that directly
ative leisure activities/games.
apply to fitness programs. Topics include cur-
HPS 1570. Walk/Jog for Fitness. 1-1-1. rent trends in aerobics classes, workout design
Prerequisite: None. and implementation, monitoring exercise, exer-
Motor skill acquisition, fundamental techniques, cise risk factors, safe and effective exercise, eval-
and knowledge appropriate for the successful uation of existing programs, and administrative
participation in walking/jogging cardiovascular considerations.
fitness activities. Nutritional principles for life-
HPS 2100. Introduction to Exercise and
time health will also be discussed.
Health Science. 3-0-3.
HPS 1810. Outdoor Recreation and Edu- Prerequisite: ENGL 099, READ 099, if required.
cation. 1-1-1. An introduction to exercise and health science.
Prerequisite: HPS majors only. Topics include historical perspectives, overview
Fundamental techniques and leadership skills of the profession and career opportunities, pro-
necessary for safe participation in a variety of fessional organizations, certification programs,
land and water outdoor recreational and educa- current issues, and future trends.
tional activities without disturbance to the envi-
HPS 2200. Introduction to Sport Man-
ronment. Activities may include backpacking,
agement. 3-0-3.
camping, orienteering, canoeing, basic survival
Prerequisite: None.
and problem solving adventure activities.
Health, Physical Education, and Sport Science (HPS) 271

An introduction to sport management. To HPS 3240. Physical Activity and Health


include a historical development of the disci- Promotion for the Older Adult. 2-3-3.
pline, overview of the profession and career Prerequisite: HPS 1000 and completion of 60
opportunities, professional organizations, cur- hours. BIOL 2222 and 3300 recommended.
rent issues, and future trends. Examination of the relationship and importance
of physical activity and health promotion of the
HPS 2290. Special Topics. 1-3.
older adult. Also includes risk reduction, health
Prerequisite: None.
maintenance, health enhancement, and physical
Selected physical activity units not regularly offered
activity assessment. Students will participate in
through the Department of HPS. Repeatable.
the lab setting associated with the SPARHKS
HPS 2300. First Aid/CPR Instructor program on Friday mornings.
Training. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Current American Red Cross Commu- HPS 3250. Family Health Issues. 3-0-3.
nity First Aid and Safety (C.F.A.S.) Certification. Prerequisite: HPS 1000.
Theory, practice, and application for safety, The study of various health issues as they relate
injury prevention, and care to include the Ameri- to relationships and family life. Topics include:
can Red Cross Community First Aid and Safety sexuality and sexual behavior; family planning,
(CFAS). Teaching methodologies are also needed pregnancy, and childbirth; parenting; communi-
to prepare professionals to teach CFAS to the cation; violence, and abuse; addictive behaviors;
layperson. Topics may include but are not lim- aging and death and dying.
ited to: personal, school, home, recreation, traffic, HPS 3300. Personal Health Behavior.
work site, and disaster safety. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: HPS 1000.
HPS 3050. Coaching Principles. 3-0-3.
A study of the physical, mental and social factors
Prerequisite: None.
of personal wellness and community health
Basic understanding of the theoretical and prac-
issues. Topics include substance use and abuse,
tical applications of the sport science areas of
human sexuality and HIV, mental and emotional
physical education related to coaching. Current
health, diseases and disorders.
issues and topics addressing the principles and
problems of the prospective interscholastic coach HPS 3370. Sport Facility Design and
including coaching philosophy, pedagogy, sport Management. 3-0-3.
psychology, sport medicine and sport physiol- Prerequisite: HPS 2200 and BLAW 2200 .

Courses
ogy. Students successfully completing the course Study of the principles and theories involving
may become certified as a Leader Level Coach by the overall design and management principles
the American Coaches Effectiveness Program. of indoor and outdoor facilities for sport and
physical activity. Topics may include but are not
HPS 3100. Sociological and Psychologi-
limited to facility development, personnel man-
cal Aspects of HPS. 3-0-3.
agement, problem solving, time management,
Prerequisite: None.
financial administration, policy making, schedul-
A survey of social psychological factors affecting
ing, public relations and event management.
performance in sports and physical activity.
Emphasis on the impact on performance and the HPS 3390. Leadership and Management
teaching/learning process. Topics will include in Sport Organizations. 3-0-3.
leadership, motivation, group cohesion, social Prerequisite: HPS 2200.
facilitation, arousal/anxiety, cognitive processes, Students explore the theoretical frameworks of
and competition and cooperation. the body of knowledge of Sport Management,
the practical applications of those frameworks,
HPS 3200. Motor Learning. 3-0-3.
and the ethical issues confronting today’s sport
Prerequisite: None.
managers.
Current theories and principles explaining motor
behavior and the psychological factors related to HPS 3398. Internship. 1-15.
and affecting motor skill acquisition and perfor- Prerequisite: Consent of department chair.
mance. Topics include learning theories, informa- A supervised, credit-earning experience of one
tion processing, motor control, state of the learner, academic semester with a previously approved
nature of skills and instructional considerations. business firm, sport organization, private agency
or governmental agency. Credit is allowed only
in elective areas. S/U grading only.
272 Course Descriptions

HPS 3450. Curriculum, Instruction & experiences for early childhood school children
Management for Early Childhood Physi- as part of the comprehensive school health edu-
cal Education. 2-2-3. cation program. Planning, teaching, and evalu-
Prerequisite: Admission to program and HPS ating a developmental program. Emphasis will
1550. be placed upon integrated planning experiences.
Knowledge, fundamental techniques and motor Includes field experience.
skill analysis appropriate for the development
HPS 3750. Adapted Physical Education.
of children’s games, dance and gymnastics.
2-2-3.
Knowledge and skills of basic skill themes and
Prerequisite: HPS 3450 or 3550.
movement concepts stressed. Curriculum devel-
Characteristics and abilities of individuals with
opment, methods and materials for planning
disabilities and effect on the performance of
and implementing a total developmental program
the individuals. Methods for assessing abilities,
for elementary physical education. Includes teach-
modifying and developing suitable physical edu-
ing experiences and appropriate computer software
cation programs for schools and activity centers.
usage. Verification of liability insurance is required
Particular attention is given to the implications
prior to placement in the field experience.
of current legislation affecting individuals with
HPS 3500. Foundations of Recreation disabilities. Includes practical experience in an
and Leisure. 3-0-3. adapted program.
Prerequisite: HPS 2200.
HPS 3800. Biomechanics. 3-0-3.
A foundation for the study of recreation and
Prerequisite: BIOL 2221.
leisure and the organizations that deliver rec-
The study of neuromuscular and mechanical
reational services. To include an overview of
principles of motion as related to the analysis of
the philosophical, historical, social, cultural, and
human movement.
political factors which influence recreation and
leisure. The course will also emphasize the role HPS 3850. Health Promotion and Program
of the professional in the delivery of recreational Planning. 3-0-3.
services. Prerequisite: HPS 3300, HPS 2100, or instructor’s
consent.
HPS 3550. Curriculum, Instruction and Fundamentals of health promotion and program
Management for Middle Grade and Sec-
development, implementation and evaluation in
ondary Physical Education. 3-0-3.
community, work site, club and clinical settings.
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.
Courses

Includes economic impact of health program-


Curriculum development, methods and materi-
ming, analysis of planning as well as tools for
als for planning and implementing a total devel-
measurement of health status at the individual,
opmental program for middle and secondary
community and national levels.
grade physical education. Includes teaching
experiences and appropriate computer software HPS 4000. Service Learning in HPS. 1-3.
usage. Prerequisite: 60 semester hours and permission
of the instructor and chair/program director.
HPS 3650. Curriculum, Methods and
A community activity which links learning to
Materials in Health Education. 2-2-3.
life by connecting meaningful community ser-
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.
vice activities with academic learning, personal
Curriculum development and instructional anal-
growth, and civic responsibility. Activity will be
ysis for the planning and implementation
designed with the instructor and approved by
of comprehensive health education programs
the chair/program director.
for grades P-12. Includes experiences in
school-community health services, teaching HPS 4050. Care and Prevention of Sport
experiences, directed field observations and Injuries. 2-2-3.
appropriate computer software usage. Verifica- Prerequisite: HPS 2300 and BIOL 2221.
tion of liability insurance is required prior to Theory and practice of the care, prevention and
placement in the field experience. rehabilitation of sport related injuries. Emphasis
on the recognition, classification and evaluation
HPS 3670. Early Childhood Health/
of specific athletic injuries related to articular
Physical Education for the Classroom
surfaces.
Teacher. 2-2-2.
Prerequisite: EDUC 3302.
The study of health education and movement
Health, Physical Education, and Sport Science (HPS) 273

HPS 4150. Nutrition and Physical Activ- stress testing and respiratory efficiency. Thor-
ity. 3-0-3. oughly familiarizes student with lab procedures,
Prerequisite: HPS 1000 and admission to pro- test protocol and construction of personalized
gram or instructor’s consent. exercise prescription.
Nutritional needs of individuals participating in
HPS 4400. Directed Study. 1-15.
physical activity and sport. Topics include the
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor, major area
role of individual nutrients in metabolism, esti-
committee, and department chair prior to regis-
mation of energy needs, fluid balance, food fads, tration.
meal planning and nutritional needs of the body Covers special topics and seminars of an advanced
during various stages of activity. nature external to regular course offerings.
HPS 4200. Contemporary Health HPS 4410. Practicum in Children’s
Issues. 3-0-3. Health and Physical Education. 1-3-1.
Prerequisite: HPS 1000. Prerequisite: HPS 3450, permission of department.
The investigation and discussion of current and Field based practicum in the early grade public
future issues that may affect the health and schools designed to provide students with practical
well-being of the individual and society. Topics experiences in planning and implementing health
include but are not limited to: health care, and and physical education instruction in grades P-5.
consumer health issues, health care legislation, Verification of liability insurance is required prior
environmental health concerns, HIV/AIDS. to placement in the field experience.
HPS 4250. Measurement and Evalua- HPS 4430. Practicum in Middle and
tion 3-0-3. Secondary School Health and Physical
Prerequisite: MATH 1107, admission to program, Education. 1-3-1.
and HPS 3450 or 3550. Prerequisite: HPS 3550, HPS 3650, admission to
A survey of tests and the study of measurement program.
and evaluation in health and physical education. A field based practicum in both the middle and
Administration and critique of appropriate mea- secondary public schools designed to provide
sures of content and skill performance. Use of students with practical experiences in planning
research design, statistics and computer software. and implementing school health and physical
HPS 4270. Research Methodology. education instruction in grades 6-12. Verification
3-0-3. of liability insurance is required prior to place-

Courses
Prerequisite: HPS major, senior standing, and ment in the field experience.
program admission.
HPS 4490. Special Topics in HPS. 1-3.
Overview of the research process applied in the
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
study of health and physical education. Topics ment chair.
will include simple experimental design, data Selected topics of interest to faculty and students
gathering techniques, statistical concepts and not normally offered by the Department of HPS.
methods and report/research writing.
HPS 4500. Physiological Basis of Train-
HPS 4300. Physiology of Exercise. ing and Performance. 2-2-3.
2-2-3. Prerequisite: BIOL 2222. Corequisite: HPS 4300.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2222. A study of the physiological basis of training and
Physiological functions of the body during mus- factors limiting human performance. Includes
cular work. Physiological aspects of fatigue, topics such as neuromuscular function, hor-
training and physical fitness. Includes laboratory monal control, environmental conditions, ergo-
experiences. genic aids, and the evaluation and training for
HPS 4350. Fitness Evaluation and Exer- performance. Includes laboratory experiences.
cise Prescription. 3-0-3.
HPS 4600. Health Promotion Applica-
Prerequisite: HPS 4300.
tions. 3-0-3.
A detailed examination of the health-related Prerequisite: HPS 3850 or permission of instructor.
aspects of physical fitness. Emphasis on current Health promotion programming emphasizing
test procedures used for determining body fat program implementation and application strat-
percentage, maximum oxygen uptake, cardiac egies. Topics include: health communication,
social marketing, funding, occupational health
274 Course Descriptions

and safety, facilitation skills and related profes- academic semester at an approved sport man-
sional issues pertaining to health promotion and agement internship site. Students work under
education. the direct supervision of sport management pro-
fessionals and a university supervisor. Required
HPS 4710. Senior Sport Management
of all sport management students. S/U grading
Seminar. 1-4-3.
only.
Prerequisite: HPS 3390 or instructor’s consent.
This capstone course is designed for the sport
• HISTORY (HIST) •
management concentration by integrating the
student’s prior academic experiences and analyz- HIST 1110. Introduction To World Civili-
ing them in the context of the required seminar zations. 3-0-3.
field-based experiences. Contemporary issues, Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 (with C or better.)
problems, research and theories are discussed. An overview of world history which provides
Additional course content includes: strategies an introduction to the origin and development
for seeking internship and entry-level employ- of the world's civilizations and their political,
ment, long-term career planning and post gradu- social, cultural, and economic traditions; uses a
ate study options. global approach to world history, and empha-
sizes the universal nature of the experience.
HPS 4730. Seminar in Exercise and HIST 2111. America to 1890. 3-0-3.
Health Science. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 (with C or better.)
Prerequisite: HPS 3850, HPS 2100, senior stand- Explores major themes in the social, cultural,
ing, or permission of instructor.
political, and economic history of the peoples of
Designed as a culminating course to integrate the
North America to 1890. Topics include the inter-
academic experiences in the Exercise and Health
section of cultures in colonial America; the origin
Science program. Recent issues, trends, theories,
and development of the American republic; the
problems, and research will be examined. Addi-
evolution of democratic ideas and institutions;
tional content will include career skills, employ-
western expansion; slavery; sectional conflict;
ment strategies and marketplace needs.
emancipation and its aftermath; immigration;
HPS 4750. Exercise and Health Science social and cultural change; the Industrial Revolu-
Internship. 1-39-12. tion; and the changing role of the U.S. in world
Prerequisite: Admission to Exercise and Health affairs. Examination of primary sources forms
Science Internship, a 2.7 GPA in EHS Core and an important element of this course.
Courses

Concentration; and department chair approval.


HIST 2112. America Since 1890. 3-0-3.
A senior-level credit-earning experience of one
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 (with C or better.)
academic semester at an approved exercise and
Examines the major themes of American history
health science internship site. Students work
since 1890, the multicultural nature of contempo-
under the direct supervision of exercise and health
rary U.S. civilization, and the nation’s role in the
science professionals and a university supervisor.
global arena.
Required of all Exercise and Health Science stu-
dents. S/U grading only. HIST 2206. Origins of Great Traditions.
3-0-3.
HPS 4850. Student Teaching in Health
Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
and Physical Education (P-12). 1-33-12.
A systematic examination of five centers of civ-
Prerequisite: Admission to HPS student teaching.
ilization in Afro-Eurasia during their defining
Full-time teaching experience under the supervi-
moments. The course focuses on the historical
sion of a public school supervising teacher and
contexts that gave rise to China’s classical
a college supervisor. S/U grading only. Verifica-
philosophies, India’s transcendental world-view,
tion of liability insurance is required prior to
the Judaeo-Christian-Islamic synthesis, African
placement in the field experience.
mytho-religious systems of thought and the
HPS 4950. Sport Management Intern- emergence of Latin-European culture in the
ship. 1-39-9. West. Content emphasizes cross-cultural influ-
Prerequisite: Admission to Sport Management ences and connections.
Internship; an AGPA of 2.5; and department
chair approval. HIST 2275. Local History Research.
A senior-level credit earning experience of one 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: HIST 2111 & 2112.
Using the vehicle of local history, this course is
Health, Physical Education, and Sport Science (HPS)—History (HIST) 275

designed to acquaint students with repositories and its end, and U.S. relations with developing
of historical documents in the Atlanta area and world areas.
to provide them with a working knowledge of
HIST 3325. Introduction to Public His-
historical research methods.
tory. 3-0-3.
HIST 3304. History of Georgia. 3-0-3. Prerequisite:HIST 2112.
Prerequisite: HIST 2112. The course exposes students to how Americans
A consideration of Georgia’s political, economic, think about the past, as well as its commemora-
social, and cultural development from the colo- tion and public presentation. Special focus will
nial period to the present. Topics include the be placed on the ways in which historians trans-
cultures of indigenous peoples, the Spanish in fer their writing, research, and analytical skills to
Georgia, the founding of a British colony, the professions outside of academia. Major subfields
Revolution, Indian removal, antebellum society, and professions within public history are exam-
the Civil War, Reconstruction, the New South ined as are the current issues and controversies
era, the rise and decline of the cotton economy, within the field.
race relations, and post-World War II prosperity
HIST 3326. Historic Preservation. 3-0-3.
and problems.
Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
HIST 3305. The World Since 1945. Examines the history, theories, and methods of
3-0-3. historic preservation. Students are exposed to
Prerequisite: HIST 1110. such activities as renovation approaches for his-
A survey of major themes in world history toric architecture, neighborhood and downtown
since 1945, it focuses on sociocultural and intel- revitalization, and heritage tourism, as well as
lectual developments in addition to the tra- the social and ethical issues swirling around
ditional concerns with political and economic preservation. Students are also introduced to the
relations. Particular emphasis is given to great “tools” of preservation, including tax incentives,
power relations, the role of the middle powers, historic inventories, HABS/HAER, the National
North-South relations as well as the interactions Register of Historic Places and the National
between Western and non-Western cultures in Trust’s Teaching with Historic Places.
the context of increasing globalization.
HIST 3331. History of Religion in U.S.
HIST 3311. The New South. 3-0-3. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: HIST 2112. Prerequisite: HIST 2112.

Courses
The South’s social, political and economic devel- A survey of religious history in the United States,
opment from 1865. Emphasizes Reconstruction, with special emphasis on beliefs, institutions,
the “New South Creed,” race relations, indus- and their social and cultural context.
trialization, and the region’s changing role in
HIST 3332. U.S. Social and Cultural His-
national affairs.
tory. 3-0-3.
HIST 3315. The History of the American Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
West. 3-0-3. For the years 1492-present, consideration will
Prerequisite: HIST 2112. be given to nationality, immigration, ethnicity
This course surveys the history of the American (Asian-Americans, Hispanic-Americans, and
West with special emphasis on the development Middle Eastern-Americans), the elderly, popular
of the Trans-Mississippi West from the early 19th culture, and the environment.
century to recent years. The crucial influences of
HIST 3334. The Africans in the Disa-
the environment, the interaction of Native Amer-
pora. 3-0-3.
icans, Hispanics, Euro-Americans and other cul-
Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
tural groups, and the unique relationship of
A survey of the activities and experiences of
the region with the Federal government are
African people who live outside the continent
explored.
from the earliest times to the present. This course
HIST 3321. Diplomatic History of the examines the migration of Africans to Eurasia,
United States. 3-0-3. the Oceania, and the Americas, and gives special
Prerequisite: HIST 1110 and HIST 2112. attention to the slave trade across the Sahara
Examines major trends in U.S. diplomacy from Desert and the Atlantic and Indian Oceans; the
1890 to the present, Emphasizing U.S. rise to comparative experience of Africans in slavery in
world power, World Wars I and II, the Cold War the Middle East and the Americas; emancipation
276 Course Descriptions

and the process of racial and national integra- changing social, political and cultural context
tion; and the economic, political, and cultural within which business and economic institutions
contributions of Africans in the Diaspora. have developed.
HIST 3335. African American History, HIST 3350. England to 1688. 3-0-3.
1865 to Present. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
Prerequisite: HIST 2112. A survey of English history from the earliest
A history of the Black people in the United time to 1688. The course emphasizes political,
States since emancipation. The course empha- cultural, and social developments between the
sizes the struggles waged by African Americans Norman conquest and the transformation of
to achieve racial equality and full citizenship in England into a constitutional monarchy by the
the United States, and the social, cultural, politi- Glorious Revolution.
cal, and economic forces that have shaped the
HIST 3351. Modern England. 3-0-3.
African American community. Special attention
Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
is given to the men and women who led the
English history from 1689. The course empha-
struggle, the ideas and ideals which inspired and
sizes the rise of parliamentary government, the
dominated each phase of the struggle, and the
importance of the British Empire and the social,
movements and institutions which were created
cultural and economic ideas that have made Eng-
in the process.
land and much of the English speaking world
HIST 3337. Greek and Roman History. what they are today.
3-0-3.
Prerequisite: HIST 1110. HIST 3360. Russian Empire to 1917.
3-0-3.
A history of Greece and Rome from the rise
Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
of the Greek city-state to the collapse of the west-
The history of the Russian Empire from its early
ern Roman Empire, with emphasis on their polit-
beginnings to the Revolution of 1917. The course
ical, cultural, and intellectual contributions to the
emphasizes the importance of Greco-Roman and
development of Western society.
Asian influences, the impact of the Russian
HIST 3340. U.S. Military Experience. Empire on eastern Europe and eastern Asia and
3-0-3. the political, social, cultural and revolutionary
Prerequisite: HIST 2112. ideas that have created modern Russia.
A survey of the development of the American
Courses

military and its role in U.S. and world history. HIST 3366. History of Mexico and Cen-
tral America. 3-0-3.
The course will emphasize the political, eco-
Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
nomic and social importance of the military and
Examines the Mesoamerican preclassic civili-
its role in integrating U.S. society as well as a
zations, the Aztec Empire and the Maya king-
study of the evolution of strategy, operations and
doms, the Spanish conquest and establishment
tactics and their use in warfare.
of New Spain, and the independent nation-states
HIST 3341. Women in U.S. History and of Mexico and Central America. Themes include
Culture. 3-0-3. Spanish colonialism, the Indian struggle for jus-
Prerequisite: HIST 2112. tice, modern nation-state building and relations
Focuses on the social, economic, political, cul- with the United States.
tural and religious experiences of American
women of various racial, ethnic and religious HIST 3367. History of Brazil. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
backgrounds from the Colonial period to the
A study of Brazil, to include the Native Ameri-
present.
can period, Portuguese colonialism, the Empire
HIST 3345. Business & Economic His- of Brazil, and Brazil in the 20th century. Major
tory of United States. 3-0-3. themes are sugar and slavery, boom and bust
Prerequisite: HIST 2112. economic cycles, the formation of the Brazilian
Surveys American business and economic devel- social identity, Brazil and the Amazon and Bra-
opment from colonial times to the present. Major zil’s place in the contemporary global world.
themes include the history of small business and
family business; the shifting position of the U.S. HIST 3373. Modern India and South
within the world economy; the regional econ- Asia. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
omy of Georgia and the South; labor-manage-
Emphasizes how Hindu, Buddhist, Islamic and
ment relations; the labor movement; and the
History (HIST) 277

other traditional cultures combined with British with North Africa and contemporary challenges of
colonial rule and other modernizing influences economic development and nation building in the
to produce the India of today. Some attention is region. It examines important themes like village,
also given to peripheral areas, particularly Paki- urban and community life; the formation of mini
stan and Bangladesh. and mega states such as Ghana, Mali and Songhai
empires; the creation of trans-Saharan and trans-
HIST 3374. Modern China and Japan.
Atlantic trade networks; traditional religion, Islam
3-0-3.
and Christianity; European colonialism and Afri-
Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
can resistances; and decolonization.
Focuses chiefly upon China and Japan, with
some consideration of Korea, emphasizing how HIST 3392. History of Southern, Eastern
traditional cultures, outside influences, and mod- and Central Africa. 3-0-3.
ernizing forces have interacted to produce the Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
East Asia of today. Covers the period 1600 to the A history of Southern, Eastern, and Central
present. Africa from the earliest times to the present. The
course emphasizes continuities and changes in
HIST 3376. Problems and Philosophies
African culture, African participation in Indian
of World History. 3-0-3.
Ocean and Middle Eastern trade networks and
Prerequisite: HIST 1110 and 2206.
the impact of European colonization. It exam-
Investigates the major limits and problems inher-
ines important themes like Bantu migration and
ent in historical understanding and introduces
state formation in Central Africa; the emergence
the student to philosophies of history that have
of the Ethiopian kingdom; the impact of the Zulu
sought to address those problems. Case studies
Mfecane; Swahili culture and Omani rule in East
of major historical controversies help students
Africa; Dutch settlement and the development of
recognize the important ways those limits and
apartheid; and the achievement of Black majority
problems influence even the greatest scholar's
rule in South Africa.
efforts at historical analysis.
HIST 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-3.
HIST 3377. History of Science. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Approval Coop Coordinator.
Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
A supervised work experience program for a
History of scientific ideas and methods from
minimum of two academic semesters at a site
ancient times to the present, with special empha-
in business, industry or government. For sopho-
sis on intellectual trends that contributed to the

Courses
more, junior or senior level students who wish
modern world's scientific outlook.
to obtain successive on-the-job experience in con-
HIST 3382. North Africa and the Middle junction with their academic training.
East in Modern Times 3-0-3.
HIST 3398. Internship. 1-9.
Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
Prerequisite: 60 Semester Hours.
A history of North Africa and the Middle East
A supervised, credit-earning work experience
since the emergence of Islam. Major themes
of one academic semester with a previously
include the rise of Berber-Arab/Islamic civiliza-
approved business firm, private or government
tion, the historical ties between North Africa and
agency. Credit is allowed in elective areas.
the Middle East and the impact of Ottoman rule.
Consideration of the 20th century includes Euro- HIST 4400. Directed Study. 1-3.
pean imperialism, the advent of military rule, Prerequisite: HIST 1110 and 2112.
the establishment of Israel, Arab-Israeli wars and Covers special topics and seminars external to
the search for peace, pan-Arabism and the inde- regular course offerings.
pendence movement in Maghrib, petroleum and
international politics, the rise of Muslim funda- HIST 4410. Colonial America From Pre-
Columbus to 1789. 3-0-3.
mentalism and the problems of economic devel-
Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
opment and modernization.
Covers the American experience from the first
HIST 3391. History of West Africa. interaction between Native Americans and Euro-
3-0-3. peans through colonization by the Spanish,
Prerequisite: HIST 1110. French and English, the eighteenth century wars
A history of West Africa from the earliest times for dominance, the American Revolution, and
to the present. The course emphasizes cultural the founding of the United States. The course
continuities and change, trade and cultural ties will explore issues such as development of class
278 Course Descriptions

structure and family life, religion, political and religion, economic theories such as those of
intellectual movements and interaction between the Physiocrats, and epistemological interests as
various racial ethnic groups. expressed in the Encyclopedie of Diderot and
d'Alembert, as well as the increased cosmo-
HIST 4411. The United States to 1837.
politianism and the importance of extra-Euro-
3-0-3.
pean models (especially the Chinese Confucian
Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
model).
Covers the presidencies of Washington and
Adams, the age of Jefferson, the impact of the War HIST 4451. Civil War and Reconstruc-
of 1812, the era of good feelings and Jacksonian tion. 3-0-3.
democracy. The course will look at reform and Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
the development of a national culture. Causes and development of the U.S. Civil War
from 1830. Includes an analysis of the political,
HIST 4425. Oral History. 3-0-3.
social and economic aspects of the Reconstruc-
Prerequisite: HIST 3325.
tion Era.
Focuses on the methods of taking, processing,
and utilizing oral histories. Additional emphasis HIST 4454. Twentieth Century Europe.
is placed on the study of planning, development, 3-0-3.
and operation of oral history projects for librar- Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
ies, museums, corporations, and public history A survey of European history from 1914 to the
agencies. present. The course focuses on the main forces
that have shaped Europe such as the Second
HIST 4426. Documentation and Inter- Industrial Revolution and the development of
pretation of Historic Sites. 3-0-3.
mass society. It examines women's issues, the
Prerequisite: HIST 3325 or 3326.
rise of Fascism, the impact of existentialism on
Explores the methods of documenting historic
philosophy, literature and art, the collapse of
properties, especially as related to the National
Euro-communism and progress toward Euro-
Register of Historic Places. Special emphasis
pean Union.
is placed on completing a nomination for the
National Register of Historic Places. Includes HIST 4455. Twentieth Century Russia.
interpretation of historic sites for public exhibit. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
HIST 4440. Medieval Europe. 3-0-3. A study of Russia in the 20th century that exam-
Courses

Prerequisite: HIST 1110.


ines in detail the birth, life, international influ-
A survey of the origins of European culture.
ence, death and aftermath of the Soviet Union
Focuses on the period between the fourth and
and relates these events to Russian and world
the fourteenth centuries, during which time
history.
Europe achieved its own form of cultural unity
distinct from that of its Mediterranean neighbors. HIST 4456. World War II. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
HIST 4444. Renaissance and Reforma- A survey of the causes, events and results of
tion Europe. 3-0-3.
World War II. The course emphasizes military
Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
history and the global nature of the conflict but
A survey of the changing patterns of thought
also examines the economic, political and diplo-
that radically altered European society between
matic aspects of the war.
the 14th and 17th centuries. The renaissance
of art, the triumph of individualism, the rise of HIST 4461. Gilded Age & Progressive
Protestantism, and the reformation of the Church Era. 3-0-3.
will be studied in their social, political and intel- Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
lectual contexts. An examination of the expansion, industrializa-
tion, and urbanization of the United States in
HIST 4445. Age of the Enlightenment. the late 19th and early 20th centuries and of
3-0-3.
the era’s cultural, political, economic, intellectual
Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
and social issues.
A contextualized discussion of major develop-
ments in European thought during the eigh- HIST 4471. Recent United States His-
teenth century. Topics include rationalism and tory. 3-0-3.
the notion of the social applicability of science, Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
the idea of progress, the critique of established Recent United States History, 1939-present. Con-
siders domestic political history, an overview of
History (HIST)—Human Services (HS) 279

foreign policy, economic growth and change, and A course designed to accommodate traditional or
social and cultural reform movements. applied learning experiences exclusive of those
offered in other Honors courses.
HIST 4475. War and Revolution in
Southeast Asia. 3-0-3. HON 4490. Honors Special Topics.
Prerequisite: HIST 1110 and 2112. 3-0-3.
Studies the responses of the traditional cultures Prerequisite: Admission to the Undergraduate
of Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Malaysia, Honors Program.
and Indonesia to outside influences and modern- A course addressing special topics of interest to
izing forces in the nineteenth and twentieth cen- Honors students and faculty.
turies; considers both world wars, the Indochina
HON 4499. Honors Senior Capstone
Wars in the context of the Cold War and their
Experience.
impact on Europe and the United States.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Undergraduate
HIST 4490. Special Topics in History. Honors Program and senior status.
1-3 credit hours. A project designed by the senior Honors student
Prerequisite: HIST 1110 and 2112. and reflecting original research,
Selected special topics of interest to faculty and an original synthesis of existing research, an
students. application of existing research to a new context,
or the application of special skills to the creation
HIST 4499. Senior Seminar. 3-0-3. and coordination of a substantial service learning
Prerequisite: HIST 2275 AND 3376, with 'C' or project in the student's major. Required of all
better.
students in the Undergraduate Honors Program.
A combined tutorial and seminar in which stu-
dents research and write a senior thesis in addi-
tion to making a computer based presentation in • HUMAN SERVICES (HS) •
class.
HS 2233.Overview of Human Services.
3-0-3.
• HONORS (HON) • Prerequisite: HS 2244 or permission of department.
This course provides students with an overview
HON 2290. Honors Seminar. 3-0-3 of helping professions. Topics include: philoso-
Prerequisite: Admission to the Undergraduate phy of human services; characteristics of human
Honors Program.

Courses
service workers; careers in human services;
A special topics course offered exclusively for
description of public, non-profit and for-profit
students admitted to the Undergraduate Honors
agencies; theory; and cultural diversity. Human
Program and designed to examine a single theme
service majors are required to take this course
or issue from a variety of disciplinary perspec-
along with HS 2244, Foundation Internship.
tives, providing students with the opportunity to
Non-majors may take HS 2233 with permission
work individually or collaboratively on a cross-
of the department and are required to complete
disciplinary project.
20 hours of volunteer service if they do not also
HON 3000. Honors Colloquium. 1-0-1. register for HS 2244.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Undergraduate
HS 2244. Foundation Internship. 3-0-3.
Honors Program.
Prerequisite: HS 2233 or permission of department.
A course designed to explore different disciplin-
This course provides human service majors and
ary perspectives on knowledge
non-majors the opportunity to begin to explore
and its acquisition, fostering faculty-student
the helping professions. Students will begin to
interchange in a seminar setting. Students also
apply theoretical knowledge, skill development
participate in three or more cultural/intellectual
and value systems they have learned in the class-
activities beyond the classroom. Required of
room to a particular work environment.
all students in the Undergraduate Honors Pro-
gram, the Colloquium may be repeated to meet HS 2275. Research Methods for Human
the expectations of Fundamental Three of the Services. 3-0-3.
Honors curriculum. Prerequisite: MATH 1107 or equivalent.
This course introduces quantitative and quali-
HON 4400. Honors Directed Study. tative social science research methods with an
3-0-3.
emphasis on the specific methods necessary
Prerequisite: Admission to the Undergraduate
for human service research and provision. This
Honors Program.
280 Course Descriptions

course enables students to become informed deal with individuals experiencing general prob-
producers and consumers of research products, lems of everyday life.
particularly in the human service areas. The
HS 3322. Aging and the Family. 3-0-3.
emphasis is on basic concepts and underlying
Prerequisite: HS 2233 or PSYC 2201.
assumptions of various social science research
This course introduces students to family sys-
methodologies and their design implications.
tems theory and practice in relation to working
It also develops skills in designing research
with older adults and their families. The impact
projects with a particular emphasis on survey
on nursing home placement, Alzheimer’s dis-
research.
ease, death and dying, and depression as it is
HS 3200. Social Welfare Policy. 3-0-3. related to family function is stressed. Services
Prerequisite: HS 2233. and solutions to aging related problems will be
This course provides students with an overview included.
of American social welfare policy and the prob-
HS 3324. Death & Dying. 3-0-3.
lems that they address. Attention will also be
Prerequisite: HS 2233 or PSYC 2201.
given to social welfare in a global society.
This course provides an understanding of death
HS 3300. Human Socialization. 3-0-3. and dying, bereavement and loss. This course
Prerequisite: SOCI 2201 or PSYC 2201. will attempt to “take death out of the closet,”
This course provides students with an overview present many viewpoints, and highlight the
of the development of human beings focusing important areas that surround this topic. Skills
on the socialization process and its effect on per- needed to work with the dying and their families
sonal and social functioning. will be stressed.
HS 3304. Community Intervention. HS 3335. Working with Families. 3-0-3.
3-0-3. Prerequisite: HS 2233.
Prerequisite: HS 2233. This course provides students an overview of
This course focuses on macro-human service the basic theoretical models used for family
practice as a complement to preparation in interventions. Students will also learn beginning
micro-direct services. It is specifically designed skills for family group work.
to provide students with a working knowledge
HS 3375. Program Development and
and basic skills required for helping communi-
Evaluation. 3-0-3.
ties and organizations address their needs and
Courses

Prerequisite: HS 2275.
concerns. Students will learn various models of
This course introduces the student to the devel-
community and organizational intervention that
opment and evaluation of human services pro-
can be used in diverse settings.
grams. It stresses the importance of considering
HS 3313. Interviewing Skills. 3-0-3. evaluation within program development. Stu-
Prerequisite: HS 2233. dents will analyze programs that have demon-
This course introduces students to interviewing strably improved the lives of disadvantaged
skills in non-crisis settings. Communication people. They will learn about techniques of eval-
skills learned in the course include relation- uation, building upon the course content of HS
building techniques within a problem-solving 2275. They will design a small-scale program
model. Additionally, students learn skills to iden- that includes an evaluation plan.
tify client strengths and to work with resistant
HS 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-3.
clients. Students are required to role-play, video-
Prerequisite: Approval of coordinator of coop-
tape, and critique skills learned in the course.
erative education (CAPS) & department chair.
The goal of this course is to expose the student to
This course is for junior or senior level students
a variety of perspectives and techniques used by
who wish to obtain credit for job experience in
all human service workers.
conjunction with academic training. Course may
HS 3320. Working with Support Groups. be repeated up to three times.
3-0-3.
HS 3398. Advanced Internship. 1-9.
Prerequisite: HS 3313.
Prerequisite: HS 3313 and HS 4410.
This course introduces students to basic theory,
Human service majors are required to complete a
skills, methods, and values necessary to lead
minimum of 450 clock hours (9 semester hours)
support groups. These groups are not designed
of supervised field experience. Students who
to be in-depth therapeutic experiences but to
complete the Foundation Internship (HS 2244)
are required to complete a minimum of 300 clock
Human Services (HS) 281

hours (6 semester hours) of advanced internship HS 4415. Principles of Child Welfare.


credit. The advanced internship must be taken 3-0-3.
within the last two semesters before graduation. Prerequisite: HS 2233.
Placement must be approved by the internship This course provides the student with a com-
faculty coordinator and must take place in agen- prehensive overview of child welfare as a soci-
cies consistent with the objectives of the major etal concern. Students will become aware of the
program. historical development of children’s problems,
services, and the issues facing children today.
HS 3520. Leadership in Nonprofit Orga-
nizations. 3-0-3. HS 4420. Dynamics of Family Violence.
Prerequisite: HS 2233. 3-0-3.
This course introduces students to the field of Prerequisite: HS 2233.
leadership in nonprofit organizations. It specifi- This provides students with a working knowl-
cally focuses on managing change, role of leader- edge of family violence issues. Students will
ship organizations of the future, and the skills become familiar with different theories regard-
needed to successfully lead an organization. The ing causation and treatment as well as society’s
“underpinning” of leadership (trust, credibility, response to family violence.
courage, aloneness, reciprocity, sharing power,
etc.) is also explored. This is a required course HS 4425. Working with Children and
for American Humanics students pursuing their Youth. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: HS 2233.
Certification in Nonprofit Management.
This course focuses on theoretical interventions
HS 3540. Fund raising in Non profits. through the lifespan phases of childhood and
3-0-3. adolescence. Intervention techniques within an
Prerequisite: HS 2233. ecological framework are explored and assessed
This course introduces students to the area of for use in a wide range of problem areas in a
fund raising and basic finance in the nonprofit variety of settings.
sector.
HS 4440. Crisis Intervention. 3-0-3.
HS 3560. Human Resources for Non- Prerequisite: HS 3313.
profit Organizations. 3-0-3. This course builds on concepts and techniques
Prerequisite: HS 2233. taught in HS 3313 Interviewing Skills for Human
This course introduces the student to the basic Service Workers. Students will learn crisis inter-

Courses
theories, techniques, and skills that are necessary vention theory, advanced communication skills,
to effectively manage human resources, includ- and knowledge about different crises and crisis
ing staff and volunteers. settings. Students will be required to role-play
crisis intervention techniques.
HS 4400. Directed Study in Human Ser-
vices. 1-3. HS 4490. Special Topics in Human Ser-
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart- vices. 3-0-3.
ment chair. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
This course covers special topics and seminars exter- ment chair.
nal to regular course offerings. May include original This courses provides selected topics of interest
research projects and practicum experiences. to faculty and students.
HS 4410. Ethics in the Helping Profes- HS 4498. Capstone Seminar in Human
sion. 3-0-3. Services. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: HS 2233. Prerequisite: HS 3370 or HS 4410.
This course provides students with an under- This course is the culmination of the public and
standing of the importance of ethics and values social services program, involving the comple-
in the Human Service Profession. Students will tion of the portfolio and preparation and presen-
examine how their own personal and profes- tation of the senior paper.
sional values affect their practice and will learn
models for ethical decision-making. Also stu-
dents will learn how to become sensitive to dif-
ferent value systems.
282 Course Descriptions

• INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY management of information technology at the


worker, department, and enterprise level.
(IT) •
IT 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit
IT 3300. Web Technologies. 3-0-3. hours.
Prerequisite: CSIS 2300 or EBIZ 2100 or equivalent. Prerequisite: Approval instructor, major area
Web Technologies will introduce students to the committee, and department chair. Up to three
planning, design, implementation and mainte- hours may be applied to the upper division
nance of World Wide Web applications. Appli- requirements for the IT certificate.
cations will be developed using both high-end Special topics of an advanced nature that are not
development environments as well as html. in the regular course offerings. Students select-
Topics include tables, image maps, frames, ing this to complete the IT certificate must select
security, ethical issues, application development a topic involving technology-applications in the
tools, and development methodologies. chosen career area.
IT 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-3 credit IT 4525. Electronic Commerce. 3-0-3.
hours. Prerequisite: EBIZ 2100 or CSIS 2300.
Prerequisite: Approval of cooperative education/ The application of information technology to the
internships (Career Services Center). buying and selling of information, products, and
A supervised work experience program for a services, via computer networks. Topics include
minimum of two semesters at a site in business, EDI, transactions over public networks, corpo-
industry, or government. For sophomore, junior rate digital libraries, advertising and marketing
or senior level students who wish to obtain suc- on the Internet, and consumer-data interface.
cessive on-the-job experience in conjunction with
their academic training.
• INSURANCE (INS) •
IT 3398. Internship. 1-9 credit hours.
Prerequisite: Approval of cooperative education/ INS 3500. Principles of Risk Manage-
internships (Career Services Center). ment and Insurance. 3-0-3.
A supervised work experience program for one Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
semester at a site in business, industry, or gov- Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 credit
ernment. For sophomore, junior or senior level hours.
students who wish to obtain successive on-the- This course is an introduction to the identification
Courses

job experience in conjunction with their aca- of risks and their management. Topics will include
demic training. fundamental life, health, retirement, property and
liability exposures and their management through
IT 3500. Database Technologies. 3-0-3.
avoidance, control, retention or transfer. The char-
Prerequisite: CSIS 2300 or EBIZ 2100 or equivalent.
acteristics of life, health, property and liability
Database Technologies covers the essentials of
insuring devices are also covered.
database concepts for non-IT careers. Key topics
may include searching and querying, validation
of electronic data, data mining, data collection • ITALIAN (ITAL) •
principles, privacy and fair use, related intel-
lectual property issues, integration of incompat- ITAL 1001. Introduction to Italian Lan-
ible data sources, database-driven web sites, and guage and Culture I. 3-0-3.
visual database programming. Tools included Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099 if
required.
may include SQL, Visual Basic Web Databases,
Introduction to Italian language and culture
Personal Oracle, and Access 2000, and various
stressing progressive acquisition of effective
database search engines.
communication skills in both the written and
IT 3700. Information Technology Man- spoken language and an understanding of the
agement. practices and products of Italian culture. Not
Prerequisite: EBIZ 2100 or CSIS 2300. open to native speakers of Italian .
Advanced applications of general-purpose soft-
ware with a special emphasis on integration ITAL 1002. Introduction to Italian Lan-
of multiple software tools and data to solve guage and Culture II. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ITAL 1001 or permission of instructor.
a wide variety of career related problems. Stu-
Introduction to Italian language and culture, part
dents study current topics in the application and
II, stressing continued, progressive acquisition of
Information Technology (IT)—KSU Seminars (KSU) 283

effective communication skills in both the writ- Special topics relevant to the study of the Italian
ten and spoken language and an understanding society.
of the practices and products of Italian culture.
Not open to native speakers of Italian.
• JAPANESE (JPN) •
ITAL 2001. Intermediate Italian Lan-
guage and Culture I. 3-0-3. JPN 1001. Introduction to Japanese
Prerequisite: ITAL 1002, or permission of instructor. Language and Culture I. 3-0-3.
The student will continue to develop proficiency Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099 if
in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and required.
learn to communicate in culturally appropriate Introduction to Japanese language and culture
ways. Not open to native speakers of Italian. stressing progressive acquisition of effective
communications skills in both the written and
ITAL 2002. Intermediate Italian Lan- spoken language and an understanding of the
guage and Culture II. 3-0-3. practices and products of Japanese culture. Not
Prerequisite: ITAL 2001 or permission of instructor. open to native speakers of Japanese.
Students continue to increase linguistic and cul-
tural proficiency through the use of a variety JPN 1002. Introduction to Japanese
of materials and activities. Course will serve as Language and Culturee II. 3-0-3.
a transition between intermediate and upper- Prerequisite: One year of high school Japanese,
level courses in the language. Not open to native or JPN 1001, or the equivalent.
speakers of Italian. Introduction to Japanese language and culture,
part II, stressing continued, progressive acquisi-
ITAL 3302. Practical Conversation. tion of effective communication skills in both the
3-0-3. written and spoken language and an understand-
Prerequisite: ITAL 2002 or permission of instructor. ing of the practices and products of Japanese cul-
Stresses expansion of effective listening compre- ture. Not open to native speakers of Japanese.
hension and speaking skills through culturally
and linguistically appropriate activities. JPN 2001. Intermediate Japanese Lan-
guage and Culture I. 3-0-3.
ITAL 3303. Grammar and Composition. Prerequisite: Two years of high school Japanese,
3-0-3. or JPN 1002 or the equivalent.
Prerequisite: ITAL 2002 or permission of instructor. The student will continue to develop proficiency

Courses
General review of grammar through composi- in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and
tion and other written activities, such as sum- learn to communicate in culturally appropriate
maries, correspondence, descriptions, narration, ways. Not open to native speakers of Japanese.
literary analysis, and other rhetorical and cultur-
ally appropriate forms. JPN 2002. Intermediate Japanese Lan-
guage and Culture II. 3-0-3.
ITAL 3398. Internship. 1-9 credit hours. Prerequisite: Three years of high school Japanese
Prerequisite: ITAL 3302 and ITAL 3303 or per- or JPN 2001 or the equivalent.
mission of instructor. Students continue to increase linguistic and cul-
Supervised, credit-earning work experience of tural proficiency through the use of a variety
one semester requiring use of Italian in the work of materials and activities. Not open to native
place. Prior approval by department coordinator speakers of Japanese.
and internship supervisor is required.
ITAL 4400. Directed Study. 1 -3 credit •KSU SEMINARS•
hours.
Prerequisite: ITAL 3302 and ITAL 3303 or per- KSU 1101. Freshman Seminar. 3-0-3.
mission of instructor. Prerequisite: Freshman or transfer standing with
Covers special topics and seminars external to fewer than 30 credits.
course offerings that allow a student to work An elective course for freshmen and transfer stu-
individually with an instructor. Requires prior dents with fewer than 30 credit hours designed
approval by instructor and department chair. to acquaint students with the campus and its
programs. The course fosters links between stu-
ITAL 4490. Special Topics in Italian.
dent needs and campus resources and empha-
3-0-3.
sizes the development of college survival skills
Prerequisite: ITAL 3302 and ITAL 3303 or per-
(study methods, time management and effective
mission of instructor.
284 Course Descriptions

oral and written communication). Also aids LATN 4490. Special Topics in Latin.
students in selecting majors, identifying career 3-0-3.
interests, and developing good relationships Prerequisite: Latin 2002 or permission of instructor.
with students and faculty. Selected topics of special interest to faculty and
students
KSU 4401. Senior Seminar. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: 90 credit hours earned and above.
This institutional capstone course provides a • MANAGEMENT (MGT) •
structure for seniors to bring closure to their
undergraduate experience while preparing for MGT 3100. Management and Behavioral
the transition from the university to the commu- Sciences. 3-0-3.
nity at large. Within a structured learning com- Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 credit
munity from a variety of disciplines, students
hours.
will access the meaning of their undergraduate
This course introduces students to the field
experience and develop an understanding of
of management, focusing on basic principles
their role as alumni and productive citizens of
and concepts applicable to all types of organiza-
the work force, community, state, nation, and
tions. The evolution of functional and behavioral
the world. Through the preparation of a reflec-
aspects of management and organization theory
tive portfolio, involvement in a service-learning
are presented in the context of political, societal,
project, and a critical discussion of their short-
regulatory, ethical, global, technological and
and long-term logistical goals, the students will
demographic environmental forces.
prepare for the post-university experience.
MGT 3200. Operations Management.
• LATIN (LATN) • 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
LATN 1001. Introduction to Latin Lan- Requirement, and ECON 3100; Non business
guage and Culture I. 3-0-3. Majors: MGT 3100 and ECON 3100.
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099 if Generic modeling techniques are applied to the
required. planning, operation and control of the produc-
Introduction to Latin stressing progressive acqui- tion of goods and services. Topics include: qual-
sition of grammar, composition, prose translation ity control, facility location and layout, material
and pronunciation. requirements planning and project scheduling.
Courses

LATN 1002. Introduction to Latin Lan- MGT 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-3
guage and Culture II. 3-0-3. credit hours.
Prerequisite: One year of high school Latin or Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
LATN 1001 or the equivalent. Requirement and approval of the Coordinator of
Introduction to Latin, part II, stressing continued cooperative education/internships (KSU Career
progressive acquisition of grammar, composi- Services); Non business Majors: Not available to
tion, prose translation and pronunciation. non business majors.
LATN 2001. Intermediate Latin Lan- A supervised work experience program for a
guage and Culture I. 3-0-3. minimum of two academic semesters at a site
Prerequisite: Two years of high school Latin or in business, industry or government. For sopho-
LATN 1002 or the equivalent. more, junior or senior level students who wish
Review of Latin grammar and syntax. Prose to obtain successive on-the-job experience in con-
translations from selected prose authors such as junction with their academic training.
Livy, Caesar, Tacitus, and Sallust. MGT 3398. Internship. 1-9 credit hours.
LATN 2002. Intermediate Latin Lan- Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
guage and Culture II. 3-0-3. Requirement and approval of the Coordinator of
Prerequisite: Three years of high school Latin or cooperative education/internships (KSU Career
LATN 2001 or the equivalent. Services); Non business Majors: Not available to
Continued refinement of grammar and reading non business majors.
skills through the study of prose and poetry from A supervised, credit-earning work experience
the Golden Age of Latin Literature. of one academic semester with a previously
approved business firm, private agency or gov-
ernment agency. A research paper is required to
KSU Seminars (KSU)—Management (MGT) 285

receive credit. For junior or senior students who skills will be taught, along with techniques for
wish to participate in an on-the-job experience in successful implementation. Students will work
which they may apply their academic training. closely with the Kennesaw State University
The work experience may not be with a current Small Business Development Center and with
employer. The course will be graded on an S/U the U.S. Small Business Administration. This
basis. Credit is allowed only in elective areas. course represents an opportunity for business
majors to improve their skills through a creative,
MGT 4120. Venture Management. 3-0-3.
challenging and enjoyable experience.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Requirement and MGT 3100; Non business MGT 4124. Franchise Management.
Majors: MGT 3100. 3-0-3.
Introduction to the management and operation Prerequisite: MGT 3100.
of small business. Topics include: start-up issues; Franchise Management is an introduction to the
legal forms of organization; operational plan- field of franchising as it concerns the franchiser
ning; developing a marketing plan; financing (the business who grants the business rights to
the business; personnel issues; developing an franchisees), and the franchisee (the individual
accounting and control system; long-range plan- or business who obtains the rights to operate
ning and strategy formation; and other topics as the franchised business in accordance with the
appropriate. chosen method to produce or sell the product
or service). It covers the body of knowledge
MGT 4121. Entrepreneurship and Cre-
on how to expand an existing business through
ativity. 3-0-3.
domestic or international franchising as well as
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
how to analyze and decide how to buy and
Requirement and MGT 3100; Non business
Majors: MGT 3100. manage a franchise.
Introduction to entrepreneurship. Students will MGT 4160. Organizational Behavior.
develop comprehensive business plans for new 3-0-3.
ventures or for the expansion of existing Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
small businesses through a disciplined approach Requirement and MGT 3100; Non business
to creatively visualizing future opportunities. Majors: MGT 3100.
Attention will focus on managing risk and cre- Drawing from psychology, sociology, anthro-
ativity. Topics include: personal assessment; pology and related disciplines, the field of

Courses
opportunity analysis; feasibility analysis; venture organizational behavior examines individual
finance; and budgeting. characteristics of people in a demographically
diverse work force, group dynamics involved in
MGT 4122. Venture Analysis. 3-0-3.
task accomplishment, and the effects of individ-
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
ual and group behavior on organizational effec-
Requirement and MGT 4120 or MGT 4121. Non
tiveness.
business Majors: MGT 4120 or MGT 4121.
A course that applies the concepts of small busi- MGT 4161. Organizational Communica-
ness management, entrepreneurship and creativ- tions. 3-0-3.
ity to the analysis of complex business problems Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
faced by new ventures and existing small busi- Requirement and MGT 3100; Non business
nesses. Case studies will be used to develop Majors: MGT 3100.
students' ability to identify and solve problems. This course develops student understanding
Work will continue on personal start-up projects of communication processes within organiza-
and business plans. tions, increases ability to diagnose and deal
with organizational communication problems,
MGT 4123. Honors Consulting Seminar.
and enhances skills in using communication to
3-0-3.
improve individual, group, and organization-
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
wide effectiveness.
Requirement, 60 credit hours with a GPA of 3.0
or higher or by permission of instructor. Non MGT 4170. Human Resource Manage-
business Majors: Not available to non business ment. 3-0-3.
majors. Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Designed to allow students to apply their aca- Requirement and MGT 3100; Non business
demic business knowledge to business and Majors: MGT 3100.
nonprofit organizations in a student-consultant The introduction of major topical areas in human
capacity. Problem-finding and problem-solving
286 Course Descriptions

resources management. Particular emphasis is compensation, labor relations, management of


placed on the functional areas that form the expatriates and their repatriation, dealing with
major occupational categories in personnel. host country nationals, and career management
Includes basic concepts in employment planning, in the international context. Special topics
employee and labor relations, compensations include human resource law and issues in spe-
benefits, health and safety and security. cific countries outside the U.S. and managing a
multicultural labor force in the U.S.
MGT 4171. Employee and Labor Rela-
tions. 3-0-3. MGT 4190. International Management.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA 3-0-3.
Requirement and MGT 4170; Non business Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Majors: MGT 4170. Requirement and MGT 3100; Non business
The study of employee and labor relations con- Majors: MGT 3100.
cerned with collective bargaining, compliance Survey course introducing students to the
with laws affecting employees, contracts nego- considerations involved in the generation, main-
tiation, grievance handling, arbitration proce- tenance and control of international flows of
dures, satisfaction and the rights of management, people, information, funds, goods, and services
employees and the union. for commercial purposes. The course focuses on
business strategies facing organizations engaged
MGT 4172. Compensation. 3-0-3.
in doing business in other countries.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Requirement and MGT 4170; Non business MGT 4199. Strategic Management.
Majors: MGT 4170. 3-0-3.
Compensation and benefits is a personnel area con- Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
cerned with all of the ways in which an organi- Requirement, within 20 hours of graduation, FIN
zation reimburses employees for their effort and 3100; Non business Majors: Not open to non
performance. The following areas are emphasized: business majors.
job evaluation, compensation and incentives, laws A course designed for the last or next-to-last
and regulations affecting compensation and ben- semester in the business program. A capstone
efits, , and analytical tools employed for maintain- course for several business disciplines, serving to
ing fair and competitive pay programs. prepare the student to conceptualize and formu-
late overall organizational policy and strategy.
MGT 4173. Staffing. 3-0-3.
Courses

Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA MGT 4210. Service Operations Manage-
Requirement and MGT 4170; Non business ment. 3-0-3.
Majors: MGT 4170. Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
An advanced personnel management course Requirement and MGT 3200; Non business
focusing on the selection of personnel into Majors: MGT 3200.
the organization. This includes the processes This course will identify and define implementa-
involved in the acquisition and maintenance of tion of the unique features of a service organiza-
human resources for the enhancement of orga- tion's operations management system. Topics
nizational effectiveness. Course topics include will include service design and development,
human resource planning and forecasting, job quality, capacity and scheduling. The course
analysis techniques, recruitment and selection will address essentials of service management,
techniques, training and development, perfor- increasingly important in the business world.
mance appraisal, retirement/out-placement, and
MGT 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit
the laws and regulations affecting those areas. hours.
MGT 4174. International Human Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Resource Management. 3-0-3. Requirement and permission of instructor and
Prerequisite: Business Majors; Sophomore GPA department chair prior to registration; Non
Requirement and MGT 3100. Non business business Majors: Permission of instructor and
Majors: MGT 3100. department chair prior to registration.
This course focuses on human resource manage- Special topics of an advanced nature not in the
ment functions required to implement interna- regular course offerings.
tional or global strategy. Areas examined include MGT 4490. Special Topics in Manage-
international recruitment and selection, perfor- ment. 1-3 credit hours.
mance management, training and development, Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Management (MGT)— Marketing (MKTG) 287

Requirement and permission of instructor and MGT 4860. Quality Management. 3-0-3.
department chair prior to registration; Non Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
business Majors: Permission of instructor and Requirement and MGT 3200. Non business
department chair prior to registration. Majors: MGT 3200.
Selected topics of interest to faculty and students. This course is an in-depth study of the key con-
MGT 4800. Purchasing Management. cepts and practices of modern quality philoso-
3-0-3. phies and techniques. The opportunities to add
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA value through quality in all phases of business
Requirement and MGT 3200; Non business and product life cycles will be identified. Con-
Majors: MGT 3200. cepts and methods of statistical quality control
An introduction to the concepts of purchasing will be presented.
and materials management in business and opera-
tions management areas. The course is a practical • MARKETING (MKTG) •
approach to common management problems and
challenges associated with the acquisition of goods MKTG 3100. Principles of Marketing.
and services in the business world. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
MGT 4810. Materials Management. Requirement; Non business Majors: 60 credit
3-0-3. hours.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA An introduction to the principles of marketing.
Requirement and MGT 3200; Non business This course examines the term, “marketing,” in
Majors: MGT 3200. a broad sense to include all those activities of
This course provides background in and individuals or organizations which encourage
understanding of the following manufacturing and facilitate exchanges of values. This includes
production and control concepts: master plan- many activities such as research, physical dis-
ning, inventory management, and material and tribution, product planning, pricing and promo-
capacity requirements planning. This course tional activities. These concepts are examined as
covers the body of knowledge for three of the six they apply to marketing of goods and services,
certification examinations of the American Pro- in profit and nonprofit sectors, in both domestic
duction and Inventory Control Society (APICS) and global markets.
for Certification in Production and Inventory
Management (CPIM). MKTG 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-3

Courses
credit hours.
MGT 4820. Production Control. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Requirement and approval of Coordinator of
Requirement and MGT 3200; Non business cooperative education/internship (KSU Career
Majors: MGT 3200. Services); Non business Majors: Not available to
This course provides background in and under- non business majors.
standing of the following manufacturing produc- A supervised work experience program for a
tion and control concepts: capacity management, minimum of two academic semesters at a site
production activity control, and just-in-time man- in business, industry or government. For sopho-
agement. This course covers the body of knowl- more, junior or senior level students who wish
edge for two additional CPIM examinations. to obtain successive on-the-job experience in con-
MGT 4850. World Class Manufacturing. junction with their academic training.
3-0-3. MKTG 3398. Internship. 1-9 credit
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA hours.
Requirement and MGT 3200; Non business Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Majors: MGT 3200. Requirement and approval of the Coordinator of
This course addresses leading-edge manu- cooperative educational/internship (KSU Career
facturing theory and practice, including the Services); Non business Majors: Not available to
just-in-time manufacturing philosophy, kanban non business majors.
production control systems, group technology, A supervised, credit-earning work experience
cellular manufacturing, the theory of constraints, of one academic semester with a previously
the drum-buffer-rope production control system, approved business firm, private agency or gov-
and VAT analysis. This course extends knowl- ernment agency. A research paper is required to
edge beyond what is taught in traditional pro- receive credit. For junior or senior students who
duction and inventory management courses.
288 Course Descriptions

wish to participate in an on-the-job experience in MKTG 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit
which they may apply their academic training. hours.
The work experience may not be with a current Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
employer. The course will be graded on an S/U Requirement and approval of instructor and
basis. Credit is allowed only in elective areas. department chair prior to registration; Non busi-
ness Majors: Approval of instructor and depart-
MKTG 4100. Marketing Research. 3-0-3. ment chair prior to registration.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Special topics of an advanced nature not in the
Requirement, MKTG 3100 and ECON 3100; Non
regular course offerings.
business Majors: MKTG 3100 and ECON 3100.
An examination of the marketing research MKTG 4410. Professional Selling. 3-0-3.
process as an information-providing activity Prerequisite: Business Majors: Admission to the
supporting management decision making. The Coles College of Business and MKTG 3100; Non
course covers definition of the research problem, business Majors: MKTG 3100.
selecting and planning of a research design, This course examines the role of personal selling
measurement and scaling, questionnaire con- in the firm’s marketing strategy, model of com-
struction, and data analysis and interpretation. munication and specific methods of selling. All
Students are required to use a statistical software students will be required to develop and deliver
package for data management and analysis. effective sales presentations.

MKTG 4150. Consumer Behavior. 3-0-3. MKTG 4430. Market Analysis. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Requirement and MKTG 3100; Non business Requirement, MKTG 3100 and ECON 3100; Non
Majors: MKTG 3100. business Majors: MKTG 3100; ECON 3100.
Examines the diverse influences of culture, soci- This course develops skills in locating, selecting
ety and psychological processes on consumer and using appropriate information sources for
purchase patterns. Implications for marketing making and using market measurements in the
activities are also discussed. planning and management of marketing and
sales operations. Students learn tools for esti-
MKTG 4300. Basic Retailing. 5-0-5. mating demand and forecasting industry and
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
company sales and how to use these measures
Requirement and MKTG 3100; Non business
in selecting market targets, designing sales ter-
Majors: MKTG 3100.
ritories, assigning sales quotas and planning cus-
Courses

An introduction to retailing as a business insti-


tomer contract programs.
tution. Attention is focused on activities, proce-
dures and decisions related to the operation of a MKTG 4450. Sales Management. 3-0-3.
retail unit. Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Requirement and MKTG 3100; Non business
MKTG 4310. Retail Merchandise Man- Majors: MKTG 3100.
agement and Control. 3-0-3.
Studies the planning, organizing, staffing, direct-
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
ing and controlling of the sales force in develop-
Requirement, MKTG 3100, 4300; Non business
ing an effective marketing organization.
Majors: MKTG 3100, 4300.
Acquisition and control of merchandise as a MKTG 4490. Special Topics in Market-
critical function in retail management. Sources ing. 3-0-3.
of supply, methods of inventory control, Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
approaches to evaluation and selection of mer- Requirement and approval of instructor and
chandise are discussed. department chair; Non business Majors:
Approval of instructor and department chair.
MKTG 4350. Retail Management. 3-0-3. Selected special topics of interest to faculty and
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA students.
Requirement and MKTG 3100; MKTG 4300 rec-
ommended; Non business Majors: MKTG 3100; MKTG 4620. Services Marketing. 3-0-3.
MKTG 4300 recommended. Prerequisites: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Examines the practices and methods of retail dis- Requirement and MKTG 3100; Non business
tribution and merchandising as a rapidly chang- Majors: MKTG 3100.
ing part of the total marketing process, involving The course examines the unique characteristics
both large and small firms. of service organizations and the increasingly
vital role they play in the U. S. economy. By
Marketing (MKTG)—Mathematics (MATH) 289

focusing upon the marketing of such diverse Majors: MKTG 3100.


services as hotels, hospitals, banking and rec- The special problems and requirements of market-
reation, the course stresses the importance of ing products to organizational buyers. The course
tailoring marketing strategies to fit the special examines organizational buyer behavior, business to
needs of service marketers, needs quite different business promotion, business to business sales and
from those of manufacturing organizations. the development of industrial products.
MKTG 4630. Direct Response Market- MKTG 4870. Sports Marketing. 3-0-3.
ing. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Requirement and MKTG 3100; Non business
Requirement and MKTG 3100; Non business Majors: MKTG 3100.
Majors: MKTG 3100. Sport event marketing is one of the fastest grow-
A study of the promotional methods that request ing career fields in America. The term, “sports
immediate action or response. Topics include: marketing” includes the administration, coordi-
planning, creating and evaluating of direct nation, and evaluation of any type of event
response advertising campaigns, introduction to related to sport. Examples are from local school
direct mail marketing techniques including lists, and community sport events, not-for-profit and
catalogs, testing and merchandise selection and corporate events, intercollegiate sport programs,
the media of direct marketing. and amateur and professional league activities
such as the Olympic Games and the Super Bowl.
MKTG 4650. Advertising. 3-0-3.
The Sports Marketing class is designed to pro-
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
vide the student an opportunity to experience
Requirement and MKTG 3100; Non business
an actual sports event project. The project will
Majors: MKTG 3100.
be selected by the class, after which a strategic
While studying the various elements of advertis-
plan will be developed and carried out. This
ing, this course emphasizes the strategic appli-
class will be interactive and require the student’s
cations of advertising and promotion from the
complete participation to be successful.
perspective of the marketing manager.
MKTG 4990. Marketing Management.
MKTG 4670. Promotional Strategy.
3-0-3.
3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
Requirement and MKTG 3100, 4100, 4150; Non
Requirement and MKTG 4650; Non business

Courses
business Majors: MKTG 3100, 4100, 4150.
Majors: MKTG 4650.
Integrates the full scope of marketing manage-
This course is designed to increase the under-
ment. Development of complete marketing pro-
standing of the various component parts of the
grams; discussion of major marketing problems;
promotional mix. Focuses on the development
study and analysis of actual case problems.
and management of personal selling, public rela-
tions, publicity and advertising in implementing
marketing strategy. • MATHEMATICS (MATH) •
MKTG 4820. International Marketing. MATH 0097. Elementary Algebra. 3-0-0.
3-0-3. Prerequisite: Placement by COMPASS Examina-
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA tion, by the Admissions Office or by the Depart-
Requirement and MKTG 3100; Non business ment of Learning Support Programs.
Majors: MKTG 3100. A Learning Support Programs course that, in
Study of the application of the marketing con- conjunction with MATH 0098, prepares students
cept in international markets. The course for basic credit courses. Emphasizes basic con-
examines how the differences in international cepts and skills of elementary algebra.
environments induced by economic, cultural,
legal and other influences necessitate the adapta- MATH 0098. Intermediate Algebra.
3-0-0.
tion of the marketing mix to satisfy consumers.
Prerequisite: Placement by COMPASS Examina-
Alternative international market entry strategies,
tion, by the Admissions Office or by the Depart-
such as exporting and licensing, are discussed.
ment of Learning Support Programs.
MKTG 4850. Business to Business Mar- A Learning Support Programs course which
keting. 3-0-3. prepares students for basic credit mathematics
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA courses. Emphasizes basic concepts and skills of
Requirement and MKTG 3100; Non business intermediate algebra.
290 Course Descriptions

MATH 0099. Elementary and Intermedi- integrated throughout the course for instruction
ate Algebra. 6-0-0. and study. Required for math/science majors.
Prerequisite: Two units of high school algebra or
MATH 1190. Calculus I. 4-0-4.
permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: MATH 1113.
A Learning Support Programs course that pre-
A first course in calculus and analytic geometry.
pares students for basic credit mathematics
Topics include fundamental concepts of limits,
courses, covering both elementary and interme-
continuity, derivatives, and integrals of functions
diate algebra in one semester. Topics include:
of one variable. Incorporates applications from
signed numbers, equations and inequalities,
a variety of disciplines. Modern computing tech-
graphs of linear equations, systems of equations,
nology will be used where necessary and appro-
polynomials and factoring, rational expressions,
priate.
radicals and quadratic equations.
MATH 2202. Calculus II. 4-0-4.
MATH 1101. Mathematical Modeling.
Prerequisite: MATH 1190.
3-0-3.
The main topics of this course will be integral
Prerequisite: MATH 0098 if required.
calculus and infinite sequences and series.
An applications-driven course that focuses on
Emphasis will be placed on applications of the
modeling real data concerning environmental
integral, techniques of integration, and Taylor
issues. Incorporates collaborative learning, oral
Series. In addition to analytical methods, com-
and written reports, and technology in the form
puting will be used to conduct numerical studies
of graphing calculators. Topics include linear,
of integrals and series.
quadratic, piecewise defined, rational, polyno-
mial, exponential and logarithmic functions. MATH 2203. Calculus III. 4-0-4.
Prerequisite: MATH 2202.
MATH 1106. Elementary Applied Calcu-
In this course, the concepts of single variable
lus. 3-0-3.
calculus are extended to functions of more than
Prerequisite: MATH 1101, or MATH 1113.
one variable. Topics will include vector calculus,
Uses techniques of college algebra and elemen-
partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and appli-
tary calculus to analyze and model real world
cations of these concepts.
phenomena. The emphasis will be on applications
using an intuitive approach to the mathematics MATH 2590. Mathematics for Teachers
rather than formal development. Topics include of Middle Grades. 2-2-3.
Courses

graphs, derivatives, and integrals of functions. Prerequisite: 6 hours of mathematics.


The course incorporates collaborative learning, The development of the student’s ability
oral and written reports, and technology. to communicate mathematically through read-
ing, writing and discussing ideas will be
MATH 1107. Elementary Statistics.
strongly emphasized along with the cultural, his-
3-0-3.
torical, and scientific applications of mathemat-
Prerequisite: MATH 1101 or MATH 1113.
ics. Topics will include the development of the
Emphasizes techniques and applications rather
set of real numbers, number theory, geometric
than derivation. Topics include methods of sum-
figures in the plane and in space, and measure-
marizing data, probability, statistical inference
ment, including area and volume. Mathematical
and regression. The course incorporates collab-
ideas will be developed in a lab setting using
orative learning, oral and written reports and
technology and physical models to motivate and
technology.
assist the more formal development. Not for
MATH 1113. Precalculus. 3-0-3. math majors.
Prerequisite: MATH 0098 if required.
MATH 3260. Linear Algebra with Appli-
Provides students with the foundation in ele-
cations. 3-0-3.
mentary functions and understanding of math-
Prerequisite: MATH 1190.
ematics needed to succeed in subsequent
An introduction to linear algebra and some of its
mathematics and science courses, especially cal-
classical and modern applications. Among topics
culus. Topics include polynomial, rational, expo-
to be included will be systems of linear equations,
nential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.
vector spaces, linear transformations, and diago-
In each case, properties, graphs, and applications
nalization. Significant use of technology will be
will be presented. Technology, in the form of
employed in performing matrix computations.
graphing calculators and/or computers, will be
Mathematics (MATH) 291

MATH 3261. Computational Linear the plane and in space. Experience and explora-
Algebra. 3-0-3. tion with appropriate technology and physical
Prerequisite: MATH 3260 and CSIS 2301. models will be an integral part of the study of
Numerical methods for the solution of linear sys- these ideas. Not for math majors.
tems will be introduced. Topics will include iter-
MATH 3317. Critical Content of ECE
ative methods and convergence. Extensive com-
Math III. 3-0-3.
puter use will be incorporated.
Prerequisite: MATH 3316.
MATH 3310. Continuous Modeling: Dif- A continuation of Mathematics 3315 and Math-
ferential Equations. 3-0-3. ematics 3316 designed for the P-5 teacher. Topics
Prerequisite: MATH 2202 and MATH 3260. will emphasize the critical content and con-
An introduction to the modeling of continuous ceptual development of measurement; trans-
phenomena using ordinary differential equa- formational geometry; symmetry in the plane;
tions. Emphasis will be placed on the combined and constructions. Geometric concepts will be
use of qualitative, numerical, and analytical explored and developed using physical models,
approaches to the analysis of models. Technol- visual models and educational software. Not for
ogy will be used for numerical and graphical math majors.
analysis. Among topics included will be formu-
lation of models, local stability analysis, phase MATH 3332. Probability and Statistical
Inference. 3-0-3.
lines and phase planes, and Euler’s numerical
Prerequisite: MATH 1190.
algorithms.
This course is designed to introduce the student
MATH 3322. Discrete Modeling I. 3-0-3. to probability and both descriptive and inferen-
Prerequisite: MATH 1113 or MATH 2590. tial statistics. Topics include: random variables
An elementary introduction to topics and meth- and probability distributions, expectation and
ods in discrete mathematics motivated by a variance of random variables, properties of esti-
series of real-world problems. Topics include mators, exploratory data techniques, confidence
matrices, graphs, counting and recursion. intervals, hypothesis tests for population mean
and proportion, Statistical Process Control, chi-
MATH 3315. Critical Content of ECE
square goodness of fit test, and contingency table
Math I. 3-0-3.
analysis. The MINITAB statistical software pack-
Prerequisite: MATH 1107.
age is used.
Designed for the P-5 teacher. The development

Courses
of the student’s ability to understand and com-
MATH 3333. Analysis of Variance and
municate fundamental concepts of mathematics
Regression. 3-0-3.
through reading, writing and discussing ideas
Prerequisite: MATH 3332.
will be strongly emphasized, along with the
A continuation of the applied statistical tech-
cultural, historical and scientific applications of
niques of MATH 3332. Topics include confidence
mathematics. Topics will include the study of
intervals and hypothesis tests for comparison
sets; the development of the set of whole num-
of two treatments; Analysis of variance—
bers and the set of integers; operations with
completely randomized design, multiple com-
whole numbers and integers; mathematical sys-
parisons, randomized complete block design,
tems and number theory. Emphasis is placed on
factorial design; Simple linear regression—
building concepts through the use of models,
method of least squares, inferences, model build-
manipulatives and the appropriate use of tech-
ing, transformations; Use of MINITAB statistical
nology. Not for math majors.
software package.
MATH 3316. Critical Content of ECE
MATH 3390. Introduction to Mathemati-
Math II. 3-0-3.
cal Systems. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: MATH 3315. Admission to Teacher
Prerequisite: MATH 1190.
Education.
Introduction to Mathematical Systems is a course
A continuation of Mathematics 3315 designed for
specifically designed to introduce students to the
the P-5 teacher. Topics include the conceptual
study of mathematics from a mathematical sys-
development of the rational numbers and exten-
tems approach. A mathematical system consisting
sion to the real numbers; operations and problem
of undefined terms, axioms and theorems will be
solving with real numbers; patterns and relation-
studied. The major emphasis of this class will be
ships; collecting, representing and interpreting
on the development of skills in communicating
data; and an introduction to geometric figures in
292 Course Descriptions

and justifying mathematical ideas and conclu- to the topics they will teach in middle school and
sions. Mathematical systems studied will vary high school.
according to the instructor and may be chosen
MATH 4322. Discrete Modeling II. 3-0-3.
from sets, number systems and/or geometry.
Prerequisite: MATH 3322 and CSIS 2301.
MATH 3395. Geometry. 3-0-3. This course continues the study of discrete math-
Prerequisite: MATH 3390. ematical modeling begun in Discrete Modeling
This course develops geometry as an axiomatic I. Topics include generating functions, design
mathematical system and approaches it from theory, and networks. Combinatorial algorithms
synthetic, transformational, and algebraic will be emphasized and some programming will
perspectives, including higher dimensions. Vari- be required.
ous geometries are studied including finite, infi-
MATH 4345. Numerical Methods. 3-0-3.
nite, projective, Euclidean and Non-Euclidean.
Prerequisite: MATH 3310 and CSIS 2301.
Includes a research project on a topic which
Topics included will be numerical methods for
would be appropriate for any entry-level school
systems of equations, differentiation and integra-
geometry student.
tion, approximation theory, initial and boundary
MATH 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-3 value problems and problems for ordinary dif-
credit hours. ferential equations. Extensive use of computing
Prerequisite: Approval of coordinator of coop- will be incorporated.
erative education/internship.
A supervised work experience program for a MATH 4361. Modern Algebra. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: MATH 3260.
minimum of two academic semesters at a site
An introduction to the fundamental structures of
in business, industry or government. For sopho-
abstract algebra (groups, rings, and fields), the
more, junior or senior level students who wish
connections of these structures with the algebra
to obtain successive on-the-job experience in con-
studied at the elementary level, and the histor-
junction with their academic training.
ical development of modern algebra. Applica-
MATH 3398. Internship. 1-9 credit tions will be selected from the classical problems
hours. of constructibility and the solvability of polyno-
Prerequisite: Approval of major area committee mial equations, and the modern applications of
and department chair. groups to cryptography, and of finite fields to
A supervised, credit-earning work experience coding and computer design.
Courses

of one academic semester with a previously


approved business firm, private agency, or gov- MATH 4381. Introduction to Real Analy-
ernment agency. sis. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: MATH 2202 and MATH 3260.
MATH 3400. Computer Applications In A study of functions of a single real variable
Statistics. 3-0-3. and of some of the finer properties of the
Prerequisite: CSIS 2300. real number system. Various foundational topics
Introduction to the use of computer-based statis- such as proofs, the theory of sets, infinity,
tical techniques and applications in the analysis etc., will present themselves naturally as the stu-
and interpretation of data. Topics include both dent deepens his/her understanding of concepts
descriptive statistics and inference methods. already familiar from Calculus. Among topics
to be included will be the real number system,
MATH 3495. Advanced Perspective on
School Mathematics. 3-0-3. sequences, functions, limits, continuity, deriva-
Prerequisite: MATH 1190 and MATH 3390. tives, and the Mean Value Theorem.
Students’ understanding of middle grades and MATH 4400. Directed Study. 3-0-3.
secondary mathematics will be deepened and Prerequisite: Approval of instructor, major area
broadened through the study of key topics in committee, and department chair.
school mathematics, including Algebra, Calcu- Special advanced topics external to regular
lus, Discrete Mathematics, and Mathematical course offerings.
Modeling. This course is designed so that stu-
dents can revisit key ideas in school math- MATH 4490. Special Topics in Mathe-
ematics, bringing with them the skills and matics. 3-0-3.
understandings of college course work in math- Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
ment chair.
ematics, deepening and broadening their under-
Special selected topics of interest to faculty and
standing, and connecting more advanced ideas
students.
Mathematics (MATH)—Military Science (MILS) 293

MATH 4700. Capstone Experience. MAED 4475. Student Teaching: Math-


3-0-3. ematics (7-12). 12 credit hours.
Prerequisite: Approval of mathematics depart- Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching.
ment chair. Full-time teaching experience in mathematics
An internship, project or course which synthesizes the under the supervision of a public school coop-
skills mastered during the course of the program. erating teacher and a specialist in mathematics
education. Includes a regularly scheduled semi-
• MATHEMATICS EDUCATION nar. Proof of professional liability insurance is
(MAED) • required prior to receiving a school placement.

MAED 3398. Internship in Teaching MAED 4490. Special Topics in Mathe-


Mathematics (7-12). 0-18-6. matics Education. 1 - 5 credit hours.
Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
ment chair.
Student teaching experience in mathematics for
Selected topics on interest to faculty and students.
provisionally certified teachers. Supervision will
be in collaboration with a mentor-teacher in the
local school and a specialist in mathematics edu- • MILITARY SCIENCE (MILS) •
cation. Proof of professional liability insurance is
required prior to receiving a school placement. MILS 1021. Introduction to the Army.
2-3-2.
MAED 4000. Service Learning in Math- Prerequisite: None.
ematics Education. 1-3. General introduction to the total Army structure,
Prerequisite: 60 hours and permission of instruc- scope of the military profession, and general
tor and department chair/program director. introduction to the primary weapon (M16A2) of
A community activity which links learning to the U.S. Army. Instruction on the implementing
life by connecting meaningful community ser- of the physical fitness program, customs and tra-
vice activities with academic learning, personal ditions, and use of the M16A2 rifle. Labs focused
growth, and civic responsibility. Activity will be on individual and squad drill and ceremony.
designed with the instructor and approved by
the chair/program director. MILS 1022. Introduction to Leadership.
2-3-2.
MAED 4400. Directed Study in Mathe- Prerequisite: None.

Courses
matics Education. 1 - 5 credit hours. Learn/apply the principles of effective leading.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart- Reinforce self-confidence through participation
ment chair. in physically and mentally challenging exercises
A concentrated investigation of a particular with upper division ROTC students. Develop
aspect of a topic within mathematics education. communication skills to improve individual per-
The content of the directed study will be deter- formance and group interaction. Relate organi-
mined jointly by the instructor and the student. zational ethical values to improve effectiveness
MAED 4416. Teaching of Mathematics when placed in a leadership role.
(7-12). 5-6-7. MILS 2021. Self/Team Development.
Prerequisite: EDUC 3308 and permission of 2-3-2.
mathematics education program coordinator. Prerequisite: None.
An examination and application of curriculum Learn and apply ethics-based leadership skills
issues, learning theories, teaching strategies, that develop individual abilities and contribute
instructional materials and assessment proce- to the building of effective teams of people.
dures for teaching secondary school mathemat- Develop skills in oral presentations, writing con-
ics. Includes a secondary school field experience cisely, planning events, coordination of group
in mathematics teaching and seminars. Empha- activities, advanced first aid, land navigation and
sizes those practices suggested by research in basic military tactics.
mathematics education and encouraged by the
NCTM and the MAA. Proof of professional lia-
bility insurance is required prior to receiving a
school placement.
294 Course Descriptions

MILS 2022. Team Military Tactics. MILS 4012. Transition to Lieutenant.


2-3-2. 3-3-3.
Prerequisite: None. Prerequisite: MILS 4011.
Introduction to individual and team aspects of Identify and resolve ethical dilemmas. Refine
military tactics in small unit operations. Includes counselint and motivating techniques. Examine
the use of radio communications, constructing aspects of tradition and law as they relate to
safety models and assessments, movement tech- leading as an officer in the U.S. Army. Prepare for
niques, security, planning and pre-execution a future as a successful Army Lieutenant.
checks. Learn techniques for training others as an
MILS 4090. Special Topics in Military
aspect of continued leadership development.
Science. 1-5 credit hours.
MILS 2090. Special Topics—Instructing Prerequisite: None.
Army Physical Fitness Training. 1-3-2. Selected special topics and seminars of interest to
Prerequisite: None. faculty and students.
Develops skills needed to participate in, assess,
develop and instruct Army physical fitness. • MUSIC (MUSI) •
Class to meet Monday, Wednesday and Friday
from 6:30 am to 7:30 am in the gymnasium for MUSI 1107. Arts in Society: Music.
training and lecture periods. This class may be 3-0-3.
substituted for the HPED activity requirement on Prerequisite: ENGL 0099, READ 099, if required.
a case by case basis. Through an examination of the role of arts in
society, and an in-depth study of musical works,
MILS 3011. Small Unit Leadership I. this interactive course provides an understand-
3-3-4. ing of the creative process and develops skills in
Prerequisite: Advanced ROTC standing or con- creativity and critical analysis. Heightened per-
sent of the department. ceptual abilities will be developed through class
Series of practical opportunities to lead small experiences and field visits to a variety of arts
groups, receive personal assessments and events in dance, theater, and visual arts, as well
encouragement, and lead in situations of increas- as in music. (Attendance at some events requires
ing complexity. Fundamentals of leadership, paid admission.)
land navigation, and tactics are combined into
demanding practical exercises. MUSI 1110. Introduction to World
Music. 2-0-2.
Courses

MILS 3012. Small Unit Leadership II. Prerequisite: MUSI 1121.


3-3-4. Introduction to music of the world’s cultures.
Prerequisite: Advanced ROTC standing or con-
sent of department. MUSI 1111. Aural Skills I. 0-2-1.
Small unit leadership and basic patrolling skills Prerequisite: None.
are taught. Students analyze task, prepare writ- For music majors. Foundation work in sight sing-
ten and oral instructions, delegate activities and ing including rhythmic and melodic dictation.
learn supervisory skills to ensure task comple- Practical application includes some composition
tion. Students are required to plan and adapt and improvisation.
courses of actions to unexpected situations under MUSI 1112. Aural Skills II. 0-2-1.
stress. Prerequisite: MUSI 1111 (with C or better).
MILS 4011. Challenges and Goal Set- For music majors. Continuation of skill develop-
ting. 3-3-3. ment in sight singing including rhythmic and
Prerequisite: MILS 3012. melodic dictation. Practical application includes
Plan, conduct, and evaluate activities in the some composition and improvisation.
ROTC cadet organization. Articulate organiza-
MUSI 1121. Music Theory I. 3-0-3.
tional goals and develop comprehensive plans Prerequisite: None.
to attain them. Assess organizational cohesion For music majors. A correlated study of rhyth-
and develop strategies to improve it. Develop mic, melodic and harmonic aspects of music
confidence and skills to lead people and manage common practice. Development of basic skills in
resources. Learn and apply various Army poli- music theory and harmony including practical
cies and programs to support the ROTC mission. application through part-writing. Components
include composition, improvisation and practical
keyboard applications.
Military Science (MILS)—Music (MUSI) 295

MUSI 1122. Music Theory II. 3-0-3. in ear training and sight singing. Includes rhyth-
Prerequisite: MUSI 1121 (with C or better). mic and melodic dictation. Practical application
For music majors. A continuation of correlated includes some composition and improvisation.
study of rhythmic, melodic and harmonic aspects MUSI 2112. Aural Skills IV. 0-2-1.
of music common practice. Continuation of key- Prerequisite: MUSI 2111 (with C or better).
board harmony is included with application at For music majors. Continuation of advanced skill
the keyboard. Components include composition, development in ear training and sight singing.
improvisation and practical keyboard applications. Includes rhythmic and melodic dictation. Practi-
MUSI 1146. Chamber Singers. 0-4-1. cal application includes some composition and
Prerequisite: Audition. improvisation.
May be repeated for lower-division credit. Study, MUSI 2221. Music Theory III. 3-0-3.
rehearsal, and concert performance of choral lit- Prerequisite: MUSI 1122 (with C or better).
erature. Membership in chamber singers is by For music majors. Advanced correlated study of
audition only. music theory and harmony of common practice
MUSI 1147. Wind Ensemble. 0-4-1. including chromatic harmony and 20th century
Prerequisite: Membership is open to all students harmonic techniques. Components include com-
with previous band experience. position, improvisation, literature analysis and
May be repeated for lower-division credit. Study, practical keyboard application.
rehearsal and concert performance of literature
MUSI 2222. Music Theory IV. 3-0-3.
for wind ensemble. Prerequisite: MUSI 2221 (with C or better).
MUSI 1148. Orchestra. 0-4-1. For music majors. Continuation of advanced cor-
Prerequisite: Audition. related study of music theory and harmony in
May be repeated for lower-division credit. Study, common practice including analytical study of
rehearsal and concert performance of literature 20th century music. Components include com-
for orchestra. Membership in the orchestra is by position, improvisation, literature analysis and
audition only. practical keyboard application.

MUSI 1149. Chorale. 0-4-1. MUSI 3165. Class Piano III. 1-0-1.
Prerequisite: None. Prerequisite: MUSI 1166.
May be repeated for lower-division credit. Study, Continuation of MUSI 1166.

Courses
rehearsal and concert performance of literature
MUSI 3166. Class Piano IV. 1-0-1.
for choir. Prerequisite: MUSI 3165.
MUSI 1165. Class Piano I. 1-0-1. Continuation of MUSI 3165.
Prerequisite: All developmental studies courses
MUSI 3311. History of Music I. 3-0-3.
if required. Non-music majors require permission
Prerequisite: MUSI 1122.
of instructor.
A survey of Western music history and literature
Keyboard proficiency for music majors and non-
from the Middle Ages to 1825.
majors. Solo and ensemble playing.
MUSI 3312. History of Music II. 3-0-3.
MUSI 1166. Class Piano II. 1-0-1.
Prerequisite: MUSI 1122.
Prerequisite: MUSI 1165.
Western music history and literature from 1825
Continuation of Music 1165.
to the present.
MUSI 2100. Technology in Music. 0-2-1.
MUSI 3315. Vocal Literature. 2-0-2.
Prerequisite: MUSI 1122.
Prerequisite: MUSI 2222.
The development of practical experience with
Solo vocal literature from 1600 to the present.
current computer applications and current
technology specifically associated with music MUSI 3317. Introduction to Opera.
instruction and music performance. The course 2-0-2.
exposes students to current capabilities of tech- Prerequisite: All developmental studies courses
nology as they relate to composition, instrumen- if required.
tation, performance and teaching. Dramatic literature from the Florentine Camerata
to the present with emphasis on the standard
MUSI 2111. Aural Skills III. 0-2-1. repertory.
Prerequisite: MUSI 1112 (with C or better).
For music majors. Advanced skill development
296 Course Descriptions

MUSI 3318. Introduction to Symphonic MUSI 3332. Instrumental Conducting.


Music. 2-0-2. 2-1-2.
Prerequisite: All developmental studies courses Prerequisite: MUSI 2222.
if required. Fundamental elements of conducting including
Orchestral literature from preclassic to present baton technique, score reading, cueing, expression,
including symphony, concert overture, inciden- interpretation and rehearsal skills with an empha-
tal music, program symphony and tone poem. sis on applying these techniques in practical con-
Emphasis on standard literature. ducting experiences involving instrumental and
vocal ensembles. Required laboratory component.
MUSI 3319. Introduction to Jazz. 2-0-2.
Prerequisite: All developmental studies courses MUSI 3333. Accompanying. 1-0-1.
if required. Prerequisite: Audition and permission of instructor.
Jazz schools, styles and personalities in historical For music majors. The practical application of
perspectives. accompaniment techniques.
MUSI 3320. Harmonic and Contrapuntal MUSI 3334. Italian and English Diction.
Analysis. 2-0-2. 0-2-1.
Prerequisite: MUSI 2222. Prerequisite: All developmental studies courses
Techniques of structural analysis of music com- if required.
positions. Advanced structural analysis of music Design for the vocal music major. The study of
compositions in a variety of styles and periods the pronunciation, enunciation, and expression
with emphasis on harmony and form. Contra- of the Italian and English language in singing.
puntal composition and the analysis of contra-
MUSI 3335. German and French Diction.
puntal form is included.
2-0-2.
MUSI 3321. Advanced Ear Training. Prerequisite: MUSI 3334.
2-0-2. Design for the vocal music major. The study of
Prerequisite: MUSI 2222 and MUSI 2112. the pronunciation, enunciation, and expression
Extended training in harmonic dictation, sight of the German and French language in singing.
singing, aural analysis and rhythm.
MUSI 3346. Chamber Singers. 0-4-1.
MUSI 3324. Instrumentation. 2-0-2. Prerequisite: Audition.
Prerequisite: MUSI 2222 and MUSI 2100. May be repeated for upper-division credit. Study,
Courses

A study of the characteristics of orchestral instru- rehearsal and performance of choral literature.
ments including scoring principles and tech- Membership in chamber singers is by audition
niques. The scoring of works for large and small only.
ensembles.
MUSI 3347. Wind Ensemble. 0-4-1.
MUSI 3326. Composition. 2-0-2. Prerequisite: Previous band experience.
Prerequisite: MUSI 2222 and MUSI 2100. May be repeated for upper-division credit. Study,
For music majors. The development of music rehearsal and concert performance of literature
composition skill by an exploration of basic tech- for wind ensemble.
niques necessary for coherent creative expression
MUSI 3348. Orchestra. 0-4-1.
using pitch, rhythm, melody, timbre and har-
Prerequisite: Audition.
mony. Students write original compositions for
May be repeated for upper-division credit. Study,
various specified instruments, voices or com-
rehearsal and concert performance of literature
binations. 20th century styles and techniques
for orchestra. Membership in the orchestra is by
are utilized. MUSI 3326 develops skill in music
audition only.
improvisation.
MUSI 3349. Chorale. 0-4-1.
MUSI 3331. Choral Conducting. 2-1-2.
Prerequisite: None.
Prerequisite: MUSI 2222.
May be repeated for upper-division credit. Study,
Fundamental elements of conducting including
rehearsal and concert performance of literature
baton technique, score reading, cueing, expres-
for choir.
sion, interpretation and rehearsal skills with
an emphasis on applying these techniques in MUSI 3352. Opera Workshop. 0-2-2.
practical conducting experiences involving vocal Prerequisite: Corequisite: Applied vocal study.
and instrumental ensembles. Required labora- Techniques for the singing actor studied through the
tory component. production of scenes from the dramatic repertory.
Music (MUSI) 297

MUSI 3353. Jazz Improvisation. 0-2-2. of one academic semester with a previously
Prerequisite: MUSI 1122. approved business firm, private agency or gov-
The development of instrumental (and vocal) ernment agency. Credit is allowed only in elec-
improvisation skills incorporating harmony, tive areas.
melody, rhythm and form. Musical styles include
MUSI 3411. Survey of African-American
traditional and contemporary jazz. May be taken Music. 3-0-3.
up to three times for credit. Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
MUSI 3367. Vocal Skills I. 1-0-1. An examination of the development of African-
Prerequisite: All developmental studies courses American music from its roots in Africa to the
if required. Non-music majors require permission present time in America. The course examines
of instructor. the various genres of African-American music
Vocal proficiency for music majors and non- created by Africans including: spirituals, work
majors. Emphasis on tone production, diction, songs, blues, gospel, jazz, rhythm and blues, and
performing skills and the physiology of the art music. The course also examines the devel-
voice. opment of the black church, minstrelsy, black
classical music artists, and black classical music
MUSI 3368. Vocal Skills II. 1-0-1. composers and their compositions.
Prerequisite: MUSI 3367.
Continuation of MUSI 3367. MUSI 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit
hours.
MUSI 3371. Composition. 1 hour Prerequisite: Approval of instructor, major area com-
instruction - 2 hours credit. mittee and department chair prior to registration.
Prerequisite: MUSI 2222, MUSI 2100 and permis- Selected topics of an advanced nature, which
sion of instructor. may include original research projects.
Individually tailored instruction for the develop-
ment of music composition skills by writing in MUSI 4410. Contemporary Music Litera-
traditional and 20th-century styles in both small ture. 2-0-2.
and large forms and for a variety of media. Prerequisite: MUSI 2222.
Music literature from Impressionism to the present.
MUSI 3372. Composition. 1 hour
instruction - 2 hours credit. MUSI 4413. Piano Literature. 2-0-2.
Prerequisite: MUSI 3371 and permission of Prerequisite: MUSI 1122 and permission of

Courses
instructor. instructor.
Continuation of MUSI 3371. Keyboard literature from 1600 to the present.
MUSI 3380. Small Ensembles. 0-2-1. MUSI 4420. Counterpoint. 2-0-2.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. All devel- Prerequisite: MUSI 2222.
opmental studies courses if required. Analysis and principles of writing in the contra-
Focus of the ensemble (jazz band, guitar ensem- puntal styles of the common practice period to
ble, flute ensemble, percussion ensemble, trom- the present.
bone ensemble, brass ensemble, brass quintet,
MUSI 4421. 20th-Century Analysis.
woodwind quintet, etc.) will be listed on stu-
2-0-2.
dent’s transcript as part of course title.
Prerequisite: MUSI 2222.
MUSI 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-3 Analysis techniques for 20th-century music, with
credit hours. an emphasis on serial, atonal and electronic
Prerequisite: Approval of coordinator of coop- compositions.
erative education/internship (Career Services).A
MUSI 4430. Piano Pedagogy. 2-0-2.
supervised work experience program for a min-
Prerequisite: Corequisite: Applied piano study.
imum of two academic semesters at a site in
Beginning-, elementary-, and intermediate-level
business, industry or government. For sopho-
teaching materials and methods for piano.
more-, junior-, or senior-level students who wish
to obtain successive on-the-job experience in con- MUSI 4433. Voice Pedagogy. 2-0-2.
junction with their academic training. Prerequisite: Corequisite: Applied vocal study.
Pedagogical methods, vocal physiology and lit-
MUSI 3398. Internship. 1-12 credit
erature for training voices from beginning to
hours.
advanced levels.
Prerequisite: None.
A supervised, credit-earning work experience
298 Course Descriptions

MUSI 4435. (Name of Instrument) Peda- •APPLIED MUSIC (MUAP)•


gogy and Literature. 1 hour of instruc-
tion - 3 hours credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 2222. Composition Courses, and
Pedagogical methods, techniques, physiology Pedagogy Courses
and literature in the principal performance con-
centration area. Course Work with Special Fees
Applied music encompasses the areas of instru-
MUSI 4471. Composition. 1 hour
instruction - 2 hours credit. mental and vocal performance requiring individual
Prerequisite: MUSI 3372 and permission of studio instruction. Other courses in music requir-
instructor. ing highly specialized individual application
Continuation of the development of music com- such as composition and pedagogy are also
position skills. taught through corresponding individual studio
instruction. Studio instruction is offered in
MUSI 4472. Composition. 1 hour applied music performance courses for one (1)
instruction - 2 hours credit. to two (2) hours of credit. Studio instruction is
Prerequisite: MUSI 4471 and permission of offered in composition for two (2) hours of credit
instructor. and in pedagogy for three (3) hours of credit.
Continuation of MUSI 4471. Studio instruction is limited to music majors.
MUSI 4480. Research for Senior A special fee will be charged for registration
Recital. 1-0-1. in applied music, composition, and pedagogy
Prerequisite: Senior standing in applied perfor- courses offered in a studio lesson format. The
mance. registration fee for one 50-minute private lesson
A research project based on the literature to per week is $150 per semester. In applied music
be presented in the senior recital. Analysis of and pedagogy courses, the particular instrument
the literature. Program notes to be drawn from will be listed on the student’s transcript as part
research and analysis. of the course title.

MUSI 4490. Special Topics in Music. 1-3


credit hours. APPLIED MUSIC Performance
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart- Courses
ment chair.
Courses

Advancement to the succeeding level requires


Selected special topics of interest to faculty and
a faculty jury recommendation. All junior and
students.
senior recitals must be preceded by a faculty jury
MUSI 4495. Senior Seminar in Music. recommendation.
0-2-1.
Prerequisite: Completion of applied studies and MUAP 1111,1112,1113. Performance.
completion of 90 hours of course work and per- (1 hour instruction - 1 hour credit)
mission of department chair. MUAP 1121,1122,1123. Performance.
A capstone course designed to complete the (1 hour instruction - 2 hours credit)
major by integrating the student’s prior aca-
demic, theoretical and applied experiences in MUAP 2211,2212,2213. Performance.
music. Discussions focus on artistic, pedagologi- (1 hour instruction - 1 hour credit)
cal, creative and entrepreneurial concerns with
MUAP 2221,2222,2223. Performance.
a goal of establishing interconnections among
(1 hour instruction - 2 hours credit)
areas of study. Students fulfill projects in areas
of musical performance, creative work, scholarly MUAP 3311,3312,3313. Performance.
documents, pedagogy and arts advocacy. A sem- (1 hour instruction - 1 hour credit)
inar format is used throughout to encourage
MUAP 3320. Performance - Secondary
student interaction with peers, faculty and the
Applied.
music/arts community.
(1 hour instruction - 1 hour credit)
MUAP 3321,3322*,3323. Performance.
(1 hour instruction - 2 hours credit)
(* - recital component)
Music (MUSI)—Music Education (MUED) 299

MUAP 4411*,4412,4413. Performance. MUED 3302. Choral Methods, Materials


(1 hour instruction - 1 hour credit) and Curriculum. 3-0-3.
(* - recital component) Prerequisite: MUSI 2222.
The development of the specific teaching skills,
MUAP 4421,4422*,4423. Performance. techniques and materials to support the role
(1 hour instruction - 2 hours credit) of the choir director and vocal music teacher.
(* - recital component) The course prepares prospective choral/vocal
MUAP 4521,4522,4523. Performance. track music specialists for all aspects of the
(1 hour instruction - 2 hours credit) role including curriculum design, rehearsal pro-
cedures, methodologies, and the study of appro-
MUAP 4621,4622,4623. Performance. priate choral literature. Field component, peer
(1 hour instruction - 2 hours credit) teaching and laboratory conducting are required.
This course is a requirement for all choral/vocal
Composition Courses music education majors.
MUSI 3371. Composition.
MUED 3303. Instrumental Methods,
(1 hour instruction - 2 hours credit) Materials and Curriculum. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: MUSI 2222, MUSI 2100 and permis- Prerequisite: MUSI 2222.
sion of instructor.
The development of specific teaching skills, tech-
MUSI 3372. Composition. niques and materials to support the role of
(1 hour instruction-2 hours credit) band director and instrumental music teacher.
Prerequisite: MUSI 3371 and permission of The course prepares prospective instrumental
instructor. track music specialists for all aspects of the role
including curriculum design, rehearsal proce-
MUSI 4471. Composition. dures, methodologies and the study of appro-
(1 hour instruction - 2 hours credit) priate band literature. Field component, peer
Prerequisite: MUSI 3372 and permission of
teaching and laboratory conducting are required.
instructor.
This course is a requirement for all instrumental
MUSI 4472. Composition. music education majors.
(1 hour instruction - 2 hours credit)
MUED 3305. Learning and Assessment
Prerequisite: MUSI 4471 and permission of
in Music. 2-0-2.
instructor.

Courses
Prerequisite: MUSI 2222.
Pedagogy Courses A course examining educational principles, cogni-
tive psychology and developmental learning the-
MUSI 4435. (Name of Instrument) Peda- ories relevant to the teaching and learning of
gogy and Literature. music. In addition, strategies for assessing music
(1 hour instruction - 3 hours credit) aptitude and achievement are addressed, includ-
ing standardized tests, teacher-constructed instru-
• MUSIC EDUCATION (MUED) • ments, and evaluation tools for music programs,
courses and performance ensembles. This course
MUED 3301. General Methods, Materi- is a requirement for all music education majors.
als and Curriculum. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: MUSI 2222. MUED 3314. Choral Literature. 2-0-2.
The development of specific teaching skills, tech- Prerequisite: MUSI 1110 and MUSI 2222.
niques and materials to support the role of the A survey of large and small choral works from
elementary/general music teacher. The course the Renaissance to the present with emphasis on
prepares prospective general track music spe- practical performing editions and special atten-
cialists for all aspects of the role including tion to contemporary literature.
curriculum design and the incorporation of a MUED 3334. Foundations of Music Edu-
wide variety of methodologies into classroom cation. 2-0-2.
instruction. Field component and peer teaching Prerequisite: MUSI 2222.
required. This course is a requirement for all An examination of the interaction of historical,
music education majors. social and philosophical forces and the devel-
opment of music education. This course is
REQUIRED for ALL music education majors.
Field component required.
300 Course Descriptions

MUED 3360. (Name of Instrument) Selected special topics of interest to faculty and
Techniques (2). 1-0-1. students.
Prerequisite: None.
Instrument Techniques are REQUIRED for all • NURSING (NURS) •
music education majors. They are taken by
advisement and provide for the necessary com- NURS 3209. Theoretical Basis for
petencies in each of the music education track Holistic Nursing & Health. 4-6-6.
specializations. Prerequisites: Admission to BSN program;
ENGL 1102, MATH 1107, BIOL 2222, BIOL 2261,
MUED 3370. Marching Band Tech- SCI CORE, SOCI 2105, PSYC 3305.
niques. 0-4-1. The first nursing course is designed to introduce
Prerequisite: MUSI 2222. the student to the philosophical and theoretical
Practicum in organization and training of march- basis for professional nursing in primary and sec-
ing bands. The study of drill and the planning ondary care settings. The student is encouraged
of movement, formations and shows. Supervised to be self-assessing, self caring, and self-directive.
apprenticeship in public school settings. Emphasis is on the six processes of nursing, self
MUED 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-3 care requisites, and holistic health. Learning expe-
credit hours. riences are provided in the Nursing Learning
Prerequisite: Approval of coordinator of coop- Resource Center, KSU’s Wellness Center and
erative education/internship (Career Services). selected primary and secondary care settings.
A supervised work experience program for a
NURS 3301. Nutritional Concepts and
minimum of two academic semesters at a site
Practice. 1-0-1.
in business, industry or government. For sopho-
Prerequisite: NURS 3209.
more-, junior-, or senior-level students who wish
Application of principles of normal nutrition
to obtain successive on-the-job experience in con-
throughout the life-span and dietary manage-
junction with their academic training.
ment of common health problems.
MUED 3398. Internship. 1-12 credit
NURS 3303. Clinical Pharmacology for
hours.
Nurses. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: None.
Prerequisite: NURS 3209 or registered nurse
A supervised, credit-earning work experience status.
of one academic semester with a previously An introduction to fundamental pharmacologic
Courses

approved school, kindergarten, music studio, principles and their application. The nursing
church music program or other appropriate process approach will provide the theoretical
apprenticeship environment. Credit is allowed base for the knowledge and skills needed to
only in elective areas. safely administer medications.
MUED 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit NURS 3309. Health Assessment. 2-3-3.
hours. Corequisite: NURS 3209 or registered nurse
Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor, major status, permission of instructor.
area committee and department chair prior to
Introduction to basic interviewing and physical
registration.
assessment techniques involved in the process of
Selected topics of an advanced nature, which
health assessment of clients. Emphasis is placed
may include original research topics.
on recognition of normal findings, and common
MUED 4470. Student Teaching/Seminar. deviations association with pathologies.
12 credit hours.
NURS 3313. Adult Health Nursing.
Prerequisite: Admission to student teaching.
2-12-6.
Full-time guided teaching experience, during
Prerequisite: NURS 3209, 3301, 3309. Corequisite:
which the student teacher takes increasing
BIOL 3317, NURS 3303.
responsibility for the work with a given group of
Application of the processes of nursing to com-
learners in a cooperating school district. The stu-
monly encountered problems of middle-aged
dent is supervised by music education faculty and
and elderly adults.
attends weekly team-taught seminars.
NURS 3314. Mental Health Nursing.
MUED 4490. Special Topics in Music 1-6-3.
Education. 1-3 credit hours. Prerequisite: NURS 3209, 3301, 3309, 3313, BIOL
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart- 3317. Corequisite: NURS 3303.
ment chair.
Music Education (MUED)—Nursing (NURS) 301

Application of the processes of nursing to commonly NURS 4400. Directed Study in Nursing.
encountered mental health problems of the young adult. Variable 1-3.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
NURS 3318. Parent-Child Nursing.
ment chair.
3-9-6.
Selected topics external to regular course offerings,
Prerequisite: NURS 3209, 3301, 3309, 3313, BIOL
3317. Corequisite: NURS 3303. which may include original research projects.
Application of the processes of nursing to com- NURS 4401. Nursing Perspectives.
monly encountered problems of young adults in 2-0-2.
the childbearing years, and newborns, children, Prerequisite: NURS 3313, 3314, 3318 or RN
and adolescents. status.
Examination and discussion of historical, current
NURS 3320. Concepts of Professional
and future perspective in nursing and health
Nursing. 3-0-3.
care.
Prerequisite: Admission to the BSN program.
Corequisite: NURS 3309. NURS 4402. Research in Nursing. 3-0-3.
Integration of the unique components of profes- Prerequisite: NURS 3209 or registered nurse
sional nursing from Level II and Level III nurs- status, MATH 1107.
ing courses for students who have previously Introduction to basic research language and con-
completed and RN program. Successful comple- cepts, including issues of design, methodology
tion of NURS 3320, 3303, and 3309 entitles the and application to practice.
student to exemption credit for NURS 3209, 3301,
3313, 3314, 3315, 3316, and 4414. May be taken NURS 4412. Community Health Nurs-
once. ing. 2-12-6.
Prerequisite: NURS 3313, 3314, 3318 or NURS
NURS 3396. Cooperative Study. Vari- 3320.
able 1-3. Application of the processes of nursing to com-
Prerequisite: Approval of department chair. monly encountered health problems of families
A supervised work experience program for a within the community.
minimum of two academic semesters at a site
in a health care agency. Work experience is NURS 4414. Complex Health Nursing.
2-0-2.
combined with seminars conducted at intervals
Prerequisite: NURS 3313, 3314, 3318.
during the semester. For senior level students

Courses
Application of the processes of nursing to indi-
who wish to obtain on-the-job experience in con-
vidual clients and their families. The focus is on
junction with their academic program. Credit is
individual clients who are experiencing complex
allowed only in elective areas.
health problems.
NURS 3398. Internship in Health Care.
NURS 4416. Leadership in Nursing.
Variable 1-3.
2-0-2.
Prerequisite: Approval of department chair.
Prerequisite: NURS 4412, 4414.
A supervised work experience program for one
Designed to develop the leadership skills neces-
academic semester in a health care agency. Work
sary for the beginning practice as a registered
experience is combined with seminars conducted
nurse. Focuses on the role of the nurse as part
at intervals during the quarter. For senior level
of the larger health care delivery system, with
students who wish to obtain on-the-job expe-
emphasis on the development of leadership and
rience in conjunction with their academic pro-
management skills useful in delivery of high
gram. Credit is allowed only in elective areas.
quality, client focused care. Topics include client
NURS 4000. Service Learning in Nurs- care/case management, budgetary management,
ing. 1-3. development of teamwork, roles of health care
Prerequisite: 60 hours and permission of instruc- providers and health care coordinators, integra-
tor and department chair/program director. tion of community health care systems, and
A community activity which links learning to health program development and evaluation.
life by connecting meaningful community ser-
vice activities with academic learning, personal NURS 4417. Advanced Clinical Practi-
growth, and civic responsibility. Activity will be cum. 0-15-5.
Prerequisite: NURS 4412. Corequisites: NURS
designed with the instructor and approved by
4414, 4416.
the chair/program director.
Designed to provide a precepted clinical experience
302 Course Descriptions

for the non-licensed and registered nurse student. NURS 4423. International Health
Provides an opportunity to practice under the guid- Policy. 3-0-3.
ance and supervision of a preceptor, and assume Prerequisite: Completion of 60 hours or permis-
the role of the professional nurse in a variety of sion of instructor.
settings. For the registered nurse student it provides Designed to serve a variety of students who are
an opportunity to practice in a new area or develop interested in international or global health policy
new clinical skills. The course focuses on the role issues. Beginning with an historical overview of
of the professional nurse as care provider, com- global health, the course progresses through the
municator, teacher, leader and manager of care for developmental levels of countries and people,
a group of clients, and as care provider, communica- incorporating a macro and microanalysis, and
tor, teacher, leader and manager of care for a group considering cultural, social, economic, political,
of clients, and as a consumer of research that is environmental, demographic, biological, techno-
applicable to individual clients and groups of clients. logical and ethical issues which impact interna-
An appropriate clinical project demonstrates appli- tional health policy.
cation of principles of nursing care and/or organiza-
tional development. NURS 4425. Nursing as Caring.3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Junior level or permission of
NURS 4418. Advanced Clinical Project. instructor.
0-12-4. Designed to explore the multiple perspectives of
Prerequisite: NURS 4412, RN status. Corequisite: caring as the foundational science of nursing.
NURS 4416. Developing a personal meaning of caring will be
Designed to develop leadership skills in the stu- emphasized as it relates to caring for self, caring
dent who is a Registered Nurse and has expe- for others, and caring as a member of the nursing
rience in delivery of clinical care. The course profession.
focuses on the role of the professional nurse as
care provider, communicator, teacher, leader and NURS 4426. Nursing Practicum in
manager of care for a group of clients, and as a Oaxaca. 3-03.
Prerequisite: Sophomore nursing status plus one
leader and manager in health care organizations.
Spanish course or fluency in Spanish from any
The practicum experience will focus on appli-
other source.
cation of skills related to health care organiza-
This course is designed for nursing students or
tions, provider networks, information systems,
practicing nurses to work within the Oaxaca,
or community organizations. A project that is
Mexico Department of Public Health Clinics, live
Courses

mutually negotiated with the health care organi-


with a local family, receive daily Spanish conver-
zation provides the framework and direction for
sational tutoring from faculty from the Univer-
the student’s activities.
sity of Oaxaca, and learn about Spanish culture.
NURS 4420. Ethical Issues in Nursing.
NURS 4490. Special Topics in Nursing.
3-0-3.
Variable 1-3.
Prerequisite: Completion of 60 hours or approval
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.
of instructor.
Selected special or currents topics of general
Exploration of the ethical issues affecting current
interest to nursing faculty and students.
and future nursing practice and health-care
delivery.
• PHILOSOPHY (PHIL) •
NURS 4422. Women and Health. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. PHIL 2200. Ways of Knowing. 3-0-3.
This course is designed to introduce students to Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099, if
a wide range of health issues affecting women required; ENGL 1101 recommended.
across the life span. Women’s health issues and A philosophical, critical examination of the dif-
problems as they are influenced by physiologi- ferent ways of knowing and thinking in the
cal, psychological, economic, cultural, emotional humanities, natural sciences, and social sci-
and social factors will be reviewed. The course ences—including ethical and religious perspec-
will focus on topics such as the politics of wom-
en’s health care, the reproductive system and its
relation to the allopathic treatment of women,
fertility control and reproductive alternatives.
Issues of mental health, substance use and abuse,
violence and aging will be examined.
Nursing (NURS)—Philosophy (PHIL) 303

tives. Emphasis is on the nature and purpose PHIL 3320. Religions of the World.
of philosophical inquiry as applied to selected 3-0-3.
issues within philosophy and the broader impli- Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
cations of these methods and questions for other A study of selected world religions with primary
disciplines and in everyday contexts. concentration of the origin and major periods
of the scriptural and doctrinal development of
PHIL 3301. Ethics. 3-0-3.
these religions.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
A study of the major approaches to ethical PHIL 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit
thought and the applicability of these hours.
approaches to selected issues in the humanities, Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
sciences, and professional areas including busi- ment chair prior to registration.
ness, medicine and law. Special topics of an advanced nature not in the
regular course offerings.
PHIL 3305. Logic. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 and MATH 1101 (or PHIL 4415. Feminist Philosophy. 3-0-3.
equivalent). Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
An introduction to deductive logic with focus A study of the main currents of contemporary
on the theoretical and practical aspects of cat- U.S. feminist philosophy including liberal femi-
egorical propositions and syllogisms, truth func- nism, radical feminism, socialist feminism and
tion logic, the method of natural deduction, and post-modern feminism.
predicate logic.
PHIL 4420. Existentialism. 3-0-3.
PHIL 3310. Ancient and Medieval Phi- Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
losophy. 3-0-3. A study of Existentialism and Phenomenology
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102. including their historical roots in the nineteenth
A study of the topics, problems and doctrines century, its major exponents of the late nine-
of ancient and medieval western philosophers teenth and early twentieth centuries, and its
including the pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, impact on philosophy, literature, and other aca-
Augustine and Aquinas. demic disciplines.
PHIL 3311. Modern Western Philosophy. PHIL 4425. The Asian Philosophical
3-0-3. Traditions. 3-0-3.

Courses
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102. Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
A study of the topics, problems and doctrines The Asian Philosophical Traditions is an upper-
of modern western philosophers beginning with division survey course that presents an in-depth
Descartes and concluding with Nietzsche. exploration into the philosophies of India, China
and Japan and engages an ongoing comparison
PHIL 3312. Contemporary Western Phi- of the various traditions with each other and
losophy. 3-0-3. with western traditions.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
A study of major movements in twentieth cen- PHIL 4490. Special Topics in Philoso-
tury western philosophy including positivism, phy. 1-3 credit hours.
pragmatism, phenomenology, philosophy of lan- Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.
guage and post-modernism and of the impact A study of selected topics within philosophy.
of these philosophical movements on other areas
including the arts, sciences and politics. • PHYSICS (PHYS) •
PHIL 3313. American Philosophy. 3-0-3. PHYS 1111. Introductory Physics I.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102. 3-2-4.
A study of major topics and philosophers in the Prerequisite: MATH 1113.
United States from the colonial period through An introduction to classical mechanics, vibra-
the twentieth century including Jefferson, Emer- tions and waves, heat and kinetic theory. Topics
son, Royce, DuBois, James and Dewey. include motion, force, statics, work, torque and
rotational dynamics, oscillations, sound, temper-
ature and heat transfer. The conservation laws of
energy, and momentum and their application to
304 Course Descriptions

mechanical and thermal systems, will be empha- as well as relativity will also be discussed. Subject
sized. Subject matter content will be reinforced matter content will be reinforced through concep-
through a systematic development of conceptual tual as well as quantitative problem solving. Prob-
as well as quantitative problem solving skills. lem solving will utilize concepts and techniques of
Laboratories will accompany these topics and both differentiation and integration.
concepts.
PHYS 2212L. Principles Physics II Lab.
PHYS 1112. Introductory Physics II. 0-2-1.
3-2-4. Prerequisite: PHYS 2211, PHYS 2211L; Corequi-
Prerequisite: PHYS 1111. site: PHYS 2212.
An introduction to classical electromagnetic Laboratory exercises to accompany topics and
theory, geometrical and physical optics and concepts in PHYS 2212.
modern physics. Major topics include the con-
PHYS 3300. Analysis of Physical Sys-
cepts of the electric field and potential, circuits
tems. 3-0-3.
and their elements, magnetic fields, inductance,
Prerequisite: MATH 2202; PHYS 1112 or 2211.
electromagnetic waves and their interaction
An examination of the mathematical tools used
with various media, interference and diffraction.
across different fields of physics combined with
Selected topics from atomic and nuclear physics
their application to specific problems selected
as well as relativity will also be discussed. Sub-
from areas such as classical mechanics and elec-
ject matter content will be reinforced through a
tromagnetism. Practical physics problems will
systematic development of conceptual as well as
illustrate the use of vectors, matrices, differential
quantitative problem solving. Laboratories will
equations, complex variables, probability and
accompany these topics and concepts.
error analysis.
PHYS 2211. Principles of Physics I.
PHYS 3305. Modern Physics. 3-0-3.
3-0-3.
Prerequisite: MATH 2202; PHYS 1112 or 2211.
Prerequisite: MATH 1190; Corequisite: PHYS
A course in modern physics for students
2211L.
in math and science. Topics will include quan-
An introduction to classical mechanics, vibra-
tum mechanics, relativity, solid state physics,
tions and waves, heat and kinetic theory. Topics
the Bohr model, Rutherford scattering, angular
include motion, force statics, work, torque and
momentum, selection rules for quantum num-
rotational dynamics, oscillations, sound, temper-
bers and the Schrodinger wave equation. A com-
ature and heat transfer. The conservation laws
Courses

bination of descriptive and mathematical models


of energy, momentum and thermal systems will
will be used.
be emphasized. Subject matter content will be
reinforced through a systematic development of PHYS 3310. How and Why - The Physics
conceptual as well as quantitative problem solv- in Everyday Life. 3-0-3.
ing skills. Problem solving will utilize concepts Prerequisite: Any core lab science sequence.
and techniques of differentiation and integration. This course will utilize physics as a tool for
understanding how everyday systems work and
PHYS 2211L. Principles Physics I Lab.
why tasks are done in certain ways. It will be
0-2-1.
taught at a level appropriate for the general audi-
Prerequisite: MATH 1190; Corequisite: PHYS
ence. Demonstrations and student activities will
2211.
be used to investigate the operation of a variety
Laboratory exercises to accompany topics and
of systems selected from areas such as household
concepts in Physics 2211.
appliances, communication systems, transporta-
PHYS 2212. Principles Physics II. 3-0-3. tion systems, television, radio, computers and
Prerequisite: PHYS 2211, PHYS 2211L; Corequi- the electrical power system. These examinations
site: PHYS 2212L. will be tied together with the underlying princi-
An introduction to classical electromagnetic ples from mechanics, optics, electricity and mag-
theory, geometrical and physical optics and netism. The large role of energy in modern
modern physics. Major topics include the con- society will be examined in detail.
cepts of the electric field and potential, circuits,
and their elements, magnetic fields, inductance, PHYS 3311. Concepts of Modern Phys-
ics. 3-0-3.
electromagnetic waves and their integration
Prerequisite: Any core lab science sequence.
with various media, interference and diffraction.
A look at quantum mechanics (the physics of
Selected topics from atomic and nuclear physics
Physics (PHYS)—Political Science and International Affairs (POLS) 305

the very small) and relativity (the physics of Examination of the institutions and processes of
high speeds and high energies) for the general American government and Georgia State govern-
audience. The puzzles of modern physics and ment. Global comparisons are made between
some philosophical implications will be consid- the governments of the U.S. and other modern
ered. Topics will include the wave-particle prob- nation-states.
lem, the uncertainty principle, time dilation, and
POLS 2212. State and Local Govern-
why the speed of light is the “speed limit” for the
ment. 3-0-3.
universe. The strong experimental evidence sup-
Prerequisite: POLS 1101 .
porting these (seemingly) strange and paradoxi-
A general survey of state and local government;
cal ideas will also be discussed.
recent and current trends.
PHYS 3312. Concepts of Optics. 3-0-3.
POLS 2250. Contemporary International
Prerequisite: Any core lab science sequence.
Politics. 3-0-3.
A survey of optics and its applications for the
Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
general audience. Topics will include the nature
This course provides an introduction to the study
of light, optical instruments and methods, color
of international relations. Sources of interna-
perception and depth perception. Techniques
tional order, conflict and war, determinants of
of color reproduction will be examined in areas
foreign policy, global actors and the dynamics
such as photography, printing, art, color TV, and
of political interaction between nation-states are
computer graphics. The course will include the
examined.
fundamentals of optical systems such as hologra-
phy, photography, microscopy and fiber optics. POLS 2260. Current Political Issues.
Emphasis will be on the applications of optical 3-0-3.
principles. Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
This course exposes students to critical contempo-
PHYS 3340. Electronics. 3-2-4. rary political and government-related issues and
Prerequisite: PHYS 1112 or 2212. provides some context and background. It ties
Fundamentals of analog and digital electronics. the various issues to subfields of political science.
This course starts with basic electrical circuit Domestic-international linkage is emphasized.
operation and progresses to operational ampli-
fiers as an example of practical analog circuits POLS 2280. Research Methods. 3-0-3.
and to basic computer interfacing as an example Prerequisite: POLS 1101; MATH 0099 if required.

Courses
of the operation of digital circuits. Lab involves An introduction to the empirical methods in
hands-on work with both analog and digital social science research. It provides the student
electronic circuits. with a working knowledge of the design,
implementation and evaluation of social science
PHYS 4400. Directed Study. 1-4. research.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor, major area
committee and Biology/Physics Department POLS 3313. Public Policy Analysis.
Chair prior to registration. 3-0-3.
Special topics of an advanced nature that are not Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
in the regular course offerings. Introduction to public policy analysis using data
and methodological approaches as well as polit-
PHYS 4490. Special Topics in Physics. ical and social inputs into the policy process.
1-4.
Analysis of policy outcomes.
Prerequisite: Varies as to topic.
Selected special topics of general interest to the POLS 3320. Legal Research. 3-0-3.
faculty and students. Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
An introduction to legal resources for law-related
• POLITICAL SCIENCE & courses and to problems that demonstrate the
effective utilization of legal research and reference
INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
tools in a manner designed to meet the needs
(POLS) • of the student in both law and non-law fields.
An understanding of legal rules is necessary for
POLS 1101. American Government in a
scientists, archaeologists and other professionals.
Global Perspective. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099, if
required.
306 Course Descriptions

POLS 3323. Political Ideologies. 3-0-3. sector lobbying and the role of interest groups
Prerequisite: POLS 1101. in a democratic society. The processes, proce-
Emphasizes the political development and appli- dures, and techniques of lobbying government
cation of contemporary ideologies such as entities will be examined in depth, as well as
nationalism, capitalism, socialism, democracy, the issue concerns and persuasion strategies of
marxism, conservatism, liberalism, feminism, interest groups. The course will focus on applied
communitarianism, facism, liberation move- learning, and will help prepare students for
ments, and others. employment in professional political environ-
ments.
POLS 3334. Comparative Politics. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: POLS 1101. POLS 3385. Campaigns and Elections.
An introduction to the comparative approaches 3-0-3.
for the study of politics, focusing on patterns of Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
development and change in contemporary politi- An in-depth look at the process of selecting gov-
cal systems. ernmental leaders in the United States. Includes
a segment on foreign elections.
POLS 3343. Principles of Public Admin-
istration. 3-0-3. POLS 3390. Political Research on-Line.
Prerequisite: POLS 1101. 3-0-3.
The methods and procedures of governmental Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
administration and the control of public bureau- This course will help students become familiar
cracies in democratic societies. with and adept at using on-line resources to per-
form political and governmental research. Stu-
POLS 3350. American Foreign Policy. dents will be coached on using Internet tools
3-0-3. and processes to improve their ability to find
Prerequisite: POLS 1101. and use political and governmental information.
This course explores the conduct, substantive Students will be assessed on their proficiency in
policy issues and problems associated with Amer- on-line political research.
ican foreign policy. The contemporary aspects
and problems evolving out of and confronted by POLS 3394. Public Polling and Survey
America's foreign policy are emphasized. Techniques. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: MATH 1107; POLS 2280 or equivalent.
POLS 3360. The United States Con- This course introduces students to the tech-
Courses

gress. 3-0-3. niques and uses of polls and surveys in political


Prerequisite: POLS 1101. science and public policy. Students will learn
Presents an in-depth treatment of the origins, the art of questionnaire design, questionnaire
development, operation of the U.S. Senate and construction, sampling, data collection, coding,
House of Representatives. and analysis. Students will learn the basics of
POLS 3370. The United States Presi- telephone survey techniques and focus group
dency. 3-0-3. moderation for the purposes of collecting infor-
Prerequisite: POLS 1101. mation. Class projects may include the con-
Examines the historical development of the pres- struction and implementation of a survey,
idency, the constitutional powers, the personali- reading and critiquing existing surveys and
ties, the roles and the relationship with other questionnaires. Quantitative and qualitative
governmental entities. approaches will be examined.

POLS 3380. Mass Media and Politics. POLS 3396. Cooperative Study. 1 - 3
3-0-3. credit hours.
Prerequisite: POLS 1101. Prerequisite: POLS 1101; approval of Depart-
Examines the role of the mass media in society. ment Chair and Coordinator of Cooperative
Emphasis is placed on the media’s role in the Education/Internship - Career Services.
social, legal and political processes in the United A supervised work experience program in busi-
States, as well as other democratic and nondemo- ness, industry or government. For sophomore,
cratic countries. junior or senior level students who wish to
obtain successive on-the-job experience in con-
POLS 3388. Lobbying and Interest junction with their academic training.
Groups. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
This course familiarizes students with public
Political Science and International Affairs (POLS) 307

POLS 3398. Internship. 1 - 12 credit Constitution affects criminal justice. Emphasis


hours. on understanding the role of the Supreme Court
Prerequisite: POLS 1101; approval of Department of the United States in interpreting provisions of
Chair and Department Internship Coordinator. the Constitution that affect criminal justice. An
A supervised, credit-earning work experience attempt to understand the content of important
with a previously approved business firm, pri- decisions in this area as well as the reason given
vate agency or government agency. Students by the Court for decisions.
must make application with the Internship Coor-
POLS 4412. Urban Affairs and Prob-
dinator before the end of the semester prior to
lems. 3-0-3.
the semester in which the internship is planned.
Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
POLS 4000. Service Learning in Politi- Emphasis on the changing patterns of local and
cal Science and International Affairs. municipal governments and politics, impact of
1-3 credit hours. reapportionment and other problems generated
Prerequisite: POLS 1101; 60 hours and permis- by an urbanized society.
sion of instructor and department chair/program
director. POLS 4415. Civil Liberties. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
A community activity which links learning to
An intensive study of the rights of Americans as
life by connecting meaningful community ser-
guaranteed by the Constitution. The changing
vice activities with academic learning, personal
character of civil liberties problems in the United
growth, and civic responsibility. Activity will be
States will be stressed with attention given to the
designed with the instructor and approved by
legal, historical and political context of the cases
the chair/program director.
studied.
POLS 4400. Directed Study. 1 - 3 credit
hours. POLS 4420. Judicial Process. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: POLS 1101; approval of Instructor, Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
Advisor and Department Chair prior to registration. Courts and judges as agents in the political
Covers special topics and seminars external to system; focus is on the judicial decision-making
regular course offerings. process, with attention to psychological and
other variables in that process. Relation of judi-
POLS 4402. Political Parties. 3-0-3. cial process to legislative, administrative and
Prerequisite: POLS 1101. electoral processes emphasized.

Courses
Examines the nature, structure and functions of
political parties in differing national cultural con- POLS 4421. Ancient and Medieval Polit-
texts with particular attention to the electoral ical Thought. 3-0-3.
activity of political parties in the United States. Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
A survey of the political thought of Socrates,
POLS 4405. Comparative Legal Sys- Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas and Machia-
tems. 3-0-3. velli emphasizing the aspects of their thought
Prerequisite: POLS 1101. most relevant to the development of Western
An examination of the ways in which the courts political institutions.
and the law in different countries affect public
policy. The source and methods utilized in dif- POLS 4422. Modern and Contempory
ferent legal systems (both democratic and non- Political Thought. 3-0-3.
democratic) as transforming agents of society Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
and/or means for maintaining order within it are A survey of the political thought of Machiavelli,
explored. Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Hume, Hegel,
Mill and Marx emphasizing the aspects of their
POLS 4410. American Legal System. thought most relevant to the development of
3-0-3. Western political institutions.
Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
Basic concepts of American law, judicial selec- POLS 4425. Early American Political
tion, the legal profession, court systems, criminal Thought: 1620 to 1865. 3-0-3.
justice and judicial behavior. Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
This course concentrates on the development
POLS 4411. Criminal Law. 3-0-3. and explication of American political ideas
Prerequisite: POLS 1101. including the English backgrounds of American
An examination of those areas in which the U.S. political thought, the colonial and formative eras.
308 Course Descriptions

POLS 4426. Modern American Political students to the role of budgeting in the governmental
Thought: 1865 to Present. 3-0-3. process. Budgetary actors, their motivations, their
Prerequisites: POLS 1101. stakes and their behaviors are investigated. Students
American political thought from the Civil War examine the legislative process of the budget and
era to the contemporary era emphasizing the budgetary implementation. Students are introduced to
development of the ideas underpinning the cutback management, funding mandates and other
development of democracy, industrialization, the current issues in governmental budgeting.
rise of the positive state and the cold war period.
POLS 4451. Politics and Government in
POLS 4430. International Law and Post-Communist Europe. 3-0-3.
Organization. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
Prerequisites: POLS 1101. This course explains the collapse of communist
This course examines the system of law gov- rule in the former Soviet Union and in Eastern
erning relations between nation-states, and the Europe. It introduces the contemporary political
roles and functions of international organiza- institutions and processes of Russia, Ukraine,
tions. It explores the conventional international Belarus, Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic
law in the areas of diplomacy, territorial ques- and other key countries of the region. The
tions and armed conflicts, as well as the devel- course uses a comparative approach and devel-
oping regimes in trade and human rights. In ops country profiles to assess the varied degrees
addition, the course examines the structures and of success in achieving stable multiparty democ-
functions of some contemporary organizations in racy. It examines the widely divergent strategies
the security and economic areas and evaluates for meeting the severe economic, environmental,
their performance and contribution. social and political challenges confronting these
countries during this difficult and volatile transi-
POLS 4435. Comparative Foreign tional era.
Policy. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: POLS 1101. POLS 4452. Politics of the Pacific Rim.
A study of governmental formulation and con- 3-0-3.
duct of foreign policy, focusing on major foreign Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
policy issues that dominate the contemporary The course is designed to acquaint students
world. with political institutions and processes of China,
Japan and Korea. Particular emphasis will be
POLS 4436. Politics of Developing Areas. placed on analysis of the relations of these coun-
Courses

3-0-3. tries with the United States on selected issues of


Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
contemporary relevance.
This course confronts the patterns of develop-
ment of governmental institutions and use of POLS 4453. Latin America: Democracy
political processes in meeting the problems of the and Development. 3-0-3.
emerging nations of Asia, Africa, Latin America Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
and the Middle East. Examines contemporary socio-political and eco-
nomic characteristics as well as political institu-
POLS 4438. Politics of International tions needed to understand the countries of Latin
Economic Relations. 3-0-3. America. Two important themes—(democracy
Prerequisite: POLS 1101 and ECON 2200.
building and development) will form the central
An exploration of the fundamental questions
focus of this course. Driving forces which facil-
about government and policies, about market
itate and/or hinder the Latin American quest
systems and about relations between the two.
for political stability and economic development
POLS 4444. Administrative Practices
will also be examined. These include political
and Organization. 3-0-3.
parties, labor and peasant movements, economic
Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
elites, religious organizations and the military.
Problems of personnel, finance, administrative
The role and influence of the United States on
law, and the growth and significance of adminis-
Latin American politics will also be examined.
trative legislation and adjudication.
POLS 4454. Politics of the Middle East.
POLS 4446. Governmental Budgeting.
3-0-3.
3-0-3.
Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
Prerequisite: POLS 1101.
This course examines contemporary socio-polit-
This course is designed to introduce undergraduate
ical and economic characteristics needed to
Political Science and International Affairs (POLS)—Psychology (PSYC) 309

understand the many countries of the Middle integrating the students' prior training in alter-
East/North Africa. The role of Islam, the Gulf native dispute resolution in on-site applied set-
war, the quest for development, the Palestine tings and in on-campus seminars. Students will
issue, and democracy versus authoritarianism be given applied experiences in selected public
are themes which will be covered in the course. or private organizations in the community or in
In addition, a “country profile” approach will campus-related programs to make use of their
also be used. This course examines key countries ADR training.
and studies their political structures in detail.
POLS 4490. Special Topics in Political
POLS 4455. International Relations of Science. 3-0-3.
Africa. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: POLS 1101; approval of Instructor
Prerequisite: POLS 1101. and Department Chair.
This course examines the international relations Selected special topics of interest to faculty and
of African states within a conceptual context, students.
with particular reference to Africa’s position in
POLS 4499. Senior Seminar. 3-0-3.
the global political economy. It covers both intra-
Prerequisite: POLS 1101; for political science
African relations and African relations with the
major, 18 hours selected from upper division
outside world. The main purpose is an attempt political science courses from each of the six
to understand African external politics in order major required areas, one of which may be taken
to deal with them, by analyzing past practices concurrently with POLS 4499; for international
and projecting new trends. affairs major, all 21 hours in general require-
POLS 4456. International Environmen- ments courses completed, one of which may be
tal Policy. 3-0-3. taken concurrently with POLS 4499.
Prerequisite: POLS 1101. This capstone course is designed to complete the
An examination of the basic elements of environ- major by integrating the problems, research and
mental policy making in the international arena. theories from the divergent specialty areas of
The course highlights current issues such as trop- the Political Science curriculum. The course will
ical rain forests, the “Global Commons” concept, focus on both the theoretical and empirical con-
bio-diversity and endangered species. Policy cerns, as well as the interconnectedness among
approaches will draw upon examples from spe- the various Political Science specialty areas.
cific countries as well as policy developed within
• PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC) •

Courses
international organizations such as the United
Nations.
PSYC 2105. Social Issues: Perspectives
POLS 4465. Mock Trial. 1-0-1. in Psychology. 2-0-2.
Prerequisite: POLS 1101. Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099.
An examination of the American trial process. One of four disciplinary options (Anthropology
The overall purpose of the course is to enhance 2105, Geography 2105, Psychology 2105, Sociol-
knowledge of the American adversarial process. ogy 2105) that can be taken to satisfy the Social
Students who take the course may qualify for Issues requirement in the general education cur-
selection to teams for state, regional and national riculum. A common set of world social issues
competition. Course may be taken three times is critically examined from one of four social sci-
for credit with permission of the instructor. ence perspectives. The discipline of psychology
POLS 4470. Alternative Dispute Resolu- addresses social issues from the perspective of
tion. 3-0-3. how these issues impact the individual and his
Prerequisite: POLS 1101. or her relationship to the larger society. Emphasis
A survey of the theory and methods of alter- will be placed on the use of scientific methodol-
native dispute resolution and conflict manage- ogy in the investigation of these issues.
ment, with simulation in facilitation, mediation PSYC 2201. General Psychology. 3-0-3.
and negotiation. Basic skills will be taught. Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099, if
POLS 4480. Practicum in Alternative required.
Dispute Resolution. 2-2-3. The scientific approach to the study of psycho-
Prerequisite: POLS 4470; permission of Program logical phenomena, human development, learn-
Coordinator. ing and thinking, motivation and emotion,
A capstone course designed to meet the Alterna- perception, testing and measurement, personal-
tive Dispute Resolution Certificate Program by ity and behavior.
310 Course Descriptions

PSYC 2258. Psychology of Adjustment. Topics will include hypothesis testing, indepen-
3-0-3. dent-group and within-subjects designs, com-
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099, if plex designs, and statistical analysis using t-tests
required. and the Analysis of Variance. Emphasis will be
The dynamics of normal and maladaptive adjust- on the selection of appropriate designs for dif-
ment, including the study of appropriate and ferent research questions, data collection, data
inappropriate reactions to frustration and stress; analysis, the interpretation of results, and writ-
resolution of conflicts, fears and anxiety; building ing laboratory reports.
emotional stability and preventing mental illness.
PSYC 3301L. Experimental Psychology
PSYC 3210. Careers in Psychology. Laboratory. 0-2-1.
3-0-3. Prerequisite: Psychology majors - PSYC 3300
Prerequisite: PSYC 2201. and PSYC 3300L. Non-psychology majors - See
This course focuses on career planning and psychology department chair. Corequisite: PSYC
development issues for psychology majors. 3301.
Using a combination of lecture, readings, and Laboratory course designed to apply topics
exercises, students will be exposed to informa- taught in PSYC 3301 (Experimental Psychology).
tion designed to assist in the clarification, selec- PSYC 3305. Life-Span Developmental
tion, and pursuit of a career in psychology or a Psychology. 3-0-3.
related field. Topics will include an overview Prerequisite: PSYC 2201 or PSYC 2105.
of the undergraduate major in psychology, career Human development from conception to death,
options in psychology and related fields, prepa- emphasizing biological, cognitive, emotional,
ration for employment with a bachelors degree, social and personality development. Scientific
preparing for and succeeding in graduate school, approaches for studying developmental psy-
and applying for a job or to a graduate school. chology will stress the importance of research
PSYC 3300. Research Methods in Psy- methodology and research findings across the
chology. 3-0-3. life-span. Theories of development and appli-
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101, MATH 1101, and PSYC cations to real-world problems will provide a
2201. Corequisite PSYC 3300L. context for understanding how humans change
This course is designed as an introduction to during the life-cycle.
methods and statistics used in psychological
PSYC 3310. Psychoactive Drugs and
research, emphasizing non-experimental meth-
Courses

Behavior. 3-0-3.
odologies including observation, correlational Prerequisite: PSYC 2201 or PSYC 2105.
research, surveys, archival research, and quasi- This course addresses how psychoactive drugs
experimental and ex post facto designs. Topics work in the central nervous system to affect
will include an introduction to the scientific behavior. Stimulants, depressants, hallucino-
method, an overview of experimental design, gens, analgesics and psychotropic drugs will be
and an emphasis on measurement and error, discussed primarily in terms of their pharma-
experimental control, descriptive statistics, sta- cological action in the brain. Substance abuse
tistical inference, scientific writing, and ethical and treatment disorders will be addressed from a
issues in non-experimental research. biological perspective.
PSYC 3300L. Research Methods in Psy- PSYC 3320. Leadership and Group
chology Laboratory. 0-2-1. Dynamics. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101, MATH 1101, and PSYC Prerequisite: PSYC 2201 or PSYC 2105. Corequi-
2201. Corequisite PSYC 3300. site PSYC 3320L.
Laboratory course designed to apply topics taught Theory and application of psychological knowl-
in PSYC 3300 (Research Methods in Psychology). edge regarding group formation, group process
PSYC 3301. Experimental Psychology. and leadership. Issues are examined in the con-
3-0-3. text of ongoing intensive group discussion.
Prerequisite: Psychology majors - PSYC 3300
PSYC 3320L. Leadership and Group
and PSYC 3300L. Non-psychology majors - See
Dynamics Laboratory. 0-2-1.
psychology department chair. Corequisite: PSYC
Prerequisite: PSYC 2201 or PSYC 2105. Corequi-
3301L.
site PSYC 3320.
This course will focus on experimental designs
Laboratory course designed to apply topics
used in laboratory research in psychology.
taught in PSYC 3320 (Leadership and Group
Dynamics).
Psychology (PSYC) 311

PSYC 3325. Social Psychology. 3-0-3. behavior. Topics include: sexual values, sex and
Prerequisite: PSYC 2201. gender, sex and love, sexual behavior over the
A survey of the effects of the social environment life span, reproduction, sex and health, sexual
upon the behavior of the individual. Interper- dysfunction and treatment, and social problems/
sonal attraction, affiliation, aggression, prejudice, issues related to sexual behavior.
conformity, attitudes and attitude change are
PSYC 3370. Industrial-Organizational
discussed. Experimental research findings are Psychology. 3-0-3.
emphasized. Prerequisite: PSYC 2201 or PSYC 2105.
PSYC 3335. Theories of Personality. The application of research and psychological
3-0-3. principles to human behavior in the workplace.
Prerequisite: PSYC 2201 or PSYC 2105. Course topics will include the psychological
A survey of selected theories as well as aspects of employment selection and assessment,
research findings and possible therapeutic, educa- performance appraisal, employee and work team
tional and social applications. Major theoretical development, reorganization and down-sizing,
schools—e.g., psychodynamic, learning, humanis- work stress, employee violence, work/family con-
tic, life-span, trait, cognitive—are covered. flict, and the changing nature of the workplace.

PSYC 3340. The Psychology of Family PSYC 3375. Psychology of Career


Interaction: A Developmental Perspec- Development. 3-0-3.
tive. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: PSYC 2201 or PSYC 2105.
Prerequisite: PSYC 2201 or PSYC 2105. The application of research and psychological prin-
An in-depth coverage of the psychological ciples with respect to how people formulate and
dynamics involved in parent/child relationships. make career decisions. The course explores career
A developmental approach will be employed to development across the life-span, focusing on theo-
explore the changing needs and demands of the ries of career decision-making, work adjustment,
child and the parents as each progress in their adult career crises and transitions, and career coun-
own development. Current research and theory seling interview and assessment techniques.
concerning parenting techniques, the psychologi-
PSYC 3380. Principles of Psychological
cal atmosphere of the home and the interaction
Testing. 3-0-3.
of the child’s temperament with the parents will Prerequisite: PSYC 2201.
be discussed. Contemporary family issues such as Designed to introduce the principles that under-

Courses
day-care, domestic violence, single parenting and lie the development, use and interpretation of
children with special needs will be presented. psychological assessment tools. Topics include:
PSYC 3345. Learning and Conditioning. test construction, survey development, scaling,
3-0-3. norming, assessment interpretation issues and
Prerequisite: PSYC 2201. psychological assessment applications in indus-
An examination of behavior theory and the types trial, vocational, clinical and research settings.
of learning that help account for similarity and Additionally, psychological assessment will be
diversity in the behavior of human and nonhu- discussed in terms of social, legal and ethical
man animals. Course focuses on the learning concerns.
processes of habituation, classical conditioning, PSYC 3396. Cooperative Study in Psy-
and operant conditioning. chology. 1-3 Credit hours.
Prerequisite: Approval of Psychology Depart-
PSYC 3355. Cross-Cultural Psychology. ment Chair and Coordinator of Cooperative
3-0-3. Education/Internship (Career Services).
Prerequisite: PSYC 2201 or PSYC 2105. A supervised work experience program for a
An overview of the study and application of psy- minimum of two academic semesters at a pre-
chological principles across a variety of cultures. viously approved site in business, industry,
Cognition, attitude structure and change, inter- government or private agency. For sophomore,
personal communication, personality and mental junior or senior level students who wish to
health issues will be discussed as they relate to obtain successive on-the-job experience in con-
different cultural contexts. junction with their academic training.
PSYC 3365. Human Sexuality. 3-0-3. PSYC 4400. Directed Study in Psychol-
Prerequisite: PSYC 2201 or PSYC 2105. ogy. 1-3 Credit Hours.
An examination of the biological, personal, inter- Prerequisite: PSYC 3300 and PSYC 3300L,
personal and social aspects of human sexual approval of instructor and department chair.
312 Course Descriptions

This course is offered to students interested in historical figures, and the historical/cultural con-
investigating special topics and seminars exter- text in which the field developed.
nal to regular course offerings. May include
PSYC 4455. Cognitive Psychology.
original research projects.
4-0-4.
PSYC 4410. Physiological Psychology. Prerequisite: Psychology Majors - PSYC 3300
4-0-4. and PSYC 3300L. Non-psychology majors - see
Prerequisite: Psychology Majors - PSYC 3300 psychology department chair.
and PSYC 3300L. Non-psychology majors - see An examination of the experimental investiga-
psychology department chair. tion of complex cognitive processes, including
This course addresses the relationship between the storage and retrieval of information, concept
our underlying physiological systems and formation, reasoning, problem-solving and deci-
behavior. The topics investigated include neural sion-making
communication, the anatomy of the nervous
PSYC 4475. Psychology of Workplace
system, and the biological bases of sleep, repro-
Motivation and Leadership. 3-0-3.
ductive behavior, stress, learning and memory,
Prerequisite: One psychology 3000-level course.
and mental disorders.
This course examines topics of motivation and
PSYC 4415. Perception.4-0-4. leadership in the workplace by addressing theo-
Prerequisite: Psychology Majors - PSYC 3300 retical formulations, major research findings and
and PSYC 3300L. Non-psychology majors - see real-world applications. Issues related to these
psychology department chair. topics will include gender, corporate culture, job
A study of various theories and phenomena of attitudes, cross-cultural influences and organiza-
perception. Course includes experimental inves- tional reward systems.
tigations of the characteristics of sensory systems
PSYC 4480. Field Practicum in Psychol-
including vision, audition, kinesthesis, and the
ogy. 3-0-3.
vestibular and skin senses.
Prerequisite: PSYC 3301 and PSYC 3301L. Must
PSYC 4420. Applied Psychology. 3-0-3. be a declared major in Psychology and have
Prerequisite: One psychology 3000-level course. completed two field-related courses in Psychol-
A critical analysis of the professional practice ogy. Permission of instructor required.
of psychology. Traditional and emerging practice The psychology practicum offers the advanced
areas will be discussed in respect to practitioner psychology major an opportunity to combine
Courses

activities, efficacy of interventions, and profes- appropriate supervised field experience with class-
sional and specialty credentialing. Ethics and room discussion of site-specific and general issues
ethical decision-making will be studied in the related to the application of psychological theory.
context of professional practice. Course structure combines 100 hours of supervised
on-site experience with weekly class sessions.
PSYC 4425. Psychology of Gender.
3-0-3. PSYC 4485. Research Practicum in Psy-
Prerequisite: One psychology 3000-level course. chology. 3-0-3.
An exploration of gender as a central organizing Prerequisite: PSYC 3301 and PSYC 3301L. Must
feature of human behavior. The course will con- be a declared major in Psychology and have
sider gender as an intrapsychic, interpersonal completed two junior or senior level courses in
and sociocultural phenomenon. Scientific Psychology. Permission of instructor required.
research findings will be emphasized as well as This course is for students seeking additional
multicultural and cross-cultural perspectives. experience in applied research settings combin-
ing in-class instruction and individual placement
PSYC 4430. Abnormal Psychology. either on or off campus. Students who seek
3-0-3. employment in a research setting upon grad-
Prerequisite: One psychology 3000-level course. uation or are interested in attending graduate
A comprehensive study of the various forms of school and wish to obtain additional experience
mental illness and maladjustment. in research techniques should select this course.
PSYC 4445. History and Systems of PSYC 4490. Special Topics in Psychol-
Psychology. 3-0-3. ogy. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: One psychology 3000-level course. Prerequisite: One psychology 3000-level course.
An examination of the historical development of This course will address selected topics of special
psychology, focusing on antecedents in philoso- interest to faculty and students.
phy and physiology, major early systems, major
Psychology (PSYC)—RUSSIAN (RUSS) 313

PSYC 4499. Senior Seminar in Psychol- values; the appraisal process; investment and
ogy. 3-0-3. financial analysis; and the public policy aspects
Prerequisite: PSYC 3301, PSYC 3301L and one of real estate planning and utilization.
course from each of the four Psychology course
RE 4500. Real Estate. 3-0-3.
groupings (any one of which can be done concur-
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA
rently with PSYC 4499).
Requirement and FIN 3100; Non business
A capstone course designed to complete the
Majors: 60 credit hours and FIN 3100.
major by integrating the student’s prior aca-
Examines the principles and procedures of real
demic experiences in psychology. Contemporary
estate appraisal, the transfer process for property,
issues, problems, research, and theories from the
and financing methods for residential and com-
different areas identified in the psychology cur-
mercial real estate. Studies the income and cost
riculum will be examined. Discussion will focus
of developing and managing real property and
on both substantive and methodological con-
analyzes real estate as an investment.
cerns, as well as interconnections among areas
of study. A seminar format will be used through-
out the course to encourage student participation • RUSSIAN (RUSS) •
and interaction with peers and with faculty.
RUSS 1001. Introduction to Russian
Language and Culture I. 3-0-3.
• READING (READ) • Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099 if
required.
READ 0020. Principles of Reading for Introduction to the Russian language and cul-
the Regents’ Test. 3-0-0. ture, stressing progressive acquisition of effective
Prerequisite: None. communications skills in both the written and
Instruction and review for the Regents’ Test with spoken language and an understanding of the
emphasis on critical reading skills, vocabulary, practices and products of the culture being stud-
and test-taking strategies. Required of students ied. Not open to native speakers of Russian.
who have failed the reading portion of the test.
RUSS 1002. Introduction to Russian
READ 0099. Reading for Academic Pur- Language and Culture II. 3-0-3.
poses. 3-0-0. Prerequisite: RUSS 1001.
Prerequisite: Placement by COMPASS Examina- Introduction to Russian language and culture,
tion, by the Admissions Office or by the Depart-

Courses
part II, stressing continued, progressive acqui-
ment of Learning Support Programs.
sition of effective communication skills in both
A Learning Support Programs course that pre-
the written and spoken language and an under-
pares the student for credit courses that require
standing of the practices and products of Russian
sophisticated reading and study strategies.
culture. Not open to native speakers of Russian.
Emphasizes comprehension strategies, vocabu-
lary development, textbook mastery, note taking RUSS 2001. Intermediate Russian Lan-
and learning strategies. guage and Culture I. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: RUSS 1002.
• REAL ESTATE (RE) • Builds upon acquisition of communication skills
begun in high school. The student will continue
RE 3400. Principles of Real Estate. to develop proficiency in listening, speaking,
3-0-3. reading and writing and learn to communicate in
Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA culturally appropriate ways. Not open to native
Requirement and FIN 3100; Non business speakers of Russian.
Majors: 60 credit hours and FIN 3100.
RUSS 2002. Intermediate Russian Lan-
Students are introduced to the principles of real
guage and Culture II. 3-0-3.
estate analysis and utilization. Subjects include
Prerequisite: RUSS 2001.
the nature of real property; the legal instruments
Students continue to increase linguistic and cul-
involved in real property transactions; market
tural proficiency through the use of a variety
analysis and the determinants of real estate
of materials and activities. Not open to native
speakers of Russian.
314 Course Descriptions

• SCIENCE (SCI) • will focus on case studies, environmental prob-


lem-solving, and the development of a personal
SCI 1101. Interdisciplinary Science: ecological ethic. Ecological principles of popula-
Basic Principles. 3-2-4. tion, community, ecosystem and biosphere will
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099, READ 0099, MATH be integrated in the case studies.
0099, if required. SCI 4700L. Applied Environmental Stud-
This course is the first in a two part sequence that ies. 0-6-2.
fulfills the general education science requirement. Prerequisite: For Biology majors: any two lab-
Using the context of environmental issues, it intro- oratory based courses at the BIOL 3000/4000
duces students to the basic nature of matter, energy, level; for Chemistry majors: 2800/2800L and one
and living systems and to the nature of science. 3000/4000 level laboratory based course, exclud-
Emphasis is placed on making decisions about ing CHEM 361/3362; for Geography majors: any
scientific issues. Science 1101 is not designed for two of the following GEOG 3305, 3315, 4405,
science majors and is not a prerequisite for intro- or 4410; for Political Science and International
ductory courses in biology, chemistry, or physics. Affairs majors: any two 3000/4000 level
POLS course.
SCI 1102. Interdisciplinary Science:
An interdisciplinary, field-based, capstone course.
Issues in Science. 3-0-3.
Students will apply skills learned in previous
Prerequisite: SCI 1101 or its equivalent.
courses in a team-based project.
This course is the second in a two part sequence
The experience will be documented in an environ-
that fulfills the general education science require-
mental assessment report describing the land and
ment. Using the context of environmental issues,
aquatic systems in terms of use,
it introduces students to the basic skills and scien-
conditions (chemical, biological, physical), economic
tific understandings needed by educated citizens
impact, environmental policy and management.
to make informed decisions about scientific issues.
SCI 2201. Concepts in Science. 2-3-3. • SCIENCE EDUCATION (SCED) •
Prerequisite: SCI 1102.
Concepts in Science defines science, examines SCED 4000. Service Learning in Sci-
how science is done and develops fundamental ence Education. 1-3.
concepts in physics, chemistry, geology, astron- Prerequisite: 60 hours and permission of instruc-
omy, meteorology and space science. Labora- tor and department chair/program director.
Courses

tories emphasize experimental design and data A community activity which links learning to
analysis. Primarily for early grades and middle life by connecting meaningful community ser-
school education majors. vice activities with academic learning, personal
growth, and civic responsibility. Activity will be
SCI 3360. Earth Science. 3-0-3. designed with the instructor and approved by
Prerequisite: Any core lab science sequence. the chair/program director.
Corequisite: SCI 3360L.
Origin, evolution and distribution of organisms SCED 4415. Teaching Science (7-12).
on the earth as determined by micro- and macro- 5-6-7.
environmental factors. History, development Prerequisite: EDUC 3308 and permission of the
and nature of the earth’s atmosphere, hydro- science education program coordinator.
sphere, lithosphere and biosphere are included. An examination of curriculum issues, learning
theories, teaching strategies, instructional mate-
SCI 3360L. Earth Science Laboratory. rials and assessment procedures for teaching
0-3-1. secondary school science. Includes a secondary
Prerequisite: Any core lab science sequence. school field experience in science teaching and
Corequisite: SCI 3360. seminars. Proof of liability insurance is required
Laboratory designed to accompany SCI 3360. prior to receiving a school placement.
SCI 3365. Earth Watch: Examining SCED 4475. Student Teaching Science
Global Environmental Issues. 3-0-3. (7-12). 12 credit hours.
Prerequisite: Any core lab science sequence. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching.
An examination of the integrative nature of envi- Full-time teaching experience in science under
ronmental sciences; emphasis on human inter- the supervision of a secondary school cooperating
actions with world environments. Discussions teacher and a college science education supervi-
sor. Includes regularly scheduled seminars.
Russian (RUSS)—Sociology (SOCI) 315

• SECONDARY EDUCATION • SOCIOLOGY (SOCI) •


(SED) •
SOCI 2000. Introduction to Gender
SED 2220. Internship. 3 credit hours. Studies. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Approval of director of Educa- Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 (with C or better).
tional Field Experiences and adviser. This course examines the ways that women’s
A practicum in a classroom during which the and men’s gender roles are shaped by social
student will be actively involved in the teaching- interaction. Using materials and learning
learning process under the guidance of a profes- approaches from multiple disciplines, students
sional teacher. will explore questions about how individual and
group expectations about gender behavior are
SED 3398. Internship. 1-12 credit hours. created and sustained.
Prerequisite: Permission of director of Educa-
tional Field Experiences and adviser. SOCI 2105. Social Issues: Perspectives
A supervised teaching experience for teachers in Sociology. 2-0-2.
seeking certification renewal credit. Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099.
This is one of four disciplinary options (Anthro-
SED 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit pology 2105, Sociology 2105, Geography 2105,
hours. Psychology 2105) that can be taken to satisfy the
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart- Social Issues requirement in the general education
ment chair prior to registration. curriculum. A common set of world social issues
A concentrated investigation of a particular is critically examined from one of four social
aspect of education as a topic within a teaching science perspectives. The discipline of sociology
field concentration or degree major. The content focuses on how culture and social structure com-
of the directed study will be determined jointly bine to shape the way human beings live their
by the instructor and the student. lives and define and solve their problems.
SED 4490. Special Topics in Education.
1-3 credit hours. SOCI 2201. Principles of Sociology.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart- 3-0-3.
ment chair. Prerequisite: READ 0099 if required.
Selected special topics of interest to faculty and An overview of sociology which emphasizes the
students. social nature of human behavior, including an

Courses
introduction to culture, social structure, socializa-
•SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION tion, deviance, stratification, family, gender, reli-
gion, demography, and complex organization.
(SSED) •
SOCI 2251. Social Problems. 3-0-3.
SSED 4413. Teaching of Social Science Prerequisite: SOCI 2201.
(7-12). 5-6-7. An overview of current social problems facing
Prerequisite: EDUC 3308 and permission of American society with attention to developing
social science education program coordinator. insights into the conceptual analysis of meaning-
An examination and application of curriculum ful solutions.
issues, learning theories, teaching strategies,
instructional materials and assessment proce- SOCI 3300. Foundations of Social
dures for teaching secondary school social stud- Theory. 3-0-3.
ies. Includes a secondary school field experience Prerequisite: ANTH 2105 or 2201 or SOCI 2105
in social studies teaching and seminars. or 2201.
This course surveys the historical development
SSED 4475. Student Teaching: Social of social theory. It emphasizes the major theories
Science (7-12). 12 credit hours. and theoreticians of anthropology, sociology, and
Prerequisite: Admission to student teaching. geography and their importance for understand-
Full-time teaching experience in social sciences ing the contemporary social sciences.
under the supervision of a secondary school
cooperating teacher and a specialist in social sci- SOCI 3304. Social Organization. 3-0-3.
ence education. Includes a regularly scheduled Prerequisite: SOCI 2201 .
seminar. An introduction to large scale social organiza-
tions, with an emphasis on bureaucracy. Exam-
ines both the formal and informal aspects
316 Course Descriptions

of bureaucracy, including topics ranging from SOCI 3334. Religion and Society. 3-0-3.
power and authority, to centralization and Prerequisite: SOCI 2201 or ANTH 2201.
decentralization, red tape, and professionalism. Examination of religion as a social institution
in historical, comparative, and contemporary
SOCI 3310. Introduction to Gerontol-
ogy. 3-0-3. terms. World religions and new religious move-
Prerequisite: SOCI 2201 or PSYC 2201. ments are studied as sociocultural processes
Introduction to the multi-disciplinary field of involving the need to know, to deal with prob-
gerontology which provides an overview of the lems and to adapt to change.
sociology, psychology, and the physiology of SOCI 3352. Juvenile Delinquency and
aging. Students will consider research and theo- Corrections. 3-0-3.
ries of aging as well as participate in field trip Prerequisite: SOCI 2201 or C J 2205.
experiences in gerontological settings. A key goal Surveys of the definition, extent, cause, treatment,
is to develop a more realistic perception of the prevention, and control of juvenile delinquency.
aging process.
SOCI 3354. Social Class and Mobility.
SOCI 3314. Race and Ethnicity. 3-0-3. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: SOCI 2201 or permission of instructor. Prerequisite: SOCI 2201.
A survey of racial and ethnic relations, concen- Examination of social class and hierarchy in
trating on the American experience. Stress is America. Issues in empowerment, equality,
placed on the dynamics of prejudice and dis- styles of life, and the nature of poverty and social
crimination, and assimilation versus pluralism, mobility will be highlighted.
including discussions of multi-culturalism, bilin-
gualism, and affirmative action. SOCI 3360. Sociology of Violence.
3-0-3.
SOCI 3320. Exploring the Aging Net- Prerequisite: CJ 2205 and SOCI 2105 or SOCI
work. 3-0-3. 2201.
Prerequisite: SOCI 2201 or PSYC 2201. This course examines the root causes and con-
The class explores through field trips and speak- sequences of violent behavior exhibited by indi-
ers the range of services and programs that relate viduals in our society. Topics covered include the
to aging in the Atlanta region and rural Georgia. social and cultural contexts that breed violence,
The goal is to immerse students in the aging society’s influence on specific crimes, and human
network so that they develop contacts, resources social behavior.
Courses

and knowledge for use in the family as well as


work settings. The grade for the course will be SOCI 3364. Sociology of the Family.
3-0-3.
based on attendance at field trips, online discus-
Prerequisite: SOCI 2201.
sion and a paper related to the student’s major,
Presents the institution of the family in historical
career path, and personal goals for the course.
and cross-cultural perspective, including an
SOCI 3324. Sex Roles in Modern Soci- analysis of the American family system, its social
ety. 3-0-3. structure and alteration, and its relation to other
Prerequisite: SOCI 2201. social institutions.
An examination of the implications of the
changes in the kinship, economic, and political SOCI 3365. The Profile of the Serial
Offender. 3-0-3.
structures related to male/female relations and
Prerequisite: CJ 2205.
their impact on gender equality in contemporary
This course is designed for the serious student
society.
of the behavioral sciences who is interested
SOCI 3333. Technology and Society. in developing the insight necessary to under-
3-0-3. stand why some violent offenders repeat their
Prerequisite: SOCI 2205 or 2201 or ANTH 2105 or crimes while others do not. The students will
2201. learn various skills necessary in the development
This course will examine the interaction between of offender characteristics and traits as well
scientific and technological development and as investigative strategies in unsolved homicide
social development, social structure and social and sexual assaults. They will learn how to
issues. determine whether a victim was specifically tar-
geted for violence or randomly selected. They
will learn how to identify and interpret the
Sociology (SOCI)—Spanish (SPAN) 317

behavioral evidence left at crime scenes by par- aspects involving profiling and analysis of spe-
ticular types of serial offenders. Additionally, the cific profiling issues in different types of serial
students will be exposed to the most recent theo- crime are addressed.
ries and research which attempt to explain how
SOCI 4432. Criminology. 3-0-3.
the serial offender evolves from childhood to
Prerequisite: SOCI 2201 or C J 2205.
young adult and beyond. It should be noted that
An overview of theory and practice, the nature
actual case presentations will be made through-
and cause of crime, and the etiology of criminal
out the course to illustrate each phase in the
offenses and offenders.
development of the serial offender.
SOCI 4442. Deviance and Social Con-
SOCI 3374. Sociology of Occupations.
trol. 3-0-3.
3-0-3.
Prerequisite: SOCI 2201.
Prerequisite: SOCI 2201.
A survey of the nature, causes, and consequences
An analysis of the contemporary occupations,
of deviant behavior. Provides an analysis of the
with emphasis on large-scale organizations, the
problems of definition, identification, explanation,
structure of occupations and the nature of work.
and social reaction to violations of institutional
SOCI 3396. Cooperative Study. 1-9. expectations. Presents techniques of social control.
Prerequisite: Approval of coordinator of coop-
SOCI 4443. Medical Sociology. 3-0-3.
erative education (CAPS) and department chair.
Prerequisite: SOCI 2201.
A supervised work experience program for a
Provides an analysis of (1) the social processes
minimum of two academic semesters at a pre-
affecting conditions of health and illness and
viously approved site in business, industry,
(2) the cluster of social relationships and orga-
government or private agency. For sophomore,
nizations that comprise the social institution of
junior or senior level students who wish to
health. Emphasizes the sociocultural factors
obtain successive on-the-job experience in con-
that influence definitions of health and illness,
junction with their academic training.
causes, preventions and treatments, cross-cul-
SOCI 3398. Internship. 1-12. tural and interclass comparisons of stress, deliv-
Prerequisite: 90 hours and SOCI 3304. ery of health care, mental illness, death and
A structured off-campus experience in a super- dying, and health care professionals.
vised setting which is related to the student’s
SOCI 4444. Social Change and Modern-
major and career interests. Practical experience

Courses
ization. 3-0-3.
is combined with scholarly research in the topi-
Prerequisite: SOCI 2201.
cal area of the internship, under the guidance
The nature, types, and causes of social change;
of an interdisciplinary faculty committee. Sites
technological and sociocultural factors affecting
must be approved in advance of the semester of
institutional change. Innovation, diffusion, and
the internship. A departmental internship orien-
the process of acceptance and rejection of change
tation session is scheduled once a semester.
by social systems.
SOCI 4400. Directed Study in Sociology.
SOCI 4464. Population. 3-0-3.
1-3.
Prerequisite: SOCI 2201.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
An analysis of the size, growth, composition, dis-
ment chair.
tribution, and characteristics of the population
Covers special topics and seminars external to
with emphasis on application of demographic
regular course offerings. May include original
information to socioeconomic structure.
research projects and practicum experiences.
SOCI 4490. Special Topics in Sociology.
SOCI 4410. Criminal Profiling and Analysis. 1-3.
1-3. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart-
Prerequisite: CJ 2005, SOCI 3365. ment chair.
This course centers on the “deductive profiling” Selected topics of interest to faculty and students.
method, the analysis process of forensic evi-
dence, and the development of offender char- SOCI 4499. Senior Seminar in Sociol-
acteristics. It approaches each crime as its own ogy. 3-0-3.
universe of social relationships and behaviors Prerequisite: SOCI 3300, and completion of pro-
posed concentration in Criminology, Organiza-
and requires the examination and analysis of a
tional and Social Change, Spatial Analysis and
real homicide. An overview of the socio-legal
318 Course Descriptions

Population Studies, or Cultural Diversity Stud- SPAN 2032. Spanish for Health Profes-
ies. Corequisite: SOCI 3398. sionals. 3-0-3.
A capstone course designed to help students Prerequisite: None.
integrate their learning from previous sociology This course focuses on Spanish language and
courses and other courses in their concentration. culture appropriate for working with Hispanics
in the medical field.
• SPANISH (SPAN) •
SPAN 2290. Special Topics. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair.
SPAN 1001. Introduction To Spanish
Special topics of interest at the intermediate
Language and Culture I. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099 or READ 0099 if level. Used primarily for studies abroad.
required. SPAN 3300. Introduction to Hispanic
Introduction to Spanish language and culture, Literature I. 3-0-3.
stressing progressive acquisition of effective Prerequisite: SPAN 2002.
communication skills in both the written and An introduction to the study and analysis of lit-
spoken language and an understanding of the erary movements and representative works of
practices and products of Hispanic cultures. Not Hispanic literature to 1800. Readings and dis-
open to native speakers of Spanish. cussion in Spanish. Spanish majors must take
this course concurrently with Spanish 3310.
SPAN 1002. Introduction to Spanish
Language and Culture II. 3-0-3. N.B. The corequisite 3310 is only for Spanish
Prerequisite: One year of high school Spanish or majors. Non-Spanish majors do not have to take
Spanish 1001 or the equivalent. the corequisite course.
Introduction to Spanish language and culture, SPAN 3301. Introduction to Hispanic
“Part II,” stressing continued, progressive acqui- Literature II. 3-0-3.
sition of effective communication skills in both Prerequisite: SPAN 2002.
the written and spoken language and an under- An introduction to the study and analysis of lit-
standing of the practices and products of His- erary movements and representative works of
panic cultures. Not open to native speakers of Hispanic literature from 1800 to the present.
Spanish. Readings and discussion in Spanish. Spanish
SPAN 2001. Intermediate Spanish Lan- majors must take this course concurrently with
guage and Culture I. 3-0-3. SPAN 3311.
Courses

Prerequisite: Two years of high school Spanish N.B. The corequisite 3311 is only for Spanish
or SPAN 1002 or the equivalent. majors. Non-Spanish majors do not have to take
The student will continue to develop proficiency the corequisite.
in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and SPAN 3302. Practical Conversation.
learn to communicate in culturally appropriate 3-0-3.
ways. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2002.
SPAN 2002. Intermediate Spanish Lan- Stresses expansion of effective listening compre-
guage and Culture II. 3-0-3. hension and speaking skills through culturally
Prerequisite: Three years of high school Spanish and linguistically appropriate activities.
or SPAN 2001 or the equivalent. SPAN 3303. Grammar and Composition.
Students continue to increase linguistic and cul- 3-0-3.
tural proficiency through the use of a variety of Prerequisite: SPAN 2002.
materials and activities. Course will serve as a General review of grammar through composi-
transition between intermediate and upper-level tion and other written activities, such as sum-
courses in Spanish. Not open to native speakers maries, correspondence, descriptions, narration,
of Spanish. literary analysis, and other rhetorical and cultur-
SPAN 2030. Spanish for Human Ser- ally appropriate forms.
vices and Criminal Justice. 3-0-3. SPAN 3310. Survey of Hispanic Culture
Prerequisite: None. and Institutions I. 3-0-3.
This course focuses on Spanish language and Prerequisite: SPAN 2002.
culture appropriate for working in the fields of A survey of major institutions, values, customs,
Public and Social Services and Criminal Justice and social and historical movements in the Span-
with Hispanics. ish speaking world from the Middle Ages to
Spanish (SPAN)—Theater (THTR) 319

1800. Readings and discussion in Spanish and movement, or genre in Peninsular or Latin
English. Spanish majors must take this course American literature prior to 1800. Readings and
concurrently with Spanish 3300. discussion in Spanish.
N.B. See SPAN 3300.
SPAN 4432. Topics in Hispanic Litera-
SPAN 3311. Survey of Hispanic Culture ture Since 1800. 3-0-3.
and Institutions II. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: SPAN 3300, SPAN 3301, SPAN 3303,
Prerequisite: SPAN 2002. SPAN 3310, AND SPAN 3311 or permission of
Survey of major institutions, values, customs, instructor.
and social and historical movements in the Span- An exploration of a specific literary period,
ish speaking world from 1800 to the present. movement, or genre in either Peninsular or Latin
Reading and discussion in Spanish and English. American literature since 1800. Readings and
Spanish majors must take this course concur- discussion in Spanish.
rently with Spanish 3301.
SPAN 4455. Advanced Grammar and
N.B. See SPAN 3301.
Translation. 3-0-3.
SPAN 3398. Internship. 1-9 credit Prerequisite: SPAN 3302 AND SPAN 3303.
hours. An examination of Spanish grammar and syntax
Prerequisite: SPAN 3302 AND SPAN 3303 OR with special emphasis on the problems posed to
Permission of Instructor. nonnative speakers of Spanish and on techniques
Supervised, credit-earning work experience of of general translation. Lecture and discussion in
one semester requiring use of Spanish in the Spanish and English.
work place. Prior approval by department coor- SPAN 4490. Special Topics in Spanish.
dinator and internship supervisor is required. 3-0-3.
No more than three semester hours may be Prerequisite: SPAN 3302 AND SPAN 3303 or per-
applied toward the major. mission of instructor.
Special topics relevant to the study of Spanish-
SPAN 4400. Directed Study. 1-3. speaking societies.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3302 AND SPAN 3303 or Per-
mission of Instructor. SPAN 4499. Senior Seminar. 3-0-3.
Covers special topics and seminars external to Prerequisite: SPAN 3300, SPAN 3301, SPAN 3303,
course offerings that allow a student to work SPAN 3310 AND SPAN 3311.
individually with an instructor. Requires prior A capstone course designed to synthesize and

Courses
approval by instructor and department chair. connect the student's prior academic experiences
in the major and related fields of study. Students
SPAN 4404. Commercial Spanish. 3-0-3. will prepare a reflective essay and a research
Prerequisite: SPAN 3302 AND SPAN 3303 or per- paper to present to the faculty. Papers and pre-
mission of instructor. sentation in Spanish.
An in-depth study of business practices and
the language of business that focuses on verbal
and written communication as well as economic,
•STUDY ABROAD (SA) •
social and political factors that are important to
KSU offers study abroad opportunities in a wide
the conduct of business in the Spanish-speaking
variety of countries and disciplines. All study
world.
abroad courses, whatever their discipline or level
SPAN 4410. Spanish Linguistics. 3-0-3. of study, are listed as SA courses for purposes
Prerequisite: SPAN 3302 AND SPAN 3303. of registration and administration. Full course
A study of the basic concepts of phonology, titles appear on students’ transcripts. Computer
syntax, semantics and stylistics of the Spanish numbers necessary for registration in SA courses
language. This course also includes an introduc- are communicated to students by letter after they
tion to the study of linguistics as a science of have been accepted into a study abroad program
language and to the most important concepts of and paid a deposit. For more information, con-
Spanish stylistics. tact the International Center, Humanities 201,
(770) 423-6732.
SPAN 4430. Topics in Hispanic Litera-
ture to 1800. 3-0-3. SA 2290. Lower-division Study Abroad.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3300, SPAN 3301, SPAN 3303, Prerequisite: Varies with discipline and subject.
SPAN 3310, AND SPAN 3311, or permission of Lower division study abroad course denoting
instructor. freshman, sophomore level work.
An exploration of a specific literary period,
320 Course Descriptions

SA 4400. Study Abroad Directed Study. of study and to the methods and practice of the
Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor and art of storytelling.
department chair prior to registration.
THTR 3203. Principles of Acting. 3-0-3.
Available for all disciplines.
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099, READ 0099, if required.
SA 4490. Upper-division Study Abroad. The theory and practice of the actor’s craft.
Prerequisite: Varies with discipline and subject.
THTR 3213. Acting for the Camera.
Upper division study abroad course denoting
3-0-3.
junior, senior level work. Prerequisite: THTR 3203.
An intermediate acting course applying acting
•THEATER (THTR) • techniques to the special demands of film and
television.
THTR 1107. Arts in Society: Theater.
THTR 3223. Acting Technique for the
3-0-3.
Large Stage. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099, READ 0099, if required.
Prerequisite: THTR 3203.
Through an examination of the role of arts
An intermediate acting course applying acting
in society, and an in-depth study of theatrical
craft to the demands of the large stage.
works, this interactive course provides an under-
standing of the creative process and develops THTR 3293. Adapting and Staging Liter-
skills in creativity and critical analysis. Height- ary Texts. 3-0-3.
ened perceptual abilities will be developed Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
through class experiences and field visits to a Aesthetics, methods, and practice in presenta-
variety of arts events in dance, music, and visual tional modes of group performance. Emphasis
arts, as well as in theater. (Attendance at some on the selection, adaptation, and staging of liter-
events requires paid admission.) ary texts.
THTR 1513. Contemporary Theater THTR 3398. Internship. 1-9 credit
Arts. 3-0-3. hours.
Prerequisite: None. Prerequisite: Approval of department chair.
An introduction to the field of theater, offering an A supervised, credit-earning work experience
overview of the discipline and profession for stu- of one academic semester with a previously
dents considering a life and career in the theater. approved business firm, private agency, or gov-
Courses

ernment agency.
THTR 1611. Theater Practicum*. 0-2-1.
Prerequisite: None. THTR 3403. Play Analysis for Produc-
Practical work in theater crafts, including light- tion. 3-0-3.
ing, costuming, set construction, box office pro- Prerequisite: THTR 1513.
cedures and other production elements. Textual analysis of playscripts, with an emphasis
*May be repeated for credit. on the perspective of the practitioner of theater.
A preparatory course for the history of theater
THTR 2193. Introduction to Perfor- and drama sequence.
mance. 3-03.
Prerequisite: ENGL 0099, READ 0099, if required. THTR 3493. Performance Art. 3-0-3.
An introduction to the field of performance stud- Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
ies and the art of oral interpretation. Emphasis History, theories, and practice of performance art
on the solo performance of literary texts based on form futurism to the present. Emphasis is on
critical analysis. the creation and performance of image, auteur
approaches to literary, mythic, visual art, and
THTR 2713. Theater Production . 0-6-3.
personal sources, and the writing and staging of
Prerequisite: Three semesters of THTR 1611.
performance pieces.
Individually designated production and/or per-
formance assignments, primarily in support of THTR 3693. Myth, Epic, and Oral Tradi-
Classic TheaterWorks productions tions. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
THTR 3093. Folklore and Storytelling. A study of various approaches to the analysis,
3-0-3.
interpretation, and performance of creation, fer-
Prerequisite: ENGL 2110.
tility and heroic myths and epics from world
A study of folk narrative as a performed verbal
art. Introduces students to folkloristics as a field
Theater (THTR) 321

oral traditions. Emphasis is on the relationship THTR 4513. Theater History I: Classical
between orality and literacy. to Neoclassical Theater and Drama.
3-0-3.
THTR 3813. Visual Imagination. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: THTR 3403.
Prerequisite: Completion of 24 hours.
A history of the theater and its literature from
A course in the visual aspects of the art of theater
Classical Greece and Rome through the medieval
that focuses on the principles, the elements and
period and the European Renaissance.
the history and current practice of visual design
for the theater. THTR 4523. Theater History II: Baroque
to Contemporary Theater and Drama.
THTR 3823. Design Skills. 3-0-3.
3-0-3.
Prerequisite: THTR 3813.
Prerequisite: THTR 3403.
Basic design skills including drafting, sketching
A history of the theater and its literature cover-
and rendering. Offered in versions oriented spe-
ing the major developments of the eighteenth,
cifically toward set design or costume design in
nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
alternating years.
THTR 4813. Scene Design. 3-0-3.
THTR 3853. History of Costume and
Prerequisite: THTR 3823.
Decor. 3-0-3.
Building blocks for scene design with an
Prerequisite: THTR 3813.
emphasis on transforming written text into
A survey of historical dress, architecture, and
three-dimensional visual language, and working
furnishings as it relates to theater.
through fundamental scene design problems.
THTR 4313. Directing. 3-0-3. THTR 4823. Lighting Design for the
Prerequisite: THTR 3403. Stage. 3-0-3.
Studies in the fundamentals of stage directing for Prerequisite: THTR 3813.
the stage. Theoretical studies will be augmented Study of lighting design for the stage, including
with the opportunity to direct selected scenes study of lighting instruments and control.
and to observe working directors.
THTR 4833. Costume Design. 3-0-3.
THTR 4400. Directed Study. 1-3 credit Prerequisite: THTR 3823.
hours. Study of principles, methods and processes for
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor, and depart- costume design for the stage.

Courses
ment chair.
Selected topics of an advanced nature, which THTR 4953. Senior Seminar. 3-0-3.
may include original research projects. Prerequisite: THTR 3403 and 90 credit hours.
An investigation into contemporary topics in
THTR 4490. Special Topics.* 1-3 credit the American theater and performance studies,
hours. selected annually. Advanced students will
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and depart- encounter and respond to contemporary theories
mental chair. and practices. May involve applied artistic work.
Topics of special interests to students and faculty.
* May be repeated for credit.
322 Course Descriptions
Courses