Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 6

Katherine Rehus

CI451

September 9, 2011

Identify Desired Results What overarching understandings are desired? What are the overarching "essential" questions?

Science ConceptsStudents will understand that Plants have structures that serve different functions Seeds hare found in the fruit of plants and have structures that serve different functions Seeds require certain conditions to germinate Plants require certain conditions to grow and develop Plants have a life cycle that follows a pattern of growth and development Inquiry ConceptsStudents will develop their abilities to Explore and Observe Design and Conduct Investigations Construct Relationships and conclusions Communicate Apply and connect

What do you think the different structures of a plant do to help the plant survive? When you plant a seed, a. What do you think will happen? b. Where will the baby plant get its food? c. Name three plants we use for food. Name three plants we use for food. Name three things a plant needs in order to grow. Can you show or explain the way a plant grows?

What will students understand as a result of this unit?

What "essential" and "unit" questions will focus this unit?

Katherine Rehus

CI451

September 9, 2011

Science ConceptsStudents will understand that The root system of a seedling develops first Roots are Structures that help a plant to survive Roots anchor the plant, absorb minerals and water, and store food Inquiry ConceptsStudents will develop their abilities to Conduct investigations Construct relationships

Why do you think the root system would grow first? What do the roots do for the plant? Why do you think it important for the root to grow quickly at first? What differences do you notice between parts of the root system? What purpose do you think the root hairs serve? How do the roots of different seeds vary from one another? What advantages or disadvantages might there be to different plants root structures?

Determine Acceptable Evidence What evidence will show that students understand... Performance Tasks, Projects

Students meeting the standards of learning will Explain that bean roots anchor the plant, provide it with water and nutrients for survival, and store food Observe how roots develop more quickly than the rest of the plant Use rulers to measure bean root and stem growth and record the data on a graph Compare the growth of the root and the stem over time Develop a logical explanation for fast root growth

Quizzes, Tasks, Academic Prompts

Find evidence of student learning in Science notebooks Class discussions Teacher observations Home-school Worksheets Group recording sheets

Katherine Rehus

CI451

September 9, 2011

Other Evidence (e.g. observations, work samples, dialogues)

Student Self-Assessment

Find evidence of student learning in Completed experiment implementation

Students will be able to assess personal understanding in Observing own group overall experimental implementation and results and other groups experimental outcomes Logical results Logical explanation of results from acquired understanding Home-school worksheet final written assessment

Plan Learning Experience and Instruction Given the targeted understandings, other unit goals, and the assessment evidence identified, what knowledge and skills are needed?

Students will need to know...

Students will need to be able to...

There are a variety of plants in our environment. Plants have structures that serve different functions. Stems and leaves emerge from the seed. Roots emerge from the seed.

Conduct the investigation from teacher instruction and modeling Work in groups to set up experiment and collaboratively collect data Use a ruler to measure upper plant and root growth Collect data and record on a chart Communicate with classmates about understanding Draw observations in science notebook Plant seeds and care for growing plants

What teachings and learning experiences will equip students to demonstrate the targeted understandings?

Katherine Rehus

CI451

September 9, 2011

Plants around the block Students begin by taking a walk to observe the variety of plant life around their school and surrounding neighborhood. During their exploration, they carefully describe the plants they see in words and pictures. Seeds in Fruits Students explore where seeds come from by taking apart a variety of edible fruits and collecting their seeds. They systematically record the number, size and location, and make other observations about he diverse appearance of seeds. Students then make a fruit salad to enjoy and learn that many seeds are eaten along with the fruit. Planting time Each student plants four bean seeds in a cup of soil. In later learning experiences, students watch the seeds emerge and measure their growth. Students discuss and record what they already know about plants and what they would like to find out. Whats inside a seed? Using the bean seeds from their germination trays and a variety of other seeds, students find out whats inside a seed. They observe a tiny plant embryo inside seeds and note similarities and differences among seeds. Students then connect the seed with the activity on the germination trays and in plant cups. Germination Students look closely at the germinating seeds on the trays. Using hand lenses, they make careful observations and record them in their science notebooks. This learning experience is an embedded assessment, an opportunity for the teacher to observe and record student understanding and performance. Students must also make careful observation of growth and development. In their science notebooks, they label the seed parts; make comparisons among beans, radishes, peas, and corn; and discuss the function of different seed parts. Adapted/formatted from Understanding by Design by Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe

Katherine Rehus

CI451

September 9, 2011

Building A Structure: Roots in a Bottle Teacher Name: Katy Rehus

Student Name:
CATEGORY Construction

________________________________________
4 Instructions are followed carefully and experiment setup is executed correctly with all experimental components included. Data taken several times in a careful, reliable manner. Recording chart is neat. Plants are cared for regularly and several entries are made and all dated and neatly. 3 Instructions are followed carefully and experiment setup is carried out with one or two minor errors. 2 Instructions are followed with three or four errors that may or may not have an effect on experimental outcome. Data taken once in a careful, reliable manner. Recording chart could be neater. Plants could be cared for more and several entries are made and most of the entries are dated and legible. Either sketches or written observations included but do not show change or scientific understanding. Explanations by most group members indicate relatively accurate understanding of scientific principles underlying root growth and plants. 1 Directions are not followed carefully and errors in construction create major experimental malfunctions. Data not taken carefully OR not taken in a reliable manner. Recording chart is messy. Plants are neglected and new entries are made AND/OR many entries are not dated or very difficult to read. Only sketches OR written observations are included and are not correct or accurate. Explanations by several members of the group do not illustrate much understanding of scientific principles underlying root growth and plants.

Data Collection

Data taken twice in a careful, reliable manner. Recording chart is neat. Plants are cared for fairly regularly and several entries are made and most of the entries are dated and neatly entered. Sketches and written observations are correct but are not detailed or informative. Explanations by all group members indicate a relatively accurate understanding of scientific principles underlying root growth and plants.

Daily care and Observation

Science Journal

Sketches and written observations are detailed, thorough, and well thought out. Explanations by all group members indicate a clear and accurate understanding of scientific principles of root growth and plants.

Scientific Knowledge

Katherine Rehus

CI451

September 9, 2011