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Welcome to the

Test Guide

November 2005

Capital One PUBLIC

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of the Test Guide is to introduce you to some of the tests you will be taking as part of the application process for salaried positions. The Guide is particularly suited to those individuals who have never seen these tests and are wondering what to expect and how to prepare. Reviewing the Test Guide may help individuals target their test preparation activities. It should be strongly noted that: 1. the Test Guide is NOT a skill-building tool and 2. doing well on the sample items in the Test Guide does not guarantee successful performance on the actual tests.

Introduction
The purpose of this Guide is to introduce some of the tests you will be taking as part of the application process. Also, you will gain understanding about: Test administration How you can prepare for the testing session This Guide contains practice questions that you can use to familiarize yourself with some of the tests. Please note that the use of this Guide does not guarantee successful test performance, nor is it a substitute for preparation and study.

WHAT KINDS OF TESTS WILL I BE TAKING?


You will take a number of tests that are related to the position for which you have applied. These tests have been specifically designed to assess your preferred work styles as well as your ability to: Analyze and use information to solve problems Draw logical conclusions based on information presented Use written information presented in text, charts and graphs

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INTRODUCTION

HOW CAN I PREPARE MYSELF?


There are a variety of things that you can do to prepare yourself for the testing session. Before the Testing Session Think about the job itself. What skills will you need to be effective in the job? Practice on tasks similar to the job to sharpen your skills. For example, if the job will entail using numerical reasoning to solve business problems, you could practice doing some numerical calculations, with and without a calculator. Focus on the things you can do well in your current job. Most people have a range of strengths to draw on. How could you apply these to the new position? Get plenty of rest the night before the testing day. Practice using the questions in this Guide. They will give you an idea of the types of questions covered in the tests. Remember that some of the tests will be timed. Practice doing the questions under time pressure. Capital One will consider requests for reasonable testing accommodations by qualified individuals with disabilities, consistent with governing laws. We may request documentation to support such requests. Contact your recruiter for more information. On the Day of Testing Most tests will be administered on a computer. Detailed instructions will be provided. There will be time to review some practice items before starting each test. Calculators and scratch paper will also be provided. Ensure that you have reading glasses or any other aids you will need to do the tests. Read carefully the instructions given for each test. Be sure you understand the practice items. Read each question carefully before marking your answer. Answer as many questions as you can in the time allotted but without rushing and making careless mistakes. Remember that most tests will have many questions and tight time limits-many people do not complete all the items in the allotted time. Don't spend too much time on any one question. Monitor the time yourself. The following pages consist of practice test items, followed by an answer key with explanations of the correct answers. The items are all in multiple-choice format. Some items will require a calculator. While practicing, you should work as quickly and as carefully as you can. While this Guide is intended to introduce you to some types of tests commonly used in the selection process, it is not a substitute for preparation and planning.

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TESTS

Test 1 Arithmetic Reasoning I


This type of test is administered for many salaried positions. This includes professional, managerial, and technical positions -- except for analysts and financial specialists. Directions: Examine the tables on the following page to answer questions 17. For each question there is only one right answer. A calculator and blank paper for your calculations will be available. There is a time limit on this test; examinees typically do not complete all the items in the allotted time. 1. In which year did Paterson Corp. spend the most on Research and Advertising? A 1994 B 1995 C 1996 D 1997 E 1998 F None of these

2. Freshman and sophomore Architecture majors accounted for approximately what percent of student enrollment? A 1.5% B 7.5% C 15.5% D 24.5% E 31.5% F 37.5%

3. By approximately what percent did Communications spending change from 1996 to 1997? A 29% B 32% C 36% D 57% E 61% F 64%

4. Approximately what percent of the total student enrollment was comprised of Business students in the spring semester of 1998? A 22% B 25% C 28% D 31% E 34% F 37%

5. If City College students are required to enroll for 18 credits per semester, how much was the tuition billed to Freshman Architecture and Business majors in the spring semester of 1998? A $97,371 B $168,427 C $617,706 D $1,752,678 E $3,138,292 F $4,554,954

6. If 20 percent of the sophomores enrolled in Liberal Arts switched majors to Architecture, approximately what percent of Architecture majors would be sophomores? A 36% B 39% C 41% D 44% E 48% F 52%

7. What was the amount of tuition billed to Liberal Arts majors in the spring semester of 1998? A $366,996 B $389,205 C $3,625,884 D $6,605,928 E $8,437,912 F None of These

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TESTS

TABLES FOR USE WITH ARITHMETIC REASONING TEST I


19941998 PATERSON CORP. SPENDING (in thousands) 1994 Advertising Communications Equipment Packaging Research Shipping Training 225 175 150 125 350 150 175 1995 150 200 100 100 400 125 175 CITY COLLEGE
TOTAL STUDENT ENROLLMENTSPRING SEMESTER, 1998

1996 200 175 150 100 300 200 200

1997 350 275 100 250 250 225 150

1998 325 175 200 100 300 200 150

MAJOR Architecture Business Liberal Arts Sciences Total

Freshmen 123 226 347 211 907

Sophomores 161 274 375 243 1053

Juniors 142 238 348 206 934

Seniors 104 212 325 251 892

TOTAL 530 950 1395 911 3786

Tuition (cost per credit hour) Underclassmen Rate (Freshman, Sophomore) = $279.00 Upperclassmen Rate (Junior, Senior) = $246.00 *ALL students must enroll for 18 credit hours per semester

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TESTS

Test 2 Arithmetic Reasoning II


This type of test is administered for most Analyst and Financial Specialist positions. Directions: Examine the following tables to answer questions 8-12. For each question there is only one right answer. A calculator and blank paper for your calculations will be available. There is a time limit on this test; examinees typically do not complete all the items in the allotted time. Profit and Loss Figures for Textbooks 4U, Inc. Figures (USD) Sales Cost of Goods Sold Gross Profit General Operating Expenses Distribution Costs Operating Income Other Income Net Profit Before Taxes Taxes (10%) Net Profit After Taxes Dividends Paid to Shareholders Retained Earnings 2001 1,500,000 -350,000 1,150,000 -175,000 -60,000 915,000 40,000 955,000 -90,500 864,500 0 864,500 2002 2,000,000 -375,000 1,625,000 -200,000 -60,000 1,365,000 60,000 1,425,000 -136,000 1,289,000 -100,000 1,189,000

Distribution Costs Breakdown: Subject Area (2002)


1,000 900

Textbooks 4 U Sales Revenue ($ in thousands)

25%

30%

800 700 600 500

15% 20%

10%

400 300 200 100 0


Ed uc at io En n gi ne er in g Bu sin es H s um an iti es Sc ie nc e

Education Engineering Business Humanities Science

2001 Sales 2002 Sales 2003 Forecast

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8. Which subject area will have the largest percentage increase in sales revenue from year 2002 to 2003 if forecasts are correct? A Engineering B Business C Science D Humanities E Both B and C

9. What was the ratio of sales revenue to distribution costs for Science books in 2002? (Round to nearest whole number.) A 27 to 1 B 53 to 1 C 39 to 1 D 4 to 1 E Cannot say

10. What will operating income be in 2003 if sales revenue forecasts are correct? A 3.2 M B 2.4 M C 1.6 M D 2.7 M E Cannot say

11. Assuming that sales forecasts are correct and costs of goods sold increase by 10 percent, what will gross profit be in 2003? A 3.2 M B 2.4 M C 1.6 M D 2.7 M E Cannot say

12. What will the operating income for 2003 be if sales forecasts are correct and cost of goods and operating expenses remain the same as in 2002, but distribution costs for Science books decrease by 20 percent? A 2.23 M B 2.17 M C 2.33 M D 2.71 M E Cannot say

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TESTS

Test 3 Work Preferences


This type of test is administered for most salaried and Sales positions. Directions: This test includes questions about your behavior in work settings. Choose the statement that is most typical of you at work. 13. A B C D 14. A B C D I like to organize events and meetings I review my work carefully for errors I think of many new ideas I enjoy analyzing charts and graphs I adjust well to frequent changes I like to learn new skills I often share my opinions during meetings I prefer working in groups

Test 4 Experience Inventory


This type of test is administered for most salaried positions. Directions: This test includes questions about your work experience and education. Choose the response that is most accurate for you. 15. In your current or most recent job, how often are you required to deliver formal presentations? A B C D E F G H Never my job does not require me to give presentations Once or twice a year About once a quarter About once a month About once a week Several times a week Daily Ive never been employed

16. What aspect(s) of your current (or most recent) job do you enjoy the most (check up to 3 activities): A B C D E F G Working with external customers Collaborating with coworkers Working with data Working with machinery or heavy equipment Working with computers or technology Working with ideas Working with written materials or documentation

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TESTS

Test 5 - Verbal Reasoning


This type of test is typically administered to Call Center Supervisor and Executive Assistant applicants. Directions: Your objective on this test is to critically evaluate conclusions based on a series of facts. Read the list of facts, then read the conclusions. From the facts, you can tell that some of the conclusions are definitely true, some are definitely false, and in some cases you cannot tell from the facts given whether the conclusion is true or false. If you decide a conclusion is definitely true, fill in the circle corresponding to "True". If it is definitely false, fill in the circle for "False." If you cannot tell whether a conclusion is definitely true or definitely false, based on the facts given, fill in the circle for "Cannot Say."

FACTS
Employees of the Grimes Corporation reside only in New Jersey. All employees of Schaar Medical Services are nurses. Pat is a nurse. Dan resides in New Jersey. Tammy is an employee of Schaar Medical Services. Sammy resides in Florida.

CONCLUSIONS
17. Sammy is not a Grimes Corporation employee. A True B False C Cannot Say

18. Dan is a Grimes Corporation employee. A True B False C Cannot Say

19. Tammy is a nurse. A True B False C Cannot Say

20. Pat is a Schaar Medical Services nurse. A True B False C Cannot Say

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TESTS

Test 5 - Verbal Reasoning (continued)


Directions: This section assesses your ability to critically evaluate written information. Items 14 - 16 test your ability to draw inferences, or conclusions, based on certain information. First read the facts, and then evaluate the conclusions that follow. If you think the conclusion made is definitely true, then fill in the circle for "True." If you think the inference made is definitely false, then fill in the circle corresponding to "False". If you think the inference cannot be determined based on the supplied information, fill in the circle for "Cannot Say."

FACTS
Researchers have recently discovered that although the flu virus is present in most of the world at all times, it is only able to infect its host when in an environment above 36 Celsius. During warm weather, the body constantly inhales viruses but is able to produce antibodies to fight them. In cold weather, the flu virus is inhaled and stored in the mucous membranes, unable to reproduce because of the cold air temperature. Upon returning to an indoor environment and reaching the appropriate temperature, the flu viruses all reproduce at once, overwhelming the host's ability to ward off infection.

CONCLUSIONS
21. Scientists are more interested in studying flu and its symptoms than in studying other illnesses. A True B False C Cannot Say

22. Flu viruses occasionally reproduce at temperatures below 36 Celsius. A True B False C Cannot Say

23. Recent discoveries by researchers have increased our understanding of flu infection. A True B False C Cannot Say

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TESTS

Test 5 - Verbal Reasoning (continued)


Directions: In this section, you are to evaluate whether or not a particular conclusion logically follows a particular statement, or premise. Below are statements followed by several conclusions. You should consider the statements as true. If you think a given conclusion must follow from the information given in the statements, then fill in the circle under "Logical Conclusion" in the answer block. If you think that the conclusion does not necessarily follow from the statements given, fill in the circle under "Conclusion Does Not Follow."

STATEMENTS
Some psychology classes are long. All long classes are boring. Therefore -

CONCLUSIONS
24. Some psychology classes are boring. A Logical Conclusion B Conclusion Does Not Follow

25. All psychology classes are boring. A Logical Conclusion B Conclusion Does Not Follow

26. Some psychology classes are not boring. A Logical Conclusion B Conclusion Does Not Follow

STATEMENTS
All biologists are artists. No biologists are florists. Therefore -

CONCLUSIONS
27. No florists are artists. A Logical Conclusion 28. All florists are artists. A Logical Conclusion 29. Some florists are not artists. A Logical Conclusion B Conclusion Does Not Follow B Conclusion Does Not Follow B Conclusion Does Not Follow

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ANSWERS

Answers Test 1 Arithmetic Reasoning I


1. This item requires finding the highest sum of Research and Advertising spending for each year. Adding these numbers together, it is apparent that 1998 was the year with the highest sum of these two: 1994 Advertising Research SUM 225 350 575 1995 150 400 550 1996 200 300 500 1997 350 250 600 1998 325 300 625

Thus, answer choice E should be marked. 2. To find the answer to this item, first add the number of freshmen Architecture majors (123) and sophomore Architecture majors (161) together, for a total of 284. Next, divide this number by the total number of students, and then multiply by 100 to get the percent: % of Freshman & Sophomore Architecture Majors = Freshman + Sophomore Architecture Majors Total Students X (100) = 123 + 161 3786 = 7.5% Thus, answer choice "B" should be marked. 3. This item requires finding the difference in the Communications spending from 1996 to 1997, then dividing by the 1996 number: % change in Communications 1996 to 1997 = Difference in Spending 1996 Communications Spending X (100) X (100) X (100) X (100)

= 275 175 175 = 100 175 = 57.1%, or 57% Thus, answer choice "D" should be marked.

4. The percent of total student enrollment comprised of Business students in the spring semester of 1998 is equal to the number of Business students divided by the number of total students, multiplied by 100. % of Business Students in Spring, 1998 = Business Students in Spring, 1998 Total Students in Spring, 1998 = 950 3786 = 25% Thus, answer choice "B" should be marked. X (100) X (100)

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ANSWERS

5. This item requires you to add together the number of Freshman Architecture and Business majors in the Spring, 1998 semester. Multiply this number by 18 (for eighteen credit hours that each is required to take). Multiply that number by the tuition rate for Freshmen for the answer. # of Freshman Architecture and Business Students in Spring, 1998 = 123 + 226 = 349 349 x 18 = 6282 = 6282 x $279.00 = $1,752,678 Answer choice "D" should be marked. 6. To answer this item, you must find the number of sophomore Architecture majors and divide by the total number of Architecture majors and then multiply by 100. However, because the item states that 20 percent of sophomore Liberal Arts majors switch to Architecture, you must take this into account. This switch increases both the number of sophomore Architecture majors and the total number of Architecture majors, as outlined below. Number of Sophomore Architecture Majors = (Sophomore Architecture Majors) + (20% of Sophomore Liberal Arts Majors) = 161 + (.20)(375) = 236 Total Architecture Majors = (Total Architecture Majors) + (20% of Sophomore Liberal Arts Majors) = 530 + 75 = 605 % of Sophomore Architecture Majors = Number of Sophomore Architecture Majors Total Number of Architecture Majors = 236 605 = 39% Answer choice "B" should be marked.

X (100) X (100)

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ANSWERS

7. This item is similar to item 5, with additional steps. To answer this item correctly, you must keep in mind that there are different tuition rates. Note that there is an underclassmen rate and an upperclassmen rate. Add the number of freshmen and sophomore Liberal Arts majors together, then multiply this number by the underclassmen tuition rate, and then by 18, as this is the number of credit hours required. Repeat for the upperclassmen - add the number of junior and senior Liberal Arts majors together; multiply by the upperclassmen tuition rate, and then by 18. Add the under- and upper-classmen tuition amounts together for the answer. Underclassmen tuition (Liberal Arts Majors) = (# of Liberal Arts underclassmen) x (tuition rate) x (# of credit hours) # of Liberal Arts underclassmen = Freshmen + Sophomore Liberal Arts Majors = 347+375 = 722 = (722) x (Underclassmen Tuition Rate) x (18 credit hours) = (722) x ($279.00) x (18) = $3,625,884 Upperclassmen tuition (Liberal Arts Majors) = (# of Liberal Arts upperclassmen) x (tuition rate) x (# of credit hours) # of Liberal Arts upperclassmen = Junior + Senior Liberal Arts Majors = 348 +325 = 673 = (673) x (Upperclassmen Tuition Rate) x (18 credit hours) = (673) x ($246.00) x (18) = $2,980,044 Total Liberal Arts Tuition = Underclassmen Tuition + Upperclassmen Tuition = $3,625,884 + $2,980,044 = $6,605,928 Answer choice "D" should be marked.

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ANSWERS

Test 2 Arithmetic Reasoning II


8. This item requires using the Sales Revenue bar chart. To answer this item, first calculate the difference between 2002 sales revenue and 2003 revenue projections for each area, then divide the difference by the 2002 revenue and multiply this proportion by 100: From this calculation, one sees that the Science area is projected to have the largest percentage increase in sales revenue: % increase in sales revenue = 2003 Projected Sales 2002 Sales 2002 Sales % increase in sales revenue for Science = 800 400 400 = 100% Thus, answer choice "C" should be marked. 9. This item requires the use of all three charts. To calculate the ratio, you must divide the 2002 sales revenue for Science by the 2002 distribution costs for Science. However, you must first calculate the distribution costs for Science by multiplying the total distribution costs by the proportion of those costs attributed to Science books. Ratio of sales revenue to distribution costs for Science books in 2002 = 2002 Science Sales Revenue 2002 Science Distribution Costs Look up numerator in Sales Revenue chart = 400,000 2002 Science Distribution Costs Look up total 2002 distribution costs in P&L Table; multiply by proportion for Science (found in Distribution Cost Breakdown chart) = 400,000 (60,000 X .25) X (100) X (100)

= 400,000 15,000 = 26.67 (Round up to 27.) Thus, answer choice "A" should be marked. 10. This item cannot be answered with the information provided. In order to answer this question, one would need the forecasted P&L figures (sales, cost of goods, general operating expenses, and distribution costs) for 2003. Although the total forecasted sales revenue can be calculated using the Sales Revenue bar chart, the other information cannot be derived from any of the graphs. Answer choice E (Cannot Say) should be selected.

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ANSWERS

11. This item requires the use of the Sales Revenue bar chart and the P&L Figures table. From the P&L table, one can see that gross profit is calculated by subtracting the costs of goods sold from sales revenue. First, use the bar chart to calculate the total sales revenue projected for 2003. Next, calculate what the cost of goods sold would be if it increased 10% from its 2002 amount. Using these 2003 projections, calculate the projected gross profit. 2003 Gross Profit = Projected Sales Revenue Projected Cost of Goods Sold Sum 2003 projected revenue across all subject areas (use Sales Revenue bar chart) = 2,800,000 Projected Cost of Goods Sold Look up 2002 cost of goods sold in P&L table and increase that by 10% 2,800,000 [375,000 + (375,000 X .10)] = 2,800,000 412,500 = 2,387,500 (Rounds to 2.4 million.) Thus, answer choice "B" should be marked. 12. This item requires the use of all three graphs. First, use the bar chart to figure the total sales revenue projected for 2003 (sum of revenues for all areas = 2,800,000). Note that this was already calculated in item #11. Next, calculate what the distribution costs for Science books would be if it decreased by 20% from its 2002 amount of 60,000: a) We know from item #9 that 2002 distribution costs for Science books were 15,000 (or 25% of 60,000); b) 20% of 15,000 = 3000; c) 60,000 3000 = 57,000. Use the P&L table to see that operating income will be using these new projections. Figures (USD) Sales Cost of Goods Sold Gross Profit General Operating Expenses Distribution Costs Operating Income Answer choice B should be selected. 2002 2,000,000 -375,000 1,625,000 -200,000 -60,000 1,365,000 2003 (forecast) 2,800,000 -375,000 2,425,000 -200,000 -57,000 2,168,000 No change from 2002 20% decrease for Science books Rounds to 2.17 million Total 2003 forecast from Sales Revenue bar chart No change from 2002

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ANSWERS

Test 3 Work Preferences


This test is designed to assess your work style preferences. You should choose the response that is most true or typical of you in work settings.

Test 4 Experience Inventory


This test is designed to assess your work experience and training. You should choose the response that is most accurate for you.

Test 5 Verbal Reasoning


17. In this example, the facts state that Sammy resides in Florida, and employees of the Grimes Corporation reside only in New Jersey. Thus, Sammy cannot be a Grimes Corporation employee, so this item is definitely true, and the circle under "True" should be filled in. 18. In the second item, although the facts state that Dan resides in New Jersey, there is no information about his employment status. Dan may or may not work for the Grimes Corporation. Thus, the answer to the second item is "Cannot Say." 19. In the third item, the "True" circle should be filled in, as it is definitely true that Tammy is an employee of Schaar Medical Services, and all employees there are nurses. 20. Although Pat is a nurse, it cannot be definitely determined that Pat is an employee of Schaar Medical Services. It is possible that Pat is a nurse in any number of settings. Therefore, this item should be marked "Cannot Say." 21. There is no evidence for this conclusion; it cannot be evaluated. Thus, "Cannot Say" is the correct response. 22. The conclusion is definitely false, because it is stated in the facts that the temperature required for a virus to reproduce is at least 36 Celsius. 23. The conclusion is true, as the facts presented here are a summary of recent research findings. 24. The conclusion is a Logical Conclusion and necessarily follows from the statements. If all long classes are boring, then some psychology classes (the long ones) must be boring. 25. The conclusion Does not Follow from the statements. There may be some psychology classes that are not boring. We know for sure that only the long ones are boring. 26. The conclusion also Does not Follow. Based on the statements given, it is possible that ALL psychology classes are boring. 27. This conclusion is invalid and Does not Follow from the statements. It is possible that some florists are artists. 28. The conclusion also is invalid. While it may be possible that all florists are artists; thus, Does not Follow is the correct answer. 29. Again, this conclusion Does not Follow. It is possible that some florists indeed are artists.

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