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6 1 4 O CTO B E R 2 0 11

Malaysia Budget 2012

Introduction
This report presents the findings of media analysis of coverage between 6 and 14 October 2011. This period covers the date immediately before the announcement of the Malaysian 2012 Budget (7 October), up until a week after this announcement.
For the purpose of this analysis, coverage was sampled proportionally from a list of media outlets that were selected on the basis of: > Audience size, beginning with the outlets that reach the largest audiences in the country; and > Volume of reporting. This resulted in a sample of 756 media reports for analysis. Social media analysis was also conducted on a representative sample of the total 3,526 social media posts that originated from Malaysia in this time. The social media posts that were monitored by Brandtology appeared on forums, blogs, news websites, review sites, Q&As, microblogs, the public pages of social networking sites and video sites (comments only). The sample of online social media discussion has been chosen to be representative of overall social media posts. This is done by: (a) Selecting online posts for analysis from representative online channels; and (b) Setting a sub-sample for each market based on proportional size. Thus, a spread of online posts across subjects, across the period has been analysed. The net sentiment shown throughout this report was determined from these sampled posts. A representative sample of blog posts were also analysed to determine the messages that they conveyed about the Budget, so that comparisons could be drawn with those that were communicated in the analysed news media coverage.

Executive summary story focus


> The Malaysian Budget 2012 was broadly labelled a peoples Budget in the news media. Nearly half of the analysed coverage focused on the rakyat (citizens), with often detailed discussion of the possible impacts on citizens of the various policy announcements. This included the governments cash handouts often described in the media as goodies for various segments of society, such as lower income households, students and retirees. As a result of this sort of discussion, the overall analysed news coverage was predominantly favourable. > As opposed to news media coverage, the sentiment of social media discussion of the Malaysian Budget 2012 was negative, particularly in the context of the economy and the private sector. This negative sentiment was largely due to criticisms of excessive cash handouts from the government, with suggestions that this was aimed only at winning electoral votes rather than at boosting Malaysias economic growth.
These charts show the story focus of each report, article or online post that was analysed over the period. CHART 1

NEWS MEDIA
600 54.9 VOLUME 339 51.8 55.2 FAVOURABILITY 53.0 60

300 171 140

50

106

0 THE RAKYAT OVERALL ECONOMY FAV NEU PUBLIC SECTOR PRIVATE SECTOR UNFAV AVG FAV

40

CHART 2

SOCIAL MEDIA (SAMPLED POSTS)


200 145 VOLUME 141 100 NET SENTIMENT

100

-13.8 -37.6

84 -13.1 53 -37.7

0 THE RAKYAT OVERALL ECONOMY POS NEU PUBLIC PRIVATE SECTOR SECTOR NET SENTIMENT

-100

NEG

Executive summary - leading topics


These charts show the number of mentions of each topic in the analysed news media coverage and social media conversation. The most often mentioned topics in the analysed news coverage were individual taxes and incentives, living costs, public education and social welfare. The media cited comments from various tax consultants who commented on the viability and possible impact of new policies across the different sectors. In comparison, the most frequently and negatively discussed topic in the analysed social media conversations was the Budget implementation. This suggests that the public has a relatively low confidence that the government will deliver the measures that it has promised.
CHART 3
60 52.9 165 160 160 53.4 50.8 175 142 50 128 117 111 94 FAVOURABILITY NET SENTIMENT 53.5 VOLUME 206 53.6 54.9 55.5 56.0 56.5 52.5

NEWS MEDIA
400

200

0 INDIVIDUAL CIVIL TAX & SERVANTS SUBSIDIES LIVING BUDGET PUBLIC COST IMPLEMENT- EDUATION CATION FAV NEU GROWTH SOCIAL MINISTRY GLOBAL CORPORATE WELFARE ALLO- ECONOMY TAX & CATION SUBSIDIES AVG FAV

40

UNFAV

CHART 4

SOCIAL MEDIA (SAMPLED POSTS)


200 100

VOLUME

100

76

-14.8 57

-4.5 -24.9 47 27 -45.2 26 -47.0 25

-14.3

-4.9 -25.0 -47.4 20 0

-36.5 0

21

19

17

-100 BUDGET CIVIL INDIVIDUAL HOUSING GROWTHCORPORATE SOCIAL IMPLEMENTSERVANTS TAX & TAX & WELFARE ATION SUBSIDIES SUBSIDIES POS NEU NEG LIVING COST GLOBALEMPLOYMENT ECONOMY

NET SENTIMENT

Executive summary further issues and conclusion


> Consistently across both news and social media, the public appeared to agree that the losers from the Budget announcement were the middle classes, minorities such as the disabled and private sector stakeholders. The online public criticised the high Budget allocation to civil servants for bonus payouts and salary increments while low-income groups from the private sector were neglected. contradictory to this message, such as lack of reforms, no surprise and neutral impact to [the stock] market. A considerable number of online posts criticised the Budget for neither providing permanent changes to the structure of Malaysias taxation system, nor guidance to eliminate regulations and promote spending in order to build a strong domestic consumer market.

> Across both news and social media, the most common criticisms of the CONCLUSION 2012 Budget were that it was short-sighted, not sustainable, and > Given the wide concerns expressed about the economic sustainability of unrealistic in terms of the prospects for the Malaysian economy in the the Budget proposals, the government could consider more proactively near future. Overall, opposition leaders and economists were among the communicating specific details about the proposals to the public. This most vocal critics of the Budgets contribution to the sustainable could include providing more information about the development and development of the economy, while middle-class professionals mostly implementation of the projects, and addressing queries from the public in discussed its lack of inclusiveness. a timely manner. This will help to boost public confidence about the governments accountability in delivering the promises made in the > The news media coverage analysed frequently quoted Chua Hak Bin, an economist from the Bank of America Merrill Lynch, who held a cautious Budget, especially in the current global economic climate. view on the growth outlook and, thus, the implementation of the Budget. > Although the Prime Minister and government ministers have an His comments resonated with those of other economists and opposition undeniably strong presence in news media, opposition leaders seem to party stakeholders. be utilising social media more effectively to communicate their > Some online posts further suggested that the civil services have become highly politicised over the years due to higher distributions from the Budget going to civil servants in order to get them to support the government. messages. Government representatives are still lacking a presence in forums and blogs, whereas opposition leaders and members of the middle-class were active in these areas. A greater government engagement in the social media space is therefore encouraged.

> Speculation about whether the government would impose a Goods and > Future news and social media tracking should relate to the implementation process and results of high-profile projects, which are Services Tax (GST) appeared frequently before the Budget commonly the focus of media and public interest. This would include announcement. Although the GST was not introduced in Budget 2012, financial aid offers for lower-income groups; ministry funding of projects the online public expressed concerns that the government might impose such as the new womens and childrens hospitals; upgrades of rural the tax if they win the upcoming general election. clinics; Kedai 1Malaysia; the Langkawi tourism project; and upgrades for > Although the Prime Minister actively promoted the Budget as the Royal Malaysian Police. transformational, this message did not appear frequently; instead, the analysed news and social media coverage reported comments that were

Media type
These charts show the breakdown of news media types and social media channels over the analysis period.
CHART 5 CHART 6

NEWS MEDIA
TELEVISION & RADIO 7.9%

SOCIAL MEDIA

SOCIAL NETWORKING SITE MICROBLOG 3.1% 1.4%

ONLINE NEWS 45.0%

PRESS 47.1%

BLOG 44.4% FORUM 51.1%

> During the report period, news media coverage of the Budget 2012 > Negative reporting appeared mostly in online news, blogs and other appeared much more prominently in both press and online outlets than social media channels. Nonetheless, some criticisms of the 2012 in broadcast media. Budget did also appear in news media coverage, and these criticisms across the media types were somewhat aligned. This was especially > Analysed online news media included more critical discussions of the the case with regard to the sustainability of the proposed government Budget (especially in Harakah Daily and the Malaysian Insider), and spending and the inclusiveness of the Budget. this online coverage was less favourable overall than press and broadcast coverage.

Trend analysis
This chart shows the volume and favourability of articles analysed over the report period.
CHART 7
The media focus shifted to implementation of the Budget, specifically the allocations to government ministries.

NEWS MEDIA
200

The rakyat responded to various news articles, expressing their concerns about and expectations of the Budget.

The media discussed the governments overoptimistic target of 2012s Budget deficit, and worrying debt levels in Malaysia.

60

100

50

0 THU 6 OCT FRI 7 OCT BUDGET DAY SAT 8 OCT SUN 9 OCT MON 10 OCT TUE 11 OCT VOL AVG FAV WED 12 OCT THU 13 OCT FRI 14 OCT

40

This chart shows the volume and net sentiment of online posts analysed over the report period.

CHART 8
Discussions continue about the governments handouts, with suggestions that this was undertaken in order to win public votes in the upcoming election. 60

SOCIAL MEDIA (SAMPLED POSTS)


200 Discussion related to speculation about Budget allocation, particularly in terms of a GST. 100 Discussion of opposition party reviews of the governments Budget allocations.

0 THU 6 OCT FRI 7 OCT BUDGET DAY SAT 8 OCT SUN 9 OCT MON 10 OCT VOL TUE 11 OCT WED 12 OCT THU 13 OCT FRI 14 OCT NET SENTIMENT

-60

NET SENTIMENT

VOLUME

FAVOURABILITY

VOLUME

Language breakdown
A substantial proportion of the analysed news media coverage was in English and came from online news outlets, including The Star Online, Yahoo! Malaysia and Malaysian Insider. Coverage by Malay-language media was more favourable than media in other languages. Very few unfavourable reports appeared in Malay-language press, and these largely consisted of articles about complaints from minority interest groups such the Malaysian Trade Union Congress or lecturers from private colleges. Most of the unfavourable Malay-language coverage came from online news channel Harakah Daily. The majority of social media conversations were in English, particularly the posts that appeared on the leading channels.
CHART 9

NEWS MEDIA
CHINESE 11.5%

TAMIL 4.2%

ENGLISH 49.5%

MALAY 34.8%

CHART 10

SOCIAL MEDIA

CHINESE 6.4%

MALAY 35.1% ENGLISH 58.5%

Commentators/influencers
Below are the leading news commentators and the most influential people in social media in the period that contributed to the topic Malaysia Budget that were most frequently reported or responded to.
TABLE 1 NEWS COMMENTATORS DATUK SERI NAJIB TUN RAZAK, MALAYSIA PRIME MINISTER DATUK DR. AWANG ADEK HUSSEIN, DEPUTY FINANCE MINISTER TAN SRI MUHYIDDIN YASSIN, MALAYSIA DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER DATUK SERI LIOW TIONG LAI, MINISTER OF HEALTH DATUK MUKHRIZ TUN MAHATHIR, DEPUTY MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE & INDUSTRY DATUK SERI ANWAR IBRAHIM, OPPOSITION LEADER VOL AVG FAV 58.0 TABLE 2

INFLUENCERS
POLARIS EDITOR@ HORNBILL UNLEASHED MALAYSIAN MIRROR ROBERTNGO

CHANNELS
LOWYAT.NET FORUM KOPITIAM HORNBILL UNLEASHED MALAYSIAN MIRROR BLOG LOWYAT.NET FORUM KOPITIAM THE BURSA MSIA FORUM PERSONAL FINANCE LOWYAT.NET FORUM KOPITIAM MIRI COMMUNITY FORUM LOUNGE MIRI COMMUNITY FORUM LOUNGE LOWYAT.NET FORUM KOPITIAM TWITTER MALAYSIA

VOL 27

INFLUENCE SENTSCORE IMENT 70 -8

67

15

55.0

27

43

-2

12

54.2

24 3

43 100

-25 0

12

54.6

11

54.5 SALAHDIN

50

44.4 JOE_MAMAK

2 2 2 1 1

100 90 65 72 56

-13 0 -13 0 0

DATUK SERI DR. NG YEN YEN, MINISTER OF TOURISM CHUA HAK BIN, BANK OF AMERICA MERRILL LYNCH ECONOMIST TONY PUA, MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT FOR PETALING JAYA UTARA DATUK SERI AHMAD HUSNI MOHAMAD HANADZLAH, SECOND MINISTER OF FINANCE

55.0 RYUNARUTO

46.9 RELAXJACK

45.6 FLAMING_LION

58.1

READZZAL

CO NT E NT A NA LYS I S FRO M NE W S ME DI A

News media findings

Story focus
CHART 11

This chart shows the story focus of each news media report. Story focus relates to the main focus of the report, and each report can have only one story focus. The chart also shows a breakdown of favourable, neutral and unfavourable reports, and the average favourability of the coverage that focused on each main theme.

600 54.9 450 VOLUME 339 300 171 150 140 106 51.8 55.2

60

50

45

0 THE RAKYAT OVERALL ECONOMY FAV NEU PUBLIC SECTOR UNFAV AVG FAV PRIVATE SECTOR

40

> Most of the rakyat-focused coverage related to the rising cost of living, with discussion of incentives and assistance in the Budget for housing and > public education. This coverage often linked to the announcement by the Malaysian Prime Minister, Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak, that this years Budget aimed to enable the government to provide for the wellbeing of the people and the prosperity of the nation. Coverage included: The Star columnist, Yap Leng Kuen writes, It was quite a refreshing change, listening to the Budget > 2012 proposals that provide an encompassing view of the multi-faceted interests and problems of the rakyat. The Government has made attempts to show that it cares about the quality of education and medical care, the plight of teachers, doctors working in government hospitals, retirees, women

and children as well as common folks requiring legal aid. (The Star, 8 October 2011). Most of the reporting that focused on the economy discussed the governments optimistic target of reducing the 2012 Budget deficit to 4.7% of gross domestic product (GDP), down from 5.4% in 2011. > Some key economists and opposition leaders questioned the viability of the governments fiscal deficit target and economic growth projections, given the gloomy outlook for the global economy. Public sector-focused reporting was the most favourable overall. Minister sources, who have vested interests in their specific ministries, tended to praise the Budget allocation that had been proposed by the Prime Minister for their ministry. Civil servants, in particular, were described as benefiting from a new annual increment structure

that would lay a strong foundation for better remuneration. Coverage stated that these policies were targeted at increasing productivity in the public sector and enhancing government effectiveness in the long-term. A low volume of coverage focused on the private sector, but these stories were slightly favourable overall. Reports noted that the governments move to further liberalise 17 services sub-sectors over the course of 2012, with the aim of accelerating investment, had been welcomed by many industry sources. Coverage stated that this liberalisation would enhance the dynamism of industry, and would widen opportunities for new and existing businesses to expand both within Malaysia and outside.

11

FAVOURABILITY

53.0

55

Leading topics
CHART 12
400 54.9 300 VOLUME 53.5 206 200 175 165 160 160 142 53.6 52.9 55.5 53.4 50.8 50 128 117 111 56.0 56.5 55 FAVOURABILITY 52.5 60

94 45

100

0 INDIVIDUAL TAX & SUBSIDIES CIVIL SERVANTS LIVING COST BUDGET IMPLEMENTATION FAV PUBLIC EDUCATION NEU GROWTH SOCIAL WELFARE AVG FAV MINISTRY ALLOCATION GLOBAL ECONOMY CORPORATE TAX & SUBSIDIES

40

UNFAV

This chart shows the number of mentions of each topic in the analysed news media coverage. The chart shows the volume of favourable, neutral > and unfavourable mentions of each topic, as well as the average favourability of the reports that mentioned each topic. > The leading topic, individual taxes and subsidies, was often mentioned in the context of various comments from tax consultants. Most of these experts were reported to have commended the viability and the necessity of the introduction of these taxes and subsidies, frequently citing current economic conditions for the rakyat. Interestingly, the coverage that mentioned taxes and subsidies also often discussed other stakeholders, such the private sector and civil servants. > Budget implementation was also frequently mentioned alongside other relevant topics, either through constructive suggestions about how the government should implement its Budget proposals, or criticisms of the

governments accountability in delivering its promises to the people. The least favourably discussed topic was the global economy. This was understandable, given the underlying negative tone of reporting about the global economic outlook. Discussion of the topic was widespread, especially in terms of how the Budget proposals were drafted to face the challenging economic conditions. For example: The grossly weakened global economy and the worldwide increase in energy prices have driven the cost of almost every other consumer item and service, including those of food, sharply higher Najib, who is also finance minister, said the 2012 Budget would be about the government delivering on its promise to ensure social justice while keeping Malaysia on a strong economic course that will deliver longterm prosperity for all (The New Straits Times, 7 October 2011).

12

Leading messages
CHART 13
0 50 100 VOLUME 150 200 250 240 89 69 56 55 37 34 FAV UNFAV 300

This chart shows the leading tracked messages by volume that appeared in the analysed Malaysia budget coverage. Messages can be implied in reporting or conveyed explicitly, and can be either favourable or unfavourable.

IS IN FAVOUR OF THE RAKYAT IS IN FAVOUR OF THE PUBLIC SECTOR OFFERS CLEAR MEASURES TO ENHANCE THE WELL-BEING OF THE RAKYAT STIMULATES ECONOMIC GROWTH IS INCLUSIVE DOES NOT PROMOTE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IS IN FAVOUR OF THE PRIVATE SECTOR

> The overall favourability of the news media towards the Budget was quite favourable, and the leading messages were overwhelmingly favourable. > News media reported extensively that the Budget is in favour of the rakyat, largely as a result of the theme of this years Budget being > Welfare for the Rakyat, Well Being for the Nation. This message mainly appeared in praise of the various measures that the government was taking to alleviate the burden of the people, especially to help lower income

groups to deal with rising living costs. For example, the message appeared in reports on the provision of RM500 to households that earn less than RM3,000 per month, and free school fees for primary and secondary education. The Budget is in favour of the public sector was another favourable message that appeared prominently in both news media. This message was expressed mainly by the various ministries and civil servants (and representatives), as they thanked the

government for the generous allocation to the public sector in terms of ministry funding and salary increases for civil servants.

13

Stakeholder satisfaction
The three pie charts show the proportions of expressions of satisfaction against expressions of dissatisfaction for the three broad stakeholder groups public sector, private sector and rakyat.
CHART 14 CHART 15

PUBLIC SECTOR
PUBLIC SECTOR IS NOT SATISFIED WITH THE BUDGET 10.7%

PRIVATE SECTOR
PRIVATE SECTOR IS NOT SATISFIED WITH THE BUDGET 28.2%

PUBLIC SECTOR IS SATISFIED WITH THE BUDGET 89.3%

PRIVATE SECTOR IS SATISFIED WITH THE BUDGET 71.8%

CHART 16

RAKYAT
RAKYAT IS NOT SATISFIED WITH THE BUDGET 22.1% RAKYAT IS SATISFIED WITH THE BUDGET 77.9%

> Only about a quarter of the analysed coverage contained an overt expression of satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the 2012 Budget. > Public sector expressions of satisfaction/dissatisfaction appeared most often, with Budget 2012 coverage discussing the extensive allocations for this sector, and commonly citing ministry spokespeople in relation to their relevant areas. The relatively high proportion of expressions of satisfaction/dissatisfaction by the rakyat was found mainly in letters-to-the-editor, or opinion or news articles that contained comments from members of the public. > Notably, 40% of total analysed letters-to-the-editor and opinion articles were neutral in tone (50.0 rating on the CARMA favourability scale), as a result of expressions of both satisfaction and dissatisfaction in the same media report.

14

Leading media by language


TABLE 3

LANGUAGE

MEDIA OUTLETS
THE STAR ONLINE YAHOO! MALAYSIA

AUDIENCE
674,424 60,630

VOLUME
89 58

AVERAGE FAVOURABILITY
53.8 53.3

ENGLISH MALAYSIAN INSIDER (ALTERNATIVE NEWS) UTUSAN MALAYSIA MALAY UTUSAN ONLINE HARAKAH DAILY (ALTERNATIVE NEWS) SIN CHEW JIT POH CHINESE CHINA PRESS MALAYSIA NANBAN TAMIL MAKKAI OSAI 52,000 13 54.6 18,870,540 2,760,000 38 18 52.6 53.6 456,895 47 48.4

41,413,162 407,925 349,027 36,987,648

71 58 20 47

54.1 56.1 42.3 54.5

15

Leading commentators
CHART 17
160 80

58.0 67

VOLUME

55.0

54.2

54.6

54.5 44.4 50

80

40 15 0 DATUK SERI NAJIB TUN RAZAK, MALAYSIA PRIME MINISTER DATUK DR. AWANG ADEK HUSSEIN, DEPUTY FINANCE MINISTER TAN SRI MUHYIDDIN YASSIN, MALAYSIA DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER NEU COMMENT DATUK SERI LIOW TIONG LAI, MINISTER OF HEALTH DATUK MUKHRIZ TUN DATUK SERI ANWAR MAHATHIR, DEPUTY IBRAHIM, OPPOSITION MINISTER OF LEADER INTERNATIONAL TRADE & INDUSTRY AVG FAV 12 12 11 9

35

20

FAV COMMENT

UNFAV COMMENT

WHAT MEDIA SAYS

WHAT MEDIA SAYS

[DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER AND] EDUCATION MINISTER TAN SRI MUHYIDDIN YASSIN SAID THE BUDGET REFLECTED A CARING GOVERNMENT, ADDING THAT IT WAS BASED ON SOUND IDEAS RECOMMENDED BY ECONOMIC EXPERTS. I THINK THIS HAS BEEN THE BEST BUDGET SO FAR, AND IT ADDRESSES THE NEEDS OF ALL LAYERS OF SOCIETY, SUCH AS FARMERS, FISHERMEN, CIVIL SERVANTS, ENTREPRENEURS AND SO ON. The Star, 8 October 2011

WHAT WE ARE SEEING FROM THE BUDGET IS ONLY ONE WHICH IS INDEBTING OUR CHILDREN, ENTRENCHING OUR STRUCTURAL PROBLEMS AND VERY WEAK EXPENDITURE CONTROLS OUR DEBT LEVELS WILL ONLY WORSEN IN THE NEXT FEW YEARS AS WE EMBARK ON RECORD LEVELS OF INFRASTRUCTURE SPENDING SUCH AS THE RM53 BILLION KLANG VALLEY MRT PROJECT WHICH IS EXPECTED TO BE FUNDED ENTIRELY ON DEBT [DAP MP TONY PUA] SAID IN A STATEMENT The Malaysian Insider, 7 October 2011

16

FAVOURABILITY

120

65

FO CUS E S O N P E RCE P T I O N, O P I NI O N A ND B E HAV I O UR O F T HE P UB L I C FRO M T HE S O CI A L ME DI A

Social media findings

@HORNBILL UNLEASHED.WORDPRESS.COM, 11 OCTOBER 2011 IN FACT, ONE-OFF PAYMENTS ARE AKIN TO PLACEBOS THAT GIVE SHORT-TERM RELIEFS. RELIEFS THAT ARE PLAYS ON THE MIND RATHER THAN REALISTIC SOLUTIONS TO A MEDICAL AILMENT. AND THIS IS THE ESSENCE OF BUDGET 2012. IT IS A SHORT TERM PLACEBO, MEANT TO GRANT A FEEL GOOD EFFECT AMONG A SELECT FEW OF THE POPULACE. JUST ENOUGH TO AFFECT THE 5% VOTE SWING BACK TO THE BARISAN NASIONAL IN ORDER TO RETAIN THE TWO-THIRDS MAJORITY IN PARLIAMENT. HOW ELSE CAN YOU EXPLAIN ITS IRRATIONALITY AND DISREGARD FOR FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY?

Social media metrics


TABLE 4 STORY FOCUS ENGAGEMENT INFLUENCE REACH NET SENTIMENT

This table shows numerical comparisons of monitored subjects based on the following index: Engagement, Influence, Reach and Sentiment. For definition of the Social Media Metrics, please refer to the Appendix from page 27.

OVERALL ECONOMY PRIVATE SECTOR PUBLIC SECTOR THE RAKYAT

54.4% 51.9% 49.4% 49.9%

57% 56% 56% 54%

66.5% 66.6% 60.8% 64.4%

-37.6 -37.7 -13.1 -13.8

> Across the social media posts analysed, discussions about the overall economy were the most engaged (or triggered the highest level of responses). This was partially a result > of frequent criticisms of the governments cash handouts, with suggestions that these measures were implemented in order to win electoral votes rather than to impact on Malaysias economic growth. > Private sector-related discussions also had higher reach. These discussions frequently related to the increase of the Employee Provident Fund (EPF) contribution by

employers, the revision of the My First Home Scheme house price to RM400,000, as well as cash aids and book vouchers for students. Revision of the upper limits of a property price under the My First Home Scheme was criticised by the rakyat. These conversations commonly described the housing scheme as ineffective, as the government had not increased the minimum wage for private sector employees. The online public stated that the government had shown a lack of consideration by increasing the upper limit of this property price, with some contributors

claiming that the current minimum wage salary is not enough to pay off the mortgage on a RM400,000 property in Malaysia.

18

Top 10 channels
This chart shows the top 10 social media channels that discussed the topic of housing affordability over the report period.
LOWYAT.NET FORUM - KOPITIAM LOWYAT.NET FORUM KOPITIAM 13.0% FREE MALAYSIA TODAY 10.5% FREE MALAYSIA TODAY MALAYSIAN MIRROR BLOG LOWYAT.NET FORUM - FINANCE, BUSINESS & INVESTMENT HORNBILL UNLEASHED CARI CHINESE FORUM - LOCAL POLITICS CARIGOLD FORUM - ISU SEMASA DETIKDAILY.NET FORUM - POLITIK SEMASA LIM KIT SIANG BLOG CARI FORUM - ISU SEMASA (CURRENT ISSUES) OTHERS

CHART 18

OTHERS 42.6%

TOP 10 CHANNELS
> Lowyat.NET Forum Kopitiam was the leading social media channel, contributing more than 450 online posts on the Malaysian Budget. The online public in this forum frequently discussed the impact of the Budget proposals on Malaysian economic growth. In particular, the cash handouts and benefits for the public sector were commonly described as election ploys to win votes from civil servants and low-income groups. > Discussions also related to impacts on the private sector, such as the effects of the increase of EPF contribution and the revision of house price under the My First Home scheme. This additionally included reviews by economists and local bankers of the over-promised Budget and the governments overly optimistic speculation of 2012 GDP growth. > The discussions from another two popular channels, the Cari Forum Isu Semasa and DetikDaily.net Forum Politik Semasa, included a large proportion of criticisms of the increased salaries and bonuses for civil servants. Contributors to these sites also frequently compared the Budget proposals from the opposition party to those from the government.

19

Leading messages in blogs


CHART 19
0 IS IN FAVOUR OF THE RAKYAT IS NOT INCLUSIVE DOES NOT PROMOTE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IS IN FAVOUR OF THE PUBLIC SECTOR OFFERS CLEAR MEASURES TO ENHANCE WELL-BEING OF THE RAKYAT IS INCLUSIVE DOES NOT STIMULATE ECONOMIC GROWTH STIMULATES ECONOMIC GROWTH IS NOT TRANSFORMATIVE IS NOT IN FAVOUR OF THE RAKYAT IS NOT IN FAVOUR OF THE PRIVATE SECTOR FAV UNFAV 6 6 6 7 7 7 8 8 11 15 5 10 VOLUME 15 20 25 24 30

> A total of 50 of blog posts were also analysed > Economists and opposition leaders claimed that the Budget proposals will not lead to the to determine the messages that they sustainable development of the Malaysian conveyed about the Budget. economy, suggesting that the short-term > The vocal critics of the Budget in the approach of government spending in the blogosphere included leaders of the forms of subsidies and one-off payments to opposition party such as Anwar Ibrahim, Lim the people does not solve the problem of Kit Siang and Wan Azizah, as well as middlerising living costs in the long term. Blogs also class citizens who were mainly professionals included frequent attacks on the government from the private sector. The most prevalent for its unrealistic projection of GDP growth criticisms from these groups related to the and the Budget deficit target for 2012, with sustainability and inclusivity of the Budget. criticisms that it was spending beyond its

means and not offering much clarity on the sources of funding for the Budget.

20

Story line: 6 14 October 2011


This chart shows the volume and sentiment of social media posts over the report period, with highlights of major stories in these conversations.
7 OCTOBER 2011 TOTAL MENTION: 952 10 OCTOBER 2011 TOTAL MENTION: 417 The online discussions spiked when the Budget was announced. Discussions related to Budget allocation, in particularly speculation about the introduction of a GST, and the implementation of the Budget. Much of the online public perceived the 2012 Budget as a ploy by the government to gain electoral votes. The volume of mentions increased on this day, after the opposition party reviewed the Budget allocation by the government. Engagement from representatives from the government and the opposition party was apparent in discussion across forums and blogs on this day. Conversations suggested that the Budget distribution is inadequate to sustain Malaysias global economic growth, with widespread claims that the Budget should cater to all levels of income groups. 12 OCTOBER 2011 TOTAL MENTION: 325

8 OCTOBER 2011

TOTAL MENTION: 691

Conversations continued to suggest that the Budget has failed to address a possible global recession. Budget 2012 was again described as perceived as tool for the government to win electoral votes. Middle-class citizens claimed they had received the least benefits from the Budget, and that finance aids were targeted only at lower income groups.

Discussions continued to relate to the governments cash handouts, again with claims that these handouts were allocated in order to win public votes in the upcoming election without consideration of the impact of the Budget on recession and low GDP growth.

CHART 20
1600 100

800

400

-50

0 6/10/2011 7/10/2011 8/10/2011 9/10/2011 VOL 10/10/2011 11/10/2011 12/10/2011 13/10/2011 14/10/2011 NET SENTIMENT

-100

21

NET SENTIMENT

1200 VOLUME

50

Voice growth & channel growth


CHART 21

The voice growth chart shows the number of unique voices that joined the digital conversation per day. This provides an indication of how many people were talking about the Malaysian Budget in the analysis period. The channel growth chart shows the number of new channels to which the conversation about the Malaysian Budget spread over the period. Both new voice and new channel growth peaked on 7 October, the day that the Budget was announced. The online conversations spiked with speculations about Budget allocation, particularly relating to the introduction of a GST, and discussions of the implementation of the Malaysia Budget 2012.

VOICE GROWTH
600

450 VOLUME

300

150

0 04/10/11

06/10/11

08/10/11 NEW VOICES

10/10/11 CUMULATIVE GROWTH

12/10/11

14/10/11

CHART 22

CHANNEL GROWTH
100

75 VOLUME

50

25

0 04/10/11

06/10/11

08/10/11 NEW CHANNELS

10/10/11 CUMULATIVE GROWTH

12/10/11

14/10/11

22

Top influencers
Below are the most influential people in the period that contributed the posts on the Budget that were most frequently responded to.

USER Polaris USER Malaysian Mirror

13 OCTOBER 2011 01:11 COMPARISONS with other countries indicate that we have too many civil servants for the population. Some 1.3 million civil servants, together with retirees, accounted for nearly two-fifths of the Federal Governments operating expenditure last year of over RM150bil. - http://forum.lowyat.net/topic/2068415 TOTAL POSTS 27 SENTIMENT Negative URL http://forum.lowyat.net/user/Polaris

CHANNEL INFLUENCE Lowyat.NET Forum Kopitiam 70

11 OCTOBER 2011 18:20 But beyond the lofty promises and glossy numbers, the so-called shadow budget, if ever it is implemented, could hurt rather than benefit ordinary Malaysians.- http://www.malaysianmirror.com/media-buzz-detail/6-nation/55159-putting-pakatansflawed-budget-under-scrutiny INFLUENCE 43 TOTAL POSTS 24 SENTIMENT Negative URL http://www.malaysianmirror.com/index.html

CHANNEL Blog

11 OCTOBER 2011 3:38 A government is more than a budget. It is not all money and mega projects and subsidies. The poor will remain poor no matter what multi-billion ringgit transformation projects are rolled out. http://www.freemalaysiatoday.com/2011/10/11/battle-of-the-budgets/ INFLUENCE 43 TOTAL POSTS 14 SENTIMENT Negative URL http://www.freemalaysiatoday.com/

USER Free Malaysia Today

CHANNEL Blog

8 OCTOBER 2011 00:00 This Budget 2012 measures to put cash in the pockets of voters ahead of a general election expected soon. http://hornbillunleashed.wordpress.com/2011/10/08/24226/. INFLUENCE 43 TOTAL POSTS 27 SENTIMENT Negative URL http://hornbillunleashed.wordpress.com

USER Hornbill Unleashed

CHANNEL Blog

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A P P E NDI X

Methodology and glossary of terms

Media Monitors & Brandtology analysis


This Media Analysis report uses both the CARMA media content analysis methodology and Brandtologys proprietary Digital Conversation Management System (DCMS) system to analyse news reporting and social media conversations. This analysis measures both news media content and online conversations to derive actionable data from total media intelligence.
ABOUT MEDIA MONITORS ANALYSIS

Media Monitors uses the CARMA media content analysis methodology. This methodology involves a systematic approach that turns media content into meaningful data that can be analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively.

ABOUT BRANDTOLOGY ANALYSIS

Brandtology combines technology, processes and trained professionals to deliver accurate and relevant intelligence to clients. The proprietary opinion mining and sentiment analysis technologies aid organisations in listening to digital conversations across countries in multiple languages.

DISCLAIMER: While Media Monitors and Brandtology endeavour to provide accurate, reliable and complete information, Media Monitors and Brandtology make no representations in relation to the
accuracy, reliability or completeness of the information contained in this report. To the extent permitted by law, Media Monitors and Brandtology exclude all conditions, warranties and other obligations in relation to the supply of this report and otherwise limits its liability to the amount paid by the recipient for the report. In no circumstances will Media Monitors and Brandtology be liable to the recipient or to any third party for any consequential loss or damage, including loss of profit, in connection with the supply of this report.

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Average favourability, net sentiment explained


RATING
This Media Analysis report uses both the CARMA media content analysis methodology and Brandtologys proprietary Digital Conversation Management System (DCMS) system to compare and contrast news and social media conversation. The CARMA favourability rating and Brandtologys sentiment score are comparable rating scales to assess articles/conversations prominence and tonality. The comparison of the two methodologies is interpreted in a Likert 3-point scale (Favourable/Neutral/ Unfavourable versus Positive/Neutral/ Negative) as shown in this table.

SCALE 76 to 100 56 to 75 51 to 55 50 45 to 49 30 to 44 0 to 30 + 51 to +100

COLOUR USED

Highly favourable Moderately favourable Average Favourability Rating 0 to 100 scale where 50 is neutral

Favourable

News Media

Slightly favourable Neutral/balanced Slightly unfavourable Moderately unfavourable Highly unfavourable Very Positive

Neutral

Unfavourable

Positive Sentiment Scale -100 to +100 scale where 0 is neutral

Social Media

Positive Neutral Negative Very Negative

+1 to +50 0 - 1 to -50 Negative -51 to -100 Neutral

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News media analysis methodology


Best Practice Media Analysis
The Media Monitors best-practice media analysis uses a systematic approach to turn media content into meaningful data. This approach analyses media content both quantitatively and qualitatively. Media Monitors uses the CARMA media content analysis methodology, which is internationally recognised as one of the leading commercial systems available. CARMA (Computer Aided Research and Media Analysis) uses advanced technology to quantify media content, and human intelligence to provide qualitative insight and analysis. Media Monitors uses the CARMA methodology to qualitatively analyse media coverage by taking into account multiple variables. These include the: > Placement of media reports (front page or lead item in broadcast media and websites); > Positioning of organisation discussion (headline, prominent mentions, passing mentions); > Image (photos, illustrations, charts, cartoons, or the image content of video); > Topics discussed in the media and their relative importance to the client organisation; > Messages, both favourable and unfavourable, communicated in media reports; > Sources quoted (both organisation representatives and other individuals who make relevant comments in the media); and > Tone of content (extreme language, adjectives and adverbs, metaphors or similes and other figures of speech). An aggregate score is calculated based on these multiple variables and presented on a 0100 scale where 50 is neutral. This is an overall rating of the favourability of each media report towards the client organisation (and, if relevant, other organisations or competitors). This aggregate score is called the CARMA Favourability Rating. The average favourability is the aggregated rating of the media coverage analysed. This can identify the potential impact of media reporting, and can be used to identify trends and establish benchmarks for future data. The criteria for analysis (such as topics and specific key messages) are set up uniquely for each individual client by a team of media analysis experts. These experts bring their industry knowledge to identify industry knowledge to identify key issues and attitudes that appear in the media, answer clients key questions, and, where relevant, provide recommendations for further action. The consistency of analysis is ensured in three key ways: > Most of the variables analysed are objective criteria (such as media name, positioning, sources names); > The somewhat more subjective topics and messages are identified by either exact phrasing or acceptable alternatives, provided to researchers before analysis begins; and > Media Monitors uses multiple researchers on projects to minimise individual subjectivity.

Average Favourability Explained

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Social media analysis methodology & glossary of terms


Social Media Metrics Explained
Brandtology social media analysis is based on keywords and channels that have been identified by a Social Media Consultant (SMCs). SMCs work closely with clients to determine what needs to be monitored, how best to do this and how to ensure the deliverables and reports meet the clients objectives. Using these keywords and channels, relevant data such as author, content, date of content and influence of author is extracted from forums, blogs, news, reviews, Q&As, microblogs, public pages on social networking sites and video sites (comments only) from the internet. The extracted data is processed by multilingual natural language processors to identify sentiments along a five-point scale (very negative, negative, neutral, positive, and very positive). Processed data is stored in databases and accessible via our Digital Conversation Management System (DCMS). Analysis based on proprietary algorithms is performed on the data to derive statistics, trends, indexes and charts. A priority rating is also calculated based on a combination of the site and author influence. Social Media Analysts (SMAs) access the data via our in-house ticketing system to ensure the relevancy and accuracy of the data, as well as to train the system to process data more efficiently on behalf of the clients. Once SMAs have checked the posts for relevancy and sentiment, Social Media Research Analysts (SMRAs) check for trends and gather insights that would be relevant to the client, and produce a report. Engagement Index

Glossary of Terms
This refers to the highest level referencing a logical grouping. A category may contain one or more subjects. A source being monitored for posts. Examples are forums, reviews, blogs, etc. The influence score weights the importance of the author/commenter within his/her channel. The score is within the range of 0 to 100. A keyword is used as a search term in the matching process to tag posts to the associated subject. Number of mentions or posts online. Online public refers to a person or persons discussing, writing, or posting on social media platforms like blogs, forum sites, Q&A sites, review sites or microblogs. Very Negative, Negative, Neutral, Positive and Very Positive. An author creating the post or a commenter that made a comment. The Voice Growth chart shows the number of unique voices per day that have grown during the time period. This provides an indication of a viral growth type of view to show how many more people are mentioning the subject.

Quantifies the content creation and response Category level of a particular subject. This takes into account the number of conversations started, as well as the number of relevant comments Channel and responses to the subject. Reflects the level of influence of a group of online contributors discussing a certain subject. Influencers are broken down into bands of Very High, High, Moderate, Low and Very Low Influence. Online contributors who are active content posters or garner more responses to their content will command a higher individual influence score. High Influencers have a higher weightage in determining the Influencer Index score. The higher the total Influence Index score, the more influential the group of online contributors discussing the subject are considered to be. Influence Score

Influence Index

Keyword

Mentions Online Public

Net Sentiment Measures the ratio of positive to negative Sentiment posts. A sentiment index value greater than 1 Scale indicates a higher proportion of positive posts. Voice Reach Measures the width and depth of the subjects reach across individual channels and unique Voice Growth voices, respectively.

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CO P YRI G HT 2 0 11 ME DI A MO NI TO RS G RO UP. A L L RI G HT S RE S E RV E D.