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Presented to the

LIBRARY of the

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

by

ONTARIO LEGISLATIVE LIBRARY

<*

JOURNAL

ONTARIO

OF THE

SOCIETY FOR PSYCHICAL

RESEARCH.

VOLUME V.

1891-92.

IOR PRIVATE CIRCULATION AMONG MEMBERS AND

'.

ASSOCIATES ONLY.

Tin: S.M-IKTY'S ROO.M> :

I

ONTARK

: ' < K I N <; HAM STREET, ADELPHI, W.C.

-.5

JOURNAL OF THE

SOCIETY FOR PSYCHICAL RESEARCH.

INDEX TO VOLUME V.

1891-92.

A.

A, Miss, Case cent rilmtciU.y

A, Mr., Case contributed by A*, Mrs., Case contributed by

A Mr-. BL, Case contributed by

Abbadie, Antoine d^ on Negatire HaUucinatuma

Al.l.ott, Mr-., The "Little Georgia Magnet." Prof. 0. Lodge's Re^n t on the Performances of

Adams, Prof. John Coach, Obituary Notice of

American Branch of the Society for Psychical Research, Meetings of

322

35

305

109

210

168

203

4, 34, 217, 221, 282

,,

,,

,,

,,

Mniiln rs, Listof. (See Members.)

" Annales ties Sciences Psychiques," Notice of

Annual liu>inc Mcrtin--

Anonymously Contributed Cases

Automatic IfeflMgea (Writing, &c.)

Automaton, Sensory, F. \\ . II. Myers on

45

18, 198

6,236,294,308,323

83, 84, 100, 218, 230, 299, 318

315

B.

I:

I

' '; n-o emit rilmted l.y

N. -.'

fix.-

Il.illucinations

man, Dr. Aln

;!iu-nts in Hypnotic Clairvoyance

BtfkwoHh, T., Case contributed by

,,

Bear'!

on ( ',irionler'> M< nil /'////\/V"////

iriliutnl ly

.mtriliutnl \>\ -c eontril.utel liy

36

1H

1 Ki

2

209

_', HT)

(iii,

"iiliil.ntf.l l.y

D Hyi'ipitir Su-^e>i i< 11

an<l I'Muc.

I

!.'{

i lit n nat imial

i-i

r.\]

l'i

-iiiiinit;il

I

An.l.l\

i

1 ntn national Congress

287, 28.V

ii

Index to Vol.

V.

Black, Mrs. McCall, Case contributed by

Blackwell, Dr. Elizabeth, Remarks on Hallucination (International

270

Congress of Experimental l\\vlu>logy)

Blaksley, Major-General, Case contributed by ui, J. M., A Case of Double Personality

Bourne, Rev. Ansel, A Case of Double Consciousness

Bramwell, Dr. J. Milne, Experiments in Hypnotic Anesthesia IJundy, Col, Obituary Notice of

291

241

260

5, 51, 83

G7, 293

310

C.

OIARCOT, DR., Hypnotic Experiments of

Childe, Mrs. Baldwyn, Case contributed by

Clairvoyance, Independent or Telepathic

Committees, Elections on

<om>pon lenee, Various

Council, Elections on

93, 94

206

1, 3, 4, 20, 66, 78, 146

20,199

31, 43, 45, 77, 78, 144, 152, 153, 158,

177, 178, 209, 210, 228, 231, 236, 239,261, 279, 326

19,20,166,199

Meetings of

19, 50, 66, 82, 97, 130, 145, 166, 182, 199,

214, 234, 266, 282, 299, 314, 330

61

236

('rewdson, Edward, Case contributed by

( Y<>\\t her, W. F., on Dr. Luys' Hypnotic Experiments

D.

Darling, Thomas, Case contributed by

Davey,

S.

J., Imitations by Conjuring of Spiritualistic Phenomena

242

,,

,,

Obituary Notice

43, 266-268

16

Davidson, Prof. T., Cases contributed by

Dean, H., Case contributed by

Delboeuf, Prof., on the Appreciation of Time by Somnambulists, &c.

173,174

141

(International Congress of Experimental Psychology)

288,289

De Vesci, Lady, Case contributed by

136

Dickinson, J. , Case contributed by

1 47

Dobbie, A. W., Case contributed by

16

Double Consciousness, Cases of Hallucinations

Downing, C., on Negative

Drury,

5, 51, 52, 83, 93, 94, 260

152

Edward, Experiences in the " Haunted House " at Willington 341, 348

Duplex Personality. (See Multiplex Personality.)

E.

EARDLEY, Lady, Case contributed by

Ebbinghaus, Prof., Remarks on a Case of Amnesia (International Congrc^ of Experimental Psychology)

241

287

Index tu Vol. V.

iii

" Edina," A Series of Automatic

Messages

Ermacora, Dr. G. B., A Veridical Message through Automatic Writing

F.

P., MBS., Case contributed by Parnane, Mrs., Case contributed by

Powler, Miss Lottie, An Experiment with

Fnuiklin, Prof., Kemarks on Hypnotic Phenomena (International Con

f Experimental P-ylmlM^y)

Premont,

Mrs., Case contributed by

1<

209

240

m."

5

292

."4

G.

1 1--, Kxperiments in Thought-Transference with

i an 1, Mrs. F. B., Case contributed by

21, 111, 182

173

bait, I!.'v. (.'., K\ pertinent as to Subliminal Consciousness of the

Lapse of Time

Grant, Mrs. S.

Green, Rev. J. Spurgeon, Case contributed by

M., Case contributed by

295

12

221,239

H.

II \ DSKI. i. K. MRS., Case contributed by

Hale, Bishop, Case contributed by

Ilallucinatii.il-, <Vn>u- of

69,70

302

4, {Ks, 21 1, -JS2, 291

Negative

H.ini-oii, Mrs., Case contributed by

Haunted Honae, Records of a

at Willington* Accounts ol Hay, Sir Jobn Drummond, Case contributed by

,,

,,

144,

, Mrs, i;. Drummond, Case contributed by

r. W. t

J. W.,

on Psychical Terminology Report on the* ( Waterford Ghost"

., \\ . II., [ndian Conjuring and 11\ pin.ti^ni i-.ii, II B., Expeiiments in Hypnotic Ajieethesia

Hit/i

, Case cont)il)ut-.l }>y

by H\]>nntiHii (International Congress of Exp

logy)

i:>2, 210

63

i3.">

331

40,42

i.~>

-J-JT

lit.";, p.n;

c.7

171

290

B. t OD Mr. S, -I. l>a\r\ '| hnitiitinn^ by Conjuring of Spiritualistic

Phenomena

K'-IH.

erimenti \\iih Mr>. Pi|.-r

in, Madame A. de, C^UM contributed by

73

riments in Consciousness

.

3

iv

Index to Vol. V.

Hu-h.

Hum]

llu-k. Exposure ! the Me, liuni

. i. -. ol.ituai-y N-.tieeof

ne contributed by

mn8k Dreams, F. W. H. Myers on

326

109

,.

,,

,,

-in as an Anesthetic

( tanftta Effects of

Indian Conjuring and

Legal and Moral Aspects of

16,67,68,293

Hi, 67, 68, 282, 287, 290, 292, 293

195

DferauaioiM

<>n.

.-a International Conoivss of Experimental

Peychol

in Kdu.-utimi

28(!--Jfl3

!

M ei in iry recovered by n loans of Measurement of time post-hypnotically

5,52,260,286

288

I.

INDIAN CONJURING ami Hypnotism

International Congress of Experimental Psychology (London)

84,195

249, 280, 283

J.

J AMI-IS, PROF., Case of Ansel Bourne

Janet, Prof., on a Case of Amnesia, &c. (International Congress of Experi-

5,51

mental Psychology on " G." Cases

Johnson-Roberts, W.,

286,290

77

K.

K I:M> ALL, REV. H., Case contributed by Kennedy, J. H., Case contributed by

Kingsbury, Dr. G. C., Experiments in Hypnotic Anaesthesia

Kingston, Dr., Case contributed by

Kirk, Joseph (2) Contradictory Nature of Communications

from the " Other World"

175

9

68

223

Professedly

228,231

(1) Experiments in Thou ght-Trausference from a Distance

21, 111, 182

L., MRS., Case contributed by

Library, Edmund Gurney, List of Additions

143

48, 128, 180,

Liebeault, Prof., Suicidal Mania cured by Hypnotism (International Con-

264, 2'J.l

gress of Experimental Psychology)

287

ois, Prof., on The Legal and Moral Aspects of Hypnotism (Inter-

national r ( ,nuie>x of Experimental Psychology) : A case of under the supposed influence of suggestion Literary Committee, Evidence collected by

Poisoning

M n

Catalogue of Unprinted Cases

13, 46, 64, 79, 127,

293

" G." Cases

161,247, 311, 328

10, 42, 77, 105, 221, 223, 226, 239, 268,

Index to Vol. V.

v

Literary Committee, " L." Cases 9, 12, 21, 35, 38, 40, 41, 52, 61, 63, 68, 69,

73, 86, 108, 109, 111, 134, 136, 137, 138, 141,

174, 175, 191, 192, 204, 205,

241, 242, 246, 2:.<>. 251, 252. 253,

70,

143,

147,

172,

239,

173,

JOG, 207,

"M." Cases

"M.C1." Cases

"P." Cases

"P.CL*CMM

269, 270, 276, 302, 322

5,6,254,299

87

76

, Prof. Oliver, Address to the Physical Section of the British Asso-

ciation

,,

,,

,,

i:\perimentsin Thought-Transference 1 ;. -port on the Performances of Mrs. Abbott

, Case contributed by Mrs., Cases contributed by Luther, Prof. F. S., Case contributed by

Lays, Dr., Hypnotic Experiments of

.

131

167

168

68

75,76

253

326,327

M.

MAKILLIER, M., Alleged Apparitions of the Virgin at Dordogne Census of Hallucinations

,,

hall, Mrs., Case contributed by

Massey, C. C., Case contributed by

Mathews, Mr., Case contributed by

MIL'S of the Society, Annual Business General and Occasional

,,

,,

20

291

108

5

2

18,198

1, 20, 51, 66, 82, 98,

Menil -:--,

,,

146, 200, 215, 234, 266, 314 A--orijites and Honorary Members, Elections 17, 33, 49, 65, 81,

!:. 129, 145, 165, 181, 197, 213, 233, 265, 281, 297, 313, 329

,,

American Branch

Kir.,

17, 49, 65, 81, 97, L30, 14.',,

LSI. 197, 213, 233, 265, 281, 298, 313, 329

"iv. Alternation^ of. (See Double CV/y/.sv/Ww.v.v. )

.M-ndel>-olin, Dr., Remarks on Hy-ierii-al Amblyopia (International

I I-:\]M-iiiii<-iital I'-yrhiilngy)

Millett, S. II., Case contributed by

Motes, Ber, \V. Stainton, Heath of

Multiplex Pcr-onalit\ , Phenomena of

RfntseUechner, Heir,

,,

,,

Case contributed by ,iina"

.ulictory Natun-

288

207

;;i

I

5, 31, 83, 9.'?, 91. 2C.O

ins

100

i ( 'oiiiiuuniealion^ Prot'o-rdlv

from the " Other \Voild "

_',;]

,,

,,

,,

,,

llyjM'nime-ie Dn-am-

[ndicfttk>ns of Conthmed Ttrreoe ivnowie.i-e in I'han-

'

i" 1

1 )<i; t'l

.

.

'Jir>

,,

M'.-'-hani-ni of < H-nius

,,

,,

,,

I'rob N -m.

of Su^'iMioii

,f

I',

i

oi.;ility

Sensory Automation

.

.

.

200

170

S3, 9.'{ f 9S, 170,

vi

Index to

N.

Vol.

V.

NEWBOLD, Miss, Case contributed by Nichols, W. t Case contributed by

Non-Informants, Appeal to

O.

0., MRS., Case contributed by

uilioers and Council, Election of

268

191,192

-35

86

19,20,166,199

< )>ler, Dr., Remarks on Hallucinations (International Congress of Experi-

mental Psychology)

291, 292

P.

PARKER, J. W., Case contributed by

Personality, Problems of

Pfirshing, Mrs. , Case contributed by

Phantasms of the Dead, Indications of Continued Terrene

324

5, 51, 83, 93, 170, 200, 234, 260

Knowledge

in

192

215

126,352

" Phantasms of the Living," French Translation of

Photographing an Indian Conjuror (A "Fancy " Sketch)

Physical Phenomena, Alleged, Not in the Presence of Paid Mediums 146,

84

,,

,,

Wood-throwing

Piper, Mrs. , Experiments with

Pokitonoff, Madame, Case contributed by

147, 227 146, 147 35, 66, 200, 20 1

73

Procter, Edmund, Account of Phenomena in the "Haunted House " at

AVillington

Joseph, Account of Experiences at Willington

Psychology, Congress at Chicago International Congress of Experimental in London

Psychical Research,

,,

,,

Formation of Swedish Society for

Q.

QuiLTY, Miss, Case contributed by

R.

331, 348

332,348

262

249, 280, 283

144

226

RASECO, T., Case contributed by

250

Kendall, Vernon H., Case contributed by

172

Richet, M. Ch., Case contributed by

251

Index to Vol.

V.

vii

S.

SACKETT, DE L. , Case contributed by Schiller, C-, on Self-Suggestion

Schrenck-Notzing, Baron von, Remarks on Hypnotic Phenomena (Inter-

254

-_'til

,,

,,

Congress of Experimental Psychology) Thought-Transference Experiments

292,293

51

ase contributed by

302,303

237

184

189,276

1, 20, 78

82,158,

177, 178, 237

26(i, 293

4, 98, 211, 282, 291

289

43, 44, 266

,,

is,

Edmund, on ''Spirit Photography," &c

Thought-Transference Experiments Mrs., Thought-Transference Experiments

,,

Shield,

Sitlgwick, Mrs., on The Evidence for Clairvoyance

" Spirit Photography "

,,

,,

,,

Thought-Transference Experiments

Prof., Census of Hallucinations

,,

Remarks on Consciou-n<'>s ( >f the Lapse of Time

Vriting" Phenomena, Mr. S. J. Davey's

Sloiuan, H<-\. A., Belief of the Church of England as to the State of the

Soul after Death

239

Smith, (J. A., Experiments in Thought-Transferance

183, 184,266

Smith, (I. M,, Exporimnits in Subliminal ( 'mi-. : oii-n<'

,,

,,

Experiment- in Thou-lit-Traii>i'erence

oy, Michael, On Spirit Photography

SjM-;u-, Mi-> Elsie, Case contributed by

.! the Lapse of Time 320

318

177

204

l .">;:.

SpiM-ling, Dr., Remarks on Sleep and Hypnotism (International Congress

.\pM-iiiH'iital P-yrlmlogy)

288

" Spirit Photography," Alleged Phenomena of Btack, Herbert J., Obituary Notice of ,

Subliminal ( 'onsciousness of the Lapse of Time 279, 288, 289, L".I|. 285,

82, 83, 153, 158, 177-78, -J37

263

308, 320

87-93

171, 236, 261, 279, 288, 289, 294, 295, 308, :wo

Suihlirk, Dr. S. T., Case contributed by

n, Power of

ien, Formation of a Society for Psychical Research in

Ill

1

1

-

Case contribute! by

T.

Table-Tilting and Thought-Transference

'ontribiitcd by

fsoo, Alfred, Lord, on the death o!

ton,

'

Miitril.utod by

e Bxperimenti

Case c'.ntril.iitc.l by

21, 51, in,

n;:. is-j.

ililiminal ( 'onsciou->in'--> oi" the l.ap-c of Timr

Tudir, \\ ., CaMM-ontrilMii.-,! by

.

:,

A

-I

,

< 'aS

contlibJltnl by

IM. iv.i.

-".

i-.n,

, ::.

,

\

: '.!."

206, 276, UKS,

2o'

J7' 1

L'i!

viii

Ind&K to Vol. V

U.

I NPKRWOOD, MR., Experiments in Automatic Writing

V

Mi: < Case contributed by

V.

218

10

Van Eeden, Dr., Suggestion as a Therapeutic Agency (Internationol Con-

gress- of Experimeutal Psychology)

287,293

Yiiviii, Madame, Case contributed by

251

Venman, H., Case contributed by

63

,,

On Psychical Terminology

W.

31, 45

WALLACE, A. R., On Spiritualistic Phenomena and Mr. S. J. Davey's

Imitations

43, 266, 267, 268

227

2,134,250

83

96

331, 348

101

Waterford llhost, The, F. W. Hayes' Report on

Wilt.se, Dr. A. S., Cases contributed by

Wedgwood, Hensleigh, Case contributed by

Obituary

Notice of

Willington, Account of Phenomena in the " Haunted House " at

Withers, J. J., Report on the "Edina" Automatic Messages

X., EMILE, Case of

X.

52

Z.

Z., LADY, Case contributed by

42

Xo. LXXVI.-VoL. V.

JOURNAL

OF THE

JANU.M.V, 1801,

SOCIETY FOR PSYCHICAL RESEARCH.

CONTENTS.

1 .M-'ctinu

ng of the American Branch

Cfctaloffne of Unprintod CMM

red by the Literary Committee

(C<mtintn-<i)

ions Performed P:iinlf>slv through Post-Hypnotic Suggestion

obituary

GENERAL MEETING.

i

\<.i:

1

4

5

Hi

10

The 42nd General Meeting of the Society was held at the West-

tho

minster Town Hall, on Friday,

December 5th, at 8.30 p.m. ;

'dent in the chair.

Mi:s. SIIM;\VICK read part of a paper on Clairvoyance, which sho

provisionally defined as knowledge, such as would ordinarily be

acijuiivd through the senses, acquired supernoruially without the use of

th % .-diMS. and not by thought-tranflference from persons present.

She said that she proposed to examine the evidence for clairvova

"nning with cases in which the knowledge of the scene or fa< t

I might, with little difficulty, be supposed to be lUMjuired from

distant human mind, cognisant of them; proceeding toothers where, owiii-- to the want of any obvious connection between the

percipici ' and the suppose 1 agent, this supposition became more and

more difficult ; and coming ultimately to cases of what appeared to be

clairvoyant knowle !_" of things unknown to any human being.

In

relation especially to these latter 08363, the limits of hypen-stli->ia and

the po->ibilitie- of acijuii-imr knowledge uncon^-iou-dy through the

In the course of the investigation

the relation of the supposed ,-Iairvoyanee t

time would also be di-

mid have to be con-id'-red.

ed

raiment of e\ ideuce >lie read three cases.

In

the iir>t

two, oiroomfltanoes aeemed \

jioim deai-ly \

were M-en.

In

a^'iicy on the part of

the laM, knowledge

voluntarily obtained by a liyjnoti---d person about \\h

to persons known to him and known to the hypnoi i-ei\ but \\lio

&f188 Fl

i througli any crisis nor i

relation with the

la sort of clair\.

oniethin^ ^hich they laid at her :

2 Journal of Society for Psychical 7iYxm /<//.

[Jan., isiu.

anil saying lie said good-bye to her.

She afterwards learnt that a

midshipman whom she knew, and who had said good-bye to her before

ing on his last voyage, had fallen from a 'mast and

about that time.

been killed

THE PRKSNU:NT said that this dream illustrated the importance of

ing a clear idea of what was meant by clairvoyance. There was no

knowledge in the dream of the scene that actually occurred, so that,

though it might be telepathic, it could not be regarded as clairvoyant.

PUOFESSOR r.AKiM.iT gave some instances of clairvoyance, either

within his own knowledge or learnt by him from the persons concerned.

In one of them a sick lady had heard from a distant room what the

doctor had said to her mother.

hypnotic trance apparently seeing a troopship, the Himalaya, coming into

The third

was of a lady truly telling him what was the matter with a friend of

Kingstown harbour, about the time that it really did do so.

Another was a ease of a lad in a

his, when he had no accurate knowledge himself on the subject. In

the

fourth, information concerning a lost dog was

given by

a

hypnotised lady, and he had himself investigated the accuracy of her

description. MR. BARKWORTII said that a definition would be helpful which

should first distinguish clairvoyance from telepathy, as treated in

l^Jtantasms of the Liviinj, and again from thought-transference from

persons present, and again from reading the far past or the future,

which he was inclined to think should be regarded as a different

phenomenon.

It seemed to him

that cases

where persons, being

hypnotised or in sleep, become cognisant of things at a distance when no crisis is going on might be regarded as cases of one and the same

person being both agent and percipient. He described an instance in which a person mesmerised in Devonshire accurately described what

He concluded by deploring the

was going on in a house in India.

tendency that people had to keep strange facts of this kind to them-

selves, and urging that all who could should communicate them to the

Society. MR. MATTHEWS discussed the possible extension of hyperoesthesia.

He knew of a case where a lady, for several weeks after recovering from

scarlet fever, could hear what was said four rooms off.

why a line should be drawn between four rooms and four miles or four

hundred miles, nor did he see why a distinction should be supposed to

exist between extension of hearing and extension of sight.

MR. MYERS then, after a brief introduction, read an interesting

case of a vivid mental experience of a person apparently dying. Dr.

Wiltse, when thought by his friends to be dead and only by his

medical attendant perceived to be still breathing slightly, seemed to

He did not see

Jan., 1891.

J

"h.

3

himself t

IT" out of his body and to see what was idling on in the

room and outside.

To tin- surprise of all he recover-

-i-iusuess,

and at once insisted on describing liis experience. What he had thought he perceived was believed to be correct. .Mi:. VUTOR HORSLKY. in connection with Dr. Wiltse's experi described some experiments lie had made on himself when under the

intli;

nitrous oxide, originally with a view to explaining reflex

i. but afterwards to ob-'rve the dream phenomena accompanying

iousness. The rirst point he tried to observe was whether simple mental operations were recovered before complex <>:

II ironld --I himself to execute a romplex action continuously, then

t ike til- nitrous oxide and observe when the action left off and when it

m again.

For instance, he would

write rows of the number .">.

Writing the :>'s one after the other in a single row he regarded as a simple action. Writing the .Ts alternately in one row and in another as

a more complex action. His hand would stop writing, and then begin

in writing ."'s before complete conscious ness returned, but it ii-

i again the complex action of writing them in alternate rows.

!! found that dreams which OOGWa8OOHSOi0USn6fiS returns are often very vivid, but usually they will be completely forgotten unless by-

maki- a point of asking the patient what he dreamt before he itirely recovered consciousness.

DK. W.u.LAcr.s.iid he had b- in

for many years to the late

Professor Laycock, and had records of experiments 0:1 th- action of

mind un

thetics, which he should be glad to communi

Society. Mi:. llAiiKwoKTii a-k.-d Mr. 1 foisley wliether he noticed any marked

ditl'.- :i his earlier

a:id

later experiments in his power of

ying on complex mental actions when under the influence nitrous oxide.

Mi:. QOBSLKY Said that he acquired no additional accomplishment

by praetice.

Mi:.

l'i.

irni

gave an account of a young man dyinir of

' to sea for th-- b -nelit of his health.

In

the QZOlte

'.fin the invalid was foi'gotten,

and si-emed

to die.

He

iisible for him b.-^an t> be worried

ime down and found him dead.