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Running head: TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS

Carroll County School District (CCSD) Technology Plan Update FRIT 8132 Scott Price William Johnson Richard Dierkes Georgia Southern University

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS Introduction

Georgias Carroll County School District Three Year Technology Plan was published on July 1, 2009 for fiscal year 2010 through fiscal year 2012. In general according to the plan, Carroll County School District (CCSD) strives to provide essential technology resources for its students and staff members in an effort to prepare all its graduates to compete in a technological and global society. The plans mission summarizes the districts intentions to ensure that all students and teachers have access to current technologies in order to provide an excellent foundation for communication, collaboration and learning. The CCSD solicits feedback from parents, community leaders, and business owners with regard to their thoughts and perceptions on technology in the schools through a community report card. In general, multiple internal and external surveys are used to gather feedback to make informed decisions with regard to hardware, software, and computer-use surveys for teachers, students, administrators, and parents (Thompson, 2009). Demographics The CCSD serves Carroll County Georgia, which is made up of multiple small communities that feed into the various schools. Each of these communities is unique in its demographic makeup. The Villa Rica and Temple areas are high-growth areas on the Interstate 20 corridor, and there is a higher transient rate in this particular area of the county as well. The Sand Hill and Ithica areas serve many of the residential areas in the northeast part of the county. The Mt. Zion community is small, primarily agrarian, and consists of no established, public businesses. The Hispanic population has established residences in the area, there has been significant housing growth, and a new school will be constructed in this community. All of the Bowdon schools are located within Bowdon, a midsized community in this county consisting of

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS businesses and agricultural interests. Whitesburg and Roopville are small communities with some businesses, but the primary income is mostly agrarian based. The Central community is located in the city of Carrollton, which is the heart of the county. The needs of the schools vary based on the differing populations throughout the county. Subgroups of students at the schools in the system that affect programs include the following: Black Students, Students with Disabilities, Economically Disadvantaged Students, and Limited English Proficient Students. These subgroups have been studied with regard to student performance and within each schools efforts to meet Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP).

Sharp Creek Elementary school has the highest percentage of African American students enrolled, and the Mt. Zion schools have the highest percentage of Limited English Proficient students. CCSDs enrollment includes a total of 58.05% of Economically Disadvantaged students as well. The performance gap for students in each of the above subgroups is an issue, and efforts to improve student performance among these subgroups is being met via professional learning opportunities for teachers, service delivery models such as Team Collaborative, and instructional technology programs (Thompson, 2009). Students and Computers The student-to-computer ratios within CCSD vary across the elementary, middle, and high schools for various reasons. Newly built schools are initially outfitted with adequate computers to support technology programs and instruction; however older schools havent experienced this attention. Over the coming years, these schools will expand the computer inventory, thereby reducing the ratio through local funding initiatives and/or grants secured. The growing student population is also a factor that affects the student-to-computer ratio. Reconfigurations of grade levels, consolidation of schools, and the addition of ninth grade

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS academies have also impacted the student-to-computer ratio. Other factors are a result of variables among schools such as grants, endowments, donations, fundraising efforts, and local funds. Major Strengths CCSDs three-year technology plan is strong in broad areas of leadership infrastructure that should serve as a reference for future plans for the district. With regard to the mission and vision, the general vision description and broad learning outcomes reflect a commitment that is student focused, and technology supported and enhanced. For example, the plan directly clarifies that the ultimate goal of the technology program is to increase student achievement and bolster teacher performance. The mission emphasizes that students come first and a premier learning environment is paramount (Thompson, 2009). The CCSDs goals are listed in correspondence with time-sensitive, quantitative

benchmarks, an evaluation plan, a succinct strategy and a responsible staff member. All goals are aligned to National Goals for Educational Technology, and surveys ensure feedback pathways to inform future decision-making. Future technology plans would do well to follow this intuitive framework. The plan clearly shows the essential details linking goals to objectives, and every goal has supporting strategies to achieve the goal along with timelines, responsible parties and funding. It also contains benchmarks and an evaluation method. Overall, the action plans timelines, responsibilities and budget are laid out such that accessing information is very intuitive and all elements clearly connect to the overall vision of the plan. With regard to multi-year planning, the National Goals for Educational Technology that form the backbone of the plan, outline a multi-year technology timeline that details ongoing

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS funding, support and overall planning. Continuous evaluation is evident and detailed to ensure timelines adjust accordingly.

The plan has a well-developed budget that is specific to its goals and objectives. It listed funding sources for federal, local and state funds, grants, E-rate and SPLOST funds. The funding is broken down by year and by future funding sources. The plans vision does state that staff development and training of all faculty and staff is an essential cornerstone to the success of CCSDs mission, and the first goal of the plan details the ongoing training opportunities for teachers to help students learn through technology and the WWW. Resources are mentioned as well for staff development. Major Weaknesses The CCSDs critical areas of need in their three-year technology plan spanned across both technology support to educational technology, and affects all of the Carrolton school community. With regard to the broad-based stakeholder support, there is not a true list of contributors in the plan; however, the listed goals do cite the party responsible for a particular goal. The CCSD does solicit regular feedback from the community about school technology, but the developmental stages of the plan do not include a planning committee of contributors with at least minimum participation from representative stakeholders. There are no specific standards listed in the plan for equipment or software purchases, other than mention of a continuous review of software programs and online resources and the use of community business partners to assist in technology developments and curricula. In addition, there is no specific software policy. The plan does include as a strategy that the school system will update and maintain the Microsoft Office suite, but there is no specific information listed for the Microsoft agreement. The plan does mention other software applications by name such as

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS

TestTrax, NetTreckker and others as well, but no software standards or licensing agreements are provided. The final major weakness in CCSDs plan is that it does not provide any initial assessment or evaluation of facility issues such as electricity, security, lighting and other infrastructure. Specifically, it does not address the physical security of computers, networks and software, as well as data encryption standards employed. Changes and Improvements Changes in the plan are needed to ensure educational outcome expectations are met, while maintaining budget and other considerations. The suggested improvements will assure CCSD technology stakeholders receive the fullest support across all essential areas. While many of the aspects of the plan are solid, (i.e., such as clarity of mission, vision, and goals), specific details of support are weak. Broad-Based Support This is one of the weakest areas of the plan due to the fact that there is a distinct lack contributors in the plan. The developmental stages of the plan need to include a planning committee of contributors and a minimum participation from representative technology stakeholders in the CCSD. The use of a technology planning committee will promote collaboration and support for the plan. Time allocation will be required from employee and community volunteers to participate in the committee; therefore guidance will be required. Needs Assessment The existing plan is moderately strong in this area; however the CRCT findings need to be further elaborated, with additional details to illustrate implemented procedures such as methodology of data collection and analysis, eighth grade technology literacy assessment results,

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS reports of hardware and software usage, budget analyses, and so on. In addition, the plan does

not include approximate details as related to attitudinal surveys, classroom observations, student skill assessments, or staff development needs. The plan should implement a level of technology integration questionnaire, classroom observations, parent and student questionnaires, and a principal-perceived questionnaire. Data should be collected by surveys, questionnaires and classroom observation and the results used for integration into present and future planning. This is needed to assess where technology utilization is at presently and how it could be improved. Administrative time will be needed to develop, administer and analyze the questionnaires, surveys, and observation tools. Mission and Vision The general vision description and broad learning outcomes are student focused, and technology supported and enhanced. For example, the plan directly clarifies that the ultimate goal of the technology program is to increase student achievement and bolster teacher performance. However, the specific items outlined within the vision indulge too much on a technology focus. The descriptors that focus on technology support and infrastructure need to be minimized. This commitment will help center the mission and vision on curriculum integration and student achievement, and will require eliminating the specific technology-focused descriptors from the mission and vision statement. Goals and Objectives This area is already very strong and no changes are needed. Action Plan/Multi-Year Planning This area is already very strong and no changes are needed. Program Integration

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS Although the plan makes efforts to connect educational, support and financial goals with timelines and responsible parties, connections to actual accountability documents is lacking. A formal evaluation process should be implemented and followed and cover all relevant areas of the CCSDs overall mission and vision. This process of integration will require time to develop, implement and analyze for future improvement. Curriculum Integration Although the technology integration standards found in the Georgia Quality Core

Curriculum and Georgia Performance Standards are followed, and the instructional uses of technology are described, specifics are needed to enhance technology across all curricular areas, and what students would do with technology in these areas as well. The plan could be improved by describing educational technology use that promotes student achievement and outlines strategies of instruction that can be enhanced with technology integration. Although the current plan has two goals listed under instructional uses of technology, more specific goals should be added for curriculum integration. Improved curriculum integration should bolster student achievement and support the districts mission and vision statement. This will require expanded teacher input, collaboration, and support, as well as administrative assistance to successfully implement in a timely manner. Evaluation The evaluation part of the plan lacks detail and comprehensiveness. The evaluation process should primarily focus on educational outcome expectations while maintaining an important, but secondary emphasis on traditional testing, student feedback and administrative preferences. Supportable evaluation methods require additional details about the evaluation process, such as links to learner objectives with goal guidelines set by Georgia Department of

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS Education Performance Standards, and other educational outcome expectations. Assessing a technologys effectiveness would be substantial asset to the evaluation process. Student performance as well as other aspects of educational outcomes such as cost to implement,

training, required maintenance, etc. should be reviewed and aligned to the respective technology. To break out of this recurring cycle, as described by Ehrmann (2002), the implementation of a new continuous process (Educational Outcome Aligned-Technology) is being proposed so that data are collected, reviewed and applied to inform the evaluation of a CCSD technology plan. The implementation of the Educational Outcome Aligned-Technology process will foster an unbiased, data-driven technology plan development for the CCSD. Standards There are no specific standards listed in the plan for procurement procedures, support of equipment or software, this includes the absence of maintenance schedules, maintenance history and other related information beneficial to favorable up-time percentages. In addition, no hardware or software update procedures were found, other than a continuing review of software programs and online resources, while community business partners are stated to assist in technology development and curricula. Specifically, there is no standardized software policy. However, the plan does include a school system strategy to update and maintain the Microsoft Office Suite, but there is no specific information listed for the Microsoft agreement. The plan does mention other software applications by name such as TestTrax, NetTreckker and others, but again, no software standards or licensing agreements are provided. The implementation of standards will help ensure that the technology used is relevant to the curriculum, needed, and cost effective. This will take time to develop a standardized policy with proper delegation of responsibilities to existing staff members.

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS Funding Alternatives The plan has a well-developed budget that is specific to its goals and objectives.

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Essentially, the plan is very strong and does not need many improvements in this area. The plan could be improved by exploring fund-raising from parent-teacher associations and emergency funding from state emergency funds, especially since the plan addresses specific areas of the district that are experiencing significant growth. In addition, reallocation of resources should be addressed in the plan. This would require administrative time to look at reallocation of resources and the support of volunteers to help with fund raising. Model Classroom Configurations Although the plans vision outlines a broad philosophy for student learning and technology, and mention of Internet access, LCDs, video etc. in classroom exist, more details are needed to ensure optimal and actual classroom configurations that foster student achievement in a technology setting (Burke, 2009). Specifically, accessibility, interactivity, and flexibility are needed to ensure all students experience the optimal technological setting for academic growth. This will require administrative time to research best practices and/or the enlistment of consultation from other professional resources. Facilities The plan needs to provide an initial assessment of facility utilities such electricity, security, lighting, climate control and other support infrastructure. The plan should include an analysis of specific utilities to ensure each school meets or exceeds required codes. Facility support requirements for implemented technologies should be in place and reviewed to determine proper operating conditions, including ventilation and temperature requirements for servers and other critical system equipment. The physical and data security of computers,

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS networks and software, as well as current data encryption standards employed should be reviewed to ensure safety and integrity. These support items would require hiring the appropriate vendors and contractors to help review, design and implement changes in each facility area. This would have to be budgeted as an additional expense. Maintenance/Support

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The only reference to software upgrades is to review the programs and online resources annually for effective and engaging programs for use in the classroom. (Thompson, 2009). Additionally, the plan does not provide any preventative maintenance schedule, backup procedures, disaster recovery, or help desk support. The plan could be improved by implementing a call center; FAQ automated system, regular software upgrade schedule, cleaning and maintenance schedule for hardware, global system software back-up procedure, an UPS (Uninterruptable Power Supply) infrastructure based on critical computer system failure points, and disaster policy. These additions will help increase the longevity of the technology being used, and provide user support, privacy and disaster recovery. This would require administrative time to write specific policies and a set-up of help desk support. Software Agreements The plan lacks software agreements and policies. There are no specific standards listed in the plan for the purchase of software, other than an ongoing review of applications and online resources and that the use of community business partners will assist in technology developments and curricula. The plan does mention other software applications by name such as TestTrax, NetTreckker and others, but no software standards or licensing agreements are provided.

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The plan could be improved by the addition of a commercially available on-line software revision application to monitor current software revision history. This is necessary to maintain proper site-specific licensing. This would require administrative time to track and maintain an application list for the district. Copyright/Acceptable Use Policy The plan has an acceptable use policy. A comprehensive and current copyright policy should be added to the plan. A specific copyright policy is necessary to guarantee no federal laws are broken that may put the district at risk for lawsuits or litigation. No additional resources are needed for this to be accomplished, other than incorporating a policy into the technology plan. Gifts and Disposal The plan has a redeployment policy for the evaluation of equipment for re-usability when equipment is replaced in whole or in part. If the equipment is not deemed usable it is transported to a recycling center. A policy is needed as well for the acceptance of gifts. Specifically, it would be good to add a policy for how and when gifts of software or hardware can be accepted. Adding this policy will help guarantee that technology accepted meets district standards. This will require a policy to be written and a designated person to be responsible for approving gifts. Staff Development Resources for professional development are mentioned but not elaborated. More details are needed to provide a clearer picture and stronger commitment to training. Specifically, relevant training, flexible scheduling, regularly-contracted professional consultants, available materials, and stipends are needed. Future planning should be based on actual needs,

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comprehensive in scope, and include incentives for educational staff and teachers in professional development (Burke, 2009). Resulting Improvements With the addition of the suggested improvements, the expectation is that the resulting technology plan would meet or exceed projected educational outcomes that cover a broad spectrum of targeted objectives and goals, ranging from financial budgets to learner achievements to improved community involvement. A more robust, varied and larger support base would provide for a more collaborative and supportive environment and build capacity throughout the CCSD over future years. The focus of the plan would shift to a curriculumdriven plan which would be more supportive of student achievement and encourage teachers to astutely integrate technology in lesson planning to promote student achievement. An established evaluation process will help produce better learning strategies and eliminate technologies or strategies that are not effective. The creation of standard policies for copyright and software licensing including software upgrades, data encryption standards, and gifts and disposal will help reduce associated costs and legal liability. Addressing facility support infrastructure areas such as lighting, electrical, ventilation, fire protection, and emergency response will provide for the increased security of technology and optimize the usage of technology in the most productive environment. Finally, the usage of classroom observations, surveying, and questionnaires will aid in identifying current weakness in the plan, including staff training, identifying waste, suggestions for improvements, and other helpful feedback. This source of feedback would also be beneficial in the evaluation of how technology is actually being used across different educational settings.

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS Plan Update The following sections will serve to analyze the Three Year Technology Plan (July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2012) of the Carroll County School District (CCSD) of Carrollton, Georgia. The Superintendent is John F. Zauner. Broad-Based Support The suggested team to provide the best support possible for the district technology plan begins with the Superintendent, John F. Zauner. Directly under him is the Chief Technology Officer, Dennis M. Thompson (770-832-3568, dennis.thompson@carrollcountyschools.com).

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Under Mr. Thompson, broad-based support is covered through the following District Technology Committee Members: school board members, district administrators, technology specialists/staff, principals, teachers, community representatives, parents, and student representatives. Needs Assessment Data sources and access to technology. The CCSD uses multiple data sources to assist in measuring technology goals and planning. The annual technology inventory submitted to the Georgia Department of Education. The information identified in this inventory includes the number of computers meeting the definition of a modern computer as defined by the Georgia Department of Education, the ratio of students to computers to identify areas of improvement for technology accessibility, and results documented through the eighth grade technology literacy assessment. Reports reflecting analysis of hardware and software usage for purchased and/or contracted technology services are examined. The annual budget for the technology department is used as a data source due to the opportunity to identify system needs for technology (e.g., hardware, software, training, and support of technology).

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Technology use instructional uses of technology. The following data sources were used to determine the current instructional uses of technology in CCSD. 1. Levels of Technology Implementation (LoTi) questionnaire. The LoTi (Level of Technology Integration) questionnaire (Sanderson, 2009): Do your instructional materials include adequate resources for student use of technology? What do you perceive as your greatest obstacle to further technology in your instructional setting? How many computers do you have for instructional use in your classroom? Approximately how often do students use computers in your instructional setting? Approximately how often do you use computers to do your job as an educator? I design units/lessons that provide opportunities for students to work on the skills that are addressed by the technology standards for students. Do you feel like technology is relevant to your instructional setting? Which of the following best describes the 21st Century Classroom technology tools available to you? A. I have a LCD projector in my class. B. I have an interactive whiteboard (with projector) and/or student response in my classroom. C. I can check some of these items out. D. Other Do you participate in formal or informal technology sharing sessions, such as faculty meetings, in-service training, lunchtime discussions, before or after school meetings, or common preparation time within your instructional setting?

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS 2. Teacher Survey Questions for professional development priority areas.

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3. Classroom Observations for student and teacher skills assessment and curriculum integration level 4. Parent, Staff, Student Survey Items 5. Eighth grade Technology Literacy Assessment Scores 6. Assistant Principal Perceived Needs Survey to determine the current instructional uses of technology in CCSD (Sanderson, 2009). Administrative uses of technology hardware. All system and school level administrators, counselors, media specialists and secretaries have a modern computer and access to the system-wide personnel and student data base with Internet access and e-mail. The Chief Technology Officer and all school principals will be the implementation coordinators. School funds and local funds will provide for the hardware and the estimated cost is $35,000 per year over an ongoing timeline. Administrative uses of technology software. The preferred administrative software is Microsoft Office. The Student Information System (SIS) from Infinite Campus is in place. A portal is utilized to provide parents and students with web based access to student records and information. A managed firewall service and content filter is in place and maintained, and an electronic board meeting program, E-board, is utilized to communicate with the community and system staff. The Chief Technology will be the implementation coordinator. Local funds and grants including E-Rate will provide for the software and the estimated cost is $150,000 per year for licenses and support over an ongoing timeline. Telecommunications. All schools have telephone systems and fax lines with local and long distance service. A long-range goal is to use the fiber network for intersystem phone calls

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS and provide voiceover IP service. This capability is currently in place in 65% of the schools. The system and school administrators have mobile devices for cellular and data services, and a telephone messaging system is in place to notify parents of absences and important school information. The Chief Technology will be the implementation coordinator. Local funds and

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grants including E-Rate will provide for the software and the estimated cost is $350,000 per year. This is a future project which will not be completed in this three-year plan. Parent/community uses of technology software. Parents have access to the student portal so that they may monitor student grades and attendance through Infinite Campus. The Carroll County Board of Education has moved to E-Board technology in order to provide parent, community, and stakeholder access to school system information. The school system website is provided and used as a communication tool to access the aforementioned items as well as additional information. All school websites are linked to the system website for easy access. Websites are in place to provide teachers, students, and the community with access to information. This includes online human resource applications, online survey capabilities, and potential professional learning registration and tracking. The Chief Technology will be the implementation coordinator. Local funds and grants including E-Rate will provide for the software and the estimated cost is $45,000 per year. This is an ongoing project. Gap Analysis. All classrooms have a minimum of one modern computer. Approximately 90% of the systems computers meet the states current definition of a modern computer. A replacement cycle is planned as a means to continue cycling out computers that do not meet the criteria of a modern computer according to the states current standards. Recognizing that those standards are likely to increase in future years, the system will adjust the replacement plan accordingly.

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The school system currently has 51 computer labs system-wide and is in need of 13 more. Nine of these are at the elementary level, one at the middle school level, and three at the high school level. Funding will be secured through local, state, and federal funds as well as grants to add these labs over the next three years. Disparities exist among schools in regard to student-computer ratios. These differences occur among elementary, middle, and high schools for various reasons. The newly built schools in the system are initially outfitted with adequate computers to support technology programs and instruction. Over the coming years, these schools will expand the computer inventory, thereby, reducing the ratio, through local funding initiatives and/or grants secured. Additionally, Carroll County is experiencing growth in areas along the Interstate 20 corridor. The student population is increasing at a faster rate, thereby, off-setting the student to computer ratio. Reconfigurations of grade levels, consolidation of schools, and the addition of ninth grade academies have also impacted the student to computer ratio. Other disparities are a result of variables among schools such as grants funds, endowments, donations, fundraising efforts, and local funds. Schools are targeted for upgrades on a rotation basis. The district uses the state inventory system to identify computers that do not meet the state definition of a modern computer. Those identified units are replaced as funds become available. Carroll County is made up of small communities that feed into the community schools. Each of these communities is unique in its demographic makeup. The Villa Rica and Temple areas are high growth areas on the Interstate 20 corridor. There is a higher transient rate in this particular area of the county. The Sand Hill and Ithaca areas serve many of the residential areas in the northeast part of the county. The Mt. Zion community is small, primarily agrarian, and

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS consists of no established, public businesses. There is significant housing growth in this area, and a new school is slated to be constructed in this community. The Hispanic population has established a residential area in the Mt. Zion district. The Bowdon schools are located in

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Bowdon, which is a midsized community in this county, consisting of businesses and agricultural interests. Whitesburg and Roopville are small communities with some businesses, but the primary income is mostly agrarian based. The Central community is located in the city of Carrollton, the heart of the county. The populations vary throughout the county; therefore, the needs of the schools vary. Subgroups of students at various schools in the system that affect programs include the following: Black students, Students with Disabilities, Economically Disadvantaged students, and Limited English Proficient students. These subgroups have been studied in regard to student performance and system and schools efforts to meet Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). Sharp Creek Elementary school has the highest percentage of African American students enrolled, and the Mt. Zion schools have the highest percentage of Limited English Proficient students. The school systems enrollment includes a total of 58.05% of Economically Disadvantaged students. The performance gap for students in each of the above mentioned subgroups is of great concern to the school system, and efforts to improve student performance in the subgroups continue. Professional learning opportunities, service delivery models such as Team Collaborative, and instructional technology programs have been implemented to address weaknesses among the subgroups. The system plans to continue formulating online strategies to provide teachers, students, and the community with access to information. Goals include the use of electronic board meetings and a parent portal for student information online. A call center message program for

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS emergency notification and informational purposes is also used in the system to promote

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communication. Plans to implement a professional learning program that will provide web based class registration and professional learning unit tracking for teachers and administrators are in development. A feature rich online human resources program is in place to more effectively receive and process job applications. Ultimately, the system seeks to enrich classrooms across the district with technology upgrades such as interactive boards, projectors, and other small technologies. The district recognizes the importance of wireless networks in its facilities. Currently, all schools are outfitted with wireless access that range from limited saturation at the elementary schools to total saturation at the high schools. It is an ongoing project to reach complete saturation at all of the schools. Areas such as special education, ESOL, gifted, connections, and other elective courses are given the same access to technology as other classrooms. In order to provide a free and appropriate public education, special needs students have access to assistive technology which is needed for them to access their curriculum in school, community and home environments. If the required technology is not currently available, the school system is committed to obtaining the required technology solution (Thompson, 2009). An assessment of current curriculum will be conducted during the school year to ensure that all technology curriculum indicators are included in the instructional program. Any needed modifications will be implemented by the start of each school year. A committee of professionals will review new software for district use. They will evaluate and select software at age and skill appropriate levels in the content areas being reviewed. Criteria for software selection include instructional value, training of staff, ease of

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS use, cost, compatibility with current hardware, and adaptability to students of all levels and abilities.

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Student needs and trend analysis. Student academic achievement needs are identified through the study of data charts generated after test results arrive in the system. At elementary schools, county scores on the CRCT are competitive with state scores in reading, language arts, and mathematics. The middle school data indicates a slight decline by grade eight in the areas of reading and language arts. Significant declines in mathematics scores are noted at grade eight. High schools report county scores on the GHSGT that are quite comparable to state averages in the areas of language arts, math, science, and social studies. Carroll County students tend to perform well in academic events involving these content areas, i.e., Young Georgia Authors Competition, Science Fair, Geography Bee, Social Science Fair, Governors Honors, etc. The test data for grade eight suggests that Carroll County middle schools are lagging in student achievement with CRCT scores below the state average. Mathematics (52% of 8th graders do not meet expectations on the mathematics CRCT) is a particular area of weakness and concern, and one strategy to support students in these schools is the placement of mathematics labs (computers and software). Curriculum specialists trained in mathematics curriculum, instructional strategies, and technologies unique to mathematics are in place at each middle school. Based on CRCT mathematics scores, students are scheduled into mathematics labs during connections time. Students also have access to these labs during after-school programs. Computer literacy skills must be improved so that students may capitalize on the use of technologies available. CRCT and GHSGT results also indicate a deficit in student achievement in the area of Science which is a serious concern in regard to technology and society. However,

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science scores are consistently rising in the high schools. Other academic areas are also in need of improvement as the school system seeks to achieve Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). In reviewing the disaggregated test results for the system, there are subgroups that demonstrate a lower performance level in the academic areas of mathematics, language arts, and reading. In grades one through eight, the subgroups of Students with Disabilities (SWD) and Limited English Proficient (LEP) are the lowest performing subgroups in mathematics across the system. Black students and Economically Disadvantaged (ED) students also demonstrate low performance in mathematics; although, the performance of these two groups in not as poor as the SWD and LEP subgroups. This trend appears to be an ongoing trend within the school system, and efforts are being made to provide opportunities that will address individual student needs. In regard to Language Arts and Reading, a review of grades one through eight across the system revealed that two subgroups performed significantly lower than the other subgroups. The students with Disabilities (SWD) subgroup had more than 40% of the students who did not meet the performance target on the CRCT while the Limited English Proficient (LEP) subgroup had 28% of the students in the Does Not Meet category. Black students, Hispanic students, and Economically Disadvantaged (ED) students had approximately 17% of the students in these subgroups who also did not meet the target. In high school the system-wide trends reflecting student performance are similar to that of grades one through eight. The two subgroups in mathematics performance that demonstrate poor academic performance include Black students, Hispanic students, and Students with Disabilities (SWD). Students in the Economically Disadvantaged subgroup also did not perform well on mathematics. Of these subgroups, the lowest performing group is the SWD subgroup. This identified trend has moved the system to provide more professional learning opportunities

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for special education and regular education teachers in areas that provide understanding of these subgroups as well as mathematics content. Also, a move to include these students in regular education classrooms in a Team Collaborative model has assisted in improving student performance in mathematics. English Language Arts academic performance in high school indicates that students in the following subgroups tend to perform lower: Black students, Students with Disabilities (SWD), and Economically Disadvantaged. Of these subgroups, the lowest performing group is the SWD subgroup. Collaborative model and tutoring has assisted in improving student performance in English Language Arts as well. These areas of identified academic need are addressed in each schools improvement plan as completed through the NSSE self study for SACS-CASI accreditation. Additionally, each school improvement plan specifies student academic achievement deficits particular to that school population. Action plans and Test Utilization Plans are generated at grade levels by teacher teams and individual teachers that are even more specific to grade and student academic achievement needs. Students are also identified for augmented services through tests and teacher evaluation. The System Leadership Team and Instructional Services personnel are placing emphasis on addressing achievement deficits as well. System initiatives include revising curriculum, setting benchmarks for achievement, and reviewing software systems that assist with diagnostic assessments and prescriptive learning paths. The school system seeks to establish consistent use of resources, curriculum, assessments, and instructional initiatives across the system. All schools use the same adopted textbook programs, and it is a priority of the system to provide every student an issued textbook and online access to textbooks in all core content areas of study.

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS Additionally, the system is engaged in thorough professional learning in the instructional initiative of Learning Focused Schools and curriculum development and implementation. An

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extension of this initiative is to develop appropriate formative assessments that assist in guiding instruction (Thompson, 2009). Mission The Carroll County Schools Technology Plan is an effort to ensure that all students and teachers will have access to and use technology as a tool for learning, communication, and collaboration. Engaging students in meaningful learning, which involves challenging, authentic experiences using technology, is embedded in Carroll County Schools mission to provide a premier learning environment while placing students first through quality and excellence. Professional development to support teachers with integrating technology and curriculum to meet instructional goals is a key component of this plan. As the system moves toward meeting the goals of this plan, all stakeholders will become more invested in technology and its benefits (Thompson, 2009). Vision Educators must be proactive in their approach to preparing students for success in the twenty-first century. Instructional designs must include the concept of preparing students for technologies not yet invented. Therefore, technology is not only a tool to facilitate the quality and excellence of the students, faculty, and staff, but also an abstract concept that must be developed in the minds of all stakeholders, including community and parent partners. Technology should not be thought of as a separate entity, but instead an integral tool used in the classroom to individualize, enhance, and motivate student learning.

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS Technology should support learning in the classroom, preparing students through authentic experiences for the real world. Integration of technology is the inclusion by teachers and students of appropriate technology that facilitates, individualizes, enhances, and enriches teaching and learning of state and local curricula. The staff development and training of all faculty and staff is an essential cornerstone to the success of Carroll County Schools mission (Thompson, 2009). Goals and Objectives

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All goals are aligned to National Goals for Educational Technology. The following areas are covered by one or more goals: The area of Access to Technology has two goals described in Tables 1 and 2. The area of Instructional Uses of Technology has two goals described in Tables 3 and 4. The area of Administrative Uses of Technology has one goal described in Table 5. The area of Parent/Community Uses of Technology has one goal described in Table 6. The area of System Readiness is described in Table 7. Action Plan/multi-year planning The CCSD has developed a three-year plan to address six areas of technology: Access to Technology, Instructional Uses of Technology Strategies, Administrative Uses of Technology, Parent/Community Uses of Technology and System Readiness. Each area is elaborated further into the following five sections: Benchmarks, Evaluation Method, Funding Source/Amount, Person(s) Responsible. Projected budgets for fiscal years 9-10, 10-11, and 11-12, with strategies and the person(s) responsible are provided as well. A full description of the multiyear planning can be seen in Tables 1 through 14.

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS Program integration A formative evaluation of the implementation of the technology plan is conducted annually to assure that all aspects of the CCSD (e.g., logistics, legal, IT, education, human resources, training, etc.) are in proper alignment. This process aims minimize discrepancies between the plan and reality, ensure that the program remains true to its design or modifies it

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appropriately, and provides feedback to the CCSD Technology Team for continual improvement to the plan (Burke, 2009). Curriculum integration The CCSD will add the following goal for curriculum integration: Improve student academic achievement through the use of technology in elementary and secondary schools. Train media specialists and implement new Information, Communication and Technology Literacy (ICT) curriculum. Participate in curriculum review to ensure the integration of technology throughout all content areas. Require teachers to design and implement at least one lesson featuring technology skills per semester/marking period. Improve student technology literacy as measured by the 5th, 8th and 10th grade technology literacy assessment. Refine and build on the successful integration of technology skills through grade-level assured experiences. Ensure library media specialists and teachers have common planning time to collaboratively plan units and enforce appropriate media scheduling to meet the needs of

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS the curriculum. Provide teachers with a toolbox of mini-lessons, graphic organizers and benchmark assessments on technology skills.

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Continue to implement the incorporation of high-quality digital resources such as video streaming, web 2.0 technologies.

Continue and complete implementation of the SMART Board with a goal of outfitting every classroom with a SMART Board of A/V presentation system.

Explore and adopt open source and open content curricular resources and online textbook materials.

Infuse technology to improve achievement in reading and writing through the use of digital storytelling, multimedia, video documentaries, audio books, eBooks and other resources (Greenwich public schools, 2009).

Evaluation All applied instructional technology effectiveness is influenced by intrinsic and extrinsic factors, it cannot be avoided. These factors have direct influence on all aspects of educational outcomes, such as learner achievement, education and training of all involved (teachers, students and technical administrators), cost to purchase said technology and to implement, and so on. Over the last 40 years, many technology investments have been justified partly by hopes that educational outcomes would be improved (Ehrmann, 2002). Initially this new process, Educational-Outcome Aligned Technology, will be developed from data collected from surveys, check-list, learner achievement, accounting records for all cost, and so on to identify the implemented technology as related to grade, subject, and learner achievements. Indirect and direct cost will also be identified and aligned with the responsible

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS technology. Educational-Outcome Aligned Technology will become an integral part of evaluating technology and assist in directing the way to better than expected educational outcomes. Standards Identification of appropriate technologies. Through the use of needs assessment

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survey and goal setting, the CCSD will identify appropriate technologies to meet the goals of the districts instructional program. The CCS District Technology Committee, which represents all school district peer groups, also evaluates and recommends new technologies, software and implementation plans to the CCSD IT staff. This group is instrumental in helping to write and formulate the CCSD annual Technology Plan (Burke, 2009). District plans to acquire software and technology-based resources. The CCSD will acquire software and technology-based educational materials. The district plans to acquire software and technology-based materials, which are usable by students with the widest range of abilities to deliver curriculum-based programs using the most appropriate technology to support the Georgia Performance Standards (Burke, 2009). The CCSD will ensure purchases of software and/or technology will be consistent with the districts technology plan. The Chief Technology Officer and the appropriate district curriculum program specialist must approve all software purchases. The Chief Technology Officer must approve all technology purchases. Any request for hardware or technology that is not a part of this plan will be reviewed by the IT Department. The CCSD will keep current with emerging software and technology, and will develop and implement an equipment replacement program (Burke, 2009).

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS Technical assistance for strategic technology planning. The CCSD Technology Committee will work with the Georgia DOE, vendors, business partners and the community to ensure that strategic planning takes place as it relates to technology purchases. All purchases will follow district standards. The CCSD will ensure that software and technology purchased will be properly supported and maintained (Burke, 2009). Funding Alternatives

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All goals are aligned to National Goals for Educational Technology. The following areas are covered by one or more goals: The area of Access to Technology has two goals described in Tables 8 and 9. The area of Instructional Uses of Technology has two goals described in Tables 10 and 11. The area of Administrative Uses of Technology has one goal described in Table 12. The area of Parent/Community Uses of Technology has one goal described in Table 13. The area of System Readiness is described in Table 14. The plan will examine fund-raising via various stakeholder groups (e.g., parent-teacher association) and research emergency funding sources from state and federal sources to address especially areas of significant growth. Resource areas will be better identified and managed as well. A. Recurring Funding (Burke, 2009): 1. Local and State Taxes 2. School Allocations - salaries for technical support, technology resource teacher supplements 3. School and department general operating fund budgets 4. State funding

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS 5. Instructional textbook funds - that portion which is used for educational software 6. E-Rate Funding B. Non-recurring Funding (Burke, 2009): 1. Competitive grant and special fund opportunities 2. Business and Community partnerships - providing equipment, technical support and training 3. University, state, and private agencies 4. Parent and business partner donations 5. Reallocation of unused funds 6. State emergency funds Model classroom configurations In education especially, technology should not be thought of as a separate entity, but instead an integral tool used in the classroom to individualize, enhance, and motivate student learning and prepare students through authentic experiences for the real world. An essential classroom technology configuration consists of a robust network infrastructure with wired and wireless access to the Internet and appropriate network resources. Accessible and interactive

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audio-visual distance learning capabilities are available within each classroom. Additional small technologies (e.g., graphing calculators, interactive boards, LCD projectors, etc.) will be provided throughout the system (Burke, 2009). However, technology in an environment that is not optimized for learning will not fulfill its role in student achievement. Well-designed classrooms are essential so that individual, smallgroup, and large-group activities take advantage of the power and potential offered by

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS technology for learning. Classrooms are flexible to accommodate a variety of academic functions with a variety of learning technologies. Student seating, classroom temperature,

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lighting, and ambient noise are informed by research to ensure optimal learning with technology. Facilities Physical security. Critical equipment and systems and equipment are housed in locked, secured cabinets and/or rooms with proper ventilation and A/C to ensure the longevity and protection of equipment. Cabinet keys and room keys are secured in the main office safe in the key lockbox of every CCSD school. The CCSD Information Technology (IT) Department will handle all technology security problems and expedite new security issues with the individual school administration when needed (Burke, 2009). Electrical infrastructure. According to local, state and federal electrical codes, schools will be evaluated for electrical infrastructure to support technology. Optimal placement of electrical outlets for media centers, student centers, and classrooms will be evaluated as technology needs change and strive for uniformity over time. Whiteboards will be positioned on the center of the teaching wall and located on wall free from vibrations of air conditioning ductwork. Additional classroom electric per DOE specification or every eight feet on every wall there should be duplex outlets, not tied into computer panel. Each classroom will have zoned lighting for optimum projection viewing (Burke, 2009). Maintenance and Support All technology has a limited useful life. CCSD shall consider technology equipment older than three years since purchase as due for immediate replacement. To achieve this result, it is prudent and necessary to budget for the replacement of up to 30% of the districts technology equipment each year. Disbursement or disposal of technology equipment will be done in

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS accordance with the CCSD. An inventory database of technology equipment will be kept and

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used for the long-range budget planning of hardware, infrastructure, and rotation. Equipment is evaluated for replacement on an annual basis. A regular cleaning and maintenance schedule will be followed to promote longevity of all equipment (Vincent, 2008). Technology hardware and software includes but is not limited to the following (Vincent, 2008): LCDs TVs video/audio equipment computer / laptops interactive boards hardware/software servers LAN switches printers servers Each fiscal year through targeted strategies and distinct points of contact, the CCSDs goal is to acquire and maintain adequate hardware with effective, engaging software and online resources as an integral part of every schools curriculum. See Table 9 for more details. User support. A help desk will be available Monday through Saturday from 7:30 AM to 4:30PM. An emergency phone call system will be in place for off-hour support. A FAQ area can be accessed via the districts website. Security policy/data retention policy. CCSD maintains a firewall and filtering services. A filtering service is purchased annually. LAN-based security includes server authenticated user identification and pass wording. Each user identification and password is unique and confidential (Vincent, 2008).

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS

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All data servers will be backed up by tape on a daily basis, Monday through Friday. There is an UPS (Uninterruptable Power Supply) infrastructure based on critical computer system failure points. Each building has an electronic alarm system to prevent theft (Vincent, 2008). Software Agreements A committee of professionals reviews new software for district use. They evaluate and select software at age and skill appropriate levels in the content areas being reviewed. Criteria for software selection include instructional value, training of staff, ease of use, cost, compatibility with current hardware, and adaptability to students of all levels and abilities. With regard to copying and licensing software, the CCSD will have a license for any software application that is installed on a computer. Use or possession of unlicensed software is a felony and can result in fines (Technology Recommendations, 2003). Employees should not copy the organizations software for personal use. Employees should not bring in personal software for business use unless approved by Chief Technology Officer. Chief Technology Officer will approve new software requests. If an employee needs to use software at home for work purposes, they should check with their system administrator for licensing restrictions or permissions before copying software. In order to meet and track site specific site licensing, the plan will be improved by researching and implementing a commercially-available, on-line software purchase and revision tracker to monitor software life cycles. This web-accessible database of software will meet sitespecific licensing requirements and allow for improved software planning.

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS Copyright/Acceptable Use Policy

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The CCSD uses an Acceptable use policy (AUP) to mandate responsibilities for Internet and school network use for students. The CCSD strongly believes in the educational value of using electronic services (such as the Internet) and recognizes their potential to support curriculum and student learning by facilitating resource sharing, innovation, and communication. The CCSD makes every effort to protect students and teachers from any misuses or abuses as a result of their experiences with this information service. Inappropriate and/or illegal interaction with the information service is strictly prohibited. The CCSD must have a students signature and that of their parent/guardian before computer access can be provided. Listed below are the provisions of this contract. If any user violates any of these provisions, access to the information service may be denied and the student user will be subject to disciplinary action. The terms and conditions of the contract cover six sections. The section Personal Responsibility requires that the user only uses Internet sites that have been directed to be used by their teacher. As a representative of this school, the student accepts personal responsibility for reporting any misuse of the network to their teacher. This includes looking at sites that have not been approved or sending or receiving inappropriate or unauthorized e-mail messages. Misuse may come in many forms, but it is commonly viewed as any message(s) sent or received that indicate or suggest pornography, unethical or illegal solicitation, racism, sexism, inappropriate language, and other issues described below. The Acceptable Use section covers the use of the Internet, e-mail, or any other electronic communication. Such use must be in support of education, research, and the educational goals and objectives of the CCSD. Users are personally responsible for this provision at all times when using the school computer resources. Only computer software purchased for use by

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS Carroll County Schools may be installed or utilized on a school computer. Adherence to copyright/licensing agreements is required. The Services section states that the CCSD does use a content filter on its Internet services; however, the CCSD makes no assurances of any kind, whether expressed or implied, for the service it is providing. Best efforts and reasonable precautions are employed to ensure safe use of the Internet and websites. The CCSD specifically denies any responsibility for the accuracy of information obtained through Internet services. The Security section indicates that on any computer system is a high priority because

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there are so many users. If a student identifies a security problem, they are to notify the system administrator at once. Students should never demonstrate the problems to other users; never use another individual's login/password. The Trespassing section defines trespassing as a violation of, or intent to violate, computer or network restrictions. Any trespassing will result in the loss of computer services, disciplinary action, and possible legal action. The Vandalism defines vandalism as any malicious attempt to harm or destroy data, applications and/or equipment connected to the system. This includes, but is not limited to, the uploading or creation of computer viruses. Any vandalism will result in the loss of computer services, disciplinary action, and possible legal action. The CCSDs Board Policy of Internet acceptable use for Internet safety states that the use of telecommunications, including the Internet, in instructional programs is an educational strategy that facilitates communication, innovation, resource sharing, and access to information. Use of the Internet must be in support of education and research and consistent with the educational mission, goals, and objectives of the school system. It shall be the policy of the

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS Carroll County Board of Education that the school district shall have in continuous operation, with respect to any computers belonging to the school having access to the Internet: 1. A qualifying technology protection measure, as that term is defined in Section 1703(b)(1) of the Childrens Internet Protection Act of 2000; and 2. Procedures or guidelines developed by the Superintendent, administrators and/or other

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appropriate personnel which provide for monitoring the online activities of users and the use of the chosen technology protection measure to protect against access through such computers to visual depictions that are (i) obscene, (ii) child pornography, or (iii) harmful to minors, as those terms are defined in Section 1703(b)(1) and (2) of the Childrens Internet Protection Act of 2000. Such procedures or guidelines shall be designed to: a. Provide for monitoring the online activities of users to prevent, to the extent practicable, access by minors to inappropriate matter on the Internet and the World Wide Web; b. Promote the safety and security of minors when using electronic mail, chat rooms, and other forms of direct electronic communications; c. Prevent unauthorized access, including so-called hacking, and other unauthorized activities by minors online; d. Prevent the unauthorized disclosure, use and dissemination of personal identification information regarding minors; and e. Restrict minors access to materials harmful to minors, as that term is defined in Section 1703(b)(2) of the Childrens Internet Protection Act of 2000.

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS

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The CCSDs copyright policy describes that while digital and/or electronic resources can or may fall under fair use doctrine that provides limited exemptions for students and teachers, the Carroll County School Board requires that staff and students conform to existing United States copyright law, as per Carroll County District Policy. (Vincent, 2008) In order to ensure copyright law compliance, the district and the technology staff will endeavor to insure that the terms and limits of all licensing agreements are observed, update licenses when necessary, install most software applications within their respective buildings, and track software and hardware. Educating the staff and students about copyright compliance is an ongoing process. The CCSD believes that is essential that all staff and students are ethical and responsible users of information and technology (Vincent, 2008). Gifts and Disposal Interoperability is being ensured by the CCSD through the standardization of software and operating systems. Servers are Microsoft Windows 2003 and desktops are Microsoft XP Professional. Various versions of Microsoft Office are in use on system computers. The school system will seek to upgrade all computers to a common Microsoft Office version during the next three years. The CCSD will seek to continue standardizing their network infrastructure with 3Com switching equipment. When equipment is replaced, the technology department evaluates the re-usability of equipment in whole or in part for value. The CCSD reuses those components of value and disposes of the equipment that is deemed of no value. Parts are transported to a recycle center. Technology related items must meet minimum technology standards and computers must meet the states current definition of a modern computer. The Chief Technology Officer and

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS Superintendent must approve all gifts through a formal and documented process that ensures fairness and coherence within the mission and vision of the CCSDs technology plan. Staff Development

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Professional development and training of all faculty and staff is an essential cornerstone to the success of the CCSDs mission. The district supports ongoing, accessible staff development opportunities to integrate educational technology into instruction. Relevant training is based on field observations and feedback to integrate technology into subjects and lessons. The CCSD commits to flexible scheduling possibilities, including early release days, in order to provide opportunities for staff development at optimal times and locations. Adequate facilities, instructors, materials, stipends and equipment are ensured for all staff development as well. Via a web-accessible portal, all teachers are able to view training offerings, register, and manage their professional development portfolios. Web-based and distance learning opportunities for teachers to participate in on-line learning opportunities and collaborate with other professionals are available as well. Consultants support all new courseware and software initiatives to ensure the fullest support for professional learning (Burke, 2009).

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS References Allen, P. (n.d.). Technology planning analysis rubric. Retrieved from http://homepages.wmich.edu/~lenewayr/Technology%20Plan%20Rubric.htm Burke, J. (2009). Monroe county school district information, communication, and technology plan. Retreived from http://www.monroe.k12.fl.us/tech/

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Ehrmann, S. C. (2000). Computer-intensive academic programs: How to evaluate, plan, support and implement (in that order) your campus technology investments. AAHE Bulletin, 53(3), 7-11. Retrieved from http://www.tltgroup.org/resources/F_Eval_Computer-Intensive.htm Ehrmann, S. C. (2002). Technology changes quickly but education changes slowly: A counter-intuitive strategy for using IT to improve the outcomes of higher education. Retrieved from http://www.tltgroup.org/resources/visions/Outcomes.html Greenwich public schools technology plan. (2009). Retrieved from http://www.greenwichschools.org/page.cfm?p=820 Kimbell, C. & Sibley, P. (1998, February 6). Technology planning analysis rubric. Retrieved from http://course1.winona.edu/shatfield/air/rubrics.htm Simon, L. (2010). Classroom physical design influencing student learning and evaluations of college instructors: A review of literature. Education, 131(1), 128-134. Retrieved from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3673/is_1_131/ai_n55819307/ Technology planning analysis rubric. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.electrovista.com/edu/techPlanRubric.pdf Technology recommendations for organization. (2003). Retrieved from http://www.ecqnet.org/ecq/HeadStart/Technology/0511_SampTechPlan.pdf

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS Thompson, D. (2009, July 30). Carroll county school system three-year technology plan. Retrieved from http://www.carrollcountyschools.com/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=PYfyVCudaZM=&t Vincent, N. (2008). Barrington school district technology plan. Retrieved from http://www.barrington.k12.nh.us/Documents/TechPlan2008-2011.pdf

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TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS Tables

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Table 1 Goals and Objectives, Access to Technology, Goal 1: Every Classroom will be Connected to the Internet through Network Wiring and Wireless Access. Strategies Benchmark Evaluation Method Funding Person(s) Source/Amount Responsible All schools will have All schools will be wired Site survey and System Local Funds Chief complete network and interconnected to the Technology Inventory $56,856 annually Technology wiring and be fiber network. Survey E-rate Funds Officer interconnected by a July 1 2009 - June 30 $190,334 annually fiber network. 2010 July 1 2010 - June 30 2011 July 1 2011 - June 30 2012 Internet access is provided in all classrooms and will continue to be a priority as new classrooms, including mobiles, are added to facilities or new schools are built. The system will provide campus wide wireless access to enhance learning opportunities both inside and outside of the classroom. The system will seek to establish additional educational programming utilizing the systems WAN. All teachers will have communication through the school system web-based email server. 100% of all building classrooms will be connected to the Internet. 100% of all mobile classrooms will be connected to the Internet. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining 100% of all schools will be equipped with adequate wireless access points to provide campus wide coverage. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining Educational programming and online learning systems will be reviewed for purchase annually. Site survey and System Technology Inventory Survey SPLOST Funds Local Funds $150,000 over 3 year period Chief Technology Officer

Site Survey

Local Funds and Grants $20,000 annually

Chief Technology Officer

Committee review

State Funds & Local Funds $100,000 annually

Instructional Services Personnel

100% of school system teachers will have email accounts assigned. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining

School survey

Local Funds $5,000 annually

Chief Technology Officer

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS


Table 2 Goals and Objectives, Access to Technology, Goal 2: Acquire and Maintain Adequate Hardware with Effective, Engaging Software and Online Resources as an Integral Part of Every Schools Curriculum. Strategies Replacing outdated computers will occur on an annual schedule Benchmark 95% of school system computers will meet states current definition of a modern computer. FY10 1/3 FY11 1/3 FY12 1/3 100% of system schools will have a minimum of 2 computer labs. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining 100% of system media centers will have adaptive hardware and software. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining 100% of high schools, including the alternative school and the evening school, will have access to online courses/programs with a minimum of 3 vendors/providers. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining 85% of high school students will complete grades 9-12 as a result of additional online resources/programs. FY10 1/3 FY11 1/3 FY12 1/3 Software programs and online resources will be reviewed annually. FY10 1/3 FY11 1/3 FY12 1/3 Evaluation Method Site Survey and System Technology Inventory Survey Funding Source/Amount Local, State, & Federal Funds 200,000 annually

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Person(s) Responsible Chief Technology Officer

All schools will have adequate technology labs to support the curriculum of the school system. All media centers will have adaptive hardware and software to accommodate special populations. System high schools, the alternative school, and the evening program will have access to online courses to enrich the curriculum and provide opportunities for advanced learning. Online resources/programs will be utilized to assist with improving the graduation rate for all high schools.

Site Survey and System Technology Inventory Survey

Site Survey

Local Funds; SPLOST Funds; Federal Funds; Grants $270,000 over 3 year period Federal Funds $25,000 annually

Chief Technology Officer & School Level Administrators Exceptional Student Services Personnel

Site Survey and System Instructional Technology Survey

Local Funds $100,000 annually

Instructional Services Personnel

System Balanced Scorecard Continuous Improvement Plan AYP 2nd Indicator as Graduation Rate

Local & State Funds $50,000 annually

Instructional Services Personnel

Continuous review of software programs and online resources will be conducted to provide teachers and students with effective and engaging programs for use in the classroom.

System Technology Survey

Local & State Funds $50,000 annually

Instructional Services Personnel

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS


The school system will maintain systemwide virus protection. 100% of system computers will have virus protection installed. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining 100% of school network traffic will be accessed through the system firewall and content filter. July 1 2009 - June 30 2010 July 1 2010 - June 30 2011 July 1 2011 - June 30 2012 90% of system computers will have Microsoft applications. FY10 Implementing FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining An automated phone system will be operational for the school system. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining Site Survey and System Technology Survey Local Funds $12,000 annually

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Chief Technology Officer

The school system will maintain a system-wide firewall and content filter.

Review of Network Reports

Local Funds $11,385 annually; E-rate Funds $38,115 annually

Chief Technology Officer & System Network Administrator Chief Technology Officer

The school system will update and maintain system-wide Microsoft Office applications. A communication system will be implemented to provide automated phone calls for emergency notification and informational purposes. The school system will provide online students with a filtered email account.

Site Survey and System Technology Survey

Local Funds $100,000 over 3 year period.

System Technology Survey; system reports will be generated

Local, State, & Federal Funds $20,000 annually

Chief Technology Officer

100% of online student emails will be filtered. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining

Student Account Review

Local Funds $1500 annually

Chief Technology Officer

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS


Table 3 Goals and Objectives, Instructional Uses of Technology, Goal 1: All teachers will have ongoing Training Opportunities to Help Students Learn through Technology and the world-wide web. Strategies Instructional Technology will be aligned to student technology standards and academic content areas as defined by the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS). All administrative and instructional personnel will make yearly progress in obtaining all teacher technology competencies as defined by the Special Georgia Teacher Certification Requirements for the purpose of improving instruction and student learning. All teachers will be trained on new system-wide software programs and hardware that are purchased. Benchmark Local curriculum guides, aligned to GPS and incorporating technology standards, is electronically posted for all content areas. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining 100% of all administrators and teachers will have completed technology training. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining Evaluation Method Curriculum Guides will be posted on the school system website. Verification that guides are in place will be done by checking the school system website. System Technology Survey. Documented through attendance verification rosters and professional learning transcripts. Funding Source/Amount Local, State, and Federal Funds $20,000 annually.

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Person(s) Responsible Instructional Services Personnel PD Source: LEA

Local, State, & Federal Funds $20,000 annually

Director of Professional Learning PD Source: LEA; ETC; WG RESA

Technology training and professional learning in the integration of instructional technology will be an ongoing process for all staff members. The system will seek to provide online staff training and professional learning for administrators, faculty, and other staff members.

Teachers will be trained on new systemwide software programs, i.e., Student Information System, electronic grade books, Interactive Boards, etc . FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining Professional Learning for the integration of instructional technology will be provided annually. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining The system will continue to offer online professional learning. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining

Documented through attendance verification rosters.

Local & State Funds $20,000 annually

Director of Professional Learning PD Source: LEA

Registration records and sign in sheets.

Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000 annually

Director of Professional Learning PD Source: LEA; ETC; WG RESA Director of Professional Learning PD Source: LEA; ETC; WG RESA

Registration records and sign in sheets.

Local, State, and Federal Funds $9,000 annually

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS

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Table 4 Goals and Objectives, Instructional Uses of Technology, Goal 2: All Teachers and Students will have Modern Technology in their Classrooms. Strategies Benchmark Evaluation Method Funding Person(s) Source/Amount Responsible Every classroom 100% of all classrooms Site Survey and System Local, State, Federal Chief will have a will have a minimum of Technology Inventory Funds, and Grants Technology minimum of two two computers with Survey $150,000 over 3 Officer computers capable internet access. year period of internet access. FY10 1/3 FY11 1/3 FY12 1/3 Interactive Presentation Devices will be acquired for use in classrooms for improvement of instruction and student learning. Classroom instructors will incorporate small technologies in lesson design. Schools will incorporate additional Interactive Presentation Devices for Instruction. FY10 1/3 FY11 1/3 FY12 1/3 By SY2008, middle school and high school math and science classrooms will incorporate the use of graphing calculators and/or CBLs in lesson design. FY10 1/3 FY11 1/3 FY12 Maintaining The system website incorporates a parent portal, a professional learning registration feature, and access to all school websites. July 1 2009June 30 2010 July 1 2010-June 30 2011 July 1 2011-June 30 2012 The system will incorporate new instructional technology applications. FY10 Implement FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining Site Survey Local, State, and Federal Funds and Grants $100,000 annually School Level Administrator

Site Survey

Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000 annually

School Level Administrator

The system will maintain and enhance web presence as an informative and interactive tool for all stakeholders.

System Technology Survey Report from web host identifying web page activity.

Local, State and Federal Funds $7,268 annually E-rate Funds $24,333 annually

Chief Technology Officer; Director of Professional Learning

The system will seek to develop, adapt, or expand existing and new applications of technology to support school improvement efforts.

System Technology Survey

Local, State and Federal Funds $10,000 annually

Chief Technology Officer

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS

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Table 5 Goals and Objectives, Administrative uses of Technology: All Administrative Personnel will Enhance Program Operation and Communication through the use of Technology. Strategies All administrative personnel will make yearly progress in obtaining technology competencies as defined by the Special Georgia Teacher Certification Requirements for the purpose of improving instruction and student learning. Benchmark 100% of all administrators will have completed technology training. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining Evaluation Method Documented through attendance verification rosters and professional learning transcripts. Funding Source/Amount Local, State and Federal Funds $3,000 annually Person(s) Responsible Director of Professional Learning PD Source: LEA; ETC; WG RESA

Administrators will be trained on new systemwide software programs that are purchased.

Technology training and professional learning in the integration of instructional technology will be an ongoing process for administrators. The system will seek to provide online staff training and professional development opportunities for administrators, faculty, and other staff members. Administrative and instructional personnel will be provided inservice opportunities for use of system software such as TestTrax, NetTrekker; Online Gradebook, Student Information System, Online Assessment System (OAS), and Data Utilization Tools.

Administrators and their support staff will be trained on the use of new software and/or applications. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining All administrators will be trained on the integration of technology into lesson design. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining The system will continue to offer online professional learning courses. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining

Documented through attendance verification rosters and professional learning transcripts. Documented through attendance verification rosters for professional learning and Georgia Leadership Institute for School Improvement (GLISI) attendance. Registration records and sign in sheets.

Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000 annually

Director of Professional Learning PD Source: LEA

Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000 annually.

Director of Professional Learning. PD Source: LEA; ETC; WG RESA

Local, State, and Federal Funds $9,000 annually

Director of Professional Learning PD Source: LEA; ETC; WG RESA

Administrative and instructional personnel will be trained on the use of at least two systemwide software programs. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining

Documented through attendance verification logs.

Local, State, and Federal Funds $15,000 annually

Director of Professional Learning and ETC Personnel PD Source: LEA; ETC; WG RESA

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS


Personnel responsible for high school scheduling will implement the use of online registration using Infinite Campus. High Schools will utilize Infinite Campus to facilitate student registration for development of a master schedule. FY10 Implementing FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining 100% of schools will provide an up-to-date web page. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining Human Resources personnel and Administrators will utilize online programming for recruitment and hiring processes. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining 100% of administrators will utilize email as a communication device. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining System reports will document the use of high school registration. System Technology Survey Local and State Funds $10,000 annually

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High School Principals and Counselors; Chief Technology Officer; Director of Secondary Instruction Chief Technology Officer

Administrative personnel will maintain current webpage information for their respective schools and programs. Human Resources personnel and Administrators will utilize online programming to facilitate the posting and application process for recruiting personnel. Administrative personnel will utilize email communication as a means of sending and receiving pertinent information.

Site Survey and System Technology Survey.

Local, State and Federal Funds $7,268 annually E-rate Funds $24,333 annually Local, State, and Federal Funds $15,000 annually

System reports will document the use of online programming. System Technology Survey.

Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources; Chief Technology Officer; Administrators

System reports will document use of the email service provided.

Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000 annually

Chief Technology Officer

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS


Table 6 Goals and Objectives, Parent/Community Uses of Technology: Parent and Community Opportunities for Use of Technology will be Enhanced and Expanded. Strategies The school system and individual schools will maintain websites for parent and community member access. Benchmark 100% of schools and the central office will provide up-to-date websites throughout the 3 year plan. July 1 2009June 30 2010 July 1 2010-June 30 2011 July 1 2011-June 30 2012 Through the new Student Information System, a parent portal will be maintained. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining Each school will offer at least one parent information session and/or notification annually. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining Each school will offer at least one technology training session for parents each school year. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining Evaluation Method Site Survey and System Technology Survey Funding Source/Amount Local, State and Federal Funds $7,268 annually E-rate Funds $24,333 annually Person(s) Responsible Chief Technology Officer

48

The school system will maintain a secure parent portal so that parents/guardians may access student records and information. Parent and student use of the Online Assessment System (OAS) will be promoted.

System Technology Survey and Student Information System Reports reflecting access. Records of parent meetings held and website information identified in System Technology Survey. Documented through attendance verification rosters for parent meetings.

Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000 annually

Chief Technology Officer

Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000 annually

Instructional Service Personnel

Parent and community members will be offered opportunities for training/instruction on use of technology, i.e., parent portals; Online Assessment System; etc.

Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000 annually

School Level Administrators and Instructional Service Personnel

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS

49

Table 7 Goals and Objectives, System Readiness: All Teachers will have Ongoing Training Opportunities Necessary for Certification and Implementation of Georgias Technology Integration Standards with Emphasis on Integrating Technology into the Classroom and the Educational Process. Strategies Benchmark Evaluation Method Funding Person(s) Source/Amount Responsible Instructional technology Local curriculum Curriculum guides will Local, State, and Director of will be aligned to guides, aligned to the be posted on the school Federal Funds Professional student technology GPS and system website. $3,000 annually Learning PD standards and academic incorporating Verification that guides Source: LEA; content areas as defined technology are in place will be ETC; WG by the Georgia standards, will be in done by checking the RESA Performance Standards. place for all content school system website (GPS) areas. for the System FY10 Maintaining Technology Survey. FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining All administrative and instructional personnel will make yearly progress in integrating technology for the purpose of improving instruction and student learning. All teachers will be trained on new systemwide software programs that are purchased, i.e., Student Information System; Gradebook; Online Assessment System; TestTrax; etc. Technology training and professional learning in the integration of instructional technology will be an ongoing process for all staff members. Administrative and instructional personnel will have opportunity for additional technology training. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining Teachers will be trained on the use of system-wide software. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining Staff members will be trained on the integration of technology into lesson design. FY10 Maintaining FY11 Maintaining FY12 Maintaining Documented through attendance verification rosters and professional learning transcripts. Local, State, and Federal Funds $3,000 annually Director of Professional Learning PD Source: LEA; ETC; WG RESA

Documented through attendance verification rosters and professional learning transcripts

Local, State, and Federal Funds $15,000 annually

Director of Professional Learning PD Source: LEA; ETC; WG RESA Director of Professional Learning PD Source: LEA; ETC; WG RESA

Documented through attendance verification rosters and professional learning transcripts.

Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000 annually

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS


Table 8 Funding Alternatives, Access to Technology, Goal 1: Every Classroom will be Connected to the Internet. Strategies FY09 FY10 FY10 FY11 FY11 FY12 Person(s) Responsible Chief Technology Officer

50

All schools will have complete network wiring and be interconnected by a fiber network. Internet access is provided in all classrooms and will continue to be a priority as new classrooms, including mobiles, are added to facilities or new schools are built. The system will provide campus wide wireless access to enhance learning opportunities both inside and outside of the classroom. The system will seek to establish additional educational programming utilizing the systems WAN. All teachers will have communication through the school system web-based email server.

Local Funds $56,856 E-rate Funds $190,334 SPLOST Funds and Local Funds $50,000

Local Funds $56,856 E-rate Funds $190,334 SPLOST Funds and Local Funds $50,000

Local Funds $56,856 E-rate Funds $190,334 SPLOST Funds and Local Funds $50,000

Chief Technology Officer

Local Funds and Grants $20,000

Local Funds and Grants $20,000

Local Funds and Grants $20,000

Chief Technology Officer

State Funds & Local Funds $100,000

State Funds & Local Funds $100,000

State Funds & Local Funds $100,000

Instructional Services Personnel

Local Funds $5,000

Local Funds $5,000

Local Funds $5,000

Chief Technology Officer

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS


Table 9 Funding Alternatives, Access to Technology, Goal 2: Acquire and Maintain Adequate Hardware with Effective, Engaging Software and Online Resources as an Integral Part of Every Schools Curriculum. Strategies Replacing outdated computers will occur on an annual schedule All schools will have adequate technology labs to support the curriculum of the school system. All media centers will have adaptive hardware and software to accommodate special populations. System high schools, the alternative school, and the evening program will have access to online courses to enrich the curriculum and provide opportunities for advanced learning. Online resources/programs will be utilized to assist with improving the graduation rate for all high schools. Continuous review of software programs and online resources will be conducted to provide teachers and students with effective and engaging programs for use in the classroom. The school system will maintain system wide virus protection. FY09 FY10 Local, State, & Federal Funds 200,000 Local Funds; SPLOST Funds; Federal Funds; Grants $90,000 Federal Funds $25,000 FY10 FY11 Local, State, & Federal Funds 200,000 Local Funds; SPLOST Funds; Federal Funds; Grants $90,000 Federal Funds $25,000 FY11 FY12 Local, State, & Federal Funds 200,000 Local Funds; SPLOST Funds; Federal Funds; Grants $90,000 Federal Funds $25,000 Person(s) Responsible Chief Technology Officer

51

Chief Technology Officer & School Level Administrators Exceptional Student Services Personnel

Local Funds $100,000

Local Funds $100,000

Local Funds $100,000

Instructional Services Personnel

Local & State Funds $50,000

Local & State Funds $50,000

Local & State Funds $50,000

Instructional Services Personnel

Local & State Funds $50,000

Local & State Funds $50,000

Local & State Funds $50,000

Instructional Services Personnel

Local Funds $12,000

Local Funds $12,000

Local Funds $12,000

Chief Technology Officer

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS


The school system will maintain a system-wide firewall and content filter. The school system will update and maintain system-wide Microsoft Office applications. A communication system will be implemented to provide automated phone calls for emergency notification and informational purposes. The school system will provide online students with a filtered email account. Local Funds $11,385 E-rate Funds $38,115 Local Funds $70,000 Local Funds $11,385 E-rate Funds $38,115 Local Funds $15,000 Local Funds $11,385 E-rate Funds $38,115 Local Funds $15,000

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Chief Technology Officer & System Network Administrator Chief Technology Officer

Local, State, & Federal Funds $20,000

Local, State, & Federal Funds $20,000

Local, State, & Federal Funds $20,000

Chief Technology Officer

Local Funds $1,500

Local Funds $1,500

Local Funds $1,500

Chief Technology Officer

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS


Table 10 Funding Alternatives, Instructional Uses of Technology, Goal 1: All Teachers will have Ongoing Training Opportunities to Help Students Learn through Technology and the World-Wide Web. Strategies Instructional Technology will be aligned to student technology standards and academic content areas as defined by the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS). All administrative and instructional personnel will make yearly progress in obtaining all teacher technology competencies as defined by the Special Georgia Teacher Certification Requirements for the purpose of improving instruction and student learning. All teachers will be trained on new system-wide software programs and hardware that are purchased. Technology training and professional learning in the integration of instructional technology will be an ongoing process for all staff members. The school system will seek to provide online staff training and professional development opportunities for administrators, faculty, and other staff members. FY09 FY10 Local, State, and Federal Funds $20,000 FY10 FY11 Local, State, and Federal Funds $20,000 FY11 FY12 Local, State, and Federal Funds $20,000 Person(s) Responsible Instructional Services Personnel

53

Local, State, and Federal Funds $20,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $20,000

Local, State, & Federal Funds $20,000

Director of Professional Learning

Local & State Funds $20,000

Local & State Funds $20,000

Local & State Funds $20,000

Director of Professional Learning

Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000

Director of Professional Learning

Local, State, and Federal Funds $9,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $9,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $9,000

Director of Professional Learning

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS

54

Table 11 Funding Alternatives, Instructional Uses of Technology, Goal 2: All Teachers and Students will have Modern Technology in their Classrooms. Strategies FY09 FY10 FY10 FY11 FY11 FY12 Person(s) Responsible Every classroom Local, State, Federal Local, State, Federal Local, State, Federal Chief will have a Funds, and Grants Funds, and Grants Funds, and Grants Technology minimum of two $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 Officer computers capable of internet access. Interactive Local, State, and Local, State, and Local, State, and School Level Presentation Federal Funds Federal Funds Federal Funds $100,000 Administrator Devices will be $100,000 $100,000 acquired for use in classrooms for improvement of instruction and student learning. Classroom Local, State, and Local, State, and Local, State, and School Level instructors will Federal Funds $10,000 Federal Funds $10,000 Federal Funds $10,000 Administrator incorporate small technologies in lesson design. The system will Local, State and Local, State and Local, State and Chief maintain and Federal Funds Federal Funds Federal Funds Technology enhance web $7,268 $7,268 $7,268 Officer; presence as an E-rate Funds E-rate Funds E-rate Funds Director of informative and $24,333 $24,333 $24,333 Professional interactive tool for Learning all stakeholders. The system will seek to develop, adapt, or expand existing and new applications of technology to support school improvement efforts. Local, State and Federal Funds $10,000 Local, State and Federal Funds $10,000 Local, State and Federal Funds $10,000 Chief Technology Officer

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS


Table 12 Funding Alternatives, Administrative Uses of Technology: All Administrative Personnel will Enhance Program Operation and Communication through the use of Technology. Strategies All administrative personnel will make yearly progress in obtaining technology competencies as defined by the Special Georgia Teacher Certification Requirements for the purpose of improving instruction and student learning. Administrators will be trained on new systemwide software programs that are purchased. Technology training and professional learning in the integration of instructional technology will be an ongoing process for administrators. The system will seek to provide online staff training and professional development opportunities for administrators, faculty, and other staff members. Administrative and instructional personnel will be provided inservice opportunities for use of system software such as TestTrax, NetTrekker; Online Gradebook, Student Information System, Online Assessment System (OAS), and Data Utilization Tools. FY09 FY10 Local, State and Federal Funds $3,000 FY10 FY11 Local, State and Federal Funds $3,000 FY11 FY12 Local, State and Federal Funds $3,000 Person(s) Responsible Director of Professional Learning

55

Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000 Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000 Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000 Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000

Director of Professional Learning Director of Professional Learning.

Local, State, and Federal Funds $9,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $9,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $9,000

Director of Professional Learning

Local, State, and Federal Funds $15,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $15,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $15,000

Director of Professional Learning and ETC Personnel

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS


Personnel responsible for high school scheduling will implement the use of online registration using Infinite Campus. Local and State Funds $10,000 Local and State Funds $10,000 Local and State Funds $10,000

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High School Principals and Counselors; Chief Technology Officer; Director of Secondary Instruction Chief Technology Officer

Administrative personnel will maintain current webpage information for their respective schools and programs. Human Resources personnel and Administrators will utilize online programming to facilitate the posting and application process for recruiting personnel. Administrative personnel will utilize email communication as a means of sending and receiving pertinent information.

Local, State and Federal Funds $7,268 E-rate Funds $24,333

Local, State and Federal Funds $7,268 E-rate Funds $24,333

Local, State and Federal Funds $7,268 E-rate Funds $24,333

Local, State, and Federal Funds $15,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $15,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $15,000

Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources; Chief Technology Officer; Administrators Chief Technology Officer

Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS


Table 13 Funding Alternatives, Parent/Community Uses of Technology: Parent and Community Opportunities for Use of Technology will be Enhanced and Expanded. Strategies FY09 FY10 FY10 FY11 FY11 FY12 Person(s) Responsible The school system and Local, State and Local, State and Local, State and Chief individual schools will Federal Funds Federal Funds Federal Funds Technology maintain websites for $7,268 $7,268 $7,268 Officer parent and community E-rate Funds E-rate Funds E-rate Funds member access. $24,333 $24,333 $24,333 The school system will maintain a secure parent portal so that parents/guardians may access student records and information. Parent and student use of the Online Assessment System (OAS) will be promoted. Parent and community members will be offered opportunities for training/instruction on use of technology, i.e., parent portals; Online Assessment System; etc. Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000 Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000 Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000 Chief Technology Officer

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Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000

Instructional Service Personnel

Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000

Local, State, and Federal Funds $5,000

School Level Administrators and Instructional Service Personnel

TECHNOLOGY PLAN ANALYSIS


Table 14 Funding Alternatives, System Readiness: All Teachers Will Have Ongoing Training Opportunities Necessary for Certification and Implementation of Georgias Technology Integration Standards with Emphasis on Integrating Technology into the Classroom and the Educational Process. Strategies FY09 FY10 FY10 FY11 FY11 FY12 Person(s) Responsible Instructional Local, State, and Local, State, and Local, State, and Director of technology will be Federal Funds $3,000 Federal Funds $3,000 Federal Funds Professional aligned to student $3,000 Learning technology standards and academic content areas as defined by the Georgia Performance Standards. (GPS) All administrative Local, State, and Local, State, and Local, State, and Director of and instructional Federal Funds $3,000 Federal Funds $3,000 Federal Funds Professional personnel will make $3,000 Learning yearly progress in integrating technology for the purpose of improving instruction and student learning. All teachers will be Local, State, and Local, State, and Local, State, and Director of trained on new Federal Funds $15,000 Federal Funds $15,000 Federal Funds Professional system-wide $15,000 Learning software programs that are purchased, i.e., SIS; Gradebook; Online Assessment System; TestTrax; etc. Technology training and professional learning in the integration of instructional technology will be an ongoing process for all staff members. Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000 Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000 Local, State, and Federal Funds $10,000 Director of Professional Learning

58