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Applying

Social Learning Theory to Humane Education March XX, 2012

Vicarious Modeling & Self-Ecacy

If all your friends jumped o a bridge, would you?

- My Mom

This Mornings Roadmap


Behavioral Theories of Learning Social Learning Theory/Social Cognitive Theory Self-Ecacy vs. Self-Concept Self-Ecacy and Behavior Obstacles to Self-Ecacy Reciprocal Determinism Sources of Self-Ecacy Vicarious Experience and Observational Learning Ideal Models Phases of Modeling Modeling vs. Mimicry Modeling Aggression vs. Modeling Compassion Humane Edutainment and Observational Learning Some Thoughts about Assessment

Behavioral Theories of Learning


Classical Conditioning

Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936)

Li7le Albert (1920)

Behavioral Theories of Learning


Classical Conditioning

Behavioral Theories of Learning


Operant Conditioning

Edward L. Thorndike (1874-1939)

B.F. Skinner (1904-1990)

Behavioral Theories of Learning


Operant Conditioning

Social Learning Theory

Social Learning Theory

Social Learning Theory

Bobo Doll (1961-1963)

Self-Ecacy
Albert Bandura (b. 1925)

Self-Ecacy vs. Self-Concept

Self-Concept: An overall general evaluaTon of competence and the feelings of self-worth.

Self-Ecacy: Beliefs, percepTons or judgments about one perceived capability or ability to successfully do the things that one wants to do.

Self-Ecacy and Behavior


What are some of the ways that increased feelings of self-ecacy impact our behaviors? 1) Inuence the choices we make and the courses of acAon we choose: People tend to engage in acAviAes in which they feel competent and avoid those in which they do not. 2) Helps determine how much eort we will expend on an acAvity, how long we will persevere in the face of obstacles and adversity. 3) Inuence the amount of stress and anxiety we feel as we engage in an acAvity. 4) Inuence the amount of intrinsic interest we have in an acAvity.

Obstacles to Self-Ecacy

Our own experiences of past success or failure in the same or similar acAvity.

Our observaAon of how others have succeeded or failed in the same or similar acAvity. The messages (verbal or non-verbal) we receive from others about our parAcipaAon in an acAvity.

Reciprocal Determinism

Personal Factors
MoTvaTng Beliefs, PercepTons, Values, EmoTons and Meanings

Behavior

Environmental Factors (Reinforcers & Punishers)

Sources of Self-Ecacy

Mastery Experience Social Persuasion Physiological Stress Vicarious Experience

Self-Ecacy

Vicarious Experience & Observational Learning

Ideal Models

Ideal Models

Social Learning Theory

If all your friends jumped o a bridge, would you?

- My Mom

The Phases of Modeling

A7enTon (Extent to which we focus on others behaviors)

RetenTon (Our ability to retain a representaTon of others behaviors in memory)

ObservaTonal Learning (acquisiAon and later performance of behaviors demonstrated by others)

MoTvaTon (Our need or desire to express the same acTons we have observed)

ProducTon (Our ability to actually perform the acTons we observe)

Mimicry vs. Modeling

Modeling Aggression

Modeling Aggression

Modeling Compassion

Humane Edutainment
How it is implemented
1) Establish a Community of Inquiry. 2) IdenAfy a Trigger.

Humane Edutainment
Trigger
I was walking home from school the other day and I happened to see a dog =ed with a very short chain to a tree in front of a store in my neighborhood. It was very hot outside and the dog looked thirsty, but as I approached him I no=ced his water dish was bone dry and overturned on the sidewalk. The chain was so short that the dog couldnt even lay down and instead had to sit or stand. I had no idea how long the dog had been there, but by the amount of feces scaBered around the tree, it looked like he might have been there all day. I felt so bad because the dog was obviously suering. It was clear that he hadnt eaten or had anything to drink for quite some =me. I looked for the shop owner to ask that the dog be given some water, but the shop had several customers in it and he just dismissed me with a wave of his hand, telling me to mind my own business. He wouldnt even talk to me.

Humane Edutainment
Trigger
Almost every day aEer school my friends and I oEen go to the park to hang out and play badminton or football. In the middle of the park there is an old iron cage holding a monkey. The monkey has been there as long as I can remember and people oEen stop by to watch him. Some people even give him pieces of fruit, while others some=mes throw rocks or s=cks at him. When the monkey gets angry or frightened he jumps around and makes loud screeching noises, which some people seem to nd entertaining. Yesterday, I was visi=ng the park with my friends when I no=ced a group of young kids standing around the monkeys cage. They were taking turns throwing stones at the monkey, trying to get it to jump around his cage. I could see that the monkey was very agitated and it was beginning to screech hysterically. I felt so bad for it, but what could I have done to help defuse this situa=on? What kind of choices could I have made to beBer this situa=on?

Humane Edutainment
How it is implemented
1) Establish a Community of Inquiry. 2) IdenAfy a Trigger. 3) Explore the context. 4) Create the AcAvaAng Scene.

Humane Edutainment
Activating Scene

Humane Edutainment
How it is implemented
1) Establish a Community of Inquiry. 2) IdenAfy a Trigger. 3) Explore the context. 4) Create the AcAvaAng Scene. 5) Conduct the Forum.

Humane Edutainment
The Forum

Humane Edutainment
How it is implemented
1) Establish a Community of Inquiry. 2) IdenAfy a Trigger. 3) Explore the context. 4) Create the AcAvaAng Scene. 5) Conduct the Forum. 5) Provide opportuniAes for pracAcal reinforcement.

Humane Edutainment
Reinforcement

Assessment

Many of the scales we use in Humane EducaTon measure a`tude. For a number of reasons, a`tudes do not always manifest themselves as behavior. In the absence of being able to observe behavior, a more accurate measure of the eecTveness of Humane EducaTon programs may be the assessment of both a`tude and percepTons of self-ecacy.

Thank You!

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